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Encyclopedia > Oklahoma
State of Oklahoma
Flag of Oklahoma State seal of Oklahoma
Flag of Oklahoma Seal
Nickname(s): Sooner State
Motto(s): Labor omnia vincit (Latin: Labor conquers all things)
Official language(s) None
Demonym Oklahoman
Capital Oklahoma City
Largest city Oklahoma City
Area  Ranked 20th in the US
 - Total 69,898 sq mi
(181,196 km²)
 - Width 230 miles (370 km)
 - Length 298 miles (480 km)
 - % water 1.8
 - Latitude 33°37' N to 37° N
 - Longitude 94° 26' W to 103° W
Population  Ranked 28th in the US
 - Total 3,579,212 (2006 est.)[1]
 - Density 50.3[1]/sq mi 
19.4/km² (35th in the US)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Black Mesa[2]
4,973 ft  (1,515 m)
 - Mean 1,296 ft  (395 m)
 - Lowest point Little River[2]
289 ft  (88 m)
Admission to Union  November 16, 1907 (46th)
Governor C. Brad Henry (D)
Lieutenant Governor Jari Askins (D)
U.S. Senators James M. Inhofe (R)
Thomas A. Coburn (R)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zones  
 - most of state Central: UTC-6/-5
 - Kenton Mountain: UTC-7/-6
Abbreviations OK Okla. US-OK
Website www.ok.gov

Oklahoma (pronounced /ˌoʊkləˈhoʊmə/)[3] is a state located in the South Central region of the United States of America. With an estimated 3,579,212 residents in 2006 and a land area of 68,667 square miles (177,847 km²),[1] Oklahoma is the 28th most populous and 20th-largest state. Its name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "land of the red man",[4] and is known informally by its nickname, The Sooner State. Formed from Indian Territory on November 16, 1907, Oklahoma was the 46th state to enter the union. Its citizens are known as Oklahomans, and the state's capital and largest city is Oklahoma City. The article about the State of Oklahoma is at Oklahoma For the musical comedy Oklahoma! see Oklahoma! For the movie Oklahoma (no exclamation mark) see Oklahoma (1979 movie) For the movies Oklahoma! (with exclamation mark) Oklahoma! (1955) and Oklahoma! (1999) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists... Image File history File links Flag_of_Oklahoma. ... Oklahoma state seal Source http://usa. ... The flag of Oklahoma consists of a traditional Osage Nation buffalo-skin shield with seven eagle feathers on a sky blue field. ... All informaton herein is from the website of the Oklahoma Secretary of State. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Labor omnia vincit is a common Latin phrase and the state motto of Oklahoma. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_OK.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Oklahoma Tulsa County, Oklahoma Osage County, Oklahoma Oklahoma County, Oklahoma McClain County, Oklahoma Marshall County, Oklahoma Comanche County, Oklahoma Cleveland County, Oklahoma Cimarron... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Nickname: Location in Oklahoma County and the state of Oklahoma. ... Nickname: Location in Oklahoma County and the state of Oklahoma. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Black Mesa extends from Mesa de Maya in Colorado southeasterly 28 miles along the north bank of the Cimarron River, crossing the northeast corner of New Mexico to end at the confluence of the Cimmaron and Carrizo Creek near Kenton in the Oklahoma panhandle. ... The Little River near Sasakwa, Oklahoma The Little River near Tecumseh, Oklahoma The Little River is a tributary of the Canadian River, 90 mi (145 km) long, in central Oklahoma in the United States. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Charles Bradford Brad Henry (born June 10, 1963) is the Governor of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Jari Askins (April 27, 1953) is an American lawyer and Democratic politician from the US State of Oklahoma. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... James Mountain Inhofe (born November 17, 1934) is an American politician from Oklahoma. ... Thomas Allen Coburn (March 14, 1948) is a politician and U.S. Senator from the state of Oklahoma. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Oklahoma to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Kenton is a small community in Cimarron County, Oklahoma. ... MST is UTC-7 The Mountain Standard Time Zone (MST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), resulting in UTC-7. ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... ISO 3166-2 codes for the United States of America cover 50 states, 1 district, 6 outlying areas (including 9 minor outlying islands under separate ISO 3166-1 country code UM). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Red states show the core of the South Central, states shown as pink may or may not be included in the South Central, and thus their inclusion or exclusion varies from source to source. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Choctaw (disambiguation). ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ...


A major producer of natural gas, oil and food, Oklahoma relies on an economic base of aviation, energy, telecommunications, and biotechnology.[5] It has one of the fastest growing economies in the nation, ranking third in per capita income growth and leading in gross domestic product growth.[6][7] Oklahoma City and Tulsa serve as Oklahoma's primary economic anchors, with nearly 60 percent of Oklahomans living in their metropolitan statistical areas.[8] The state holds a mixed record in education and healthcare, and its largest universities participate in the NCAA and NAIA athletic associations, while two house athletic departments rated among the most successful in American history.[9][10] For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Petro redirects here. ... Insulin crystals Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... GDP redirects here. ... Downtown Tulsa Tulsa is the second-largest city in Oklahoma. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... NAIA is an acronym (or an initialism) that can refer to the following: National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics in the United States. ...


