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Encyclopedia > Olaf II of Norway
Saint Olaf of Norway

A medieval representation of Olav
King and Martyr
Born 995
Died July 29, 1030
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church, Lutheran Church
Canonized 1164 by Alexander III
Major shrine Trondheim
Feast July 29
Attributes crown, axe, dragon
Patronage carvers; difficult marriage; kings; Norway
Saints Portal

Olaf II Haraldsson (995July 29, 1030), king from 10151028, (known during his lifetime as the Stout or Thick (Olav Digre) and after his canonization as Saint Olaf), was born in the year in which Olaf Tryggvason came to Norway. His mother was Åsta Gudbrandsdatter, and his father was Harald Grenske, great-grandchild of Harald I Fairhair. In modern day Norway he is known as Olav den Hellige or Olaf the Holy as a result of his sainthood. Image File history File links Saint Olaf in Överselö kyrka Originally uploaded at svwiki as sv:Bild:Olof Overselo. ... Events (Erik Segersäll) is succeeded by (Olof Skötkonung), the first baptized ruler of Sweden. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July 29 - Battle of Stiklestad in Norway. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Icon of St. ... Alexander III, né Orlando Bandinelli (c. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... County District Municipality NO-1601 Administrative centre Trondheim Mayor (2003-) Rita Ottervik (AP) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 258 342 km² 322 km² 0. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Carver can refer to any of the following: Bob Carver, American physicist and audio equipment designer George Washington Carver (1864-1943), American botanist and inventor Jeffrey Carver (b. ... Armenian king Tigranes the Great. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Events (Erik Segersäll) is succeeded by (Olof Skötkonung), the first baptized ruler of Sweden. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July 29 - Battle of Stiklestad in Norway. ... Events August: Canute the Great invades England. ... Events November 12 - Dying Emperor Constantine VIII of the Byzantine Empire marries his daughter Zoe of Byzantium to his chosen heir Romanus Argyrus. ... Icon of St. ... Olaf Tryggvason (Old Norse: Óláfr Tryggvason, Norwegian: Olav Tryggvason), (960s - September 9? 1000), was King of Norway from 995 to 1000. ... Ã…sta Gudbrandsdatter (born circa 975/980, died circa 1020/1030) was the mother, from her marriage to Harald Grenske, of Norwegian king Olaf II, renowned as Olaf the Holy (995-1030, reigned 1015 to 1028). ... Harald Grenske (10th century) was the son of Gudrød Bjørnsson. ... Harald Fairhair or Harald Finehair (Old Norse:Haraldr hinn hárfagri, Icelandic:Haraldur hinn hárfagri, Norwegian:Harald HÃ¥rfagre) (c. ...

Contents

Concerning the king's name

King Olaf II Haraldsson of Norway had the given name Óláfr in Old Norse. Olav is the modern equivalent in Norwegian, formerly often spelt Olaf. His name in Icelandic is Ólafur, in Danish Oluf, in Swedish Olof. Other names, such as Oláfr hinn helgi, Olavus rex, and Olaf (as used in English) are used interchangeably (see the Heimskringla of Snorri Sturluson). He is sometimes referred to as Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae, eternal King of Norway, a designation which goes back to the thirteenth century. The term Ola Nordmann as ephithet of the archetypal Norwegian may originate in this tradition, as the name Olav for centuries was the most common male name in Norway. Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... Heimskringla is the Old Norse name of a collection of sagas recorded in Iceland around 1225 by the poet and historian Snorri Sturluson (1179-1242). ... Snorri Sturluson (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae (from Latin, Eternal King of Norway) is an honorific title that was given to King Olaf II of Norway (Saint Olaf) in 1163. ... Ola Nordmann is a national personification of Norway, much like Uncle Sam in the US, Britannia of UK. Ola Nordmann is often used by people and media to personify a typical norwegian citizen. ...


