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Encyclopedia > Old Joseon
Gojoseon
Hangul: 고조선
Hanja: 古朝鮮
Revised Romanization: Go-Joseon
McCune-Reischauer: Ko-Josŏn

Gojoseon ("ancient" Joseon, to distinguish from the later Joseon Dynasty) was the first Korean kingdom. According to legend, it was founded in 2333 BC by Dangun in the basins of the Liao and Taedong Rivers, ruling over northern Korean peninsula and southern Manchuria until 108 BC. Hangul (hangul: 한글; revised: hangeul; McCune-Reischauer: hangŭl) is the native alphabet used to write the Korean language, as opposed to the Hanja system borrowed from China. ... Hanja (lit. ... The Revised Romanization of Korean is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea. ... McCune-Reischauer is one of the two most widely used Korean language romanization systems, along with the Revised Romanization of Korean, which replaced (a modified) McCune-Reischauer as the official romanization system in South Korea in 2000. ... The Joseon Dynasty (also Chosun, Hangul: 조선왕조, Hanja: 朝鮮王朝) was the final ruling dynasty of Korea, lasting from 1392 until 1910. ... (Redirected from 2333 BC) (25th century BC - 24th century BC - 23rd century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC -- Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period 2350 BC - End of the Early Dynastic IIIb Period in Mesopotamia 2334 - 2279 BC -- Sargon... Dangun is the mythical founder of Korea. ... The Liao He (Liao River) is the principal river in southern Manchuria. ... River Taedong is the river that runs across the Capital of North Korea, Pyongyang. ... The Korean Peninsula is a peninsula in East Asia. ... Extent of Manchuria according to Definition 1 (dark red), Definition 3 (dark red + medium red) and Definition 4 (dark red + medium red + light red) Manchuria (Manchu: Manju, Simplified Chinese: 满洲; Traditional Chinese: 滿洲; pinyin: ) is name given to a vast territorial region in northeast Asia. ... Centuries: 3rd century BCE - 2nd century BCE - 1st century BCE Decades: 150s BCE 140s BCE 130s BCE 120s BCE 110s BCE - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BCE 70s BCE 60s BCE 50s BCE Years: 113 BCE 112 BCE 111 BCE 110 BCE 109 BCE - 108 BCE - 107 BCE 106 BCE...


Historians generally refer to this entire period as Gojoseon, but some classify Gija Joseon and Wiman Joseon as separate periods. Gija Joseon (around 300 BC - 194 BC or 1126 BC - 194 BC) was an ancient kingdom that succeeded Go-Joseon. ... Wiman Joseon (194 BC - 108 BC) was the continuation of Go-Joseon, founded by Wiman. ...

Contents


Founding legend

History of Korea

Gojoseon
Samhan
Three Kingdoms :
 Goguryeo, Baekje, Silla
Unified Silla and Balhae
Later Three Kingdoms
Goryeo
Joseon
1900-1950
Divided Korea :
 N. Korea, S. Korea
This article is about the history of Korea. ... During the Samhan period, the three confederacies of Mahan, Jinhan, and Byeonhan dominated the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... The Three Kingdoms of Korea were Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. The Three Kingdoms period in Korea is usually considered to run from the 1st century BCE (overlapping with the Samhan period in southern Korea... Goguryeo (37 BC-668) was an empire in Manchuria and northern Korea. ... Baekje was a kingdom that existed in southwestern Korea from 18 BCE to 660 CE. In Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla, it is known as one of the Three Kingdoms. ... Silla (also denoted as Shilla) was one of the three kingdoms of ancient Korea. ... Unified Silla is the name often applied to the Korean kingdom of Silla after 668. ... Alternate meaning: Bohai Sea Bohai (Chinese) or Balhae (Korean) was a kingdom in northeast Asia from AD 698 to 926, occupying parts of Manchuria, northern Korea and the Russian Far East. ... The Later Three Kingdoms of Korea (892-936) consisted of Silla, Hubaekje (later Baekje), and Taebong (also known as Hugoguryeo, or Later Goguryeo). ... The Goryeo (also Koryo) kingdom ruled Korea from the fall of Silla in 935 until the founding of Joseon in 1392. ... The Joseon Dynasty (also Chosun, Hangul: 조선왕조, Hanja: 朝鮮王朝) was the final ruling dynasty of Korea, lasting from 1392 until 1910. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Korean peninsula, first divided along the 38th parallel, later along the demarcation line The division of Korea occured after the end of World War 2 through an agreement between the Soviet Union and the United States as a way of administering the country. ... History of North Korea: Following World War II, Korea, which had been a colonial possession of Japan since 1910, was occupied by the Soviet Union (in the north) and the United States (in the south). ... The History of South Korea traces the development of South Korea from the division of the Korean Peninsula in 1945 to the present day. ...

