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Encyclopedia > Oliver!
Oliver!
Music Lionel Bart
Lyrics Lionel Bart
Book Lionel Bart
Based upon Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist
Productions 1960 West End
1963 Broadway
1968 Film
1984 Broadway revival
1994 West End revival
2003 Tallinn
2002
Australasian tour
Awards Tony for Best Composer and Lyricist

Oliver! is a British musical, with music and lyrics by Lionel Bart. It was made into a film directed by Carol Reed. Oliver! is an Academy Award winning film and 1968 musical film directed by Carol Reed and based on the stage musical Oliver!. Both the film and play are based on the famous Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Lionel Bart (1930-1999) was a British composer of songs musicals, best known for Oliver! Bart was born Lionel Begleiter in London to Galician Jews, and grew up in Stepney. ... Lionel Bart (1930-1999) was a British composer of songs musicals, best known for Oliver! Bart was born Lionel Begleiter in London to Galician Jews, and grew up in Stepney. ... Lionel Bart (1930-1999) was a British composer of songs musicals, best known for Oliver! Bart was born Lionel Begleiter in London to Galician Jews, and grew up in Stepney. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Oliver Twist (1838) is Charles Dickens second novel. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Oliver! is an Academy Award winning film and 1968 musical film directed by Carol Reed and based on the stage musical Oliver!. Both the film and play are based on the famous Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... County Area 159. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Australasia Australasia is a term variably used to describe a region of Oceania: Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Lionel Bart (1930-1999) was a British composer of songs musicals, best known for Oliver! Bart was born Lionel Begleiter in London to Galician Jews, and grew up in Stepney. ... Sir Carol Reed (30 December 1906 – 25 April 1976) was an English film director, winner of an Academy Award for his film version of the musical, Oliver! (1968). ...


It first appeared in the West End in 1960, and enjoyed a long run that launched the careers of several child actors, including Davy Jones, later of The Monkees, Phil Collins, later of Genesis, and Tony Robinson, later playing the role of Baldrick in the television series Black Adder. The rock star Steve Marriott (The Small Faces, Humble Pie) also featured in early line-ups, eventually graduating to the role of Dodger in the West End. West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... For other persons of the same name, see Davy Jones. ... The Monkees were a pop-rock quartet created and based in Los Angeles in 1965 for an NBC American television series of the same name. ... For other uses, see Phil Collins (disambiguation). ... Genesis is an English rock band formed in 1967. ... Tony Robinson (born 15 August 1946) is an English actor, broadcaster and political campaigner, known for playing the part of Baldrick in the BBC TV series Blackadder and for hosting a number of shows on Channel 4, the most noteworthy being Time Team. ... The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... Steve Marriott (30 January 1947 in Upton, East London, – 20 April 1991 in Arkesden, Essex. ... Small Faces were a British mod group formed in 1965[1] by Steve Marriott, Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones, and Jimmy Winston (who was soon replaced by Ian McLagan). ... For the hard rock band of the same name, see Humble Pie (band). ...


The musical is loosely based upon Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. That it was the first musical adaptation of a Dickens novel to become a stage hit was one of the reasons why it attracted such attention. There had been two previous Dickens musicals, both of them television adaptations of A Christmas Carol in the 1950s, but never a successful stage musical, and certainly never one of as dramatic a story as Oliver Twist. Another reason for its success was the revolving stage set, an innovation designed by Sean Kenny[1]. Oliver Twist (1838) is Charles Dickens second novel. ... Dickens redirects here. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas (commonly known as A Christmas Carol ) is what Charles Dickens described as his little Christmas Book and was first published on December 19, 1843 with illustrations by John Leech. ... 1932-1973 Born in Portroe, Tipperary Ireland film and stage production designer, architect Crossed the Atlantic with three others in an open Ketch, Ituna, Studied with Frank Lloyd Wright Oliver! (UK 1960) Charles Dickens Oliver Twist, double turntable set by designer Sean Kenny. ...