Reign

Norway during the reign of St. Olaf (1015–1028) showing areas under the control of hereditary chieftains (petty kingdoms).
Norway during the reign of St. Olaf (10151028) showing areas under the control of hereditary chieftains (petty kingdoms).

After some years' absence in England, fighting the Danes, he returned to Norway in 1015 and declared himself king, obtaining the support of the five petty kings of the Uplands. In 1016 he defeated Earl Sweyn, hitherto the virtual ruler of Norway, at the Battle of Nesjar, and within a few years had won more power than had been enjoyed by any of his predecessors on the throne. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1134x2002, 390 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: History of Norway Harald I of Norway Olaf II of Norway Counties of Norway ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1134x2002, 390 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: History of Norway Harald I of Norway Olaf II of Norway Counties of Norway ... Events August: Canute the Great invades England. ... Events November 12 - Dying Emperor Constantine VIII of the Byzantine Empire marries his daughter Zoe of Byzantium to his chosen heir Romanus Argyrus. ... A petty kingdom is an independent realm recognizing no suzerain and controlling only a portion of the territory held by a particular ethnic group or nation. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... Events August: Canute the Great invades England. ... Petty kingdoms were prominent before the formation of many of todays nation states. ... George Tsul, ruler of Khazaria, is captured by a combined Byzantine-Rus force, which effectively ends Khazarias existence. ... After the Battle of Svolder, Sveinn ruled the area marked yellow on the map. ... The Battle of Nesjar was a sea battle off the coast of Norway in 1016. ...


He had annihilated the petty kings of the South, had crushed the aristocracy, enforced the acceptance of Christianity throughout the kingdom, asserted his suzerainty in the Orkney Islands, conducted a successful raid on Denmark, achieved peace with king Olof Skötkonung of Sweden through Þorgnýr the Lawspeaker, and was for some time, engaged to his daughter, the Princess of Sweden, Ingegerd Olofsdotter without his approval. After the end of her engagement to Olaf, Ingegerd married the Great Prince Yaroslav I of Kiev. Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... The Orkney Islands, usually called simply Orkney, are one of the 32 council areas of Scotland. ... Coin minted for Olof Skötkonung in Sigtuna Olof of Sweden or Olof Skötkonung/Skottkonung (Old Icelandic: Óláfr sænski, Old Swedish: Olawær skotkonongær) was the son of Eric the Victorious and Sigrid the Haughty. ... Þorgnýr the Lawspeaker (Old Icelandic: Þorgnýr lögmaðr, Swedish: Torgny Lagman) is the name of one of at least three generations of lawspeakers by the name Þorgnýr. ... Ingegerd Olofsdotter, born 1001 in Sigtuna, Sweden, was the daughter of Swedish King Olof Skötkonung. ... Yaroslav I the Wise (978?-1054) (Russian: Ярослав, Christian name: Yury, or George) was thrice prince of Novgorod and Kiev, uniting the two principalities for a time under his rule. ...


In 1019 Olaf married the illegitimate daughter of King Olof of Sweden and half-sister of his former bride, Astrid. They had an only daughter, Wulfhild, who married in 1042 to the Duke Ordulf of Saxony. Events Toi invasion: Jurchen pirates invade Kyushu. ... Events April 18/April 19 - Emperor Michael V of the Byzantine Empire attempts to remain sole Emperor by sending his adoptive mother and co-ruler Zoe of Byzantium to a monastery. ... Fought along with his brother-in-law, Magnus I of Norway, against the Wends. ...