Dangun Wanggeom is the legendary founder of Korea. The oldest existing record of this founding myth appears in the Samguk Yusa, a 13th-century collection of legends and stories. A similar account is found in Jewang Ungi. Dangun is the mythical founder of Korea. ... Korea refers to South Korea and North Korea together, which were a unified country until 1948. ... Samguk Yusa, or Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, is a collection of legends, folktales, and historical accounts relating to the Three Kingdoms of Korea (Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla), as well as to other periods and states before, during, and after the Three Kingdoms period. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


Dangun's ancestry begins with his grandfather Hwanin (환인; 桓因;), the "Lord of Heaven" (a name which also appears in Indian Buddhist texts). Hwanin had a son Hwanung who yearned to live on the earth among the valleys and the mountains. Hwanin chose Mount Taebaek for his son to settle down in and sent him with 3,000 helpers to rule the earth and provide humans with great happiness. Hwanung descended to Mount Taebaek and founded a city, which he named Sinsi (신시; 神市), or "City of God." Along with his ministers of clouds, rain, and wind, he instituted laws and moral codes and taught the humans various arts, medicine, and agriculture. Hwanin in medieval Korean mythology is Indra, the ruler of heaven and earth in Buddhism. ... A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found from Sarnath, near Varanasi Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. Buddhism gradually spread from India...


A tiger and a bear living in a cave together prayed to Hwanung that they may become human. Upon hearing their prayers, Hwanung called them to him and gave them 20 cloves of garlic and a bundle of mugwort. He then ordered them to only eat this sacred food and remain out of the sunlight for 100 days. The tiger shortly gave up and left the cave. However, the bear remained and after 21 days was transformed into a woman. Binomial name Artemisa vulgaris L. Mugwort or Common Wormwood (Artemisia vulgaris) is a species from the daisy family Asteraceae. ...


The bear-woman (Ungnyeo; 웅녀; 熊女) was very grateful and made offerings to Hwanung. She lacked a husband, however, and soon became sad and prayed beneath a sandalwood tree to be blessed with a child. Hwanung, moved by her prayers, took her for his wife and soon she gave birth to a son, who was named Dangun Wanggeom (단군 왕검; 檀君王儉). The branches of a young sandalwood tree found in Hawaii Sandalwood is the wood of trees of the genus Santalum. ...


