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Encyclopedia > Olivia de Havilland
Olivia de Havilland

from the trailer for In This Our Life
Birth name Olivia Mary de Havilland
Born July 1, 1916 (1916-07-01) (age 91)
Tokyo, Japan
Years active 1935 - 1988
Spouse(s) Marcus Goodrich (1946-1953)
Pierre Galante (1955-1979)
Children Benjamin Briggs (1949-1991)
Gisele Galante (b.1956)

Olivia Mary de Havilland (born July 1, 1916) is a two-time Academy Award winning actress in American motion pictures and is the last surviving principal cast member from Gone with the Wind. She is the sister of Academy Award winning actress Joan Fontaine. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Tokyo (東京; Tōkyō, lit. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... To Each His Own is a 1946 film which tells the story of an unwed mother, following World War I, who gives up her son for adoption and loves him from afar. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... The New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress is one of the awards given by the New York Film Critics Circle to honor the finest achievements in filmmaking. ... The Snake Pit is a 1948 film which tells the story of a woman who finds herself in an insane asylum, and cant remember how she got there. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... For the film, see Gone with the Wind (film). ... Joan Fontaine (born October 22, 1917) is an Academy Award-winning British American actress, who became an American citizen in April 1943. ...

Contents

Early life

De Havilland was born in Tokyo, Japan, and is the elder daughter of Walter de Havilland (1872-1968), a British patent attorney with a practice in Japan, and the former Lilian Augusta Ruse (1886-1975), an actress known by her stage name of Lilian Fontaine, whom he married in 1914. For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... A patent attorney is an attorney who has the specialized qualifications necessary for representing clients in obtaining patents and acting in all matters and procedures relating to patent law and practice, such as filing an opposition. ...


Her father was the half-brother of Charles de Havilland, who was the father of the aviation pioneer Sir Geoffrey de Havilland (1882-1965). Geoffrey de Havilland (left) with Frederick Handley Page. ...


Her younger sister is the actress Joan Fontaine (b. 1917), from whom she has been estranged for many decades, not speaking at all since 1975. Joan Fontaine (born October 22, 1917) is an Academy Award-winning British American actress, who became an American citizen in April 1943. ...


De Havilland's family moved from Tokyo when she was two years old, settling in Saratoga, California. She attended school at Los Gatos High School and at the Notre Dame Convent Catholic girls' school in Belmont, California. An acting award at Los Gatos is named after her. Saratoga (IPA: ) is a city in Santa Clara County, California, USA. It is located on the west side of the Santa Clara Valley, in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Los Gatos High School is located on Main Street in Los Gatos. ... Notre Dame High School, Belmont is a private Catholic all-girls school located in the San Mateo County suburb of Belmont, California. ... Belmont is a city located in San Mateo County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Career

De Havilland's career began co-starring with Joe E. Brown in Alibi Ike in 1935. She appeared as Hermia in A Midsummer Night's Dream, her first stage production, at the Hollywood Bowl. The stage production was later turned into a 1935 movie. Although the stage cast was largely replaced with Warner Bros. contract players, Olivia was hired to reprise her role as Hermia. De Havilland played opposite Errol Flynn in such highly popular films as Captain Blood and The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936), and as Maid Marian to Flynn's Robin Hood in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938). She starred opposite Flynn in eight films. Joe E. Brown in the late 1920s. ... Hermia is a fictional character from the Shakespeare play, A Midsummers Night Dream. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ... Hollywood Bowl in 2005. ... A Midsummer Nights Dream is a 1935 film directed by Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle, produced by Henry Blanke and adapted by Charles Kenyon and Mary C. McCall Jr. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Captain Blood is a 1935 swashbuckling film. ... The Charge of the Light Brigade is a 1936 historical film made by Warner Bros. ... Robin Hood and Maid Marian (poster, ca. ... Robin Hood memorial statue in Nottingham. ... The Adventures of Robin Hood is an American film released in 1938 and directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. ...

De Havilland as Melanie Hamilton.
De Havilland as Melanie Hamilton.

She played Melanie Wilkes in Gone with the Wind (1939) and received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress nomination for her performance. She played the only one of the four main characters of Gone with the Wind to die in the film but outlived all the others (Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh and Leslie Howard) in real life. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Melanie Hamilton Wilkes is a fictional character first appearing in the novel Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ... Leslie Howard (April 3, 1893 - June 1, 1943) was a British stage and Academy Award nominated film actor. ...


