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Encyclopedia > Olympia, Greece

Coordinates: 37°38′N, 21°37′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Archaeological site of Olympia  (Αρχαία Ολυμπία)
Location
Coordinates 37°38′N, 21°37′E
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (center): 63 m (207 ft)
Government
Country: Greece
Periphery: West Greece
Prefecture: Elis
Districts: 5
Population statistics (as of 2001)
Municipality
 - Population: 11,069
Codes
Postal codes: 271 65
Area codes: 26240
License plate codes: HA
Website
www.dimospirgou.gr
Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries
Archaeological Site of Olympiaa
UNESCO World Heritage Site
State Party Flag of Greece Greece
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iii, iv, vi
Identification #517
Regionb Europe and North America

Inscription History Image File history File links Size of this preview: 685 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 700 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Adapted from Image:Greece outline map. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+3 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... This is an alphabetical list of countries of the world, including independent states (both those that are internationally recognised and generally unrecognised), inhabited dependent territories and areas of special sovereignty. ... The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... Categories: Greece geography stubs ... Greece consists of 13 administrative regions known as Peripheries of Greece, which are further subdivided into 51 prefectures (nomoi, singular - nomos, Greek: νομοί, νομός)): See also List of the prefectures of Greece by area List of the prefectures of Greece by population density List of the prefectures of Greece by population External... Elis (Modern Greek: Ηλεία - Ileía, also Ilia and Elia) is a prefecture in the Western Peloponnese and in Western portion of Greece. ... Districts are a form of local government in several countries. ... This is an alphabetical list of municipalities and communities in Greece. ... Here are list of postal codes in Greece. ... This is an alphabetical list by town of dialing codes in Greece. ... Greek car number plates are composed of three letters and four digits per plate (e. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Ajax prepares to violate the sanctuary of Athena by abducting Cassandra by force: red-figure vase, c. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ...

Formal Inscription: 1989
13th Session

a Name as officially inscribed on the WH List
b As classified officially by UNESCO
A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Olympia (Greek: Ολυμπία Olympí'a or Ολύμπια Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. Both games were held every Olympiad (i.e. every four years), the Olympic Games dating back possibly further than 776 BC. In 394 emperor Theodosius I abolished them because they were reminiscent of paganism. Elis, or Eleia (Greek, Modern: Ήλιδα Ilida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Ήλις, also Ilis, Doric: Άλις) is an ancient district within the modern prefecture of Ilia. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... View of the stadium of the Delphi sanctuary, used for the Pythian Games. ... Delphi (Greek Δελφοί, [ðeÌžlˈfi]) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in a valley of Phocis. ... An Olympiad is a period of four years, associated with the Olympic Games. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Centuries: 9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC Decades: 820s BC 810s BC 800s BC 790s BC 780s BC - 770s BC - 760s BC 750s BC 740s BC 730s BC 720s BC Events and Trends 778 BC - Agamestor, King of Athens dies after a reign of 17 years and... Events September 6 - Battle of the Frigidus: The christian Roman Emperor Theodosius I defeats and kills the pagan usurper Eugenius and his Frankish magister militum Arbogast. ... An engraving depicting what Theodosius may have looked like, ca. ... Heathen redirects here. ...

Contents

Ancient Site

The sanctuary, known as the Altis, consists of an unordered arrangement of various buildings. Enclosed within the temenos are the Temple of Hera (or Heraion/Heraeum) and Temple of Zeus, the Pelopion and the area of the altar, where the sacrifices were made. The hippodrome and later stadium were also to the east. Ajax prepares to violate the sanctuary of Athena by abducting Cassandra by force: red-figure vase, c. ... Altis was a location in what is today Peloponnese, Greece, on a little plain in the Elis Prefecture, on the right shore of the Alfeios River near the city of Pyrgos, around 18 kilometers away from the Ionian Sea and at the foot of Mount Cronion. ... Greek Temenos ([1], from the Greek verb to cut) (plural = temene) is a piece of land cut off and assigned as an official domain, especially to kings and chiefs, or a piece of land marked off from common uses and dedicated to a god, a sanctuary, holy grove or holy... The remains of the Temple of Hera, Olympia The Heraeum, or Temple of Hera at Olympia, is thought to be the oldest known example of Doric architecture. ... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck The Statue of Zeus at Olympia is one of the classical Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. ... In Greek mythology, Pelops (Greek Πέλοψ) (from pelios: dark; and ops: face, eye) was a son of Tantalus and Dione. ... A Hippodrome (Gr. ... Telstra Stadium in Sydney, Australia is capable of being converted from a rectangular rugby football field to an oval for cricket and Australian rules football games This article is about the building type. ...