With small mountain ranges, prairie, and eastern forests, most of Oklahoma lies in the Great Plains and the U.S. Interior Highlands—a region especially prone to severe weather.[11] With a prevalence of German, Irish, British and Native American ancestry, more than 25 Native American languages are spoken in Oklahoma, the most of any state.[12] It is located on a confluence of three major American cultural regions and historically served as a route for cattle drives, a destination for southern settlers, and a government-sanctioned territory for Native Americans. Part of the Bible Belt, widespread belief in evangelical Christianity makes it one of the most politically conservative states, though voter registration is largest in the Democratic Party.[13] For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... The Talimena Scenic Drive traverses the Ouachita Mountains in Oklahoma, part of the U.S. Interior Highlands region. ... NOAA scientists observe severe weather using a mobile doppler radar and a helicopter (in the distance) Severe weather phenomena are weather conditions that are hazardous. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Cultural region is a term used mainly in the study of geography. ... Cattle drives started in the late 1800s in the United States. ... Political divisions of the United States as they were from 1868 to 1876, including 9 organized territories and 2 unorganized territories Territories of the United States are one type of political division of the United States, administered by the U.S. government but not any part of a U.S... The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red The Bible Belt is an informal term for an area of the United States of America in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a dominant part of the culture. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Conservative may refer to: Conservatism, political philosophy A member of a Conservative Party Conservative extension, premise of deductive logic Conservativity theorem, mathematical proof of conservative extension Conservative Judaism britney spears Category: ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...

Contents

Etymology

The name Oklahoma comes from the Choctaw phrase okla humma, literally meaning red people. Choctaw Chief Allen Wright suggested the name in 1866 during treaty negotiations with the federal government regarding the use of Indian Territory, in which he envisioned an all-Indian state controlled by the United States Superintendent of Indian Affairs. Equivalent to the English word Indian, okla humma was a phrase in the Choctaw language used to describe the Native American race as a whole. Oklahoma later became the de-facto name for Oklahoma Territory, and it was officially approved in 1890, two years after the area was opened to white settlers.[4][14][15] For other uses, see Choctaw (disambiguation). ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... Look up De facto in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Oklahoma Territory was an organized territory of the United States from May 2, 1890 until November 16, 1907, when Oklahoma became the 46th state. ...


Geography

Main article: Geography of Oklahoma
The state's high plains stretch behind a greeting sign in the Oklahoma Panhandle.

Oklahoma is the 20th-largest state in the United States, covering an area of 69,898 square miles (181,035 km²), with 68,667 square miles (177847 km²) of land and 1,231 square miles (3,188 km²) of water.[16] It is one of six states on the Frontier Strip, and lies partly in the Great Plains near the geographical center of the 48 contiguous states. It is bounded on the east by Arkansas and Missouri, on the north by Kansas, on the northwest by Colorado, on the far west by New Mexico, and on the south and near-west by Texas. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 653 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) welcome sign for Oklahoma along highway 412 in the Oklahoma Panhandle. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 653 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) welcome sign for Oklahoma along highway 412 in the Oklahoma Panhandle. ... The Oklahoma Panhandle is the extreme western region of the state of Oklahoma, comprising Cimarron County, Texas County, and Beaver County. ... Frontier Strip refers to the American six states from North Dakota south to Texas. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... The continental United States is a term referring to the United States situated on the North American continent. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...


Topography

See also: Lakes in Oklahoma

Oklahoma is situated between the Great Plains and the Ozark Plateau in the Gulf of Mexico watershed,[17] generally sloping from the high plains of its western boundary to the low wetlands of its southeastern boundary.[18][19] Its highest and lowest points follow this trend, with its highest peak, Black Mesa, at 4,973 feet (1,516 m) above sea level, situated near its far northwest corner in the Oklahoma Panhandle. The state's lowest point is on the Little River near its far southeastern boundary, which dips to 289 feet (88 m) above sea level.[20] Lakes Arcadia Lake Bellcow Lake Canton Lake Lake Dahlgren Lake Stanley Draper Eufaula Lake Grand Lake Great Salt Plains Lake Lake Hefner Keystone Lake Lake Murray Lake Overholser Tenkiller Ferry Lake Lake Texoma Lake Thunderbird Reservoirs Arbuckle Reservoir Fort Cobb Reservoir Konawa Reservoir McGee Creek Reservoir Tom Steed Reservoir Wes... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Ozark redirects here. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Black Mesa extends from Mesa de Maya in Colorado southeasterly 28 miles along the north bank of the Cimarron River, crossing the northeast corner of New Mexico to end at the confluence of the Cimmaron and Carrizo Creek near Kenton in the Oklahoma panhandle. ... The Oklahoma Panhandle is the extreme western region of the state of Oklahoma, comprising Cimarron County, Texas County, and Beaver County. ...

A river carves a canyon in the Wichita Mountains.
A river carves a canyon in the Wichita Mountains.

The state has four primary mountain ranges: the Ouachita Mountains, the Arbuckle Mountains, the Wichita Mountains, and the Ozark Mountains.[18] The U.S. Interior Highlands Region, which contains the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains, is the only major mountainous region between the Rocky Mountains and the Appalachians.[21] A portion of the Flint Hills stretches into north-central Oklahoma, and in the state's southeastern corner, Cavanal Hill is officially regarded as the world's tallest hill; at 1,999 feet (609 m), it fails the definition of a mountain by one foot.[22] More than 500 named creeks and rivers make up Oklahoma's waterways, and with 200 lakes created by dams, it holds the highest number of artificial reservoirs in the nation.[22] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1891 KB) View through a small canyon in the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1891 KB) View through a small canyon in the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma. ... View from Mount Scott The Wichita Mountains are an ancient mountain range located in southwestern Oklahoma. ... Ouachita Mountains The Ouachita Mountains are a mountain range located in west central Arkansas and east central Oklahoma. ... Travertine Creek, in the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, located in the foothills of the Arbuckles near Sulphur. ... View from Mount Scott The Wichita Mountains are an ancient mountain range located in southwestern Oklahoma. ... This article is about the Ozark Plateau. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... The Appalachian Mountains are a system of North American mountains running from Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada to Alabama in the United States, although the northernmost mainland portion ends at the Gaspe Peninsula of Quebec. ... The Flint Hills are a group of hills in eastern Kansas, extending from Marshall County in the north, to Cowley County in the south. ... Cavanal Hill located at Poteau, Oklahoma is, by definition, the tallest hill in the world at 1,999 feet. ...