Dangun ascended to the throne in the 50th year of the reign of the Emperor Yao (the legendary Chinese sage Yao), the year of Gengyin, built the walled city of P'yŏngyang, and called the kingdom Joseon. He then moved his capital to Asadal on Mount Baegak (or Mount Gunghol). 1,500 years later, in the year Kimyo, King Wu of the Zhou Dynasty enfeoffed Jizi to Joseon, and Dangun moved his capital to Jangdangyeong. Finally, he returned to Asadal and became a mountain god at the age of 1,908. The Three August Ones and Five Emperors (Chinese: 三皇五帝; pinyin: sānhuáng wǔdì, Wade-Giles: san-huang wu-ti) were mythological rulers of China during the period preceding the Xia dynasty from 2500 BC to 2205 BC. The Three August Ones The Three August Ones, sometimes known as the Three Sovereigns... The Three August Ones and Five Emperors (Chinese: 三皇五帝; pinyin: sānhuáng wǔdì, Wade-Giles: san-huang wu-ti) were mythological rulers of China during the period preceding the Xia dynasty from 2500 BC to 2205 BC. The Three August Ones The Three August Ones, sometimes known as the Three Sovereigns... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar formed by combining a purely lunar calendar with a solar calendar. ... Pyŏngyang (평양 / 平壤) is the capital city of North Korea, located in the northwest of the country, situated on the Taedong River. ... Go-Joseon, or Old Korea (2333 - 206 BC), was the first Korean kingdom. ... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar formed by combining a purely lunar calendar with a solar calendar. ... King Wu was a posthumous title often given to the king who won martial glory. ... The Zhou Dynasty (周朝; Wade-Giles: Chou Dynasty (also Chow or Jou)) (late 10th century BC or 9th century BC to 256 BC) followed the Shang (Yin) Dynasty and preceded the Qin Dynasty in China. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... Jizi (Gija in Korean) or Viscount of Ji was a semi-legendary Chinese sage who is said to have ruled Korea in the 9th century BC. His family name was Zi (子) and given name was Xuyu (胥餘/서여 xūyú/seoyeo, or 須臾/수유 xūyú/suyu). ...


History

Gojoseon is said to have been established in 2333 BC, based on the description of the Dongguk Tonggam (1485), but the date differs among historical sources; nevertheless, all of them put it during Yao's reign (traditional dates: 2357 BC-2256 BC). Samguk Yusa says Dangun ascended to the throne in the 50th year of Yao's reign, while Sejong Sillok says the first year and Dongguk Tonggam says the 25th year. (Redirected from 2333 BC) (25th century BC - 24th century BC - 23rd century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC -- Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period 2350 BC - End of the Early Dynastic IIIb Period in Mesopotamia 2334 - 2279 BC -- Sargon... The Dongguk Tonggam is a chronicle of early Korean history, compiled under the reign of Seongjong of Joseon, in the 15th century. ... // Events August 5-7 - First outbreak of sweating sickness in England begins August 22 - Battle of Bosworth Field is fought between the armies of King Richard III of England and rival claimant to the throne of England Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. ... Samguk Yusa, or Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, is a collection of legends, folktales, and historical accounts relating to the Three Kingdoms of Korea (Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla), as well as to other periods and states before, during, and after the Three Kingdoms period. ...


The people of Gojoseon are called in Chinese records Dong-i, "eastern bowmen," belonging to the Tungusic family and linguistically affiliated with the Altaic. They propagated in Manchuria, far eastern China, north of the Yangtze River, and the Korean Peninsula. Gojoseon eventually consolidated in Manchuria and the Korean Peninsula, and was praised by Confucius and Mencius for the decorum of its people. However, it was called arrogant and cruel by the Yan. Confucius (traditionally September 28 551 BCE–479 BCE) was a famous thinker and social philosopher of China, whose teachings have deeply influenced East Asia for centuries. ... Mencius (most accepted dates: 372 BC – 289 BC; other possible dates: 385 BC – 303 BC or 302 BC) was born in the State of Zou (鄒國), now forming the territory of the county-level city of Zoucheng (邹城市), Shandong province, only 30 km (18 miles) south of Qufu, the town of Confucius. ... Dave Reid is the most beautiful man on Earth. ...


The Bronze Age began around 2500 - 1000 BC. Rice, red beans, soybeans and millet were cultivated, and rectangular huts and increasingly larger dolmen burial sites are found throughout the peninsula. [1] Around 2000 BC, a new pottery culture is evidenced, with painted designs, in Manchuria and northern Korea. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... T shaped Hunebed D27 in Borger-Odoorn, Netherlands, recent. ...