In 1941, de Havilland became a naturalized citizen of the United States and was becoming increasingly frustrated by the roles being assigned to her. She felt that she had proven herself to be capable of playing more than the demure ingĂ©nues and damsels in distress that were quickly typecasting her, and began to reject scripts that offered her this type of role. When her Warner Bros. contract expired, the studio informed her that six months had been added to it for times she had been on suspension; the law allowed for studios to suspend contract players for rejecting a role and the period of suspension to be added to the contract period. In theory this allowed a studio to maintain indefinite control over an uncooperative contractee. Naturalization is the process whereby a person becomes a national of a nation, or a citizen of a country, other than the one of his birth. ... The word typecasting (past participle typecast) can mean more than one thing: typecasting (programming) typecasting (acting) in acting This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Most accepted this situation, while a few tried to change the system; Bette Davis had mounted an unsuccessful lawsuit against Warner Bros. in the 1930s. De Havilland mounted a lawsuit in the 1940s, supported by the Screen Actors Guild and was successful, thereby reducing the power of the studios and extending greater creative freedom to the performers. The decision was one of the most significant and far-reaching legal rulings until that time in Hollywood. Her courage in mounting such a challenge, and her subsequent victory, won her the respect and admiration of her peers, among them her sister Joan Fontaine who later commented, "Hollywood owes Olivia a great deal". [1] The studio, however, vowed never to hire her again. The court's ruling came to be known, and is still known to this day, as the "de Havilland law". For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... “WB” redirects here. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ...


Following the release of Devotion, which had been made three years earlier, de Havilland signed a three picture deal with Paramount Studios. The quality and variety of her roles began to improve. James Agee, in his review for The Dark Mirror (1946), noted the change, and stated that although she had always been "one of the prettiest women in movies", her recent performances had proven her acting ability. He commented that she did not possess "any remarkable talent, but her playing is thoughtful, quiet, detailed and well-sustained... and an undivided pleasure to see." [2] She won Best Actress Academy Awards for To Each His Own (1946) and The Heiress (1949), and was also widely praised for her Academy Award nominated performance in The Snake Pit (1948). This was one of the earliest films to attempt a realistic portrayal of mental illness, and de Havilland was lauded for her willingness to play a role that was completely devoid of glamour and that confronted such controversial subject matter. She won the New York Film Critic's Award" for both The Snake Pit and The Heiress. The Paramount Pictures logo used from 1988 to 1989. ... James Rufus Agee (November 27, 1909 – May 16, 1955) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, screenwriter, journalist, poet, and film critic. ... The Dark Mirror is a black-and-white 1946 film starring actress Olivia de Havilland as a pair of twins. ... To Each His Own is a 1946 film which tells the story of an unwed mother, following World War I, who gives up her son for adoption and loves him from afar. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... The Snake Pit is a 1948 film which tells the story of a woman who finds herself in an insane asylum, and cant remember how she got there. ... A mental illness or mental disorder refers to one of many mental health conditions characterized by distress, impaired cognitive functioning, atypical behavior, emotional dysregulation, and/or maladaptive behavior. ...


De Havilland appeared sporadically in films after the 1950s and attributed this partly to the growing permissiveness of Hollywood films of the period. She was reported to have declined the role of Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire, citing the unsavoury nature of some elements of the script and saying there were certain lines she could not allow herself to speak. The role eventually went to her former Gone with the Wind co-star, Vivien Leigh, who won her second Academy Award for her role. De Havilland continued acting on film until the late 1970s, afterwards continuing her career on television until the late 80s, which included her winning a Golden Globe for her performance as the Dowager Empress Maria in the 1986 miniseries Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna. Vivien Leigh as Blanche DuBois in the film version of A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), with Marlon Brando as Stanley Kowalski Blanche DuBois is the principal character in Tennessee Williams play A Streetcar Named Desire. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ...


Sibling rivalry

Of the two sisters, Olivia was the first to become an actress; when Joan tried to follow her lead, their mother, who allegedly favoured Olivia, refused to let her use the family name. Joan was forced to invent a name, taking first Joan Burfield, and later Joan Fontaine, utilizing her own mother's former stage name. For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Joan Fontaine (born October 22, 1917) is an Academy Award-winning British American actress, who became an American citizen in April 1943. ...


Biographer Charles Higham records that the sisters have always had an uneasy relationship, starting in early childhood when Olivia would rip up the clothes that Joan had to wear as hand-me-downs, forcing Joan to sew them back together. A lot of the feud and resentment between the sisters stems from Joan's perception of Olivia being their mother's favourite child.


