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Encyclopedia > Oliver Queen
Green Arrow


Green Arrow
Matt Wagner, artist Download high resolution version (550x850, 804 KB)Cover to Green Arrow #15 (September 2002). ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance More Fun Comics #73
Created by Mort Weisinger
George Papp
Statistics
Real name Oliver Queen
Status Active
Affiliations Justice League of America reserve; partner of Connor Hawke (Green Arrow II); partner of the second Speedy
Previous affiliations partner of the first Speedy; Seven Soldiers of Victory (Pre-Crisis Earth-2 only); All-Star Squadron (Pre-Crisis Earth-2 only); Green Arrows of the World; partner of the second Black Canary; partner of Green Lantern (Hal Jordan); partner of Shado; partner of Eddie Fyers; Justice League Elite
Notable aliases
Notable relatives Robert (last name unknown, son), Connor Hawke (Green Arrow II, son)
Notable powers None, but a master archer with large selection of specialized trick arrows.

Green Arrow (Oliver "Ollie" Queen) is a DC Comics superhero. Created by Mort Weisinger and Greg Papp, he first appeared in More Fun Comics #73 (1941). The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to the date or issue of a characters first appearance. ... Mortimer Weisinger (1915-1978) was an American magazine and comic book editor. ... The Justice League of America, also often referred to as the Justice League or JLA for short, is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ... The original Speedys real name was Roy Harper, Jr. ... The Seven Soldiers of Victory (also known as Laws Legionaires) is a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ... The All-Star Squadron, featuring Doctor Mid-Nite, Star-Spangled Kid, Robotman, Uncle Sam, Phantom Lady, Commander Steel, Plastic Man, Starman, Sandman, Green Lantern, Atom, Flash, Liberty Belle, Hourman and Amazing-Man The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981–1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by... Black Canary is a female superhero published by DC Comics. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #6, art by Ethan Van Sciver. ... Justice League Elite was a 12 issue comic book miniseries published monthly by DC Comics in 2004 and 2005. ... Archer may refer to: Someone taking part in archery. ... The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... Superman (left) and Batman, two of the most recognizable and influential superheroes. ... Mortimer Weisinger (1915-1978) was an American magazine and comic book editor. ... More Fun Comics was a DC Comics title which began as New Fun Comics in February 1935 and changed to More Fun with its seventh issue. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Dressed like Robin Hood, Green Arrow is an archer, who invents arrows with various special functions, such as a glue arrow, a net arrow, a boxing glove arrow, etc. Originally, most of his other traits were borrowed from Batman. Like the caped crusader, Green Arrow was a millionaire, mentored a young sidekick (Speedy) and policed a fictional metropolis, known as Star City. Robin Hood is the archetypal English folk hero, an outlaw who, in modern versions of the legend, stole from the rich to give to the poor. ... Archers in Competition Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... The DC Comics superhero Batman (originally and still sometimes referred to as The Batman) is a fictional character who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Don Quixote and Sancho Panza unsuccessfully confront windmills. ... The original Speedys real name was Roy Harper, Jr. ... Star City is a fictional city that appears in stories published by DC Comics. ...


Throughout his first twenty-five years, Green Arrow was not a significant hero. But in the late 1960s, after he lost his fortune, writers gave him the unique role of streetwise crusader for the working class and the underprivileged. In 1970, he was paired with the more law-and-order-oriented hero Green Lantern in a groundbreaking, socially conscious comic book series. Since then, he has been popular among comic book fans and most writers have taken an urban, gritty approach to the character. The 1960s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #6, art by Ethan Van Sciver. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ...

