FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Olympic flag
The Olympic flag (see version with transparent background)
The Olympic flag ( see version with transparent background)
The Olympic flag
The Olympic flag

The Olympic flag represents the Olympic movement. It has a white field and five interlocking rings coloured blue, yellow, black, green, and red. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x600, 13 KB)Subject: The Olympic Rings. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x600, 13 KB)Subject: The Olympic Rings. ... Subject: The Olympic Rings. ... This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... The Olympic Games, or Olympics, is an international multi-sport event taking place every four years and comprising summer and winter games. ...

Contents


Use of the Olympic flag

An Olympic flag is raised during the opening ceremonies of each Olympic Games, and lowered during the closing ceremonies. A second flag is used for the Olympic Oath. Special flags are kept in the city halls of cities organizing the Olympic Games. At the end of the Olympic Games, the mayor of the city that organized the Games returns the flag to the president of the IOC, who then passes it on to the mayor of the next city to host the Olympic Games. (This ceremony is known as the "Antwerp Ceremony" because it started there). There are three such flags, differing from all other copies in that they have a six-coloured fringe around the flag, and are tied with six coloured ribbons to a flagstaff. The Olympic Games, or Olympics, is an international multi-sport event taking place every four years and comprising summer and winter games. ... The Olympic Oath is taken by an athlete and a judge at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games. ... The Olympic Games, or Olympics, is an international multi-sport event taking place every four years and comprising summer and winter games. ...

The Antwerp flag 
Was presented to the IOC at the 1920 Summer Olympics by the city of Antwerp, Belgium, and was passed on to the next organising city of the Summer Olympics until the Games of Seoul 1988.
The Oslo flag 
Was presented to the IOC at the 1952 Winter Olympics by the city of Oslo, Norway, and is passed on to the next organising city of the Winter Olympics.
The Seoul flag 
Was presented to the IOC at the 1988 Summer Olympics by the city of Seoul, South Korea, and is passed on to the next organising city of the Summer Olympics.

The Games of the VII Olympiad were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ... The Games of the XXIV Olympiad were held in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... The VI Olympic Winter Games were held in 1952 in Norway. ... County Oslo NO-03 Landscape Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² 426 km² 0. ... A runner carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games, Winter Olympics for short but more correctly The Olympic Winter Games, are the cold-weather counterpart to the Summer Olympic Games. ... The Games of the XXIV Olympiad were held in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... Seoul (서울, â–¶ (help· info)) is the capital of South Korea (the Republic of Korea) and is one of the most populous cities in the world, located in the northwestern part of the country on the Han River. ...

Olympic Emblem

The flag features the emblem of the Olympic Games — five interlocking rings (blue, yellow, black, green, and red respectively) on a white field. This was originally designed in 1913 by Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the founder of the modern Olympic Games, but gained widespread popularity due to its promotion by Nazi Germany [1]. Upon its initial introduction, de Coubertin stated the following in the August, 1913 edition of Revue Olympique: The tricolor flag of France A flag is a piece of coloured cloth flown from a pole or mast, usually for purposes of signalling or identification. ... 1913 (MCMXIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Baron Pierre de Coubertin Baron Pierre de Coubertin (January 1, 1863-September 2, 1937), born as Pierre de Frédy, was a French pedagogue and historian, but is best known as the founder of the modern Olympic Games. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Note: as an adjective (stressed on the second syllable instead of the first), august means honorable. ...

The emblem chosen to illustrate and represent the world Congress of 1914 ...: five intertwined rings in different colours - blue, yellow, black, green, red - are placed on the white field of the paper. These five rings represent the five parts of the world which now are won over to Olympism and willing to accept healthy competition.

In his article published in the "Olympic Revue" the official magazine of the International Olympic Committee in November 1992, the American historian Robert Barney explains that the idea of the interlaced rings came to Pierre of Coubertin when he was in charge of the USFSA ( Unión des Societes Française de Sports Athletiques): The emblem of the union was two interlaced rings ( like the typical interlaced marriage rings) and the ideas of the Austrian psychiatrist Carl Jung Freud´s disciple because for him the ring meant continuity and the human being. [2] 1914 (MCMXIV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Marriage is a relationship between individuals which has formed the foundation of the family for most societies. ... Carl Jung Carl Gustav Jung (July 26, 1875 – June 6, 1961) (IPA:) was a Swiss psychiatrist and founder of Analytical Psychology. ...

Moreover, the six colours thus combined reproduce those of all the nations without exception. The blue and yellow of Sweden, the blue and white of Greece, the French, British, American, German, Belgian, Italian, and Hungarian tricolours, the yellow and red of Spain lie next to the new Brazilian and Australian flags, and the old Japan and the young China. This is really an international emblem.

The 1914 Congress had to be suspended due to the outbreak of World War I, but the flag and emblem were later adopted. They would first officially debut at the VIIth Olympiad in Antwerp, Belgium in 1920. Clockwise from top: Trenches in frontline, a British Mark I Tank crossing a trench, the Royal Navy battleship HMS Irresistible sinking after striking a mine at the battle of the Dardanelles, a Vickers machine gun crew with gas masks and a Sopwith Camel biplane. ... An Olympiad is a period of four years between two celebrations of the Olympic Games. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... 1920 (MCMXX) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ...