To the north of the sanctuary can be found the Prytaneion and the Philippeion, as well as the array of treasuries representing the various city states. The Metroon lies to the south of these treasuries, with the Echo Stoa to the East. To the south of the sanctuary is the South Stoa and the Bouleuterion, whereas the West side houses the Palaestra, the workshop of Pheidias, the Gymnasion and the Leonidaion. A Prytaneion was seat of the Prytaneis (executive), and so the seat of government in ancient Greece. ... The Philippeion at Olympia was an Ionic memorial which contained a statue of King Philip of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great. ... The Treasuries at Olympia were a series of small temple-shaped buildings located to the north side of the Altis or sanctuary at the site of Olympia in Greece. ... Metroon (metrôon) was the name given to a building dedicated to the mother goddess, Cybele, Rhea, or Demeter, in Ancient Greece. ... A Bouleuterion was a building which housed the council of citizens (boule) in Ancient Greece. ... The palaestra at Olympia is part of the gymnasium at the sanctuary. ... Phidias, (or Pheidias), son of Charmides, (circa 490 BC - circa 430 BC) was an ancient Greek sculptor, universally regarded as the greatest of Greek sculptors. ... In ancient Greece, the gymnasium (Greek: ; gymnasion) functioned as a training facility for competitors in public games. ... The Leonidaion was the lodging place for athletes taking part in the Olympic Games at Olympia. ...


Olympia is also known for the gigantic ivory and gold statue of Zeus that used to stand there, sculpted by Pheidias, which was named one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World by Antipater of Sidon. Very close to the Temple of Zeus which housed this statue, the studio of Pheidias was excavated in the 1950s. Evidence found there, such as sculptor's tools, corroborates this opinion. The ancient ruins sit north of the Alfeios River and Mount Kronos (named after the Greek deity Kronos). The Kladeos, a tributary of the Alfeios, flows around the area. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck. ... Phidias, (or Pheidias), son of Charmides, (circa 490 BC - circa 430 BC) was an ancient Greek sculptor, universally regarded as the greatest of Greek sculptors. ... The Seven Wonders of the World (from left to right, top to bottom): Great Pyramid of Giza, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Temple of Artemis, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Mausoleum of Maussollos, Colossus of Rhodes and the Lighthouse of Alexandria. ... Antipater of Sidon (2nd century BC) is an ancient Greek writer and poet. ... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck The Statue of Zeus at Olympia is one of the classical Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Alfeiós (Greek: Αλφειός, also Alfiós) is a river in Peloponnese, Greece. ... Chronos is the personification of time in Greek mythology There is also Cronus, the similarly named Greek mythological Titan, father of Zeus. ... Kladeos (Greek: Κλάδεος) or Kladeus, Latin: Cladeus or Cladeos was a river god in Greek mythology. ...


Site plan

Site plan of Olympia showing the relative location of major archaeological remains Key
  1. Temple of Zeus
  2. Temple of Hera
  3. Altar of Zeus
  4. Pelopion
  5. Philippeion
  6. Metroon
  7. Echo stoa
  8. Treasuries
  9. Stadium
  10. Roman triumphal arch
  11. Bouleuterion
  12. South stoa
  13. Bath buildings
  14. Leonidaion
  15. Roman hostel
  16. Pheidias’ workshop
  17. Theokoleon
  18. Palaestra
  19. Gymnasion
  20. Prytaneion