Bronze daggers, and mirrors have been excavated from the Korean bronze age. Bronze was employed as weaponry and helped in the conquest of Neolithic communities. Archeological evidence of walled-town states are found from this time.


Gija, a subject of the Yan state, entered Gojoseon and introduced the culture of Yin around the 11th century BC Gojoseon clashed with the Zhou during China's Warring States Period (475-221 BC), and lost the territories west of the Liao River to the Yan people in the third century BC. By this time, iron culture was developing and the warring states pushed the refugees eastward. Gija Joseon (around 300 BC - 194 BC or 1126 BC - 194 BC) was an ancient kingdom that succeeded Go-Joseon. ... Dave Reid is the most beautiful man on Earth. ... Zhou refers to Zhou Dynasty (1122 BC - 256 BC) Zhou Dynasty (690 AD - 705 AD) Zhou (political division) — Zhou is the name of a type of political division of China. ... Alternative meaning: Warring States Period (Japan) The Warring States Period (traditional Chinese: 戰國時代, simplified Chinese: 战国时代 pinyin Zhànguó Shídài) takes place from sometime in the 5th century BC to the unification of China by Qin in 221 BC. It is nominally considered to be the second part of the... Dave Reid is the most beautiful man on Earth. ...


Around this time, Jin-guk existed in the southern part of the Korean peninsula. Very little is known about this state, except it was the apparent predecessor to the Samhan confederacies. Jin was an early Iron Age state which occupied some portion of the southern Korean peninsula during the 2nd and 3rd centuries BCE, at the time when Wiman Joseon occupied the peninsula’s northern half. ... During the Samhan period, the three confederacies of Mahan, Jinhan, and Byeonhan dominated the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ...


Among the Yan refugees, Wiman entered the service of Gojoseon as military commander with a base on the Amnokgang river. He usurped control from King Jun in 194 BC. Dave Reid is the most beautiful man on Earth. ... Wiman Joseon (194 BC - 108 BC) was the continuation of Go-Joseon, founded by Wiman. ... The Yalu (Amnok) River is a river on the border between China and North Korea. ...


In 109 BC, the Han emperor Wuti began a massive invasion of Gojoseon near the Liao River. Gojoseon fell after over a year of war, and four Chinese commanderies were set up in southern Manchuria and the northern part of the Korean Peninsula: Lelang (樂浪) (Korean: Nangnang), Xuantu (玄菟) (Hyeondo), Zhenfan (真番) (Jinbeon), and Lintun (臨屯) (Imdun). Han can refer to: Han Chinese, the dominant majority ethnic group of mainland China The Chinese written language (漢文) The Han Dynasty (202 BCE - 220 CE) of China The state of Han, a state during the Chinese Warring States Period Han, one of the Chinese Sixteen Kingdoms, founded by the... Lelang (樂浪郡 le4 lang4 jun4) was one of the Chinese commanderies which was kept in the Korean Peninsula over 400 years until Goguryeo conquers it in 313 A.D. History In 108 B.C. Emperor Wu of the Han Dynasty conquered the area under Youqu (右渠), a grandson of Wei...


Numerous small states and confederations arose from the remnants of Gojoseon. Three of the commanderies fell quickly to the Koreans of Samhan, and the last, Lolang (Korean: Nangnang) was destroyed by Goguryeo in 313. During the Samhan period, the three confederacies of Mahan, Jinhan, and Byeonhan dominated the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... Goguryeo (37 BC-668) was an empire in Manchuria and northern Korea. ...


Annals of Danguns

Hwandan-gogi is a controversial text said to detail ancient Korean history, but its authenticity has been widely questioned. It appears to be partly based on other known "alternative history" texts. The Annals of the Danguns are recorded in Gyuwon Sahwa (1675), which is described by its author as a nationalistic, rather than mainstream, history. Events January 5 - The Battle of Turckeim June 18 - Battle of Fehrbellin August 10 - King Charles II of England places the foundation stone of the Royal Greenwich Observatory in London - construction begins November 11 - Guru Gobind Singh becomes the Tenth Guru of the Sikhs. ...