Both Olivia and Joan were nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in 1942. Joan won first for her role in Alfred Hitchcock's Suspicion (1941) over Olivia's nomination for Hold Back the Dawn (1941). Charles Higham states that Joan "felt guilty about winning; given her lack of obsessive career drive..." The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Suspicion (1941) is a film noir directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine as a married couple. ... Hold Back the Dawn is a 1941 romantic film in which a Romanian gigolo marries an American woman in Mexico in order to gain entry to the United States, but winds up falling in love with her. ...


Charles Higham has described the events of the awards ceremony, stating that as Joan stepped forward to collect her award, she pointedly rejected Olivia's attempts at congratulating her and that Olivia was both offended and embarrassed by her behaviour. Several years later, Olivia would remember the slight and exact her own by brushing past Joan, who was waiting with her hand extended, because Olivia had allegedly taken offence at a comment Joan had made about Olivia's then-husband.


Olivia's relationship with Joan continued to deteriorate after the incident at the Academy Awards in 1942. Charles Higham has stated that this was the near final straw for what would become a lifelong feud, but the sisters did not completely stop speaking until 1975. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...


According to Joan, Olivia did not invite her to a memorial service for their mother who had recently died. Olivia claims she told Joan, but that Joan had brushed her off, claiming that she was too busy to attend.


Charles Higham records that Joan has an estranged relationship with her own daughters as well, possibly because she discovered that they were secretly maintaining a relationship with their aunt Olivia.


Both sisters have refused to comment publicly about their feud and dysfunctional family relationships.


Personal life

Olivia and Errol Flynn were known as one of Hollywood's most exciting on-screen couples, appearing in eight films together, but never had a romantic life off screen. In an interview with Gregory Speck, de Havilland stated, "He never guessed that I had a crush on him. And it didn't get better either. In fact, I read in something that he wrote that he was in love with me when we made 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' the next year, in 1936. I was amazed to read that, for it never occurred to me that he was smitten with me, too, even though we did all those pictures together." Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ...


De Havilland had relationships with John Huston, James Stewart and Howard Hughes in the early 1940s. She married novelist Marcus Goodrich in 1946 but they divorced in 1953. They had a son, Benjamin, who died of complications from Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1991. John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... For the Welsh murderer, see Howard Hughes (murderer). ... For the record label, see Divorce Records. ... Hodgkins lymphoma, also known as Hodgkins disease, is a type of lymphoma first described by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. ...


She was married to Pierre Galante from 1955 until 1979, producing a daughter, Giselle, in 1956. When de Havilland and Galante divorced they remained on good terms, and she nursed him through his final illness in Paris, which was the stated reason for her absence from the star-studded 70th Anniversary of the Oscars in 1998.


De Havilland was good friends with Bette Davis and remained a close friend of Gloria Stuart. For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... Gloria Stuart (born July 4, 1910) is an American stage, television and film actress and artist. ...


De Havilland today

A resident of Paris since the 1950s, de Havilland rarely makes appearances. She is reported to be working on an autobiography. She appeared as a presenter at the 75th Annual Academy Awards in 2003. In June 2006, she made appearances at tributes for her 90th birthday at the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences and the Los Angeles County Art Museum.


In 2004, Turner Classic Movies put together a retrospective piece called Melanie Remembers in which de Havilland was interviewed for the 65th anniversary of Gone with the Wind's original release. Then 88 years old and the only surviving principal cast member, de Havilland remembered every detail of her casting as well as filming. The 40-minute documentary can be seen on the Gone with the Wind four-disc special collector's edition. Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ...


With the death of Katharine Hepburn in 2003, many[attribution needed] consider Olivia de Havilland and her sister Joan Fontaine to be the last remaining great leading ladies of 1930s and 40s Hollywood. It has been suggested that Tom Hepburn be merged into this article or section. ...


Academy awards

Wins:

Nominations: The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... To Each His Own is a 1946 film which tells the story of an unwed mother, following World War I, who gives up her son for adoption and loves him from afar. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ...

