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Encyclopedia > Oliver Goldsmith
Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith (November 10, 1730 or 1728April 4, 1774) was an Irish writer and physician known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), his pastoral poem The Deserted Village (1770) (written in memory of his brother), and his plays The Good-natur'd Man (1768) and She Stoops to Conquer (1771, first performed in 1773). (He is also thought to have written the classic children's tale, The History of Little Goody Two Shoes, giving the world that familiar phrase.) 1881 Young Persons Cyclopedia of Persons and Places This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1881 Young Persons Cyclopedia of Persons and Places This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ... Events Astronomical aberration discovered by the astronomer James Bradley Swedish academy of sciences founded at Uppsala The founding of the University of Havana (Universidad de la Habana), Cubas most well-established university. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The Doctor by Samuel Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... Choosing the Wedding Gown by William Mulready, an illustration of Ch. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... // Oliver Goldsmith, The Deserted Village George Canning Joseph Cottle James Hogg James Plumptre William Wordsworth June 23 — Mark Akenside, 48, British poet Thomas Chatterton, suicide by arsenic poisoning Poetry List of years in poetry Categories: | | ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... She Stoops to Conquer is a comedy by Oliver Goldsmith, first performed in 1773. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A Woodcut of Goody Two-Shoes from the 1768 edition The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes is a childrens story published in 1765. ...

Contents

Biography

He was either born in the townland of Pallas, near Ballymahon, County Longford, where his father was Anglican curate of the parish of Forgney, or at the residence of his maternal grandparents, Smith Hill House in the diocese of Elphin, County Roscommon where his Grandfather Oliver Jones was a clergyman and master of the Elphin diocesan school. When he was aged two, Goldsmith's father was appointed rector of the parish of Kilkenny West in County Westmeath. The family moved to the parsonage at Lissoy, between Athlone and Ballymahon, and continued to live there until his father's death in 1747. Ballymahon (Irish: ) is a small town in the southern part of County Longford, Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Longford Code: LD Area: 1,091 km² Population (2006) 34,361 Website: www. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... From the Latin curatus (compare Curator), a curate is a person who is invested with the care, or cure (cura), of souls of a parish. ... An early nineteenth century house situated about 1. ... Elphin (Irish Ail Finn) is a village in north County Roscommon, Ireland. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Mullingar Code: WH Area: 1,764 km² Population (2006) 79,403 Website: www. ... The rectory is the title usually given to the building inhabited, or formerly inhabited, by the rector of a parish. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... Year 1747 (MDCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Goldsmith earned his Bachelor of Arts in 1749 at Trinity College, Dublin, studying theology and law but never getting as far as ordination. Nevertheless, his name has been given to a new lecture theatre and student accommodation on the Trinity College campus, Goldsmith Hall. He later studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Leiden, then toured Europe, living on his wits. He also studied at the University of Padua in 1755 and 1757. On his return, he settled in London, where he worked as an apothecary's assistant. Perennially in debt and addicted to gambling, Goldsmith had a massive output as a hack writer for the publishers of London, but his few painstaking works earned him the company of Samuel Johnson, along with whom he was a founding member of "The Club". The combination of his literary work and his dissolute lifestyle led Horace Walpole to giving him the much quoted epithet of Inspired Idiot. Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... Trinity College, Dublin, corporately designated as the Provost, Fellows and Scholars of the College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin, was founded in 1592 by sexy Sandie Moran, and is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ... At Wikiversity you can learn more and teach others about Theology at: The School of Theology Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Leiden University in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands. ... Gymnasivm Patavinum: The Universitys main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut The University of Padua (Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) is one of the most well-renowned universities in Italy. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Interior of an apothecarys shop. ... A hack writer is a writer for hire, paid to express others thoughts or opinions in felicitous verbiage, often in the form of political pamphlets. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... The Club was a London dining club founded in 1764 by essayist Samuel Johnson, and Joshua Reynolds, the painter. ... Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ...


Goldsmith is recorded as being a highly jealous man, a likeable but disorganised character who once failed to emigrate to America because he missed the ferry. World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ...


He was buried in Temple Church; his death in 1774 may have been partly caused by his own misdiagnosis of his kidney infection. There is a monument to him in the centre of Ballymahon, also in Westminster Abbey with an epitaph written by Samuel Johnson.[1] The Temple Church. ... It has been suggested that Renal anomalies and Renal plasma threshold be merged into this article or section. ... Ballymahon (Irish: ) is a small town in the southern part of County Longford, Ireland. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... An epitaph ( literally: on the gravestone in ancient Greek) is text honoring the deceased, most commonly inscribed on a tombstone or plaque. ...


Goldsmith's birth date is not known for certain. According to the Library of Congress authority file, he told a biographer that he was born on November 29, 1731 or perhaps 1730. Other sources have indicated November 10, on any year from 1727 to 1731. November 10, 1730 is now the most commonly accepted birth date, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica. November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 10 Downing Street becomes the official residence of the United Kingdoms Prime Minister when Robert Walpole moves in. ... Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... Events 10 Downing Street becomes the official residence of the United Kingdoms Prime Minister when Robert Walpole moves in. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ...