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 780 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (823 × 633 pixel, file size: 28 KB, MIME type: image/png) 1 Temple of Zeus 2 Temple of Hera 3 Altar of Zeus 4 Pelopion 5 Phillipeum 6 Metroon 7 Echo stoa 8 Treasuries 9 Stadium 10... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck The Statue of Zeus at Olympia is one of the classical Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. ... The remains of the Temple of Hera, Olympia The Heraeum, or Temple of Hera at Olympia, is thought to be the oldest known example of Doric architecture. ... In Greek mythology, Pelops (Greek Πέλοψ) (from pelios: dark; and ops: face, eye) was a son of Tantalus and Dione. ... The Philippeion at Olympia was an Ionic memorial which contained a statue of King Philip of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great. ... Metroon (metrôon) was the name given to a building dedicated to the mother goddess, Cybele, Rhea, or Demeter, in Ancient Greece. ... The Treasuries at Olympia were a series of small temple-shaped buildings located to the north side of the Altis or sanctuary at the site of Olympia in Greece. ... View down the stadium at Olympia The vaulted tunnel leading into the stadium The exedra (stone platform) on which the judges sat, located on the south bank of the stadium The stadium at the archaeological site of Olympia, Greece is located to the east of the sanctuary of Zeus. ... A Bouleuterion was a building which housed the council of citizens (boule) in Ancient Greece. ... The Leonidaion was the lodging place for athletes taking part in the Olympic Games at Olympia. ... Phidias, (or Pheidias), son of Charmides, (circa 490 BC - circa 430 BC) was an ancient Greek sculptor, universally regarded as the greatest of Greek sculptors. ... The palaestra at Olympia is part of the gymnasium at the sanctuary. ... The gymnasium of the Greeks originally functioned as the school where competitors in the public games received their training, and was so named from the circumstance that these competitors exercised naked (gymnos). ... A Prytaneion was seat of the Prytaneis (executive), and so the seat of government in ancient Greece. ...

History

For a history of the Olympic Games, see Olympic Games or Ancient Olympic Games.

The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia The Ancient Olympic Games, originally referred to as simply the Olympic Games (Greek: ; Olympiakoi Agones) were a series of athletic competitions held between various city-states of Ancient Greece. ...

Prehistory

Remains of votive and burnt offerings dating back to the 10th century BCE and give evidence of a long history of religious activity at the site. No buildings have survived from this earliest period of use.[1] An icon of Aghia Paraskevi with votive offerings hung beside it. ... (Redirected from 10th century BCE) (11th century BC - 10th century BC - 9th century BC - other centuries) (1000s BC - 990s BC - 980s BC - 970s BC - 960s BC - 950s BC - 940s BC - 930s BC - 920s BC - 910s BC - 900s BC - other decades) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events...


Geometric and Archaic periods

The first Olympic festival was organised on the site by the authorities of Elis in the 8th century BCE - with tradition dating the first games at 776 BCE. Major changes were made to the site around 700 BCE, including levelling land and digging new wells. Elis' power diminished and at the beginning of the 7th century BCE the sanctuary fell into the hands of the Pisatans in 676BCE. The Pisatans organised the games until the late 7th century BCE.[1] Elis, or Eleia (Greek, Modern: Ήλιδα Ilida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Ήλις, also Ilis, Doric: Άλις) is an ancient district within the modern prefecture of Ilia. ... (9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC - other centuries) (800s BC - 790s BC - 780s BC - 770s BC - 760s BC - 750s BC - 740s BC - 730s BC - 720s BC - 710s BC - 700s BC - other decades) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Golden age in Armenia Assyria... (8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC - other centuries) (700s BC - 690s BC - 680s BC - 670s BC - 660s BC - 650s BC - 640s BC - 630s BC - 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC - other decades) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Scythians arrived in Asia Collapse... Pisa, or Pisatis, was the name of an ancient Greek town in Elis. ...