But Olav's success was short-lived, for in 1026, he lost the Battle of the Helgeå and in 1029 the Norwegian nobles, seething with discontent, rallied round the invading Knut the Great, and Olaf had to flee to Kievan Rus. During the voyage he stayed some time in Sweden in the province of Nerike where, according to local legend, he baptized many locals. On his return a year later, seizing an opportunity to win back the kingdom after Knut the Great's vassal and governor of Norway, Håkon Jarl, was lost at sea, he fell at the Battle of Stiklestad, where some of his own subjects from middle Norway were arrayed against him. Events Archbishop Ariberto crowns Conrad II King of Italy in Milan. ... Combatants Denmark Sweden and Norway Commanders Canute the Great Anund Jacob and Olaf the Stout The naval Battle of the HelgeÃ¥ took place in 1026, between Denmark and the other Scandinavians, at the estuary of a river called HelgeÃ¥. Opinions are divided on whether it was the HelgeÃ¥ of Uppland... Events Births July 2 - Caliph Al-Mustansir of Cairo (d. ... Canute (or Cnut) I, or Canute the Great (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Danish: Knud den Store, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den store) (ca. ... Kievan Rus′ (Ки́евская Ру́сь, Kievskaya Rus in Russian; Київська Русь, Kyivs’ka Rus’ in Ukrainian) was the early, mostly East Slavic¹ state dominated by the... Nericia, also known as Nerike or Närke, is a Province in middle Sweden, which historically formed part of Svealand. ... Events July 29 - Battle of Stiklestad in Norway. ... HÃ¥kon Eiriksson, earl of Lade (Trøndelag). ... The Battle of Stiklestad (Old Norse Stiklarstaðir) in 1030 is one of the most famous battles in the history of Norway. ...


Olav, a rather stubborn and rash ruler, prone to rough treatment of his enemies, ironically became Norway's patron saint. His canonization was performed only a year after his death by the bishop of Nidaros. The cult of Olav not only unified the country, it also fulfilled the conversion of the nation, something for which the king had fought so hard.


While divisive in life, in death Olav wielded a unifying power no foreign monarch could hope to undo.


Canute, most distracted by the task of administrating England, managed to rule Norway for 5 years after the Battle of Stiklestad, through the viceroyship of his son Svein. However, when Olav's illegitimate son Magnus (dubbed 'the Good') lay claim to the Norwegian throne, Canute had to yield. Thus, a century of prosperity and expansion followed, lasting until the kingdom again descended into a civil war over succession. The Battle of Stiklestad (Old Norse Stiklarstaðir) in 1030 is one of the most famous battles in the history of Norway. ...


Sainthood

Owing to Olaf's later status as the patron saint of Norway, and to his importance in later medieval historiography and in Norwegian folklore, it is difficult to assess the character of the historical Olaf. Judging from the bare outlines of known historical facts, he appears, more than anything else, as a fairly unsuccessful ruler, who had his power based on some sort of alliance with the much more powerful king Knut the Great; who was driven into exile when he claimed a power of his own; and whose attempt at a reconquest was swiftly crushed. Canute (or Cnut) I, or Canute the Great (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Danish: Knud den Store, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den store) (ca. ...

Illustration in wrought-iron of Olav's life on the door of a Stave church in Hardemo, Nerike, where Olav baptized locals during his escape
Illustration in wrought-iron of Olav's life on the door of a Stave church in Hardemo, Nerike, where Olav baptized locals during his escape

This calls for an explanation of the status he gained after his death. Three factors are important: his role in the Christianization of Norway, the various dynastic relationships among the ruling families, and the needs for legitimization in a later period. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (803x985, 122 KB) Illustration in wrought-iron of Olavs life on the door of Saint Olavs Chapel, in Hardemo (Kumla Municipality), Närke, where Olav baptized locals during his escape Uploaded on English Wikipedia by its photographer User:Wiglaf, July... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (803x985, 122 KB) Illustration in wrought-iron of Olavs life on the door of Saint Olavs Chapel, in Hardemo (Kumla Municipality), Närke, where Olav baptized locals during his escape Uploaded on English Wikipedia by its photographer User:Wiglaf, July... Urnes stave church in Luster, Norway, listed as a world heritage site by UNESCO A stave church is a medieval wooden church with a post and beam construction related to timber framing. ... Hardemo Hundred, or Hardemo härad, was a hundred of Nericia in Sweden. ... Nericia, also Nerike or Närke, is a historical Province or landskap in middle Sweden. ...