Awards
Preceded by
Joan Crawford
for Mildred Pierce
Academy Award for Best Actress
1946
for To Each His Own
Succeeded by
Loretta Young
for The Farmer's Daughter
Preceded by
Jane Wyman
for Johnny Belinda
Academy Award for Best Actress
1949
for The Heiress
Succeeded by
Judy Holliday
for Born Yesterday
Preceded by
Jane Wyman
for Johnny Belinda
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
1950
for The Heiress
Succeeded by
Gloria Swanson
for Sunset Boulevard
Preceded by
Sylvia Sidney
for An Early Frost
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress - Mini-series
1987
for Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna
Succeeded by
Claudette Colbert
for The Two Mrs. Grenvilles
Preceded by
Deborah Kerr
for Black Narcissus
NYFCC Award for Best Actress
1948
for The Snake Pit
Succeeded by
Olivia de Havilland
for The Heiress
Preceded by
Olivia de Havilland
for The Snake Pit
NYFCC Award for Best Actress
1949
for The Heiress
Succeeded by
Bette Davis
for All About Eve

The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... Hold Back the Dawn is a 1941 romantic film in which a Romanian gigolo marries an American woman in Mexico in order to gain entry to the United States, but winds up falling in love with her. ... The Snake Pit is a 1948 film which tells the story of a woman who finds herself in an insane asylum, and cant remember how she got there. ... Joan Crawford (March 23, 1905 – May 10, 1977),[1] was an acclaimed, iconic, Academy Award-winning American actress, arguably one of the greatest from the Golden Age of Hollywood from the 1920s through 1940s. ... For other uses, see Mildred Pierce (disambiguation). ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... To Each His Own is a 1946 film which tells the story of an unwed mother, following World War I, who gives up her son for adoption and loves him from afar. ... Loretta Young in 1935 Loretta Young (January 6, 1913 – August 12, 2000) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... The Farmers Daughter is a 1947 movie which tells the story of a Minnesota farmgirl who ends up working as a maid for a Congressman and his politically-connected mother. ... Jane Wyman (January 5, 1917[1]– September 10, 2007) was an Oscar, Golden Globe-winning and Emmy-nominated American actress. ... Johnny Belinda is a 1948 film which tells the story of a deaf mute woman who is raped, becomes pregnant, and then is ruled unfit to care for the child. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921–June 7, 1965) was an Academy Award and Tony Award-winning American actress. ... For the 1993 remake, see Born Yesterday (1993 film) Born Yesterday is a 1950 film directed by George Cukor, which tells the story of a corrupt tycoon who brings his showgirl mistress with him to Washington when he tries to buy a Congressman. ... Jane Wyman (January 5, 1917[1]– September 10, 2007) was an Oscar, Golden Globe-winning and Emmy-nominated American actress. ... Johnny Belinda is a 1948 film which tells the story of a deaf mute woman who is raped, becomes pregnant, and then is ruled unfit to care for the child. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... Gloria Swanson (March 27, 1899 - April 4, 1983), was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American Hollywood actress. ... It has been suggested that Norma Desmond be merged into this article or section. ... Sylvia Sidney (August 8, 1910 - July 1, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress. ... An Early Frost was the first major film to deal with the topic of HIV/AIDS. It was first broadcast on NBC on November 11, 1985. ... Claudette Colbert (September 13, 1903 - July 30, 1996) was an Academy Award-winning and Golden Globe-winning French-American actress in Hollywood film, stage, television and radio. ... Deborah Kerr, CBE (born 30 September 1921) is a Golden Globe award winning Scottish actress who is a recipient of an Academy Honorary Award for a motion picture career that has always represented Perfection, Discipline and Elegance. ... This page is about the film. ... The New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress is one of the awards given by the New York Film Critics Circle to honor the finest achievements in filmmaking. ... The Snake Pit is a 1948 film which tells the story of a woman who finds herself in an insane asylum, and cant remember how she got there. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... The Snake Pit is a 1948 film which tells the story of a woman who finds herself in an insane asylum, and cant remember how she got there. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... For other uses, see All About Eve (disambiguation). ...