Among the most geographically diverse states, Oklahoma is one of four to harbor more than 10 distinct ecological regions, containing eleven within its borders, more per square mile than in any other state by a wide margin.[11] Marked by differences in geographical diversity between its western and eastern halves, eastern Oklahoma touches eight ecological regions, while its western half holds three.[11] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 670 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View from a scenic vista along the Talimena Scenic Drive in Oklahoma. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 670 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View from a scenic vista along the Talimena Scenic Drive in Oklahoma. ... Ouachita Mountains The Ouachita Mountains are a mountain range located in west central Arkansas and east central Oklahoma. ... Turner Falls, nestled in the Arbuckle Mountains of Kiamichi Country. ... An ecoregion, sometimes called a bioregion, is a relatively large area of land or water that contains a geographically distinct assemblage of natural communities. ...


Most of the state lies in two primary drainage basins belonging to the Red and Arkansas rivers, though the Lee and Little rivers also contain significant drainage basins.[23] In the state’s northwestern corner, semi-arid high plains harbor few natural forests and rolling to flat landscape with intermittent canyons and mesa ranges like the Glass Mountains. Partial plains interrupted by small mountain ranges like the Antelope Hills and the Wichita Mountains dot southwestern Oklahoma, and transitional prairie and woodlands cover the central portion of the state. The Ozark and Ouachita Mountains rise from west to east over the state's eastern third, gradually increasing in elevation in an eastward direction.[19][23] A drainage basin is the area within the drainage basin divide (blue outline), and drains the surface runoff and river discharge (green lines) of a contiguous area. ... The Red River is one of several rivers with that name, and of two rivers with that name in the United States. ... The Arkansas River flows through Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. ... The Glass Mountains are a series of mesas south of the Cimarron River. ... Semi-arid generally describes regions that receive low annual rainfall (25 to 50 cm /10 to 20 in) and generally have scrub or grass vegetation. ... The High Plains are a subregion of the Great Plains in the central United States, located in eastern Colorado, western Kansas, western Nebraska, central and eastern Montana, eastern New Mexico, western Oklahoma, northwestern Texas, and southeastern Wyoming. ... Grand Canyon, Arizona A canyon, or gorge, is a valley walled by cliffs. ... For other uses, see Mesa (disambiguation). ... The Glass Mountains are a series of low mesas south of the Cimarron River. ... Antelope Hills may refer to several places or geographic features in the United States. ... View from Mount Scott The Wichita Mountains are an ancient mountain range located in southwestern Oklahoma. ... The Antelope Hills of Southwest Oklahoma in the distance Southwest Oklahoma is a geographical name for the southwest portion of the state of Oklahoma, typically considered to be south of the Canadian River, extending eastward from the Texas border to a line roughly from Weatherford, to Anadarko, to Duncan. ... Central Oklahoma is a geographical name for the central region of the state. ...


Flora and fauna

Populations of American Bison inhabit the state's prairie ecosystems.
Populations of American Bison inhabit the state's prairie ecosystems.

Forests cover 24 percent of Oklahoma[22] and prairie grasslands composed of shortgrass, mixed-grass, and tallgrass prairie, harbor expansive ecosystems in the state's central and western portions, although cropland has largely replaced native grasses.[24] Where rainfall is sparse in the western regions of the state, shortgrass prairie and shrublands are the most prominent ecosystems, though pinyon pines, junipers, and ponderosa pines grow near rivers and creek beds in the far western reaches of the panhandle.[24] Marshlands, cypress forests and mixtures of shortleaf pine, loblolly pine and deciduous forests dominate the state's southeastern quarter, while mixtures of largely post oak, elm, cedar and pine forests cover northeastern Oklahoma.[24][23][25] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 546 pixelsFull resolution (1493 × 1019 pixel, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a photo of the Tallgrass Prairie Nature Preserve in Osage County, Oklahoma that I took myself that I am putting into Public Doamin. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 546 pixelsFull resolution (1493 × 1019 pixel, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a photo of the Tallgrass Prairie Nature Preserve in Osage County, Oklahoma that I took myself that I am putting into Public Doamin. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Prairie grasses The tallgrass prairie is an ecosystem native to central North America, with fire as its primary periodic disturbance. ... Bales of hay on a farm near Ames, Iowa A farm is the basic unit in agriculture. ... Shrubland is a habitat type dominated by woody shrubs. ... Species Section Cembroides     Pinus cembroides     Pinus orizabensis     Pinus johannis     Pinus culminicola     Pinus remota     Pinus edulis     Pinus monophylla     Pinus quadrifolia Section Rzedowskiae     Pinus rzedowskii     Pinus pinceana     Pinus maximartinezii Section Nelsoniae     Pinus nelsonii The pinyon (or piñon) pine group grows in the southwestern United States and in Mexico. ... Species Junipers are coniferous plants in the genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. ... Binomial name Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex C. Lawson Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) is a widespread and very variable pine native to western North America. ... This article is about marsh, a type of wetland. ... Monterey Cypresses (Cupressus macrocarpa) planted in Melbourne, Australia Cypress is the name applied to many plants in the conifer family Cupressaceae (cypress family). ... Binomial name Pinus echinata Mill. ... Binomial name Pinus taeda L. The Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda) is one of the pines native to the southeastern United States. ... Turner Falls, nestled in the Arbuckle Mountains of Kiamichi Country. ... Binomial name Quercus stellata Wangenh. ... Species See Elm species, varieties, cultivars and hybrids Elms are deciduous and semi-deciduous trees making up the genus Ulmus, family Ulmaceae, found throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Siberia to Indonesia, Mexico to Japan. ... For other uses, see Cedar (disambiguation). ... This article deals with the tree; for the e-mail client see Pine email client Species About 115. ... Located in Northeast Oklahoma, Green Country is an area of the state with a relatively high amount of rolling hills, mountains and foliage as opposed to Central and Western Oklahoma (which have geography similar to the Great Plains region of the U.S.). Average rainfall totals in Green Country are...


