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Encyclopedia > Old Bailey
The Old Bailey.
An Old Bailey trial circa 1808.
An Old Bailey trial circa 1808.
South Block, Old Bailey.
South Block, Old Bailey.

For other uses, see The Old Bailey (disambiguation). Download high resolution version (523x900, 126 KB)Old Bailey, London, from NW, photo by Nevilley 14/6/04 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (523x900, 126 KB)Old Bailey, London, from NW, photo by Nevilley 14/6/04 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (828x626, 120 KB) A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (828x626, 120 KB) A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... South Block, Old Bailey (1970-1972). ... South Block, Old Bailey (1970-1972). ... The Old Bailey may refer to the following: The Old Bailey, The Central Criminal Court in London, England. ...


The Central Criminal Court in England, commonly known as the Old Bailey (a bailey being part of a castle), is a Crown Court centre (higher criminal court) in central London, dealing with major criminal cases in Greater London and, exceptionally, in other parts of England. It stands on the site of the medieval Newgate Gaol, in the street also called Old Bailey which is situated between Holborn circus and St Paul's Cathedral. Pierrefonds Castle, France. ... Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... Central London is a much-used but unofficial and vaguely defined term for the most inner part of London, the capital of England. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2007 estimate 50... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Old Newgate Prison, which was replaced in the 18th century. ... Holborn (pronounced ho-bun or ho-burn) is a place in London, named after a tributary to the river Fleet that flowed through the area, the Hole-bourne (the stream in the hollow). ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ...

Contents

The building and its history

The original mediaeval court was located on the western wall of the City of London, but was destroyed in the 1666 Fire of London. It was rebuilt in 1674, with the court open to the weather to prevent the spread of disease. In 1734 it was refronted, enclosing the court and reducing the influence of spectators: this led to outbreaks of typhus, notably in 1750 when sixty people died, including the Lord Mayor and two judges. It was rebuilt again in 1774 and a second courtroom was added in 1824. In 1834 it was renamed as the Central Criminal Court and its jurisdiction extended.[1] The Great Fire of London was a major fire that swept through the City of London from September 2nd to September 5th, 1666, and resulted more or less in the destruction of the city. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Epidemic typhus. ...


The present building dates from 1907 (officially opened on 27 February 1907) and was designed by E.W. Mountford. Above the main entrance is inscribed "Defend the Children of the Poor & Punish the Wrongdoer". King Edward VII personally opened the courthouse. February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth realms, and the Emperor of India. ...


On the dome above the court is to be found the statue of Lady Justice, a woman holding in her right hand a sword standing for the power to punish, and in her left hand a balance standing for equity. Lady Justice Lady Justice (Justitia, the Roman Goddess of Justice and sometimes, simply Justice) is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system. ...


During the Blitz, the Old Bailey was bombed and severely damaged, but subsequent reconstruction work restored most of it in the early 1950s. In 1952 the restored interior of the Grand Hall of the Central Criminal Courts was once again open. Heinkel He 111 German bomber over the Surrey Docks, Southwark, London (German propaganda photomontage). ... This does not cite any references or sources. ...


From 1968 to 1972 a new South Block, designed by the architects Donald McMorran and George Whitby, was built containing more modern courts. Donald Hanks McMorran (3 March 1904 - 6 August 1965) was an English architect who is known today for his sensitive continuation of the neo-Georgian and classical tradition in the period after the Second World War. ...


The Old Bailey celebrated its 100th Birthday on 27 February 2007 with a Reception attended by Queen Elizabeth II.[2] February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Judges

All judges sitting in the Old Bailey are addressed as "My Lord" or "My Lady" whether they be High Court, circuit judges or Recorders. The Lord Mayor of London and aldermen of the City of London are entitled to sit on the judges' bench during a hearing but do not actively participate in trials. Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of Judicature of England and Wales (which under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, is to be known as the... Current Lord Mayor of London John Stuttard during the parade on November 11th, 2006 Michael Berry Savory, Previous Lord Mayor (2004–2005) The Right Honourable Lord Mayor of London is the Mayor of the City of London and head of the Corporation of London. ... An alderman is a member of a municipal assembly or council in many jurisdictions. ... The City of London is a geographically-small city within Greater London, England. ...


The most senior permanent judge of the Central Criminal Court has the title of the Recorder of London, and his deputy has the title of Common Serjeant of London. The present Recorder of London is His Honour Judge Peter Beaumont QC, who was appointed in December 2004 following the death earlier that year of his predecessor, His Honour Judge Michael Hyam. The present Common Serjeant is His Honour Judge Brian Barker QC. The position of Recorder of London should not be confused with that of Recorder, which is the name given to lawyers who sit part-time as Crown Court judges. A select number of the most senior criminal lawyers in the country sit at as Recorders in the Central Criminal Court. Cherie Booth QC wearing her ceremonial robes (including full-bottomed wig) as Queens Counsel at the Bar of England and Wales. ...


Sir John Mortimer, a criminal barrister, often appeared at the Old Bailey. His courtroom experiences led him to create the fictional character Horace Rumpole, alias Rumpole of the Bailey. Sir John Clifford Mortimer QC (born 21 April 1923) is an English barrister turned prolific writer and dramatist. ... // Artists impression of an English barrister A barrister is a lawyer found in many common law jurisdictions which employ a split profession (as opposed to a fused profession) in relation to legal representation. ... Rumpole of the Bailey is a television series created and written by British writer John Mortimer, QC and starring Leo McKern as Horace Rumpole, an aging London barrister who defends any and all clients. ... Rumpole of the Bailey is a British television series created and written by British writer and barrister Sir John Mortimer, QC and starring Leo McKern as Horace Rumpole, an aging London barrister who defends any and all clients. ...


In popular culture

A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a historical novel by Charles Dickens. ... Dickens redirects here. ... This article is about the comic book series. ... V for Vendetta is a 2006 action-thriller film set in London, England in a near-future dystopian society. ... Rumpole of the Bailey is a British television series created and written by British writer and barrister Sir John Mortimer, QC and starring Leo McKern as Horace Rumpole, an aging London barrister who defends any and all clients. ...

See also

Wikibooks
Wikibooks has a book on the topic of

Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system: England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland another. ... The main entrance The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a building in London, which houses the Court of Appeal and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... Bow Street Magistrates Court has been the most famous magistrates court in England for much of its existence. ... Horseferry Road Magistrates Court in Westminster, London, is one of the three magistrates courts of the central region of Great London. ... Elizabeth Brownrigg (1720-1767) was an eighteenth century murderer. ...

External links

Coordinates: 51°30′57″N, 0°6′7″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Old Bailey (2200 words)
The gravest offences are usually tried in the Old Court on the Wednesday or Thursday after the commencement of the session, on which days one or two of the judges from Westminster sit at the Old Bailey.
A visitor at the Old Bailey, to whom the courts of Westminster or Guildhall are familiar, will probably be very much struck with the difference between the manner in which the Nisi Prius and the criminal barristers are treated by the officials of their respective Courts.
On the occasion of our last visit to the Old Bailey, during the trial of Jeffrey for the murder of his son, we happened to witness a dispute between an insolent policeman, stationed at the bar-entrance, and a young barrister in robes, who was evidently not an habitue [frequenter] of that court.
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