The emblem's popularity and widespread use began during the lead-up to the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. Carl Diem, president of the Organizing Committee of the 1936 Summer Olympics wanted to hold a torchbearers' ceremony in the stadium at Delphi, site of the famous oracle, where the Pythian Games were also held. For this reason he ordered construction of a milestone with the Olympic rings carved in the sides, and that a torchbearer should carry the flame along with an escort of three others from there to Berlin. The ceremony was celebrated but the stone was never removed. Later, two British authors Lynn and Gray Poole when visiting Delphi in the late 1950´s saw the stone and reported in their "History of the Ancient Games" that the Olympic rings design came from ancient Greece. This has become known as "Carl Diem's Stone". [3] [4]. This created a myth that the symbol had an ancient Greek origin. The rings would subseqently be featured prominently in Nazi images and theatrics in 1936 as part of an effort to glorify the Third Reich and claim a noble and ancient lineage. There were two Olympic Games in the year 1936: 1936 Summer Olympics 1936 Winter Olympics This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Dr. Carl Diem (born June 24, 1882 in Würzburg - died December 17, 1962 in Cologne) was the originator of the modern tradition of the Olympic torch relay. ... The Games of the XI Olympiad were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... The theatre, seen from above Delphi (Greek Δελφοί - Delphoi; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece. ... View of the stadium of the Delphi sanctuary, used for the Pythian Games. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


The current view of the International Olympic Committee is that the "five rings represent the five continents". In this scheme, the Americas is viewed as a single continent, and Antarctica is omitted. The International Olympic Committee is an organisation based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin in 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece, and organise this sports event every four years. ... The Americas (sometimes referred to as America) is the area including the land mass located between the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean, generally divided into North America and South America. ...


Interpretations of the coloured rings

Though the Baron de Coubertin obviously considered the rings and colours as two independent characteristics, and even though the IOC explicitly states no ring represents a specific continent, still some people list matches. These are some such lists. (Since users of each list claim that list to be the explanation in general use, they are ordered here alphabetically according to the arbitrary, somewhat explanatory titles.)


A map, of sorts

For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation) Blue is one of the three primary additive colors; blue light has the shortest wavelength range (about 420–490 nanometers) of the three additive primary colors. ... World map showing America CIA map of the Americas (as it is now known in English) The Americas commonly refers to the landmass in the Western Hemisphere consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands. ... Yellow is a color with a wavelength 565-590 nanometers. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most populous continent, after Asia. ... Black is a color with several subtle differences in meaning. ... Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ... Look up green in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... World map showing Oceania (geographically) Oceania is a geographical (often geopolitical) region consisting of numerous countries and territories – mostly islands – in the Pacific Ocean. ... Red is a color at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... World map showing Asia. ...

Colours representing peoples, Blue ocean

For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation) Blue is one of the three primary additive colors; blue light has the shortest wavelength range (about 420–490 nanometers) of the three additive primary colors. ... World map showing Oceania (geographically) Oceania is a geographical (often geopolitical) region consisting of numerous countries and territories – mostly islands – in the Pacific Ocean. ... Yellow is a color with a wavelength 565-590 nanometers. ... World map showing Asia. ... Black is a color with several subtle differences in meaning. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most populous continent, after Asia. ... Look up green in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ... Red is a color at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... World map showing America CIA map of the Americas (as it is now known in English) The Americas commonly refers to the landmass in the Western Hemisphere consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands. ...

Colours representing peoples, Greek flag

This is the colours continents meanings who choose an IOC organism: The Association of National Olympic Committees who englobes to all 204 National Olympic Committee like the colours symbology for its emblems *[5] For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation) Blue is one of the three primary additive colors; blue light has the shortest wavelength range (about 420–490 nanometers) of the three additive primary colors. ... Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ... Yellow is a color with a wavelength 565-590 nanometers. ... World map showing Asia. ... Black is a color with several subtle differences in meaning. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most populous continent, after Asia. ... Look up green in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... World map showing Oceania (geographically) Oceania is a geographical (often geopolitical) region consisting of numerous countries and territories – mostly islands – in the Pacific Ocean. ... Red is a color at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... World map showing America CIA map of the Americas (as it is now known in English) The Americas commonly refers to the landmass in the Western Hemisphere consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands. ...


References

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

External links

The Olympic symbols


  Results from FactBites:
 
Olympic flag - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (839 words)
Was presented to the IOC at the 1920 Summer Olympics by the city of Antwerp, Belgium, and was passed on to the next organising city of the Summer Olympics until the Games of Seoul 1988.
Was presented to the IOC at the 1952 Winter Olympics by the city of Oslo, Norway, and is passed on to the next organising city of the Winter Olympics.
Was presented to the IOC at the 1988 Summer Olympics by the city of Seoul, South Korea, and is passed on to the next organising city of the Summer Olympics.
International Olympic Committee / Comité International Olympique (857 words)
The Olympic flag was designed in 1913 by Baron Pierre de Coubertin as a flag for the Olympic Congress in Paris 1914 celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Olympic Movement.
At the congress the flag was adopted as the flag for the Olympic Movement.
According to the Olympic Charter the design and proportions of the Olympic flag are those of the flag presented by Pierre de Coubertin at the Paris Congress in 1914.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m