The earliest evidence of building activity on the site dates from around 600 BCE. At this time the Skiloudians, allies of the Pistans, built the Temple of Hera. The Treasuries and the Pelopion were built during the course of the 6th century BCE. The secular structures and athletic arenas were also under construction during this period including the Bouleuterion. The first stadium was constructed around 560 BCE, it consisted of just a simple track. The stadium was remodelled around 500 BCE with sloping sides for spectators and shifted slightly to the east. Over the course of the 6th century BCE a range of sports was added to the Olympic festival. In 580 BC, Elis, in alliance with Sparta, occupied Pisa and regained the control over the sanctuary.[1] The remains of the Temple of Hera, Olympia The Heraeum, or Temple of Hera at Olympia, is thought to be the oldest known example of Doric architecture. ... The Treasuries at Olympia were a series of small temple-shaped buildings located to the north side of the Altis or sanctuary at the site of Olympia in Greece. ... In Greek mythology, Pelops (Greek Πέλοψ) (from pelios: dark; and ops: face, eye) was a son of Tantalus and Dione. ... (7th century BC - 6th century BCE - 5th century BCE - other centuries) (600s BCE - 590s BCE - 580s BCE - 570s BCE - 560s BCE - 550s BCE - 540s BCE - 530s BCE - 520s BCE - 510s BCE - 500s BCE - other decades) (2nd millennium BCE - 1st millennium BCE - 1st millennium) The 5th and 6th centuries BCE were... A Bouleuterion was a building which housed the council of citizens (boule) in Ancient Greece. ...


Classical period

Artists impression of ancient Olympia
Artists impression of ancient Olympia

The classical period, between the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, was the golden age of the site at Olympia. A wide range of new religious and secular buildings and structures were constructed.[2] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 472 pixelsFull resolution (1225 × 723 pixel, file size: 478 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description: Olympia in Ancient Greece Source: Pierers Universal-Lexikon, 1891 Scanned by --Immanuel Giel 12:34, 31 May 2005 (UTC) File links The following pages on... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 472 pixelsFull resolution (1225 × 723 pixel, file size: 478 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description: Olympia in Ancient Greece Source: Pierers Universal-Lexikon, 1891 Scanned by --Immanuel Giel 12:34, 31 May 2005 (UTC) File links The following pages on... The Temple to Athena, the Parthenon Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around three thousand years. ...


The Temple of Zeus was built in the middle of the 5th century BCE, its size, scale and ornamentation was beyond anything previously constructed on the site. Further sporting facilities, including the final iteration of the stadium, and the hippodrome (for chariot-racing) were constructed. The Prytaneion was built at the north west side of the site in 470 BCE.[2] A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck The Statue of Zeus at Olympia is one of the classical Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. ... (6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Demotic becomes the dominant script of ancient Egypt Persians invade Greece twice (Persian Wars) Battle of Marathon (490) Battle of Salamis (480) Athenian empire formed and falls Peloponnesian War... A Hippodrome (Gr. ... A Prytaneion was seat of the Prytaneis (executive), and so the seat of government in ancient Greece. ...


In the late classical period further structures were added to the site. The Metroon was constructed near the Treasuries c.400 BCE. The erection of the Echo Stoa, around 350 BCE, separated off the sanctuary from the area of the games and stadium. The South Stoa was built at the southern edge of the sanctuary at approximately the same time.[2]


Hellenistic period

The late 4th century BCE saw the erection of the Philippeion. Around 300 BCE the largest building on the site, the Leonidaion, was constructed to house important visitors. Due to the increasing importance of the games, further athletic buildings were constructed including the Palaestra (3rd century BCE), Gymnasion (2nd century BCE) and bath houses (c.300 BCE). Finally, in 200 BCE, a vaulted archway was erected linking the entrance to the stadium to the sanctuary.[3] (5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Invasion of the Celts into Ireland Kingdom of Macedon conquers Persian empire Romans build first aqueduct Chinese use bellows The Scythians are beginning to be absorbed into the Sarmatian... The Philippeion at Olympia was an Ionic memorial which contained a statue of King Philip of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great. ... The Leonidaion was the lodging place for athletes taking part in the Olympic Games at Olympia. ... Pompeii palaestra seen from the top of the stadium wall. ... (4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events The first two Punic Wars between Carthage and Rome over dominance in western Mediterranean Rome conquers Spain Great Wall of China begun Indian traders regularly visited Arabia Scythians occupy... The gymnasium of the Greeks originally functioned as the school where competitors in the public games received their training, and was so named from the circumstance that these competitors exercised naked (gymnos). ... (3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events BC 168 Battle of Pydna -- Macedonian phalanx defeated by Romans BC 148 Rome conquers Macedonia BC 146 Rome destroys Carthage in the Third Punic War BC 146 Rome conquers...