Contents


Inspirations

The Green Arrow character was inspired by a few different sources, including Edgar Wallace's The Green Archer (and the 1940 Columbia Pictures serial of the same name based on the novel) and Fawcett Publications' earlier archery-themed hero Golden Arrow. Green Arrow was also obviously created as an archery-themed version of the earlier character Batman, as several similarities between the two characters can be spotted, especially in Green Arrow's earlier incarnation: Green Arrow had a teenaged sidekick named Speedy just as Batman has Robin; Green Arrow and Batman were/are both millionaire playboys in their secret identities; Green Arrow had an Arrowcar and an Arrowplane similar to Batman's Batmobile and Batplane; while Batman is summoned to police headquarters by the Bat-signal, Green Arrow was summoned by the Arrow-signal. The Arrowcar was yellow in color and shaped reminiscent of the land-speed record holder of the 1920s, the British Golden Arrow. Edgar Wallace pictured on a 1929 cover of Time Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace (April 1, 1875–February 10, 1932) was a prolific British crime writer, journalist and playwright, who wrote 175 novels, 24 plays, and countless articles in newspapers and journals. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Columbia Pictures logo, since 1993. ... Serial is a term, originating in literature, for a format by which a story is told in contiguous installments in sequential issues of a single periodical publication. ... Fawcett Publications was an American publishing company launched in 1919 in Robbinsdale, Minnesota by Wilford H. Captain Billy Fawcett (1883-1940). ... Golden Arrow is a fictional character who had his own strip in Fawcett Comics Whiz Comics comic book series, from 1940 to 1953. ... The DC Comics superhero Batman (originally and still sometimes referred to as The Batman) is a fictional character who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Don Quixote and Sancho Panza unsuccessfully confront windmills. ... A classic image of Batman and Robin reinterpreted by painter Alex Ross. ... The Golden Arrow was a luxury train of the Southern Railway and later British Railways that linked London with Dover, where passengers took the ferry to Calais to join the Flèche d’Or that took them onto Paris. ...


Publishing history

Beginnings

Created in 1941 by writer/editor Mort Weisinger and artist George Papp, who remained with the series for almost twenty years, Green Arrow and Speedy first appeared in More Fun Comics #73 (cover-dated November 1941). For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Mortimer Weisinger (1915-1978) was an American magazine and comic book editor. ... More Fun Comics was a DC Comics title which began as New Fun Comics in February 1935 and changed to More Fun with its seventh issue. ... Periodical cover date refers to the date displayed on the covers of magazines. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Incidentally, another Mort Weisiner-created character called Aquaman also appeared for the first time in that issue, and these two back-up features continued to run concurrently in More Fun Comics until the mid-1940s, and then in Adventure Comics from 1946 until 1960. Green Arrow and Speedy also appeared in various issues of World's Finest Comics until issue #140 (1964). The Green Arrow and Speedy feature was one of five back-up features to be promoted in one of the earliest team-up books, Leading Comics. Aquaman is a DC Comics superhero. ... // Events and trends The 1940s were seen as a transition period between the radical 1930s and the conservative 1950s, which also leads the period to be divided in two halves: The first half of the decade was dominated by World War II, the widest and most destructive armed conflict in... Adventure Comics was a comic book published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Worlds Finest Comics was a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1941 to 1986. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... Leading Comics is a comic book published during the 1940s and early 1950s. ...


Green Arrow was one of the few DC characters to keep going after the Golden Age of Comic Books. The longevity of the character was due to the influence of creator Mort Weisinger, who kept Green Arrow and Aquaman as back-up features to the headlining Superboy feature first in More Fun Comics and then Adventure Comics. The Green Arrow and Speedy feature had a relatively undistinguished publishing history, though the main exception in this period was a short run in 1958 by Jack Kirby. Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ... Superboy is the name of two fictional characters published by DC Comics. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Fantastic Four, one of Kirbys most famous co-creations. ...


After the last original Green Arrow and Speedy features in the early 1960s, Green Arrow was made the first non-charter member of the Justice League of America, a team which guaranteed the character's being continually featured, in some way or another, continuously until 1998. The 1960s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... The Justice League of America, also often referred to as the Justice League or JLA for short, is a DC Comics superhero team. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


Neal Adams and Dennis O'Neil

Green Lantern #76, April 1970. Art by Neal Adams.
Green Lantern #76, April 1970. Art by Neal Adams.

