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Encyclopedia > Oliver Plunkett
Saint Oliver Plunkett

Martyr, Archbishop and Primate of All Ireland
Born November 1, 1629, Loughcrew, County Meath, Ireland
Died July 1, 1681, Tyburn, London England
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church
Beatified 1920
Canonized 1975
Major shrine St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church, Drogheda, Ireland
Feast July 11
Patronage Peace and reconciliation in Ireland
Saints Portal

St. Oliver Plunkett (1 November 16291 July 1681) was Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland. He maintained his duties in Ireland in the face of English persecution and was eventually arrested and tried for treason at a kangaroo court after lawful courts had failed to convict him. He was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn on July 1, 1681, and became the last Catholic martyr to die in England. Oliver Plunkett was beatified in 1920 and canonised in 1975, the first new Irish saint for almost seven hundred years. Saint Oliver Plunkett This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Events March 4 - Massachusetts Bay Colony is granted a Royal charter. ... Loughcrew, Oldcastle, County Meath, Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Navan Code: MH Area: 2,342 km² Population (2006) 162,831 Website: www. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... Tyburn was a former village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Icon of St. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... St. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Massachusetts Bay Colony is granted a Royal charter. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Armagh is a senior Irish cleric of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Primate of All Ireland is the title held by the Archbishop of Armagh. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To be hanged, drawn and quartered was the penalty once ordained in England for treason. ... Tyburn was a former village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Biography

The shrine of St Oliver Plunkett, in St Peter's, Drogheda

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 404 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2460 × 3648 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 404 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2460 × 3648 pixel, file size: 2. ...

Life

Oliver Plunkett was born in Loughcrew, County Meath, Ireland in 1629 from well-to-do parents of Danish origins. He was related by birth to a number of families recently ennobled, such as the Earl of Roscommon and Fingall, as well as the Earl of Louth and the Earl of Dunsany. Till his sixteenth year, the boy's education was entrusted to Patrick Plunket, Abbot of St. Mary's, Dublin, and brother of the first Earl of Fingall who later became bishop, successively, of Ardagh and Meath. As an aspirant to the priesthood, he set out for Rome in 1645, under the care of Father Pierfrancesco Scarampi, of the Roman Oratory. At this time, the Irish Confederate Wars were raging in Ireland; these were essentially conflicts between native Irish Catholics and British Protestants. Scarampi was the Papal envoy to the Catholic movement known as the Confederation of Ireland. Many of Plunkett's relatives were involved in this organisation. Plunkett could not have known that, as a result of the outcome of this war, he would not return to Ireland for 15 years. Loughcrew, Oldcastle, County Meath, Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Navan Code: MH Area: 2,342 km² Population (2006) 162,831 Website: www. ... Events March 4 - Massachusetts Bay Colony is granted a Royal charter. ... Wentworth Dillon, Earl of Roscommon (1633–1685) References Johnson, Samuel. ... The title of Baron Athenry was created in the Peerage of Ireland in 1172. ... The titles of Baron Killeen and Earl of Fingall were titles in the Peerage of Ireland. ... Pierfrancesco Scarampi (1596 - October 14, 1656) was a Roman Catholic oratorian and Papal envoy. ... The Irish Confederate Wars were fought in Ireland between 1641 and 1653. ...


