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Encyclopedia > Olympos (novel)
Olympos

Cover to the 2005 first edition
Author Dan Simmons
Cover artist Gary Ruddell; cover design by Ervin Serrano
Country United States
Language English
Series Ilium/Olympus duology
Genre(s) Science fiction novel
Publisher HarperCollins, Eos imprint
Date published June 28, 2005
Media type Print (Hardback)
Pages 690 pp. hardcover, 891 pp. paperback
ISBN ISBN 0-380-97894-6
Preceded by Ilium (2003)

Dan Simmons' novel Olympos, published in 2005, is the sequel to Ilium and final part of Ilium/Olympus duology. Like its predecessor it is a work of science fiction, and contains many literary references: it blends together Homer's epics the Iliad and the Odyssey, Shakespeare's The Tempest, and has frequent smaller references to other works, including Proust, James Joyce, Caliban upon Setebos, Shakespearean poetry and even William Blake and Virgil's Aeneid. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American author most widely known for his Hugo Award-winning science fiction novel Hyperion and its sequel The Fall of Hyperion. ... In political geography and international politics a country is a geographical entity, a territory, most commonly associated with the notions of state or nation. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Ilium/Olympus is a science fiction duology by Dan Simmons. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... ISBN-13 represented as EAN-13 bar code (in this case ISBN 978-3-16-148410-0) The International Standard Book Number, ISBN, is a unique[1] commercial book identifier barcode. ... Ilium is a science fiction novel by Dan Simmons concerning the re-creation of the events in the Iliad (possibly on an alternate-universe Earth) by post-humans who dwell on Olympus Mons on Mars, and who have taken on the roles of the Greek gods. ... Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American author most widely known for his Hugo Award-winning science fiction novel Hyperion and its sequel The Fall of Hyperion. ... Ilium is a science fiction novel by Dan Simmons concerning the re-creation of the events in the Iliad (possibly on an alternate-universe Earth) by post-humans who dwell on Olympus Mons on Mars, and who have taken on the roles of the Greek gods. ... Ilium/Olympus is a science fiction duology by Dan Simmons. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Homer (Greek: , ) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Prospero and Ariel from a painting by William Hamilton The Tempest is a play written by William Shakespeare. ... The name Proust can refer to: Antonin Proust (1832-1905), French journalist and politician Joseph Proust (1754-1826), French chemist Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French author This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... Caliban upon Setebos is a poem written by the British poet Robert Browning. ... William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) was an English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. ... Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story...


Plot introduction

The novel centers on three main character groups; that of the scholic Hockenberry, Helen and Greek and Trojan warriors from the Iliad; Daeman, Harman, Ada and the other humans of Earth; and the moravecs, specifically Mahnmut the Europan and Orphu of Io. The novel is written in first-person, present-tense when centered on Hockenberry's character, but features third-person, past-tense narrative in all other instances. Much like Simmons' Hyperion where the actual events serve as a frame, the three groups of characters' stories are told over the course of the novel and their stories do not begin to converge until the end. ... The present tense is the tense (form of a verb) that is often used to express: Action at the present time A state of being A habitual action An occurrence in the near future An action that occurred in the past and continues up to the present There are two... Grammatical person, in linguistics, is used for the grammatical categories a language uses to describe the relationship between the speaker and the persons or things she is talking about. ... The past tense is a verb tense expressing action, activity, state or being in the past. ... Hyperion is a Hugo Award-winning 1989 science fiction novel by Dan Simmons. ... A frame story (also frame tale, frame narrative, etc. ...


Puns

The "Paris Crater" location (a devastated French capital) includes a few toponymic puns supposedly produced by folk etymology such as "Invalid Hotel" for "Hotel des Invalides", "Champs Ulysses" for "Champs Elysées" or "Guarded Lion" for "Gare de Lyon". Folk etymology or popular etymology is a linguistic term for a category of false etymology which has grown up in popular lore, as opposed to one which arose in scholarly usage. ...


 
 

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