Christianisation

Olaf is generally held to be the driving force behind Norway's final conversion to Christianity.[citation needed] This is an exaggeration.[citation needed] Large stone crosses and other Christian symbols suggest that at least the coastal areas of Norway were deeply influenced by Christianity long before Olav's time; with one exception, all the rulers of Norway back to Håkon the Good (c. 920961) had been Christians; and Olav's main opponent, Knut the Great, was a Christian ruler. What seems clear is that Olav made efforts to establish a church organization on a broader scale than before, among other things by importing bishops from England and Germany, and that he tried to enforce Christianity also in the inland areas, which had the least communication with the rest of Europe, and which economically were more strongly based on agriculture, so that the inclination to hold on to the former fertility cult would have been stronger than in the more diversified and expansive western parts of the country. Haakon I (ca. ... Events The golden age of the Empire of Ghana began in Africa. ... Events Byzantine Empire recaptures Crete from Muslim control Ani made the capital of Armenia by the Bagratid dynasty Haakon I of Norway squashed the rebelling forces of Eric Bloodaxes sons but was killed in the Battle of Fitje. ... Canute (or Cnut) I, or Canute the Great (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Danish: Knud den Store, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den store) (ca. ...


Olaf's dynasty

For various reasons, most importantly the death of king Knut the Great in 1035, but perhaps even a certain discontent among Norwegian nobles with the Danish rule in the years after Olaf's death in 1030, his illegitimate son with the concubine Alvhild, Magnus the Good, assumed power in Norway, and eventually also in Denmark. Numerous churches in Denmark were dedicated to Olaf during his reign, and the sagas give glimpses of similar efforts to promote the cult of his deceased father on the part of the young king. Events Harthacanute becomes king of Denmark. ... Events July 29 - Battle of Stiklestad in Norway. ... Magnus I (1024 - October 25, 1047) was a King of Norway (1035 - 1047) and king of Denmark (1042 - 1047). ...


Saint Olaf

Among the bishops that Olaf brought with him from England, was Grimkell (Grimkillus). He was probably the only one of the missionary bishops who was left in the country at the time of Olaf's death, and he stood behind the translation and beatification of Olaf on August 3, 1031. In the Catholic church, the feast celebrating the moving of a saints relics. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


At this time, local bishops and their people recognized and proclaimed a person a saint, and a formal canonization procedure through the papal curia was not customary; in Olaf's case, this did not happen until 1888. Icon of St. ... A Curia in early Roman times was a subdivision of the people, i. ...


Grimkell was later appointed bishop in the diocese of Selsey in the south-east of England. This is probably the reason why the earliest traces of a liturgical cult of St Olaf are found in England. An office, or prayer service, for St Olaf is found in the so-called Leofric collectar (c. 1050), which was bequeathed in his last will and testament by bishop Leofric of Exeter to the church of Exeter, the neighbouring diocese of Selsey. This English cult seems to have been short-lived. Selsey is an English seaside town, about 7 miles (11 kilometres) south of Chichester, West Sussex. ... Leofric becomes Bishop of Exeter Hedeby is sacked by King Harald Hardraade of Norway during the course of a conflict with King Eric Estridsson of Denmark. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ...


Adam of Bremen, writing around 1070, mentions pilgrimage to the saint's shrine in Nidaros, but this is the only firm trace we have of a cult of St Olaf in Norway before the middle of the twelfth century. By this time he was also being referred to as "The Eternal King of Norway". In 1152/3, Nidaros was separated from Lund as an archbishopric of its own. It is likely that whatever formal or informal — which, we do not know — veneration of Olav as a saint there may have been in Nidaros prior to this, was emphasised and formalized on this occasion. Adam of Bremen (also: Adam Bremensis) was one of the most important German medieval chroniclers. ... Events Hereward the Wake begins a Saxon revolt in the Fens of eastern England. ... Nidaros was the old name of Trondheim, Norway, in the middle ages. ...