Selected filmography

Alibi Ike is a series of short stories written by Ring Lardner and first publised in the Saturday Evening Post on July 31, 1915. ... A Midsummer Nights Dream is a 1935 film directed by Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle, produced by Henry Blanke and adapted by Charles Kenyon and Mary C. McCall Jr. ... Captain Blood is a 1935 swashbuckling film. ... Anthony Adverse is a 1936 film based upon the novel by Hervey Allen. ... The Charge of the Light Brigade is a 1936 historical film made by Warner Bros. ... The Adventures of Robin Hood is an American film released in 1938 and directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. ... Dodge City is a western movie starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland. ... The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939), is a romantic drama film based on the relationship between Queen Elizabeth I (played by Bette Davis) and Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (played by Errol Flynn). ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... Santa Fe Trail is a 1940 western film directed by Michael Curtiz and starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland. ... The Strawberry Blonde was a 1941 Warner Brothers film starring James Cagney. ... Hold Back the Dawn is a 1941 romantic film in which a Romanian gigolo marries an American woman in Mexico in order to gain entry to the United States, but winds up falling in love with her. ... Errol Flynn portrays George Armstrong Custer in the 1941 Warner Brothers film They Died With Their Boots On. ... Show Business at War was a 1943 short (17 minutes) film touting the film industrys contribution to the war effort. ... Thank Your Lucky Stars is a 1943 film made by Warner Brothers as a World War II fundraiser. ... To Each His Own is a 1946 film which tells the story of an unwed mother, following World War I, who gives up her son for adoption and loves him from afar. ... The Dark Mirror (1946) is a black-and-white psychological thriller film directed by Robert Siodmak, starring Olivia de Havilland as a pair of twins, and Lew Ayres as their psychiatrist. ... The Snake Pit is a 1948 film which tells the story of a woman who finds herself in an insane asylum, and cant remember how she got there. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... My Cousin Rachel is a 1952 mystery film/romance film directed by Henry Koster and starred Olivia de Havilland, Richard Burton, Audrey Dalton, Ronald Squire, George Dolenz and John Sutton. ... Not as a Stranger was a 1954 novel written by Morton Thompson. ... Libel is a 1959 UK film. ... Original edition The Light in the Piazza is a 1960 novella by Mississippi writer Elizabeth Spencer. ... Hush. ... The Papess, a Marseilles tarot card of the 18th century, which depicts a female Pope. ... Swarm, see Swarm (disambiguation). ...

Television work

  • Noon Wine (1966)
  • The Screaming Woman (1972)
  • Roots: The Next Generations (1979 - miniseries)
  • Murder Is Easy (1982)
  • The Royal Romance of Charles and Diana (1982)
  • North and South II (1986 - miniseries)
  • Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna (1986)
  • The Woman He Loved (1988)

Fred Ward Noon Wine is a western novel and a 1985 film (German Title: In der Mittagsglut) is a Western-Drama with Fred Ward and Stellan Skarsgård. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Shipman, p. 153
  2. ^ Shipman, p. 151

References

  • de Havilland, Olivia. Every Frenchman Has One. Random House, 1962, 202 pages. Comic observations on life in Paris; little actual biographical information.
  • Fontaine, Joan. No Bed of Roses. Morrow, 1978, 319 pages. Fontaine's autobiography, containing much detail about growing up with her sister.
  • Higham, Charles. Sisters: The Story of Olivia De Haviland and Joan Fontaine. Coward McCann, May 1984, 257 pages.
  • Lamparski, Richard. Manhattan Diary. BearManor Media, 2006 ISBN 1-59393-054-2
  • Shipman, David, The Great Movie Stars, The Golden Years, Bonanza Books, New York, 1970. Library of Congress Catalogue Card Number 78-133803
  • Thomas, Tony. The Films of Olivia de Havilland. Citadel Press, 1983, 255 pages. Foreword by Bette Davis.

For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Olivia de Havilland
Persondata
NAME Havilland, Olivia de
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Havilland, Olivia Mary de
SHORT DESCRIPTION British actress
DATE OF BIRTH 1 July 1916
PLACE OF BIRTH Tokyo, Japan
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Olivia de Havilland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1278 words)
Havilland was born in Tokyo, Japan, and is the elder daughter of Walter de Havilland, a British patent attorney with a practice in Japan, and the former Lilian Augusta Ruse, an actress known by her stage name of Lilian Fontaine, who he married in 1914.
De Havilland mounted a lawsuit in the 1940s and was successful, thereby reducing the power of the studios and extending greater creative freedom to the performers.
De Havilland was good friends with her co-star at Warners, the late Bette Davis, and also with Gloria Stuart, the newly rediscovered (in her 80s) ingenue of Titanic (1997 film).
Olivia de Havilland - definition of Olivia de Havilland in Encyclopedia (690 words)
Olivia Mary de Havilland (born July 1, 1916 in Tokyo, Japan), is a US film actress.
De Havilland and her sister Fontaine, were each nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in 1942.
This was one of the earliest films to attempt a realistic portrayal of mental illness, and de Havilland was lauded for her willingness to play a role that was completely devoid of glamour and, which confronted such controversial subject matter.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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