In 1969 artist Neal Adams decided to update the character's visual appearance by giving him a goatee beard and costume of his own design. Inspired by Adams' redesign, writer Dennis O'Neil followed up on Green Arrow's new appearance by completely remaking the character's attitude in the pages of Justice League of America #79 (cover-dated November 1969), giving his personality a rougher edge like that of Marvel Comics' archery-themed hero Hawkeye. This revision was explained by having Oliver Queen lose his fortune and become an outspoken and strident advocate of the underprivileged in society and the political left wing. For instance, he once saved a child's dog playing in a railyard, but instead of satisfaction, he brooded on the larger problem of how the poor child apparently had nowhere else in the city to play safely. In short, he became a kind of superheroic hybrid between Robin Hood and Abbie Hoffman. In addition, the Green Arrow began a long running romantic relationship with The Black Canary II (Dinah Lance). As a member of the Justice League, he became an argumentative figure who often acted as the team's political conscience. Cover of Green Lantern #76 This work is copyrighted. ... Cover of Green Lantern #76 This work is copyrighted. ... April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Cover to Green Lantern #76, April 1970. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Cover to Green Lantern #76, April 1970. ... A goatee A goatee is a beard formed by a tuft of hair on the chin resembling that of a billy goat. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s. ... Periodical cover date refers to the date displayed on the covers of magazines. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ... Hawkeye is a fictional character, a superheroic archer in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Chicago and Northwestern Railways Proviso Yard in Chicago, Illinois, December 1942. ... Robin Hood is the archetypal English folk hero, an outlaw who, in modern versions of the legend, stole from the rich to give to the poor. ... Abbie Hoffman, New York City, 1970. ... The Black Canary as depicted in Justice League Unlimited Black Canary is a female superhero published by DC Comics. ... The Justice League of America, also often referred to as the Justice League or JLA for short, is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


In the early 1970s, he became a co-feature with Green Lantern in the latter's series in an acclaimed, but shortlived series of stories by O'Neil and Adams that dealt with various social and political issues in which Green Arrow spoke for the liberal argument (thus a voice for O'Neil himself) while Green Lantern was an establishment figure, half-heartedly serving the conservative viewpoint. Oliver Queen convinced Hal Jordan to see beyond his strict obedience to the Green Lantern Corps, to help those who were neglected or discriminated against. The duo embarked on a quest to find America, witnessing the corruption, racism, pollution, and overpopulation confronting the nation. Denny O'Neil even took on current events, such as the Manson Family cult murders, in issues #78-79 ("A Kind of Loving") where Black Canary falls briefly under the spell of a false prophet who advocates violence. The 1970s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1970 and 1979. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #6, art by Ethan Van Sciver. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ...


Later in the series, Oliver Queen would land a job as a newspaper columnist, which allowed him to articulate his political beliefs in a more public field. It was during this period that the most famous Green Arrow story of all time appeared, in Green Lantern #85-86, when it was revealed that Speedy was addicted to heroin. In his zeal to save America, Oliver Queen had failed in his personal responsibility to Roy Harper -- who would overcome his addiction with the help of Black Canary. This story prompted a congratulatory letter from the mayor of New York, John V. Lindsay. Unfortunately, the series did not match commercial expectations because of its mature topics. After a brief wrap-up as a feature in "The Flash," the Green Arrow/Green Lantern partnership returned to more traditional superhero storylines. A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... Heroin or diacetylmorphine (INN) is a semi-synthetic opioid. ...


In May through August of 1983, Green Arrow appeared for the first time in his own comic book, a four issue miniseries of murder and betrayal that established potential for a full series. 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A miniseries, in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ...