Roman period

During the Roman period the games were opened up to all citizens of the Roman Empire. A programme of extensive repairs - including to the Temple of Zeus - and new building took place. In 150 CE the Nympheum (or Exedra) was built. New baths replaced the older Greek examples in 100 CE and an aqueduct constructed in 160 CE.[4] Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... A Nymphaeum, in Greek and Roman antiquities, is a monument consecrated to the nymphs, especially those of springs. ... An exedra adopted by James Cameron for a neoclassical interior space, at the Hermitage In architecture an exedra is a semicircular recess, often crowned by a half-dome, which is usually set into a buildings facade. ...


The 3rd century saw the site suffer heavy damage from a series of earthquakes. Invading tribes in 267 CE led to the centre of site being fortified with robbed material from the sites monuments. Despite the destruction the Olympic festival continued to be held at the site until the last Olympiad in 393 CE, after which a decree from the Christian emperor, Theodosius I implemented a ban. The workshop of Pheidias was turned into a Basilica and the site was inhabited by a Christian community until the late 6th century.[4] // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first... An engraving depicting what Theodosius may have looked like, ca. ... St. ... This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ...


After this point the site was buried under the alluvial deposits of two rivers until its discovery by archaeologists in the 19th century.[4] Alluvium is soil land deposited by a river or other running water. ...


Excavation

Discovery and early excavations

The exact site was re-discovered in 1766 by the English antiquarian Richard Chandler.[5] The first excavation of the sanctuary at Olympia was not carried out until 1829, by the French "Expedition Scientifique de Moree".[6] Richard Chandler (1738 - 9 February 1810), English antiquary, was born at Elson in Hampshire, and educated at Winchester and at Queens College, Cambridge and Magdalen College, Oxford. ...


1875-1881

The German Excavation of Olympia, 1875-1881
The German Excavation of Olympia, 1875-1881

The first major excavation of Olympia began in 1875, funded by the German government after negotiation of exclusive access by Ernst Curtius. Other archaeologists responsible for the dig were Gustav Hirschfeld, Goerge Treu, and Adolf Furtwängler who worked alongside architects A. Boetticher, Wilhelm Dörpfeld, and Richard Borrmann. They excavated the central part of the sanctuary including the Temple of Zeus, Temple of Hera, Metroon, Bouleuterion, Philipeion, Echo Stoa, Treasuries and Palaestra. Important finds included sculptures from the Temple of Zeus, the Nike of Paeonius, the Hermes of Praxiteles and many bronzes. In total 14,000 objects were recorded. The finds were displayed in a museum on the site.[7] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 500 × 473 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 473 pixel, file size: 62 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Olympia, Greece ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 500 × 473 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 473 pixel, file size: 62 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Olympia, Greece ... You may be looking for Ernst Robert Curtius (1886–1956). ... Adolf Furtwängler (June 30, 1853 - October 10, 1907) was a famous German archaeologist and art historian. ... Wilhelm Dörpfeld Wilhelm Dörpfeld (or Doerpfeld) (26 December 1853 – 25 April 1940) was a German architect, best known for his contributions to classical archaeology. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... Paeonius (or Paionios) of Mende in Thrace was a Greek sculptor of the late 5th century BC. The only work that can be definitely attributed to him is the statue of Nike (circa 420 BC) discovered at Olympia. ... Hermes bearing the infant Dionysus, by Praxiteles, found at the Heraion, Olympia, 1877 Hermes (IPA: , Greek IPA: ), in Greek mythology, is the Olympian god of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of orators and wit, of literature and poets, of athletics, of weights and... Praxiteles of Athens, the son of Cephisodotus, was the greatest of the Attic sculptors of the 4th century BC, who has left an imperishable mark on the history of art. ...


1900-1950

Excavation was continued in a more limited way by Dörpfeld between 1908 and 1929 but a new systematic excavation was begun in 1936 on the occasion of the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin under Emil Kunze and Hans Schleif. Their excavation focus on the area to the south of the stadium, the South stoa, bath complex and gymnasion.[7] The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... Berlin is the capital city and one of the sixteen states of the Federal Republic of Germany. ...