The original London production of Oliver! opened in the New Theatre (now the Noel Coward Theatre) on June 30, 1960. Among the original cast were Ron Moody as Fagin, Georgia Brown as Nancy, and Barry Humphries in a small comic role as Mr. Sowerberry, an undertaker. Keith Hamshere (the original Oliver) is now a Hollywood still photographer (Star Wars etc); Martin Horsey (the original Dodger) works as an actor/ director and is the author of the play "L'Chaim". New Theatre, postcard, circa 1905. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ronald Moodnick, known as Ron Moody (born January 8, 1924) is a British actor. ... An etching by George Cruikshank titled Fagin in the condemned Cell, November 1838. ... Cover of 2003 rerelease of two 1963 albums - Georgia Brown and Georgia Brown sings Gershwin. ... Nancy is the sympathetic lover of Bill Sykes in the novel Oliver Twist, in its film versions, and in the stage and film version of the musical Oliver!. She was corrupted at the age of six by Fagin, the seemingly lovable but heartless villain who persuades otherwise innocent youths to... John Barry Humphries, AO, CBE (born 17 February 1934 in Camberwell, Melbourne, Victoria) is an Australian comedian, satirist and character actor best known for his on-stage and television alter egos Dame Edna Everage, a Melbourne housewife, and Sir Les Patterson, Australias foul-mouthed cultural attaché to Britain. ...


In view of criticisms from some quarters about racial/ ethnic stereotyping, it is interesting to note that as well as being authored/ composed by a Jew, the first stage production of "Oliver!" featured many Jewish actors in leading roles: Ron Moody (Ronald Moodnik), Georgia Brown (Lilian Klot), & Martin Horsey.


The musical previewed in the U.S. with a 1962 national tour, and the first Broadway production opened in the Imperial Theatre on January 6, 1963[2]. In 1984 there was a short lived Broadway revival with Ron Moody reprising his role as Fagin and Patti LuPone as Nancy. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Imperial Theater can also refer to the Imperial Garden Theater in Tokyo, Japan The Imperial Theater was the Schubert brothers fiftieth theater in New York City. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Ronald Moodnick, known as Ron Moody (born January 8, 1924) is a British actor. ... Patti LuPone in her Tony Award winning role as Eva Perón in the Broadway musical Evita. ...


Dickens's original novel is considerably simplified for the purposes of the musical, with Fagin being represented more as a comic character than as a villain, and large portions of the latter part of the story being completely left out. An etching by George Cruikshank titled Fagin in the condemned Cell, November 1838. ...

Contents

Synopsis

Act I

The musical opens in the workhouse, as the half-starved orphan boys are entering the enormous lunchroom for dinner. ("Food Glorious Food") They are fed only gruel. Nine year old Oliver Twist gathers up the courage to ask for more. He is immediately apprehended and is told to gather his belongings by Mr Bumble and the Widow Corney, the heartless and greedy caretakers of the workhouse ("Oliver!"). Mr Bumble and Widow Corney start flirting during conversation. Mr Bumble goes too far in "I Shall Scream!". At the end, Widow Corney ends up on Mr Bumble's lap, kissing him. Oliver comes back and is promptly sold ("Boy for Sale") and apprenticed to an undertaker, Mr. Sowerberry. He and his wife taunt Oliver with the song "That's Your Funeral". He is sent to sleep in the basement with the coffins, something which makes him visibly uncomfortable. ("Where is Love?"). Former workhouse at Nantwich, dating from 1780 A workhouse was a place where people who were unable to support themselves could go to live and work. ... Gruel is a type of preparation consisting of some type of cereal boiled in water or milk. ... Mr Buble is a character in Charles Dickens Oliver Twist who we are introduced to very early on in both the play and the novel. ... Mr Buble is a character in Charles Dickens Oliver Twist who we are introduced to very early on in both the play and the novel. ... Mr Buble is a character in Charles Dickens Oliver Twist who we are introduced to very early on in both the play and the novel. ...


The next morning bully Noah Claypole, who oversees Oliver's work, badmouths Oliver's dead mother, whereupon Oliver begins pummeling him. Mr. Bumble is sent for, and he and the Sowerberrys lock Oliver in a coffin, but during all the commotion Oliver escapes form the grave site and runs away to London, where his father used to live. On his first day there, he meets the Artful Dodger, a boy wearing an oversize coat and a top hat. He and the company then welcome him with "Consider Yourself". Dodger is, unknown to Oliver, a boy pickpocket, and he invites Oliver to come and live in Fagin's lair. Fagin is a criminal, and he is in the business of teaching young boys to pick pockets. Oliver, however, is completely unaware of any criminality, and believes that the boys make handkerchiefs rather than steal them. Oliver is introduced to Fagin and all the other boy pickpockets, and is taught their ways in "You've got to Pick a Pocket or Two". The Artful Dodger is a character in the novel, Oliver Twist, by Charles Dickens. ... Pickpocketing is a crime, a form of larceny which involves the stealing of money and valuables off the person of a victim without them noticing. ... An etching by George Cruikshank titled Fagin in the condemned Cell, November 1838. ...