Mike Grell to Chuck Dixon

Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters #1, the gritty redefinition of the Green Arrow
Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters #1, the gritty redefinition of the Green Arrow

In 1987, the character was changed once more in Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters, written and illustrated by Mike Grell, who had previous experience dating back to Green Arrow features in "The Flash." In this three-issue prestige format mini-series, Green Arrow abandons gadget arrows and fights crime in Seattle, Washington, where he now lives with Black Canary. The series took on a more gritty, violent, and urban tone, befitting the series' mature audience label. While fighting drug runners, Oliver Queen encounters the enigmatic Japanese archer, Shado, whose family suffered in a World War II internment camp. While uncovering the connection between the drug operations and Shado's quest for vengeance, Green Arrow also kills a murderer to save Black Canary. This was the first time that he had deliberately killed someone. He could have disarmed the man but in his rage over the torture of Black Canary he chose to kill him instead. This was the first of many that he would kill during Mike Grell's run. Shado and Green Arrow join forces against the criminals, later becoming occasional allies and, on one occasion when Oliver was injured and delirious, lovers. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x608, 70 KB)Cover of Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters #1 This image is the cover of an individual issue of a comic book. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x608, 70 KB)Cover of Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters #1 This image is the cover of an individual issue of a comic book. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mike Grell (born 1947) is a comic book writer and artist. ... Downtown Seattle skyline City nickname: The Emerald City Location Location of Seattle in King County and Washington Government County King Mayor Greg Nickels NP/Democrat ¹ Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 369. ...


The Longbow Hunters mini-series led to a long-running regular series (Green Arrow), which Grell wrote for 80 issues. Grell tried to redefine Oliver Queen as a realistic and flawed character, purging the series of any superhero characteristics. This incarnation of Green Arrow would still team up occasionally with Batman (as in the graphic novel Poison Tomorrow) but his past with the Justice League rarely came up. Dinah Lance remained Oliver Queen's domestic partner for most of the series, although she lost her 'sonic scream' ability during her ordeal. Green Arrow even lost his mask a couple of issues into the regular series when he learned it no longer obscured his identity. His overall look underwent slight changes, as he began to don a hood instead of the cap, and his outfit was given long sleeves. Dinah explained this as being a costume more suited to the Pacific Northwest, most likely referring to the cold climate and rain. The DC Comics superhero Batman (originally and still sometimes referred to as The Batman) is a fictional character who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Graphic novel is a term for a long-form comic book, usually with lengthy and complex storylines, and often aimed at more mature audiences. ... The Justice League of America, also often referred to as the Justice League or JLA for short, is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


The Green Arrow series dealt largely with serial killers, terrorists, and street gangs, with Oliver Queen sometimes working with Seattle Police Lieutenant Anderson, who sometimes resents Green Arrow's penchant for vigilante justice. During one story-line, Green Arrow wounds a teenager with a paintball gun, thinking him a criminal. This near-tragedy forces a crisis intervention from Hal Jordan, who rallies his depressed friend. Another notable episode involves Oliver Queen's framing for a terrorist bombing, which destroys his heroic reputation until he is given a presidential apology. During his disgrace, Queen travelled across Great Britain, Europe, and much of Africa before returning to Seattle.


During The Longbow Hunters, Green Arrow fell afoul of renegade CIA agent Greg Osborne, who begins to monitor Oliver Queen's activities. At first, mercenary Eddie Fyers is introduced as Oliver Queen's adversary, but he becomes a companion of necessity when Green Arrow is forced to leave Seattle. This event is accelerated when Dinah Lance discovers Shado has had Oliver's son, Robert. When she catches Oliver kissing their houseguest, Marianne (who had a long case of hero worship for Green Arrow), Dinah permanently breaks off their relationship. The mature was dropped with issue 60 being the last, this is not due to Grell leaving, his last issue was 80. More than likely it was actually from the formation of Vertigo and Green Arrow being too much of a mainstream character to go over to it. This also led to Green Arrow's eventual return to the DC Heroes mainstream in the Crossroads story arc. A mercenary is a soldier who fights, or engages in warfare primarily for private gain, usually with little regard for ideological, national or political considerations. ...