Works

The Deserted Village

In "The Deserted Village," Goldsmith uses real life images pertaining to the land in his poem in order to give his readers a full sense of what it was like to live in the countryside during modernization. He tries to re-populate the countryside by using appealing imagery and portraits of its former inhabitants and the liveliness it used to have. By using imagery, Goldsmith is better able to give his readers a sense at what modernization did to the countryside and how it destroyed the land the former inhabitants worked hard to maintain. Images help the reader better see how man was taking over the land and using his own ideas and thoughts as to what the countryside should look like. By having a first hand account of living in the countryside, Goldsmith is able to more successfully project, through his writing, the experience of Auburn through him, and a village, which was unknown, becomes infused with the thoughts of the speaker and thereby grows in stature and importance.


At the time in which this poem was written, it was true that the labouring class was in a dire situation. Changes in land ownership led to shortages in labour, and poverty became a common problem. Small farmers were forced out of the countryside. Alongside this problem came the new zest for luxuries and possessions. Poets became enamoured by each situation, and accordingly much poetry of the time uses the labouring class and the growth of the luxury as a key theme. Thus, it is equally possible that Oliver Goldsmith’s Deserted Village is a critique of luxury, or alternatively, an engagement with the realities of labouring-class poverty.


In the books dedication to Joshua Reynolds, Goldsmith attempts to convey his reasons for writing a poem about the depopulation of the countryside. He is sure that the poetic community will disagree with his picture of the countryside as a poor place of misfortune, desolation and poverty and thus justifies it here. He writes:


"I know you will object (and indeed several of our best and wisest friend concur in the opinion) that the depopulation it deplores is no where to be seen, and the disorders it laments are only to be found in the poet’s own imagination. To this I can scarce make any other answer than that I sincerely believe what I have written; that I have taken all possible pains, in my country excursions, for these four or five years past, to be certain of what I alledge, and that all my views and enquiries have led me to believe those miseries real, which I here attempt to display."[2]


This assertion indicates Goldsmith’s attachment to the people of the countryside; he believes it is vital that their lives are portrayed truthfully and lucidly, perhaps without the typical frills of pastoral poetry. However, in the same letter, Goldsmith goes on to write, In regretting the depopulation of the country, I inveigh against the increase of our luxuries.


"For twenty of thirty years past, it has been the fashion to consider luxury as one of the greatest national advantages… Still however, I…continue to think those luxuries prejudicial to states, by which so many vices are introduced, and so many kingdoms have been undone."


This second and perhaps, more strongly worded argument indicates that Goldsmith is further angered by the effect of the luxury on Britain at this time. He finishes the letter on this note, and does not return to the situation of the labouring class, and this emphasises his strength of feeling on this matter.


Notes and References

  1. ^ "Oliver Goldsmith: A Poet, Naturalist, and Historian, who left scarcely any style of writing untouched, and touched nothing that he did not adorn. Of all the passions, whether smiles were to move or tears, a powerful yet gentle master. In genius, vivid, versatile, sublime. In style, clear, elevated, elegant." Epitaph written by Dr. Johnson, translated from the original Latin.
  2. ^ "The Deserted Village", with dedication to Sir Joshua Reynolds.[1]
  • The Vicar of Wakefield, ISBN 0-19-283940-3
  • She Stoops to Conquer, ISBN 0-486-26867-5
  • Life of Oliver Goldsmith, by Washington Irving, ISBN 1-58963-236-2
  • The Complete Poetical Works of Oliver Goldsmith by Austin Dobson (Editor), ISBN 1-58827-277-X
  • Oliver Goldsmith (Everyman's Poetry Series) edited by Gordon Campbell, ISBN 0-460-87827-1
  • George Rousseau (1974), Goldsmith: The Critical Heritage (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1974). ISBN 0710077203
  • Oliver Goldsmith of Elphin, by J. A. Connellan, Published for the Goldsmith Society (1935)

This article is about the literary figure. ... Washington Irving (April 3, 1783–November 28, 1859) was an American author of the early 19th century. ... Henry Austin Dobson (January 18, 1840 – September 2, 1921) was an English poet and essayist. ...

Trivia

There is a school named after him in London called Oliver Goldsmith Primary School


External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Oliver Goldsmith - MSN Encarta (473 words)
Oliver Goldsmith (playwright and novelist) (1730-74), Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and essayist, best known for his witty comedy She Stoops to Conquer and his novel The Vicar of Wakefield, an early example of the form.
Goldsmith was born November 10, 1730, in Pallas, Ireland, the son of an Anglican curate.
Goldsmith was buried in the churchyard of the Church of Saint Mary (known as The Temple), London; subsequently The Club erected a memorial to him in Westminster Abbey.
Oliver Goldsmith (4795 words)
Oliver early became, and through life continued to be, a passionate admirer of the Irish music, and especially of the compositions of Carolan, some of the last notes of whose harp he heard.
Goldsmith, indeed, was so regardless of truth as to assert in print that he was present at a most interesting conversation between Voltaire and Fontenelle, and that this conversation took place at Paris.
Goldsmith might now be considered as a prosperous man. He had the means of living in comfort, and even in what to one who had so often slept in barns and on bulks must have been luxury.
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