He was admitted to the Irish College in Rome in 1646 and there proved an able pupil. He was ordained a priest in 1654, and deputed by the Irish bishops to act as their representative in Rome. Meanwhile, the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland (1649-53) had defeated the Catholic cause in Ireland and, in the aftermath, the public practice of Catholicism was banned and Catholic clergy were executed. As a result, it was impossible for Plunkett to return to Ireland for many years. He petitioned to remain in Rome and, in 1657, became a professor of theology. Throughout the period of the Commonwealth and the first years of Charles II's reign, he successfully pleaded the cause of the Irish Church, and also served as theological professor at the College of Propaganda Fide. At the Congregation of Propaganda Fide on July 9, 1669, he was appointed Archbishop of Armagh, the Irish primatial see, and was consecrated on November 30 at Ghent by the Bishop of Ghent, assisted by the Bishop of Ferns and another bishop. He eventually set foot on Irish soil again in March 1670, after the English Restoration having made the political climate there less hostile. The pallium was granted him in the Consistory of July 28, 1670. Irish Colleges were centres of education for Irish Catholic clergy and lay people on continental Europe in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. ... 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events April 5 - Signing of the Treaty of Westminster, ending the First Anglo-Dutch War. ... Combatants English Royalists and Irish Catholic Confederate troops English Parliamentarian New Model Army troops and allied Protestants in Ireland Commanders James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde (1649 - December 1650) Ulick Burke, Earl of Clanricarde (December 1650-April 1653) Oliver Cromwell (1649-May 1650) Henry Ireton (May 1650-November 1651) Charles... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... The Commonwealth was the republican government which ruled first England and then the whole of Britain, Ireland, the colonies and other Crown possessions during the periods from 1649 (the monarch Charles I being beheaded on January 30 and An Act declaring England to be a Commonwealth being passed by the... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province East Flanders Arrondissement Ghent Coordinates , , Area 156. ... The Bishop of Ghent is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Ghent, which comprises the entire province of East Flanders as well as the Antwerp municipalities of Zwijndrecht and Burcht. ... Ferns is a diocese in south-eastern Ireland (province of Leinster; roughly coterminous with County Wexford). ... Year 1670 (MDCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... now. ... // Antiquity Originally, the Latin word consistorium meant simply sitting together, just as the Greek syn(h)edrion (from which the Biblical sanhedrin was a corruption). ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1670 (MDCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


After arriving back in Ireland, he set about reorganising the ravaged Church and built schools both for the young and for clergy, whom he found 'ignorant in moral theology and controversies'. He tackled drunkenness among the clergy, writing 'Let us remove this defect from an Irish priest, and he will be a saint'. The Penal Laws had been somewhat relaxed and he was able to establish a Jesuit College in Drogheda in 1670. A year later 150 students attended the College. In the most general sense, penal is the body of laws that are enforced by the State in its own name and impose penalties for their violation, as opposed to civil law that seeks to redress private wrongs. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O088754 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 1 m Population (2006)  - Proper  - Environs    28,973[1]  6,117[1] Website: www. ... Year 1670 (MDCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Persecution

St. Oliver Plunkett's head
St. Oliver Plunkett's head

With the onset of new persecution in 1673 and the college being levelled to the ground, Plunkett went into hiding, traveling only in disguise, and refusing a government edict to register at a seaport to await passage into exile. In 1678, the so-called Popish Plot, concocted in England by Titus Oates, led to further anti-Catholicism. Archbishop Peter Talbot of Dublin was arrested, and Plunkett again went into hiding. The Privy Council in London was told he had plotted a French invasion. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2736 × 3648 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2736 × 3648 pixel, file size: 2. ... 1673 (MDCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events August 10 - Treaty of Nijmegen ends the Dutch War. ... The Popish Plot was an alleged Catholic conspiracy. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Peter Talbot, (1620-1680), was the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Dublin from 1669 to his death. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, typically in a monarchy. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Despite being on the run and with a price on his head, he refused to leave his flock. He was arrested in Dublin in December 1679 and imprisoned in Dublin Castle, where he gave absolution to the dying Talbot. At some point before his final incarceration, he took refuge in a church that once stood in the townland of Killartry in County Louth, in the parish of Clogherhead, seven miles outside of Drogheda. He was tried at Dundalk for conspiring against the state by plotting to bring 20,000 French soldiers into the country, and for levying a tax on his clergy to support 70,000 men for rebellion. Events January 24 - King Charles II of England disbands Parliament August 7 - The brigantine Le Griffon, which was commissioned by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, is towed to the southern end of the Niagara River, to become the first ship to sail the upper Great Lakes. ... Dublin Castle. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County: Population () c. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


Lord Shaftesbury knew Oliver Plunkett would never be convicted in Ireland and had him moved to Newgate prison, London. The first grand jury found no true bill, but he was not released. The second trial was a kangaroo court; Lord Campbell, writing of the judge, Sir Francis Pemberton, called it a disgrace to himself and his country. Plunkett was found guilty of high treason on June, 1681 "for promoting the Catholic faith," and was condemned to a gruesome death. The title of Earl of Shaftesbury was created in 1672 for Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Baron Ashley, a prominent politician in the Cabal then dominating the policies of King Charles II. Earls of Shaftesbury (1672) Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury (1621-1683) Anthony Ashley Cooper, 2nd Earl of... Newgate, the old city gate and prison. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Campbell, 1st Baron Campbell of St Andrews (17 September 1779-1861), was a British politician and Lord Chancellor of Great Britain. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ...