Green Arrow II (Connor Hawke)

Connor Hawke and Oliver Queen. Art by Matt Wagner.
Connor Hawke and Oliver Queen. Art by Matt Wagner.

Under later writers, such as Kelley Puckett, Kevin Dooley, and Chuck Dixon, some superheroic elements of the DC Universe were re-introduced, such as Hal Jordan's transformation into the villainous Parallax. In the 1994 Zero Hour storyline, Green Arrow was forced to kill his former comrade in order to save the universe. Puckett introduced a young monk named Connor Hawke, who teamed up with Green Arrow and Eddie Fyers. Eventually, Connor discovered that Oliver Queen was his father. During the Green Lantern/Green Arrow series, Oliver Queen once fled to a meditational retreat after killing a criminal in Star City. Evidently, Green Arrow fathered yet another child after conveniently having yet another undisclosed affair. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (507x780, 89 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (507x780, 89 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Matt Wagner is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... Former editor at DC Comics. ... Chuck Dixon - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Zero Hour was a weekly comic event miniseries/crossover published by DC Comics in the summer of 1994. ... A Roman Catholic monk A monk is a person who practices monasticism, adopting a strict religious and ascetic lifestyle, usually in community with others following the same path. ... Star City is a fictional city that appears in stories published by DC Comics. ...


In 1995, Dixon and other DC editors decided that Oliver Queen's storytelling possibilities had been exhausted, and he died in Green Arrow #100-101, triggering an explosion that would have destroyed Metropolis. Metropolis is a fictional city that appears in comic books published by DC Comics, and is the home of Superman. ...


Like many DC superheroes in the mid-1990s, the "old" Green Arrow was immediately replaced with a young successor, in this case, Connor Hawke. Chuck Dixon, Green Arrow's writer during this period, explored Connor's difficulty adjusting to the world after spending years in an ashram. In marked contrast to his father, Connor was awkward around the opposite sex, sparking some misdirected fan questions as to his sexual orientation. Dixon also tried to resurrect the traditional partnership of Green Arrow and Green Lantern, who had also been recently replaced (by Kyle Rayner). Moreover, Green Arrow II became an active member of the Justice League, using some of his father's old gadget arrows to some advantage against more powerful foes. Connor Hawke starred in the series (as "Green Arrow II") from issue 102 until issue 137, when it was canceled in 1998. The 1990s refers to the years 1990 to 1999; the last decade of the 20th Century, but in an economical sense The Nineties is often considered to span from the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 to the 9/11 attacks in 2001. ... Ashrams in ancient India were Hindu hermitages where sages lived in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... Kyle Rayner is a fictional hero from the DC Comics universe. ... The Justice League of America, also often referred to as the Justice League or JLA for short, is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


Green Arrow of Earth-2

There was an Earth-2 version of Green Arrow who was a member of the Seven Soldiers of Victory and All-Star Squadron in the 1940s along with his sidekick Speedy. Aside from their origin, having been trained on a mesa top together, their history nearly parallels the history of the Earth-1 version up until the point when Arrow and Speedy along with their teammates were thrown into various periods of time during a battle with the Nebula Man. He and his teammates were later retrieved by the Justice Society and the Justice League in order to assist them in saving Earth-2 from the machinations of their old foe the Iron Hand. Years after returning to the present, Arrow came out of retirement until he died during the Crisis on Infinite Earths. The Seven Soldiers of Victory (also known as Laws Legionaires) is a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ... The All-Star Squadron, featuring Doctor Mid-Nite, Star-Spangled Kid, Robotman, Uncle Sam, Phantom Lady, Commander Steel, Plastic Man, Starman, Sandman, Green Lantern, Atom, Flash, Liberty Belle, Hourman and Amazing-Man The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981–1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a team of fictional superheroes whose adventures have been published by DC Comics. ... The Justice League of America, also often referred to as the Justice League or JLA for short, is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1. ...