The next day, Oliver meets Nancy, the live-in girlfriend of the evil, terrifying Bill Sikes, a burglar whose abuse she endures because she loves him. Nancy and Oliver take an instant liking to each other, and Nancy shows motherly affection toward him. Bet, Nancy's younger sister (merely her best friend in the 1968 film and in Dickens' novel), is also with her. Nancy, along with Bet and the boys, sing about how they don't mind a bit of danger in "It's a Fine Life". Dodger humorously starts pretending to be an upper-class citizen, ("I'd Do Anything"), along with Fagin, Oliver, Nancy, Bet, and the boys mocking high society. Nancy and Bet leave and Oliver is sent out with the other boys on his first pickpocketing job ("Be Back Soon"), though he still believes that they are going to teach him how to make handkerchiefs. The Dodger, another boy pickpocket named Charley Bates, and Oliver decide to stick together, and when Dodger and Charley rob Mr. Brownlow, a wealthy old man, they run off, leaving the shocked Oliver, who now realizes that his new friends are pickpockets, to be blamed for looking guilty. Brownlow thinks that Oliver is the thief, but Oliver is cleared in court (offstage). Nancy is the sympathetic lover of Bill Sykes in the novel Oliver Twist, in its film versions, and in the stage and film version of the musical Oliver!. She was corrupted at the age of six by Fagin, the seemingly lovable but heartless villain who persuades otherwise innocent youths to... Bill Sykes is a fictional character in the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens He is one of Dickenss most menacing characters and a very strong force in the novel when it comes to having control over somebody or harming others. ... Burglary is a crime related to United States burglary is a felony and involves trespassing, or entering a building with intent to commit any crime, not necessarily a felony or theft. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charley Bates is a supporting character in the Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist. ... Oliver Twist is an 1838 novel by Charles Dickens. ...

photo: (left to right) Oliver Twist, Fagin and The Artful Dodger. A still taken for the 1968 film version.
photo: (left to right) Oliver Twist, Fagin and The Artful Dodger. A still taken for the 1968 film version.
Act II

To make up for his error, the wealthy Brownlow has taken Oliver to live with him, noticing something vaguely familiar about him. In the evening the bar is full of people having a good time and Nancy is called upon to sing an old tavern song ("Oom Pah Pah"). Bill Sikes enters and sings ("My Name"), and gets the crowd to leave. Dodger runs in and tells Fagin about Oliver being captured. Fagin and Bill decide that they have to kidnap Oliver to keep him from revealing their whereabouts and secrets. Nancy is asked to participate, but feeling sorry for the boy and wishing him to have a better life if he has the chance - refuses, until Bill slaps her around. She tries to convince herself that he really loves her and expresses her feeling for him in "As Long As He Needs Me". Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This is a song sung by the character of Nancy in the musical/movie Oliver!, first introduced in the 1960 musical. ...


Meanwhile the next morning, at Mr. Brownlow's house, Ms. Bedwin, the housekeeper, sings Oliver a reprise of "Where is Love?" and as he wakes up they take notice of the street vendors outside in the song "Who Will Buy?". Mr. Brownlow and Dr. Grimwig discuss Oliver's condition. They come to the conclusion that he is fine and that he can return some books to the bookseller for Mr. Brownlow. The Vendors continue to sing ("Who Will Buy") and at the very end, Nancy and Bill show up and grab Oliver. They bring him back to Fagin's, where Nancy saves Oliver from a beating from Sikes after the boy tries to flee but is stopped. Nancy angrily and remorsefully reviews what their "Fine Life" has come to in "It's A Fine Life (reprise)". When Sikes and Nancy leave, Fagin ponders his future in the humorous song "Reviewing the Situation", in which, every time he thinks of a good reason for going straight, he reconsiders and decides to remain a criminal.


Back at the workhouse, Mr. Bumble and the Widow Corney, now unhappily married, meet up with the dying pauper Old Sally and another old lady, who tell them of how Oliver's mother came to the workhouse to have her baby and gave her a gold locket after the birth, inferring she came from a rich family. The mother then died. Mr Bumble and Widow Corney, realizing that Oliver may have wealthy relatives, visit Mr. Brownlow in order to profit from any reward given out for information of him ("Oliver! (reprise)"). He throws them out, knowing that they have suppressed evidence until they could get a reward for it. Brownlow looks at the picture inside the locket, a picture of his friend's daughter, and realizes that Oliver, who knows nothing of his family history, is actually his grandson. (Oliver's mother had disappeared after having been left pregnant by her lover, who jilted her.)