During the visit of the papal legate, Nicholas Brekespear (later Pope Adrian IV), the poem Geisli ("the ray of sun") was recited. In this poem, we hear for the first time of miracles performed by St Olaf. One of these took place on the day of his death, when a blind man got his eye-sight back again after having rubbed his eyes with hands that were stained with the blood from the saint. Pope Adrian IV (c. ...


The texts which were used for the liturgical celebration of St Olaf during most of the Middle Ages, were probably compiled or written by Eystein Erlendsson, the second archbishop of Norway (11611189). The nine miracles reported in Geisli form the core of the catalogue of miracles in this office. Events Bartholomew Iscanus becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Events January 21 - Philip II of France and Richard I of England begin to assemble troops to wage the Third Crusade September 3- Richard I of England is crowned as king of England. ...


The celebration of St Olaf was widespread in the Nordic countries. Apart from the early traces of a cult in England, there are only scattered references to him outside of the Nordic area. Several churches in England were dedicated to him (often as St Olave). St Olave Hart Street in the City of London is the burial place of Samuel Pepys and his wife. Another south of London Bridge gave its name to Tooley Street and to the St Olave's Poor Law Union, later to become the Metropolitan Borough of Bermondsey: its workhouse in Rotherhithe became the St Olave's Hospital, now an old-people's home a few hundred metres from St Olaf's Church, which is the Norwegian Church in London. St Olave Hart Street, surrounded by the City of London St Olave Church Interior St Olave Hart Street is an Anglican church in the City of London, located on Hart Street near Fenchurch Street railway station. ... The City of London is a geographically-small city within Greater London, England. ... Samuel Pepys, FRS (23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament, who is now most famous for his diary. ... Former workhouse at Nantwich, dating from 1780 The Poor Law was the system for the provision of social security in operation in England and the rest of the United Kingdom from the 16th century until the establishment of the Welfare State in the 20th century. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Bermondsey was a metropolitan borough in the County of London, created in 1899. ... St Olavs, Rotherhithes Norwegian church. ... St Olaves Hospital as a general hospital serving the Rotherhithe area of London until its closure in 1985. ... There are several long-established Nordic churches in London. ...


Also it lead to the naming of St Olave's Grammar School which is consistently one of the top achieving state schools in England, and was established in 1571 and up until 1968 was situated in ""Tooley Street" London where many other things related to St Olaf can be found. In 1968 the school was moved to Orpington, Bromley. St Olaves Grammar School St. ...


Recently the pilgrimage route to Nidaros Cathedral, the site of Saint Olav's tomb, has been reinstated. Following the Norwegian spelling the route is known as Saint Olav's Way. The main route, which is approximately 640 km long, starts in the ancient part of Oslo and heads North, along Lake Mjosa, up the Gudbrandsdal Valley, over Dovrefjell and down the Oppdal Valley to end at Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim. There is a Pilgrim's Office in Oslo which gives advice to Pilgrims, and a Pilgrim Centre in Trondheim, under the aegis of the Cathedral, which awards certificates to successful Pilgrims upon the completion of their journey. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... County District Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² 426 km² 0. ... Map of Mjøsa with cities Lillehammer (North), Gjøvik (West), and Hamar (East) Mjøsa is Norways largest lake. ... Gudbrandsdalen is a valley and traditional district in the Norwegian fylke (county) of Oppland. ... Dovrefjell is a mountain range in central Norway that forms a natural barrier between the southern regions of Norway and the area around Trondheim. ... County Sør-Trøndelag District Dovre region Municipality NO-1634 Administrative centre Aune Mayor (2004) Ola Røtvei (Ap) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 21 2,274 km² 2,202 km² 0. ... Nidaros was the old name of Trondheim, Norway, in the middle ages. ... County District Municipality NO-1601 Administrative centre Trondheim Mayor (2003-) Rita Ottervik (AP) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 258 342 km² 322 km² 0. ...