Alternate Green Arrow Future

The death scene in Green Arrow #100-101 pays tribute to Frank Miller's graphic novel, The Dark Knight Returns, an alternate Batman adventure where Oliver Queen resurfaces as a hard-bitten old revolutionary missing one arm. Never on the best of terms with Queen, Superman intends to rescue Green Arrow by removing his arm, but Ollie refuses to let him, thus bringing about his apparent death. Frank Miller (born 27 January 1957 in Olney, Maryland) is an American writer and artist best known for his film noir-style comic book stories. ... Graphic novel is a term for a long-form comic book, usually with lengthy and complex storylines, and often aimed at more mature audiences. ... The premiere issue of the series The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ...


The 21st century

Cover to Green Arrow #1 (2000). Art by Matt Wagner.
Cover to Green Arrow #1 (2000). Art by Matt Wagner.

In 2000, Oliver Queen was revived in a new Green Arrow series, written by Kevin Smith and illustrated by Phil Hester and Ande Parks. Smith's storyline returned the character to life from a point before the Mike Grell period which includes his use of gadget arrows, although the world around him still reflected the changes that had taken place — for example, the introduction of Wally West, Kyle Rayner and Connor Hawke to replace Barry Allen, Hal Jordan, and Queen himself, respectively. Smith's fifteen issues were followed by a story arc by Brad Meltzer, who in 2002 handed the title over to Judd Winick. Hester and Parks remained as the art team throughout these changes. Download high resolution version (442x684, 376 KB)Cover to Green Arrow #1. ... Download high resolution version (442x684, 376 KB)Cover to Green Arrow #1. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Kevin Smith as Silent Bob Kevin Patrick Smith (born August 2, 1970) is an American screenwriter, film director, comic book writer, and creator of View Askew Productions. ... Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, and the current (third) Flash. ... Kyle Rayner is a fictional hero from the DC Comics universe. ... Barry Allen was a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe and the second Flash. ... Hal Jordan is a DC Comics superhero, arguably the most famous to bear the name of Green Lantern. ... Brad Meltzer is an American author of several New York Times best-selling books including The Tenth Justice, The Millionaires, Dead Even, The First Counsel, and The Zero Game. ... 2002 (MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Judd Winick at Midtown Comics East in New York City, June 24, 2004. ...


One of Winick's most-publicized innovations was to reveal that Mia Dearden, a former prostitute unofficially adopted by Green Arrow during Kevin Smith's run, had tested positive for HIV. Winick had published a graphic novel (Pedro and Me) about a gay friend who died of HIV/AIDS, and subsequently wrote a Green Lantern storyline about homophobia, so some critics have pigeonholed him as a writer of social-commentary storylines, or for being overly didactic. Winick argues that his writing range is wider than simple liberal propaganda, that socially relevant storylines are part of the Green Arrow tradition, and that he intends to show Mia living a normal life, "living with HIV, as many people do." [1] The human immunodeficiency virus, commonly called HIV, is a retrovirus that primarily infects vital components of the human immune system such as CD4+ T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. ... Graphic novel is a term for a long-form comic book, usually with lengthy and complex storylines, and often aimed at more mature audiences. ... Castro Street in San Francisco Look up gay in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV-positive people and those living with AIDS. AIDS is an acronym for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and is defined as a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the depletion of the immune system caused... The term homophobia means an irrational fear of homosexuality or homosexuals. It is derived from the words homosexual and phobia (meaning panic fear in Greek). ... Literally, a pigeonhole is a small hole in a loft, the nesting-place of a pigeon. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... North Korean propaganda showing a soldier destroying the United States Capitol building. ...


In recent years, Green Arrow has been depicted as having a confrontational relationship with fellow superhero Hawkman. While their arguments seemed to center on politics, Identity Crisis revevaled that their differences went deeper than that, and was rooted in their disagreement over whether to mindwipe a particular villain. Hawkman is also the name of a reggae artist who collaborated with trip-hop artist Tricky. ... Identity Crisis #7, the conclusion. ...


