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Encyclopedia > Old Brass Spittoon
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The Old Brass Spittoon is presented to the winner of the Indiana-Michigan State football game. First presented in 1950, it was Michigan State's idea to start up the trophy and Indiana quickly accepted. It's believed that the spittoon has been around since both universities were established. [1]


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Old Capitol Museum Artifacts: Spittoons (92 words)
There are several types of spittoons throughout the museum.
Spittoons were provided so that people who chewed tobacco could spit out the toxic tobacco juice in a somewhat civilized manner.
Left: A brass spittoon in the Territorial Library
Spittoon - definition of Spittoon in Encyclopedia (751 words)
While it was still not unusual to see spittoons in some public places in parts the US as late as the 1930s, vast numbers of old brass spittoons met their ends in the scrap drives of World War II.
The spittoons used in China were typically made of white porcelain, sometimes with traditional Chinese art painted onto the exterior.
Spittoons were used even during official functions by the political leaders of China; this eventually became a source of ridicule by the mass medias outside the Communist state.
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