The oldest picture of St. Olav is painted on a column in the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem. View of The Church of the Nativity from Manger Square The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is one of the oldest continuously operating churches in the world. ...


St Olav's Church is the tallest church in Tallinn, Estonia and between 1549 and 1625 was the tallest building in the world. St. ... County Area 159. ... For many millennia the record holder for worlds tallest structure was clearly defined (see table below. ...


The Royal Norwegian Order of St. Olav was founded in 1847 by Oscar I, king of Norway and Sweden, in memory of this king. Order of St. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Oscar I, born Joseph François Oscar Bernadotte (July 4, 1799, Paris–July 8, 1859, Stockholm), was King of Sweden and Norway from 1844 to his death. ...


St. Olaf College was founded by Norwegian immigrant Bernt Julius Muus in Northfield, Minnesota, in 1874. St. ... Bernt Julius Muus (1832-1900) led a group of Norwegian-American immigrant pastors and farmers, to found St. ... Northfield is a city in Rice County, Minnesota. ...


The only country which keeps July 29 as a holiday are the Faroe Islands, see Ólavsøka. is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ólavsøka is the National holiday of the Faroe Islands. ...


See also

Preceded by
Svein Forkbeard
Sveinn Hákonarson
Hákon Eiríksson
King of Norway
1015–1028
Succeeded by
Knut the Great
Hákon Eiríksson
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Saint Olav

The Saint Olav Drama (Spelet om Heilag Olav) is an outdoor theatre performance played every end of July in Stiklestad in Verdal, Norway to commemorate the battle of Stiklestad. ... Ólavsøka is the National holiday of the Faroe Islands. ... Olsok (literally St. ... St. ... Sweyn I, or Sweyn Forkbeard, (Danish: Svend Tveskæg, originally Tjugeskæg or Tyvskæg, Old Norse: Sveinn Tjúguskegg, Norwegian: Svein Tjugeskjegg), (??? – February 3, 1014), king of Denmark and England, a leading Viking warrior and the father of Canute the Great (Cnut I). ... After the Battle of Svolder, Sveinn ruled the area marked yellow on the map. ... Håkon Eiriksson, earl of Lade (Trøndelag). ... This article is a list of rulers of Norway up until the present, including: The Norwegian kingdom (with the Faroe Islands) The Union with Iceland and Greenland (1262-1814) The Norwegian kingdom (with Iceland, Greenland and the Faroe Islands 1262-1814) The Union of Sweden and Norway (1319-1343) The... Canute (or Cnut) I, or Canute the Great (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Danish: Knud den Store, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den store) (ca. ... Håkon Eiriksson, earl of Lade (Trøndelag). ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

External links

  • Den Kongelige Norske St. Olavs Orden ( Norwegian)
  • The Royal Norwegian Order of St. Olav
  • Account of pilgrimage to Nidaros (Trondheim) in Norway on Olav's Way. With useful page about kit.

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
World Homes Network - Norway (3277 words)
Olaf II and the establishment of the church Olaf Haraldsson, a descendant of Harald I Hårfager, came to the throne as Olaf II in around 1015.
Olaf II's policy was a dual one of establishing both the royal power and the Christian church on a national basis in opposition to the claims of the local chieftains.
Norway suffered considerably in the constant wars between Sweden and Denmark (the former having seceded from the union in the early 16th century), losing the provinces of Hä rjedalen and Jämtland in 1645 and Bohuslän in 1658.
Norway. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (2041 words)
Norway is a constitutional monarchy; executive power, while nominally held by the monarch, is exercised by a council of ministers led by the prime minister.
Olaf II was driven out of Norway by King Canute of England and Denmark, in league with discontented Norwegian nobles; however, his son, Magnus I, was restored (1035) to the Norwegian throne.
Norway was one of the original members of the United Nations (the Norwegian Trygve Lie was the first UN Secretary-General), and it became a member of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in 1949.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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