The state holds populations of white-tailed deer, coyotes, bobcats, elk, and birds such as quail, doves, cardinals, bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and pheasants. In prairie ecosystems, american bison, greater prairie-chickens, badgers, and armadillo are common, and some of the nation's largest prairie dog towns inhabit shortgrass prairie in the state's panhandle. The Cross Timbers, a region transitioning from prairie to woodlands in Central Oklahoma, harbors 351 vertebrate species. The Ouachita Mountains are home to black bear, red fox, grey fox, and river otter populations, which coexist with a total of 328 vertebrate species in southeastern Oklahoma.[24] Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America, northern portions of South America as far south as Peru, and... Binomial name Canis latrans Say, 1823 A coyote (Canis latrans) is a member of the Canidae (the dog family) and a relative of the domestic dog. ... For other uses, see Bobcat (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... This article is about the bird. ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Dove redirects here. ... Genera Periporphyrus Saltator Caryothraustes Parkerthraustes Rhodothraupis Cardinalis Pheucticus Cyanocompsa Guiraca Passerina Spiza The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds found in North and South America. ... Binomial name Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Linnaeus, 1766) The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a raptor that is indigenous to North America, and is the national symbol of the United States of America. ... Binomial name Buteo jamaicensis (Gmelin, 1788) The Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) is a large Buteo which breeds from western Alaska and northern Canada to Panama and the West Indies. ... Genera Ithaginis Catreus Rheinartia Crossoptilon Lophura Argusianus Pucrasia Syrmaticus Chrysolophus Phasianus † See also partridge, quail Pheasants are a group of large birds from the order Galliformes. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Binomial name Tymphanucus cupido (Linnaeus, 1758) The Greater Prairie Chicken, Tymphanucus cupido, is a large bird in the grouse family. ... For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Armadillo (disambiguation). ... Species Cynomys gunnisoni Cynomys leucurus Cynomys ludovicianus Cynomys mexicanus Cynomys parvidens The prairie dog (Cynomys) is a small, burrowing rodent native to the grasslands of North America. ... The Cross Timbers is a savanna on the southern Great Plains running from southeastern Kansas, across central Oklahoma, into central Texas. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Binomial name Pallas, 1780 Synonyms Euarctos americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. ... For the American comedian, see Redd Foxx. ... Gray Fox may also refer to a special forces unit of the United States; see Gray Fox. ... Binomial name Lontra canadensis (Schreber, 1777) The Northern River Otter, Lontra canadensis, is a North American member of the Mustelidae or weasel family. ...


Protected lands

Mesas rise above one of Oklahoma's state parks.
Mesas rise above one of Oklahoma's state parks.

Oklahoma has 50 state parks,[26] six national parks or protected regions,[27] two national protected forests or grasslands,[28] and a network of wildlife preserves and conservation areas. Six percent of the state's 10 million acres (40,000 km²) of forest is public land,[25] including the western portions of the Ouachita National Forest, the largest and oldest national forest in the southern United States.[29] With 39,000 acres (158 km²), the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in north-central Oklahoma is the largest protected area of tallgrass prairie in the world and is part of an ecosystem that encompasses only 10 percent of its former land area, once covering 14 states.[30] In addition, the Black Kettle National Grassland covers 31,300 acres (127 km²) of prairie in southwestern Oklahoma.[31] The Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge is the oldest and largest of nine national wildlife refuges in the state[32] and was founded in 1901, encompassing 59,020 acres (238.8 km²).[33] Of Oklahoma's federally protected park or recreational sites, the Chickasaw National Recreation Area is the largest, with 4,500 acres (18 km²).[34] Other federal protected sites include the Santa Fe and Trail of Tears national historic trails, the Fort Smith and Washita Battlefield national historic sites, and the Oklahoma City National Memorial.[27] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 676 KB) Author is myslef I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 676 KB) Author is myslef I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Glass Mountains are a series of low mesas south of the Cimarron River. ... State park is a term used in the United States and in Mexico for an area of land preserved on account of its natural beauty, historic interest, or other reason, and under the administration of the government of a U.S. state or one of the states of Mexico. ... This article is about national parks. ... This article is on national forests in the United States. ... An Inner Mongolia Grassland. ... The Ouachita National Forest is a National Forest that lies in the western portion of Arkansas and portions of eastern Oklahoma. ... Photo of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. ... Prairie grasses The tallgrass prairie is an ecosystem native to central North America, with fire as its primary periodic disturbance. ... A coral reef near the Hawaiian islands is an example of a complex marine ecosystem. ... The Cibola National Forest stretches from western Oklahoma to western New Mexico. ... Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, located in southwestern Oklahoma near Lawton, has protected unique wildlife habitats since 1901. ... National Wildlife Refuge is a designation for certain protected areas of the United States managed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. ... Chickasaw National Recreation Area is a unit of the National Park Service near Sulphur, Oklahoma. ... The Santa Fe Trail was an important route in the western United States, leading from Missouri to Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... For other uses, see Trail of Tears (disambiguation). ... At Fort Smith National Historic Site you can walk where soldiers drilled, pause along the Trail of Tears, and stand where justice was served. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Oklahoma City National Memorial is the largest memorial of its kind in the United States. ...