1950 to present

Between 1952 and 1966, Kunze and Schleif continued the excavation joined by architect Alfred Mallwitz. They excavated Pheidias' workshop, the Leonidaion and the north wall of the stadium. They also excavated the southeast section of the sanctuary and out of approximately 140 debris pits found many bronze and ceramic objects along with terracotta roof tiles.[7]


Mallwitz took charge of the excavations between 1972 and 1984 revealing important dating evidence for the stadium, graves, and the location of the Prytaneion. From 1984 to 1996, Helmut Kyrieleis took over the site and the focus shifted to the earlier history of the sanctuary with excavation of the Prytaneion and Pelopion.[7]


Modern Olympia

The Olympic flame of the modern-day Olympic Games is lit by reflection of sunlight in a parabolic mirror at the restored Olympia stadium and then transported by a torch to the place where the games are held. When the modern Olympics came to Athens in 2004, the men's and women's shot put competition was held at the restored stadium. The Olympic Flame at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun is a symbol of the Olympic Games. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... A parabolic reflector (also known as a parabolic dish or a parabolic mirror) is a reflective device formed in the shape of a paraboloid of revolution. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα - Athína) is the largest city and capital of Greece, located in the Attica periphery of central Greece. ... The 2004 Summer Olympic Games, officially known as the Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, were held in Athens, Greece, from August 13 to August 29, 2004. ... Shot put The shot put is an athletics (track and field) event involving putting (throwing in a pushing motion) a heavy metal ball (called the shot) as far as possible. ...


Olympia has a school and a square (plateia) and is a popular site for tourism. The town has a train station and is the easternmost terminus of the line of Olympia-Pyrgos (Ilia). The train station with the freight yard to its west is located about 300 m east of the town centre. Plateia (πλατεία) is the Greek word for town square. ... For other places that have the same name, click Pyrgos (disambiguation) Pyrgos (Greek: Πύργος) is the capital of the Prefecture of Ilia in Greece. ...


It is linked by GR-74, and the new road was opened in the 1980s; the next stretch N and NE of Olympia will open in around 2005. The distance from Pyrgos is 20 km E(old: 21 km), about 50 km SW of Lampeia, W of Tripoli and Arcadia and 4 km north of Krestena and N of Kyparissia and Messenia. The highway passes north of the ancient ruins. A reservoir is located 2 km southwest, damming up the Alfeios River. A road from Olympia and Krestena was closed in the late-1990s. The area is hilly and mountainous; most of the area within Olympia is forested. Greece Interstate 74 is a highway linking Pyrgos, Olympia, Tripoli and GR-7/E65. ... The 1980s refers to the years of and between 1980 and 1989. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other places that have the same name, click Pyrgos (disambiguation) Pyrgos (Greek: Πύργος) is the capital of the Prefecture of Ilia in Greece. ... Lampeia (Greek: Λαμπεία, Romanization before the 1990s, Lambia), rarely Lampia, is a Greek town and a muinicipality on the southern part of the Divri (Δίβρη) range and is also known as that name. ... Tripoli (Greek, Modern: Τρίπολη, Ancient/Katharevousa: -s; see also List of traditional Greek place names), older form and Latin: Tripolis, rarely Tripolitsa, Tripolitza and Tripolizza is a city in the central part of the Peloponnesos, Greece, and the capital of the prefecture of Arcadia and the province of Mantineia which is... Arcadia or Arkadía (Greek Αρκαδία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a region of Greece in the Peloponnesus. ... Krestena (Greek: Κρέστενα), is a city located in the Prefecture of Ilia. ... Kyparissia, rarely Cyparissia (Greek: Κύπαρισσία) is a town of around 4,000 in western Messenia. ... Messenia (Greek: , in Modern Greek Messinia; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a prefecture in the Peloponnese, a region of Greece. ... km redirects here. ... Krestena (Greek: Κρέστενα), is a city located in the Prefecture of Ilia. ... The 1990s decade refers to the years from the start of 1990 to the end of 1999. ...