He has also been briefly depicted as being somewhat aloof and cold towards Kyle Rayner, likely due to his inability to accept anyone else in Hal Jordan's place.


Other media depiction

With the new found popularity of the O'Neil/Adams version, the once ignored character began to attract some interest in televised adaptations, as well as the collectible toy market.


The first television appearance was a single guest spot in an episode of the original 1973 incarnation of The Superfriends where his politics became irrelevant, given the nature of Saturday morning cartoons format and timeslot. In "Gulliver's Gigantic Goof," Green Arrow rescues his fellow superheroes, who have become shrunk by a mad scientist. He also swore oaths such as "By Robin Hood's Bow," and in short, conformed to the bland characterizations of his fellow Superfriends. 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Super Friends is an animated series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1973 to 1985. ... Saturday morning cartoon is the colloquial term for the typical television animation programming that was typically scheduled on Saturday mornings on the major American television networks since the mid 1960s. ... Robin Hood is the archetypal English folk hero, an outlaw who, in modern versions of the legend, stole from the rich to give to the poor. ...


During the 1970s, Mego Enterprises commissioned the first Green Arrow doll as a part of its DC Superheroes line, which still features as a collectible. Since then, several action figures and models have emerged during the 1980s and 1990s, appealing to the Emerald Archer's moderate fanbase. For a brief period, a Green Arrow television series had been bruited about in the late 1980s. This series would have likely been based upon the Longbow Hunters incarnation of Green Arrow, based in Seattle. But after Mike Grell's Jon Sable pilot episode failed on ABC in 1988, nothing came of this proposal. Mego is an experimental electronic music record label based in Vienna, Austria. ... An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of an action hero, superhero or a character from a movie or television program. ... A model figure is a scale model that represents a person, either a generic figure of a type (such as World War II Luftwaffe pilot), a historical personage (such as King Henry VIII), or a fictional character (such as Conan). Model figures are sold both as kits for the enthusiast... Downtown Seattle skyline City nickname: The Emerald City Location Location of Seattle in King County and Washington Government County King Mayor Greg Nickels NP/Democrat ¹ Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 369. ... Mike Grell (born 1947) is a comic book writer and artist. ... Jon Sable:Freelance was one of the very first titles created for the fledging First Comics back in 1983. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is a television and radio network in the United States. ...

Green Arrow, as depicted in Justice League Unlimited.
Green Arrow, as depicted in Justice League Unlimited.

A more faithful and mainstream portrayal is used in the animated television series, Justice League Unlimited. In this version, his strong political convictions (and his sometimes irreverent advocacy of them) are key reasons the Justice League insists on recruiting him as a populist voice of the team, although it took an alluring encounter with the Black Canary to finally persuade him. That decision proved a wise one with Queen providing a valuable perspective for the team during the "Project Cadmus" story arc. In addition, Queen is still a billionaire, having sold his company to devote to his volunteer and activist activities exclusively. He is played by Kin Shriner A screen shot from the Justice League Unlimited television series title sequence. ... A screen shot from the Justice League Unlimited television series title sequence. ... An animated television series or cartoon television series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... A Justice League Unlimited promotional image. ... Kin Shriner (born December 6, 1953 in New York, New York, USA) is an actor, best known for playing Scott Baldwin on both daytime soap operas General Hospital (1977-1980, 1981-1984, 1988-1993, 2000-2004) and Port Charles (1997-2000, 2001). ...


Green Arrow also appeared in the Justice League Task Force Super Nintendo fighting game. Justice League Task Force is a western Super NES tournament fighting game developed by Blizzard Entertainment and published by the now-defunct Acclaim. ... The European SNES design is identical to the Super Famicom. ...