Climate

Oklahoma is located in a climate prime for thunderstorm development.
Oklahoma is located in a climate prime for thunderstorm development.

Oklahoma is located in a temperate region and experiences occasional extremes of temperature and precipitation typical in a continental climate.[35] Most of the state lies in an area known as Tornado Alley characterized by frequent interaction between cold and warm air masses producing severe weather.[20] An average 54 tornadoes strike the state per year—one of the highest rates in the world.[36] Because of its position between zones of differing prevailing temperature and winds, weather patterns within the state can vary widely between relatively short distances.[20] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. ... An outline of Significant Tornado Alley in the United States, where the highest percentage of violent tornadoes occur Tornado Alley is a colloquial term most often used in reference to the area of the United States in which tornadoes are most frequent. ... NOAA scientists observe severe weather using a mobile doppler radar and a helicopter (in the distance) Severe weather phenomena are weather conditions that are hazardous. ... For other uses of Tornado, see Tornado (disambiguation). ...


The humid subtropical climate (Koppen Cfa) of the eastern part of Oklahoma influenced heavily by southerly winds bringing moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, but transitions progressively to a semi-arid zone (Koppen BSk) in the high plains of the Panhandle and other western areas from about Lawton westward less frequently touched by southern moisture.[35] Precipitation and temperatures fall from east to west accordingly, with areas in the southeast averaging an annual temperature of 62 °F (17 °C) and an annual rainfall of 56 inches (1,420 mm), while areas of the panhandle average 58 °F (14 °C), with an annual rainfall under 17 inches (430 mm).[20] All of the state frequently experiences temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C) or below 0 °F (−18 °C),[35] and snowfall ranges from an average of less than 4 inches (10 cm) in the south to just over 20 inches (51 cm) on the border of Colorado in the panhandle.[20] The state is home to the National Storm Prediction Center of the National Weather Service located at Norman.[37] The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Semi-arid generally describes regions that receive low annual rainfall (25 to 50 cm /10 to 20 in) and generally have scrub or grass vegetation. ... Lawton is a city in Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... The degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... The Storm Prediction Center, located in Norman, Oklahoma, is part of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), operating under the control of the National Weather Service, which in turn is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the U.S. government. ... The National Weather Service (NWS) is one of the six scientific agencies that make up the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States government. ... Norman, Oklahoma, is the county seat and largest city in Cleveland County in the U.S. state of Oklahoma, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. ...

Monthly temperatures for Oklahoma's largest cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Oklahoma City 47/26 54/31 62/39 71/48 79/58 87/66 93/71 92/70 84/62 73/51 60/38 50/29
Tulsa 46/26 53/31 62/40 72/50 80/59 88/68 94/73 93/71 84/63 74/51 60/39 50/30
Lawton 50/26 56/31 65/40 73/49 82/59 90/68 96/73 95/41 86/63 76/51 62/39 52/30
Average high/low temperatures in °F[38][39]

History

Main article: History of Oklahoma
Land runs opened much of the state to white settlers.

Evidence exists that native peoples traveled through Oklahoma as early as the last ice age,[40] but the state's first permanent inhabitants settled in communities accentuated with mound-like structures near the Arkansas border between 850 and 1450 AD.[41][42] Spaniard Francisco Vásquez de Coronado traveled through the state in 1541,[43] but French explorers claimed the area in the 1700s[44] and it remained under French rule until 1803, when all the French territory west of the Mississippi River was purchased by the United States in the Louisiana Purchase.[43] This article is about the History of Oklahoma. ... Cherokee Strip land run (1893 photo) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Cherokee Strip land run (1893 photo) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Cherokee Strip land run Land run (sometimes land rush) usually refers to a historical event in which previously-restricted land of the Indian people was stolen for homesteading on a first arrival basis. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... 80. ... Coronado Sets Out to the North, by Frederic Remington, 1861-1909 Francisco Vázquez de Coronado (c. ... The Louisiana Purchase (French: Vente de la Louisiane) was the acquisition by the United States of America of 828,000 square miles (2,140,000 km²) of French territory (Louisiana) in 1803. ...

Cowboys drove cattle across the state in the late 19th century.
Cowboys drove cattle across the state in the late 19th century.

Thousands of Native Americans, including those making up the "Five Civilized Tribes", were removed from their lands in Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee and transported to Oklahoma in the 1830s[45] on the Trail of Tears. The area, already occupied by Osage and Quapaw tribes, was designated Indian Territory by the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the Indian Intercourse Act of 1834.[43] Fifteen tribes were given land within the territory in 1830,[46] but by 1890, more than 30 tribes had been allocated federal land.[47] Cowboy circa 1887 Free Public Domain Image from http://www. ... Cowboy circa 1887 Free Public Domain Image from http://www. ... For other uses, see Cowboy (disambiguation). ... The Five Civilized Tribes is the term applied to five Native American nations, the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole, considered civilized by white Anais because they had adopted many of the colonists customs (including the ownership of plantations and black slaves) and had generally good relations with their neighbors. ... Indian Removal was a nineteenth century policy of the government of the United States that sought to relocate American Indian (or Native American) tribes living east of the Mississippi River to lands west of the river. ... For other uses, see Trail of Tears (disambiguation). ... The Osage Nation is a Native American tribe in the United States, which is mainly based in Osage County, Oklahoma, but can still be found throughout America. ... The Quapaw people are a tribe of Native Americans who historically resided on the west side of the Mississippi River in what is now the state of Arkansas. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... The Indian Removal Act, part of a U.S. government policy known as Indian Removal, was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830. ... The Indian Intercourse Acts were several acts passed by the United States Congress regulating commerce between American Indians and non-Indians and restricting travel by non-Indians onto Indian land. ...