  1. Dangun Wanggeom BC 2333-BC 2240
  2. Dangun Buru BC 2240-BC 2182
  3. Dangun Garuk BC 2182-BC 2137
  4. Dangun Osagu BC 2137-BC 2099
  5. Dangun Gueul BC 2099-BC 2083
  6. Dangun Dalmun BC 2083-BC 2047
  7. Dangun Hanyul BC 2047-BC 1993
  8. Dangun Useohan BC 1993-BC 1985
  9. Dangun Asul BC 1985-BC 1950
  10. Dangun Noeul BC 1950-BC 1891
  11. Dangun Dohae BC 1891-BC 1834
  12. Dangun Ahan BC 1834-BC 1782
  13. Dangun Holdal (a.k.a. Daeumdal) BC 1782-BC 1721
  14. Dangun Gobul BC 1721-BC 1661
  15. Dangun Daeum (a.k.a. Huhuldal) BC 1661-BC 1610
  16. Dangun Wina BC 1610-BC 1552
  17. Dangun Yeoul BC 1552-BC 1484
  18. Dangun Dongum BC 1484-BC 1435
  19. Dangun Gumoso BC 1435-BC 1380
  20. Dangun Sotae BC 1337-BC 1285
  21. Dangun Saekbullu BC 1285-BC 1237
  22. Dangun Aheul BC 1237-BC 1161
  23. Dangun Solna BC 1150-BC 1062
  24. Dangun Churo BC 1062-BC 997
  25. Dangun Dumil BC 997-BC 971
  26. Dangun Haemo BC 971-BC 943
  27. Dangun Mahyu BC 943-BC 909
  28. Dangun Naehyu BC 909-BC 874
  29. Dangun Deungol BC 874-BC 849
  30. Dangun Chumil BC 849-BC 819
  31. Dangun Gammul BC 819-BC 795
  32. Dangun Orumun BC 795-BC 772
  33. Dangun Sabeol BC 772-BC 704
  34. Dangun Maeruk BC 704-BC 646
  35. Dangun Mamul BC 646-BC 590
  36. Dangun Damul BC 590-BC 545
  37. Dangun Duhol BC 545-BC 509
  38. Dangun Daleum BC 509-BC 491
  39. Dangun Umcha BC 491-BC 471
  40. Dangun Uleuji BC 471-BC 461
  41. Dangun Mulli BC 461-BC 425
  42. Dangun Gumul BC 425-BC 396
  43. Dangun Yeoru BC 396-BC 341
  44. Dangun Boeul BC 341-BC 295
  45. Dangun Goyeolga BC 295-BC 237

See also

  • List of Korea-related topics
  • History of Korea

  Results from FactBites:
 
Korea - definition of Korea - Labor Law Talk Dictionary (3008 words)
The Joseon era also presided over progress in traditional arts and crafts, such as white glazed celadons, better silk and better paper, beatiful fans and clothes, and the completion of the Korean alphabet, hangul.
In 1392 a Goryeo general, Yi Seong-gye, overthrew the Goryeo king in a coup d'état and established a new dynasty: the Joseon Dynasty.
In 1895, Queen Min of Joseon, the last empress of Korea, was killed by a group of assassins that are believed to have been under the command of the Japanese minster to Korea, Miura Goro.
Korea - Free Encyclopedia (1638 words)
(According to the Dangun myth, "Old Joseon" was the first Korean state.) In the 660s, the kingdoms of Baekje and Goguryeo came under the control of Silla, and Korea was called "Silla" (or Unified Silla by modern historians) from then until the 10th century.
The Joseon Dynasty moved the capital to Hanseong (formerly Hanyang; modern-day Seoul) in 1394 and adopted Confucianism as the country's official religion, resulting in much loss of power and wealth by the Buddhists.
Joseon (as Korea was called during the Joseon Dynasty) suffered invasions by Japan (1592 to 1598).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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