Trivia

Oliver Queen bears an uncanny resemblance to the Warlord (Travis Morgan), who was created by Mike Grell, and Deathstroke the Terminator. Deathstroke, however, is missing one eye, and both Warlord and Deathstroke have white hair, while Green Arrow is blond. Furthermore, Green Arrow fans have also drawn some interesting comparisons between Oliver Queen and Mike Grell's original character, Jon Sable, another troubleshooter for hire, who possesses Olympic-level archery skills. During the Mike Grell run, The Warlord appeared in Seattle leading to a few cases of mistaken identity (and a rather perturbed Warlord). During the Crossroads story arc, Oliver Queen is also mistaken for Deathstroke the Terminator. For the omnibus novel by David Drake and S.M. Stirling, see Warlord For the professional wrestler, see The Warlord The Warlord was a comic book published by DC Comics from 1976 - 1989. ... Slade Wilson, also known as Deathstroke the Terminator, is a fictional character appearing in the DC Comics universe. ... This article refers to the sight organ. ... Human beings have many variations in hair color and texture. ... Natural blond hair Blond (feminine, blonde) is a hair color found in certain mammals characterised by low levels of the dark pigment eumelanin and higher levels of the pale pigment phæomelanin, in common with red hair. ... Jon Sable:Freelance was one of the very first titles created for the fledging First Comics back in 1983. ...


Secret origins

Green Arrow has had several official "secret origins" attributed to his character, but most versions agree that Oliver Queen began as a wealthy playboy who lived like Robinson Crusoe on a semi-deserted Pacific island, after having been washed overboard during an ocean cruise. Forced to hunt for survival, Queen developed his natural archery skill to a peak level. When criminals (originally pirates, but later changed to drug-runners) came to the island, he captured them and returned to civilization. The Longbow Hunters gives this origin a humorous twist, as Queen recounts that the "drug runners" were two ordinary guys with a small boat growing pot on the island. He claims that when he reached civilization, and the story got out, the media and urban myths trumped it up to something else entirely. Green Arrow's code against outright killing is established firmly, with the development of trick arrows to subdue or outwit opponents. Perhaps the most mature origins tale came from Mike Grell's four-part 1992 miniseries, Green Arrow: The Wonder Year. Grell portrayed Oliver Queen as a thrill-seeker who inherits his family business at a very young age. Changed by his sojourn on the island, Ollie decided to take up crimefighting as a means of rebelling against his responsibilities. During his first adventure in Star City, Oliver Queen meets an old flame, Brianna Stone, a former college radical who warns him if he continued to carry his bow, he would one day have to use it for real. Grell's miniseries also established Queen's attraction toward dangerous women. Robinson Crusoe and Man Friday by Carl Offterdinger Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published in 1719 and sometimes regarded as the first novel in English. ... Mike Grell (born 1947) is a comic book writer and artist. ...


During his early days, Oliver Queen also befriended a boy living with a Native American tribe, Roy Harper, whom he nicknames Speedy because he collared a criminal before Green Arrow could. Roy Harper eventually becomes Ollie's adopted son, as well as Green Arrow's sidekick. Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ...


External link


  Results from FactBites:
 
Green Arrow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4030 words)
This revision was explained by having Oliver Queen lose his fortune and become an outspoken and strident advocate of the underprivileged in society and the political left wing.
In 2000, Oliver Queen was revived in a new Green Arrow series, written by Kevin Smith and illustrated by Phil Hester and Ande Parks.
Oliver Queen was a major player in Frank Miller's Batman: The Dark Knight Returns and the sequel Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again.
Green Arrow -- Oliver Queen (4452 words)
Oliver "captured" the dope growers while they were under the influence of their own crops and, using their boat, took them off the island and turned them over to the Coast Guard.
Oliver was unable to prove his innocence and, though he was never convicted on any charges stemming from these forged documents, his stature in the business world was destroyed and he was forced into bankruptcy.
Oliver figured Hal lost touch with the everyday "human beings" because his head and worries were in the "cosmos".The two would work together on and off in crimefighting together in several adventures for a few years together.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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