In the period between 1866 and 1899,[43] cattle ranches in Texas strived to meet the demands for food in eastern cities, and railroads in Kansas promised to deliver in a timely manner. Cattle trails and cattle ranches developed as cowboys either drove their product north or settled illegally in Indian Territory.[43] In 1881, four of five major cattle trails on the western frontier traveled through Indian Territory.[48] Increased presence of white settlers in Indian Territory prompted the United States Government to establish the Dawes Act in 1887, which divided the lands of individual tribes into allotments for individual families, encouraging farming and private land ownership among native Americans, but giving excess land to the federal government. In the process, nearly half of Indian-held land within the territory was made open to outside settlers and for purchase by railroad companies.[49] Cattle drives started in the late 1800s in the United States. ... For other uses, see Cowboy (disambiguation). ... The General Allotment Act of 1887 (also known as the Dawes Act or the Dawes Severalty Act) authorized the President of the United States to survey Native American tribal lands and divide the areas into allotments for individual Native American families. ...

The Dust Bowl sent thousands of farmers into poverty during the 1930s.
The Dust Bowl sent thousands of farmers into poverty during the 1930s.

Major land runs, including the Land Run of 1889, were held for settlers on the hour that certain territories were opened to settlement. Usually, land was allocated to settlers on a first come, first served basis.[50] Those who broke the rules by crossing the border into the territory before it was allowed were said to have been crossing the border sooner, leading to the term sooners, which eventually became the state's official nickname.[51] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 612 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (952 × 933 pixel, file size: 182 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date April 1936 Author Arthur Rothstein, for the Farm Security Administration Permission (Reusing this image) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 612 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (952 × 933 pixel, file size: 182 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date April 1936 Author Arthur Rothstein, for the Farm Security Administration Permission (Reusing this image) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as... Farmer and two sons during a dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936 The Dust Bowl, or the dirty thirties, was a period of horrible dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940), caused by severe... Cherokee Strip land run Land run (sometimes land rush) usually refers to a historical event in which previously-restricted land of the Indian people was stolen for homesteading on a first arrival basis. ... Oklahoma Land Rush The Land Run of 1889 was the first land run into the Unassigned Lands and included all or part of the modern day Canadian, Cleveland, Kingfisher, Logan, Oklahoma, and Payne counties of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Sooners redirects here. ...


In 1890, despite attempts to receive recognition by the U.S. Congress, Cimmaron Territory (situated where the panhandle is now located) was taken over by Oklahoma. Cimmaron Territory did not resist and no military forces were used in the annexation.


Delegations to make the territory into a state began near the turn of the 20th century, when the Curius Act abolished all tribal jurisdiction in Indian Territory. Attempts to create an all-Indian state named Oklahoma, and a later attempt to create an all-Indian state named Sequoyah failed, but the Sequoyah Statehood Convention of 1905 eventually laid the groundwork for the Oklahoma Statehood Convention, which took place two years later.[52] On November 16, 1907, Oklahoma was established as the 46th state in the Union. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was one of the deadliest acts of terrorism in American history.
The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was one of the deadliest acts of terrorism in American history.

The new state became a focal point for the emerging oil industry, as discoveries of oil pools prompted towns to grow rapidly in population and wealth. Tulsa eventually became known as the "Oil Capital of the World" for most of the 20th century, and oil investments fueled much of the state's early economy.[53] In 1927, Oklahoma businessman Cyrus Avery, known as the "Father of Route 66", began a campaign to create Route 66. Using an existing stretch of highway from Amarillo, Texas to Tulsa, Oklahoma to form the original portion of Highway 66, Avery spearheaded the creation of the U.S. Highway 66 Association to oversee the planning of Route 66, based in his hometown of Tulsa.[54] Image File history File links Aerial view of Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building after bombing, 1995 Source: [1] URL: [2] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Aerial view of Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building after bombing, 1995 Source: [1] URL: [2] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Alfred P. Murrah building four days before its demolition Alfred P. Murrah building during demolition Aerial view of Alfred P. Murrah building after bombing The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was a United States Federal Government complex located at 200 N.W. 5th Street in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... The Oil industry brings to market what is currently considered the lifeblood of nearly all other industry, if not industrialized civilization itself. ... The name Oil Capital of the World can refer to Houston, Texas or Tulsa, Oklahoma, which claimed the name early in the 20th Century and held it outright until the early 1990s, when Houston became the most prominent hub of the oil industry in the United States. ... Cyrus Stevens Avery (1871–1963) was known as the Father of Route 66. He created the route while appointed to a federal board to create the Federal Highway System, then pushed for the establishment of the U.S. Highway 66 Association to pave and promote the highway. ... Alternate meanings of Route 66: New Jersey State Highway 66, Interstate 66, and a company named after the route US Highway 66 or Route 66 was and is the most famous road in the United States highway system and quite possibly the most famous and storied highway in the world. ... Amarillo redirects here. ... The U.S. Highway 66 Association was organized in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1927. ...