When Pierre de Coubertin, the founder of the modern Olympic Games movement, died in 1937, a monument to him was erected at ancient Olympia. His heart was buried at the monument. Baron Pierre de Coubertin Pierre de Coubertin (January 1, 1863 – September 2, 1937), born as Pierre de Frédy, was a French pedagogue and historian, but is best known as the founder of the modern Olympic Games. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Geography and demography

Nearest places

Varvasena or Varvassena (Greek: Βαρβάσαινα) is a town in the eastern part of the municipality of Pyrgos in the central part of the prefecture of Ilia. ...

Subdivisions

  • Drouva

Communes

  • Ancient Pisa (Miraka)
    • International Olympic Academy (pop: 63)
  • Aspra Spitia
    • Ypsilo
  • Chelidonio
  • Floka
  • Irakleia
  • Kafkonia
  • Kamena
    • Nea Kamena
  • Vasilaki
  • Kladeos
  • Koskina
    • Fanara
  • Kryonero
  • Linaria
  • Louvro
  • Gyros
  • Mageira
  • Mouria
  • Pefko
  • Pelopio
    • Ampari
  • Platanos
    • Agios Georgios (pop: 7)
  • Pournario
  • Smila
    • Kourouta
  • Strefi
    • Kato Strefi (Flokeika)
  • Xirokampos

Pisa, or Pisatis, was the name of an ancient Greek town in Elis. ... Irakleia (Ηράκλεια) may refer to several places in Greece: Irakleia, Arta, a municipality in Arta Prefecture Irakleia, Elis, a village in Elis, part of Olympia, Greece Irakleia, Cyclades, an island in the Cyclades Irakleia, Serres, a municipality in Serres Prefecture Irakleia, Phthiotis, a village in Phthiotis, part of Gorgopotamos See also... Kladeos (Greek: Κλάδεος) or Kladeus, Latin: Cladeus or Cladeos was a river god in Greek mythology. ... Pournari, older forms: Pournario and Pournarion may refer to several places in Greece: Pournari, a village in the Ilia prefecture Pournari, a village in the Fthiotida prefecture Pournari, a village in the Larissa Prefecture Categories: | ... Smila is a little village near Olympia with about 400 citizens. ...

Historical Population

Year Communal population Change Municipal population Change
1981 1,125 - - -
1991 1,742 -349/-4.87% 11,229 -
2001 1,475 -267/-15.33% 11,069 -160/1.42%

1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Here are list of communities or communes including sections in the prefecture of Ilia, Greece A-B Achladini Koutsoutroumpa Aetorrachi Afgeio Agia Anna Agia Kyriaki Agia Mavra Agia Triada Agias Ilias Aghios Ioannis Agii Apostoli Agigdales Agios Charalampos Agios Dimitrios Agios Georgios (Vrachnaiika) Agios Georgios, Pyrgos Agios Ilias near Pyrgos...

External links

North: Foloi
West: Pyrgos
Olympia East:
South:Skillounta, Alifeira
Municipalities of the Elis Prefecture
AlifeiraAmaliadaAndravidaAndritsainaAncient OlympiaFigaleiaFoloiGastouniIardanos • Kastro-Kyllini • LampeiaLasionaLechainaOleniPineiaPyrgosSkillountaTraganoVartholomioVolakasVouprasiaZacharo


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ancient Olympia, Greece (1569 words)
Olympia is connected to many gods and myths, and there are different versions on how the Olympic Games got started.
Olympia was to be renovated many times, and new buildings were added through the ages.
In the 6th century earthquakes destroyed the buildings in Olympia, and it was filled with mud from the flooded rivers Kladeos and Alfeos.
Olympia, Greece - LoveToKnow 1911 (5879 words)
The area known as Olympia is bounded on the west by the Cladeus, on the south by the Alpheus, on the north by the low heights which shut in the Alpheus valley, and on the east by the ancient racecourses.
Olympia thus became the centre of an amphictyony, or federal league under religious sanction, for the west coast of the Peloponnesus, as Delphi was for its neighbours in northern Greece.
The significance of Olympia was larger and higher than the political fortunes of the Greeks who met there, and it survived the overthrow of Greek independence.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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