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Encyclopedia > Oliver (William Oliver Swofford)

William Oliver Swofford (February 22, 1945February 12, 2000), known as Oliver, was an American pop singer. Born in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, he began singing as an undergraduate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the early 1960s. He was a member of two music groups: The Virginians and, later, The Good Earth. February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 500 miles (805 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 9. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... The outrageously crowded Woodstock festival epitomized the popular antiwar movement of the 60s. ...


Oliver's clean-cut good looks and soaring baritone were the perfect vehicle for his July 1969 #3 single "Good Morning Starshine", from the pop-rock musical Hair. In October 1969 Oliver reached #2 with Rod McKuen's melodious ballad "Jean", the theme from the Oscar-winning film The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. "Sunday Mornin'" peaked at #35 in December 1969, while "Angelica" stalled at #97 in April 1970. The follow-up "I Can Remember" from July 1970 missed the Hot 100. Oliver appeared on a number of TV variety shows and specials in the late 1960s, including the Ed Sullivan Show. 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... For Popular music (music that is popular, rather than of a specific genre or style), see Popular music. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The original poster for the show. ... Rod McKuen (born April 29, 1933) is a bestselling American poet, composer, and singer, instrumental in the revitalization of popular poetry that took place in the 1960s and early 1970s. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent film awards in the United States and most watched awards ceremony in the world. ... The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie is a novel by Muriel Spark, first published in 1962. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... The outrageously crowded Woodstock festival epitomized the popular antiwar movement of the 60s. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948, to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by Ed Sullivan. ...


Despite his vocal talents, Oliver could not sustain more hits and he later made a career in business. A short-lived attempt to team up with Karen Carpenter in the late 1970s was unsuccessful. In 1983, People magazine ran a feature article on Oliver, describing a happily married father who kept his distance from the music business. In the late 1990s Oliver was diagnosed with cancer, and he died in Shreveport, Louisiana, on the same date that Screamin' Jay Hawkins, Charles Schulz, and Tom Landry all died. Image:The Carpenters. ... Seinfeld was a pop cultural phenomenon during the 90s and became one of the most popular TV programs ever. ... Shreveport, Louisiana is the third largest metropolitan city in the state of Louisiana, USA. It is located in Caddo Parish, and as of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 200,145. ... Official language(s) English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last census; probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33... Screamin Jay Hawkins Jalacy Hawkins, best known as Screamin Jay Hawkins (Cleveland, Ohio, July 18, 1929 – Paris, France, February 12, 2000) was an African American singer famed for his wildly theatrical performances of songs like I Put a Spell on You and Constipation Blues. // Early career Hawkins originally set out... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 - February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. ... Thomas Wade Landry (September 11, 1924 – February 12, 2000) was an American football player and coach. ...


Oliver's brother, John Swofford, is a former athletic director of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is the current commissioner of the Atlantic Coast Conference. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Oliver - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (539 words)
Oliver Plunkett (1629-1681), Irish saint and Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland
Oliver Twist, fictional character in the 1838 novel by Charles Dickens.
Oliver, British Columbia is a small town in the Okanagan Valley known as the Wine Capital of Canada
Oliver—Unreleased Liner Notes (1127 words)
Born William Oliver Swofford on February 22, 1945 in North Wilkesboro, N.C., he began his career in the early Sixties, during the height of the folk boom.
Oliver began his UA career in early 1971 with a song that epitomized his desire for global change, "Light the Way." It was written by future Raspberries leader Eric Carmen, who also played piano and organ on it and wrote the string arrangement.
Oliver was too old for the former, and his pop past made him anathema to the latter.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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