During the 1930s, parts of the state began feeling the consequences of poor farming practices, drought, and high winds. Known as the Dust Bowl, areas of Kansas, Texas, New Mexico, and northwestern Oklahoma were hampered by long periods of little rainfall and abnormally high temperatures, sending thousands of farmers into poverty and forcing them to relocate to more fertile areas of the western United States.[55] Over a twenty-year period ending in 1950, the state saw its only historical decline in population, dropping 6.9 percent. In response, dramatic efforts in soil and water conservation led to massive flood control systems and dams, creating hundreds of reservoirs and man-made lakes. By the 1960s, more than 200 man-made lakes had been created, the most in the nation.[56][11] Farmer and two sons during a dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936 The Dust Bowl, or the dirty thirties, was a period of horrible dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940), caused by severe... The Glass Mountains are a series of mesas south of the Cimarron River. ... Sheep pasture with macroscale erosion, Australia Soil Conservation is a set of management strategies for prevention of soil being eroded from the earth’s surface or becoming chemically altered by overuse, salinization, acidification, or other chemical soil contamination. ... Water conservation refers to reducing use of fresh water, through technological or social methods. ... A reservoir (French: réservoir) is an artificial lake created by flooding land behind a dam. ...


In 1995, Oklahoma City became the scene of one of the worst acts of terrorism ever committed in American history. The Oklahoma City bombing of April 19, 1995, in which Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols detonated an explosive outside of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, killed 168 people, including 19 children. Timothy McVeigh was later sentenced to death and executed by lethal injection, while his partner, Terry Nichols, was convicted of 161 counts of first degree murder and received life in prison without the possibility of parole.[57] The Oklahoma City bombing was a domestic terrorist attack on April 19, 1995 aimed at the U.S. government in which the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was bombed in an office complex in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... McVeigh redirects here. ... Terry Lynn Nichols (born April 1, 1955) was convicted of being an accomplice of Timothy McVeigh, the man convicted of murder in the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, April 19, 1995), which claimed 168 lives. ... Alfred P. Murrah building four days before its demolition Alfred P. Murrah building during demolition Aerial view of Alfred P. Murrah building after bombing The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was a United States Federal Government complex located at 200 N.W. 5th Street in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ...


Economy

The BOK Tower of Tulsa, Oklahoma's tallest building, serves as the world headquarters for Williams Companies.

Based in the sectors of aviation, energy, transportation equipment, food processing, electronics, and telecommunications, Oklahoma is an important producer of natural gas, aircraft, and food.[5] The state ranks second in the nation for production of natural gas,[58] and is the 27th-most agriculturally productive state, ranking 5th in production of wheat.[59] Six Fortune 500 companies and one additional Fortune 1000 company are headquartered in Oklahoma,[60] and it has been rated one of the most business-friendly states in the nation,[61] with the 7th-lowest tax burden in 2007.[62] From 2000 to 2006, Oklahoma's gross domestic product grew 50 percent, the fifth-highest rate in the nation. It had the fastest-growing GDP between 2005 and 2006, increasing from $122.5 to $134.6 billion, a jump of 10.8 percent,[7] and its gross domestic product per capita grew 9.7 percent from $34,305 in 2005 to $37,620 in 2006, the second-highest rate in the nation.[63] Though oil has historically dominated the state's economy, a collapse in the energy industry during the 1980s led to the loss of nearly 90,000 energy-related jobs between 1980 and 2000, severely damaging the local economy.[64] Oil accounted for 17 percent of Oklahoma's economic impact in 2005,[65] and employment in the state's oil industry was outpaced by five other industries in 2007.[66] At the centre of 250 acres of Bok Gardens, Bok Tower rises over 200 feet, and is crowned by a large carillon. ... The Williams Companies, Inc. ... Aviation encompasses all the activities relating to airborne devices created by human ingenuity, generally known as aircraft. ... Food processing is the set of methods and techniques used to transform raw ingredients into food for consumption by humans or animals. ... Surface mount electronic components Electronics is the study of the flow of charge through various materials and devices such as semiconductors, resistors, inductors, capacitors, nano-structures and vacuum tubes. ... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Flying machine redirects here. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Fortune 1000 is a reference to a list maintained by the American business magazine Fortune. ... GDP redirects here. ...


Industry

In early 2007, Oklahoma had a civilian labor force of 1.7 million and total non-farm employment fluctuated around 1.6 million.[66] The government sector provides the most jobs, with 326,000 in 2007, followed by the transportation and utilities sector, providing 285,000 jobs, and the sectors of education, business, and manufacturing, providing 191,000, 178,000, and 151,000 jobs, respectively.[66] Among the state's largest industries, the aerospace sector generates $11 billion annually.[61] Tulsa is home to the largest airline maintenance base in the world, which serves as the global maintenance and engineering headquarters for American Airlines.[67] In total, aerospace accounts for more than 10 percent of Oklahoma's industrial output, and it is one of the top 10 states in aerospace engine manufacturing.[5] Due to its position in the center of the United States, Oklahoma is also among the top states for logistic centers, and a major contributor to weather-related research.[61] The state is the top manufacturer of tires in North America and contains one of the fastest-growing biotechnology industries in the nation.[61] In 2005, international exports from Oklahoma's manufacturing industry totaled $4.3 billion, accounting for 3.6 percent of its economic impact.[68] Tire manufacturing, meat processing, oil and gas equipment manufacturing, and air conditioner manufacturing are the state's largest manufacturing industries.[69] A public utility is a company that maintains the infrastructure for a public service. ... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... American Airlines, Inc. ... Insulin crystals Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ...