Nancy, terrified for Oliver and feeling guilty, visits Brownlow and promises to deliver Oliver to him safely that night at midnight on London Bridge - if Brownlow does not bring the police or ask any questions. She then ponders again about Bill in "As Long As He Needs Me (reprise)". Bill suspects that Nancy is up to something. That night, he follows her as she sneaks Oliver out, although in the stage version it is never made clear how he knew exactly when to do this. At London Bridge, he confronts them, knocks Oliver temporarily unconscious, and brutally clubs Nancy to death (in some stagings of the show, he strangles her, but the musical's original libretto follows Dickens's original novel in having her beaten to death). He then grabs Oliver, who has since revived, and runs offstage with him, presumably back to the hideout to ask Fagin for getaway money. Mr. Brownlow, who had been late keeping the appointment, arrives and discovers Nancy's body. A large crowd soon forms, among them the distraught Bet. Bullseye, Bill's fierce terrier, returns to the scene of the crime and the crowd prepares to follow him to the hideout. After they exit Fagin and his boys, terrified at the idea of being apprehended, leave their hideout in panic. Not finding Bill at the hideout, the anxious crowd, now whipped up into a thirst for justice, returns to the Thames Embankment, when suddenly Bill appears at the top of the bridge, holding Oliver as hostage and threatening to kill him if the crowd tries to take him. Unseen by Bill, two policemen sneak up on him. One of them shoots Bill to death and the other grabs Oliver as Bill releases him. Oliver is then reunited with Mr. Brownlow. Victoria Embankment, London The Victoria Embankment, previously the Thames Embankment is a road and walkway along the north bank of the River Thames in London in the cities of Westminster and London. ...


After the crowd disperses, Fagin re-enters, making sure not to be seen by anyone, and sings a reprise of "Reviewing the Situation". All of the cast re-enter for curtain calls, singing a medley of "Food Glorious Food" and "Consider Yourself", and then the fourth wall of drama is broken, as the actors respectively playing the supposed-to-be dead Nancy and Sikes re-enter very much alive, and Oliver, joined by the rest of the cast, once more sings to Nancy "I'd Do Anything". The fourth wall is the imaginary invisible wall at the front of the stage in a proscenium theater, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. ...


Songs

  • Food Glorious Food
  • Oliver!
  • I Shall Scream
  • Boy for Sale
  • That's Your Funeral
  • Where is Love?
  • Consider Yourself
  • You've Got to Pick a Pocket or Two
  • It's a Fine Life
  • I'd Do Anything
  • Be Back Soon
  • Oom-Pah-Pah
  • My Name
  • As Long As He Needs Me
  • Where is love? (reprise)
  • Who Will Buy?
  • It's a Fine Life (reprise)
  • Reviewing the Situation
  • Oliver! (reprise)
  • As Long As He Needs Me (reprise)
  • Reviewing the Situation (reprise)
  • Finale

Food Glorious Food is the opening song from the musical and movie Oliver!. It is when the workhouse boys from the 1960s West End and Broadway musical and 1968 film adaptation are dreaming and fantasizing about food while going to collect their gruel from the staff of the workhouse. ... Oliver! is the title song from the 1960s original West End and Broadway musical Oliver! and the 1968 film of the same name. ... Where is Love? is a musical number from the Tony Award-winning musical Oliver!, based on the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. ... Consider Yourself is a song from the 1960s original West End and Broadway musical Oliver! and the 1968 film of the same name. ... This is a song sung by the character of Nancy in the musical/movie Oliver!, first introduced in the 1960 musical. ...

1994 revival

In 1994, Oliver! was revived for the London stage with some additional music and lyrics by Lionel Bart. It was directed by Sam Mendes, and featured Jonathan Pryce as Fagin, Sally Dexter as Nancy, James Villiers (Mr Brownlow) and Miles Anderson as Bill Sikes. Later on in the run of this production future pop stars Jon Lee (who would later rise to fame as a member of the successful pop group, "S Club 7") and Tom Fletcher (who would later become a member of "McFly") played the title role. Sam Mendes Samuel Alexander Mendes, CBE (born August 1, 1965) is an English stage and film director born in Reading, Berkshire, England. ... Jonathan Pryce (born June 1, 1947) is a Welsh film, television, and stage actor who has starred in such Hollywood films include Brazil, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tomorrow Never Dies and The New World. ... An etching by George Cruikshank titled Fagin in the condemned Cell, November 1838. ... Sally Dexter is a British actor best known for her role as Natalie Harper in Night and Day. ... Nancy is the sympathetic lover of Bill Sykes in the novel Oliver Twist, in its film versions, and in the stage and film version of the musical Oliver!. She was corrupted at the age of six by Fagin, the seemingly lovable but heartless villain who persuades otherwise innocent youths to... A British actor, formerly in Family Affairs, now appearing in ITVs Ultimate Force as Colonel Aiden Dempsey (Series 1-). He was awarded the 1982 London Critics Circle Drama Theatre Award for Best Supporting Actor of 1981 for his performances in The Twin Rivals and The Witch of Edmonton. He... Bill Sykes is a fictional character in the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens He is one of Dickenss most menacing characters and a very strong force in the novel when it comes to having control over somebody or harming others. ... Promotional image of Jon Lee Jon Lee (born Jonathan Lee, 26 April 1982-14 March 2007, Croydon, Surrey, England) was a member of the late 1990s pop band S Club 7 (later S Club), until they split in April 2003. ... Thomas Michael Fletcher (born 17 July 1985 at Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, London, England), commonly known as Tom Fletcher, is one of the lead vocalists and guitarists in the British pop band McFly, along with fellow band members Danny Jones, Dougie Poynter and Harry Judd. ...