On July 1, 1681, Plunkett became the last Catholic martyr to die in England when he was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn, the last Catholic to die for his faith at Tyburn. His body was initially buried in two tin boxes next to five Jesuits who had died before in the courtyard of St Giles. The remains were exhumed in 1683 and moved to the Benedictine monastery at Lamspringe, near Hildesheim in Germany. The head was brought to Rome, and from there to Armagh and eventually to Drogheda where, since June 29, 1921, it has rested in Saint Peter's Church. Most of the body was brought to Downside Abbey, England, where the major part is located today, with some parts remaining at Lamspringe. Some relics were brought to Ireland in May 1975, while others are in England, France, Germany, the United States, and Australia. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... To be hanged, drawn and quartered was the penalty once ordained in England for treason. ... Tyburn was a former village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... St. ... Lamspringe is a village and a municipality in the district of Hildesheim, in Lower Saxony, Germany. ...   is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O088754 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 1 m Population (2006)  - Proper  - Environs    28,973[1]  6,117[1] Website: www. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... St. ... Saint Gregorys Abbey, commonly known as Downside Abbey, is a Benedictine monastery of the English Benedictine Congregation. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Oliver Plunkett was beatified in 1920 and canonised in 1975, the first new Irish saint for almost seven hundred years, and the first of the Irish martyrs to be beatified. He has since been followed by 17 other Irish martyrs who were beatified by Pope John Paul II in 1992. Among them were Archbishop Dermot O'Hurley, Margaret Ball, and the Wexford Martyrs. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In Catholicism, beatification (from Greek μακαριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead persons accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in their name (intercession of saints). ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... Dermot OHurley (c. ... Margaret Ball Born as Margaret Birmingham in 1515, near Skryne, in County Meath. ... The Wexford Martyrs were Matthew Lambert, Robert Tyler, Edward Cheevers, Patrick Cavanagh and two unknown individuals, all Catholic. ...


Nevertheless, his ministry during its time was most successful and he confirmed over 48,000 people over a four-year period. Since 1997, he is the patron saint, adopted by the prayer group campaigning for peace in Ireland, namely, 'St. Oliver Plunkett for Peace and Reconciliation'.


Timeline of events

is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 1 - Charles II crowned King of Scotland in Scone. ... Tonsure is the practice of some Christian churches of cutting the hair from the scalp of clerics as a symbol of their renunciation of worldly fashion and esteem. ... The minor orders are the lowest ranks in the Christian clergy. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... This article is about the sacrament. ... Subdeacon is a title used in various branches of Christianity. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April 5 - Signing of the Treaty of Westminster, ending the First Anglo-Dutch War. ... This article is about religious workers. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary. ... To consecrate an inaminate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1670 (MDCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 24 - King Charles II of England disbands Parliament August 7 - The brigantine Le Griffon, which was commissioned by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, is towed to the southern end of the Niagara River, to become the first ship to sail the upper Great Lakes. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... To be hanged, drawn and quartered was the penalty once ordained in England for treason. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for his or her religious faith. ... The term Whitsunday may refer to: The Sunday of the feast of Whitsun or Pentecost in the Christian calendar, observed 50 days after Easter. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Catholicism, beatification (from Greek μακαριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead persons accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in their name (intercession of saints). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article discusses the process of declaring saints. ...

References

Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (born 10 October 1930) is an English playwright, screenwriter, poet, actor, director, author, and political activist. ... The Birthday Party is the second play by Harold Pinter. ... J.P. Donleavy James Patrick Donleavy is an Irish American author, born April 23, 1926 in New York to Irish immigrants. ... The Ginger Man is a 1955 novel by J. P. Donleavy. ...

Works Cited

  • Blessed Oliver Plunkett: Historical Studies, Gill, Dublin, 1937.
  • Desmond Forristal, Oliver Plunkett in his own words, Veritas Publications, Dublin, 1975.
  • John Hanley (ed.), The Letters of Saint Oliver Plunkett, Dolmen Press, Dublin, 1979.

This article incorporates text from the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


External links

  • Brief biography on Louth Online
  • Loughcrew gardens, site of Plunkett family church
  • Biography of St. Oliver Plunket
  • St Peters Church, Drogheda - shrine of Oliver Plunketts head

 
 

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