Australian tour

The Australian tour was a successful trip through Sydney, Melbourne, and Singapore from 2002 - 2004. John Waters the actor, not to be confused with John Waters the director, portrayed Fagin, Tamsin Carroll was Nancy, and the production also featured Stuart Wagstaff, Steve Bastoni and Keegan Joyce in the title role. The role of Oliver was also rotated with Maddison Orr. The role of the Artful Dodger was shared between Matthew Waters and Tim Matthews, just 10 years old. Both of the children's casts earned good notices. This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lisa McCune as Maria, and John Waters as Captain von Trapp, in the Australian production of The Sound of Music (advertising flyer) John Russell Waters (born 8 December 1948, London, England) is a famous film, theatre and television actor, best known in Australia, where he moved to in 1968. ... John Waters (born April 22, 1946) is an American filmmaker, writer, personality, visual artist and art collector, who rose to fame in the early 1970s for his transgressive cult films. ... Tamsin’s theatre credits include Grease - The Arena Spectacular , Measure For Measure and The Listmaker for The Bell Shakespeare Company, Into The Woods for the Melbourne Theatre Company, A Little Night Music for IMG and MTC, as Tracy Lord in High Society for The Production Company, The Republic of Myopia... Stuart Wagstaff (born February 13, 1925 in Great Dunford, Wiltshire, England, UK) is an iconic Australian television and stage entertainer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Popular culture

  • In 1991 Series 14, episode 2 of Grange Hill parodied Oliver's "Please sir, I want some more" scene. Thin Alice Rowe (played by Alice Dawnay), her face dirtied, begged for more on her school dinner plate, as part of the stingy school dinner storyline.
  • In an episode of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, when Will is telling Ashley and her friends about the time he (or Wilber Simthsonian) started Bel-Air Prep, Will's cousin Cartlon and other students sing Consider Yourself to the new students.
  • As part of the Oliver! cast, Davy Jones appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show on the same night that the Beatles made their American TV debut.
  • The song Food, Glorious Food appears in Ice Age 2: The Meltdown.
  • There were many Consider Yourself Jokes made on Full House which appeared in several episodes
  • Hip Hop Artist Jay-Z samples the song "I'd Do Anything" in his song, "Anything".

Grange Hill is a British childrens television drama series which is shown on BBC One. ... The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air is an Emmy, BAFTA, and RTS-award winning popular American television sitcom that aired on NBC from September 10, 1990, to May 20, 1996. ... This article is about the TV show. ... Jay-Z (aka the Jigga, HOV and Hova, born Shawn Carter on December 4, 1970 in Brooklyn, New York) is an African American rapper/hip hop artist and record label executive; one of the most popular and successful rappers of the late 1990s and early 2000s. ...

References and notes

  1. ^ Sean Kenny described how he designed the set for the original stage production in an article ( "Designing Oliver" ) published in "The Strand Archive", 18, ii, 7, September 1960, pp 6 - 12 (http://www.strandarchive.co.uk/tabs/a_to_z.htm ): the article contains rare photographs of the set taken from Stalls right & Dress Circle/ left positions. The edition also contains interesting articles by the lighting engineer, John Wyckham ( pp 12 - 16 ), and by an audience member, K.R. Ackerman ( pp 17 - 18 )
  2. ^ Oliver! at the Internet Broadway Database First Broadway production

Internet Broadway Database The Internet Broadway Database (IBDb) is an online database of Broadway theatre productions and their personnel. ...

External links

Awards
Preceded by
No Strings
by Richard Rodgers
Tony Award for Best Composer and Lyricist
1963
by Lionel Bart
Succeeded by
Hello, Dolly!
by Jerry Herman

 
 

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