Energy

A major oil producing state, Oklahoma is the fifth-largest producer of crude oil in the nation.
A major oil producing state, Oklahoma is the fifth-largest producer of crude oil in the nation.[70]

Oklahoma is the nation's second-largest producer of natural gas, fifth-largest producer of crude oil, has the second-greatest number of active drilling rigs,[70] and ranks fifth in crude oil reserves.[71] While the state ranked fifth for installed wind energy capacity in 2005,[72] it is at the bottom of states in usage of renewable energy, with 96 percent of its electricity being generated by non-renewable sources in 2002, including 64 percent from coal and 32 percent from natural gas.[73] However, since 1993, with the Oklahoma Legislature's creation of the Oklahoma Energy Resources Board, more than $38 million has been spent on restoring more than 7,800 orphaned and abandoned oil well sites across the state. Ranking 11th for total energy consumption per capita in 2006,[74] the state's energy costs were 10th lowest in the nation.[70] As a whole, the oil energy industry contributes $23 billion to Oklahoma's gross domestic product,[65] and employees of Oklahoma oil-related companies earn an average of twice the state's typical yearly income.[75] In 2004, the state had 83,750 commercial oil wells and as many as 750,000 total wells,[71][65] churning 178 thousand barrels of crude oil a day.[71] Ten percent of the nation's natural gas supply is held in Oklahoma, with 1.662 trillion cubic feet (47.1 km³).[71] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Drilling Rig, Reverse circulation in Western Australia A drilling rig is a machine which creates holes (usually called boreholes) and/or shafts in the ground. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Renewable energy effectively utilizes natural resources such as sunlight, wind, tides and geothermal heat, which are naturally replenished. ... Non-renewable energy is energy taken from finite resources that will eventually dwindle, becoming too expensive or too environmentally damaging to retrieve, [1] as opposed to renewable energy sources, which are naturally replenished in a relatively short period of time. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... An oil well is seen in Texas. ...


According to Forbes Magazine, three of the largest private oil-related companies in the nation are located in the state,[76] and all five of Oklahoma's Fortune 500 companies are oil-related.[60] In 2006, Tulsa-based Semgroup ranked 5th on the Forbe's list of largest private companies, Tulsa-based QuikTrip ranked 46th, and Oklahoma City-based Love's Travel Shops ranked 132nd.[76] Tulsa's ONEOK and Williams Companies are the state's largest and second-largest companies respectively, also ranking as the nation's second and third-largest companies in the field of energy, according to Fortune Magazine.[77] The magazine also places Oklahoma City's Devon Energy as the second-largest company in the mining and crude oil-producing industry in the nation, while Chesapeake Energy ranks seventh respectively in that sector and Oklahoma Gas & Electric ranks as the 25th-largest gas and electric utility company.[77] Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... Founded in February 2000, SemGroup LP is engaged in diversified services for the North American crude oil and refined products industry. ... QuikTrip (abbreviated QT) is a chain of convenience stores primarily found in the Midwestern and Southern United States (not to be confused with Kwik Trip convenience stores). ... ONEOK, Inc. ... The Williams Companies, Inc. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Time Warner subsidiaries | Business magazines ... Devon Energy Corporation (NYSE: DVN), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, is a Fortune 500 company. ... Chesapeake Energy (NYSE: CHK) is a producer of natural gas in the United States and is the third largest independent producer, sixth overall (including majors) and the most active driller of new wells in the US. Their primary growth is due to acquisitions and mergers. ... Oklahoma Gas & Electric is a regulated electric utility company that serves over 720,000 customers in the Oklahoma and eastern Arkansas areas. ...


Agriculture

The 27th-most agriculturally productive state, Oklahoma is fifth in cattle production and fifth in production of wheat.[78][59] Approximately 5.5 percent of American beef comes from Oklahoma, while the state produces 6.1 percent of American wheat, 4.2 percent of American pig products, and 2.2 percent of dairy products.[59] The state had 83,500 farms in 2005, collectively producing $4.3 billion in animal products and under one billion dollars in crop output with more than $6.1 billion added to the state's gross domestic product.[59] Poultry and swine are its second and third-largest agricultural industries.[78]


Culture

Oklahoma's heritage as a pioneer state is depicted with the Pioneer Woman statue in Ponca City.
Oklahoma's heritage as a pioneer state is depicted with the Pioneer Woman statue in Ponca City.

Oklahoma is placed in the South by the United States Census Bureau,[79] but lies fully or partially in the midwest, southwest, and southern cultural regions by varying definitions, and partially in the Upland South and Great Plains by definitions of abstract geographical-cultural regions.[80] Oklahomans have a high rate of German or native American ancestry,[81] with 25 different native languages spoken, more than in any other state.[12] Six governments have claimed the area at different times,[82] and 67 native American tribes are represented in Oklahoma,[43] including 39 tribal headquarters, the most in the nation.[83] Western ranchers, native American tribes, southern settlers, and eastern oil barons have shaped the state's cultural predisposition, and its largest cities have been named among the most underrated cultural destinations in the United States.[84][85] While residents of Oklahoma are associated with stereotypical traits of friendliness and generosity — the Catalogue for Philanthropy ranks Oklahomans 4th in the nation for overall generosity[86] — the state has also been associated with a negative cultural stereotype first popularized by John Steinbeck's novel Grapes of Wrath, which described the plight of uneducated, poverty-stricken Dust Bowl-era farmers from midwestern states deemed "Okies".[87][88][89] However, the term is used in a positive manner by Oklahomans.[88] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 468 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1235 × 1582 pixel, file size: 112 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is my photo of the Pioneer Woman Statue in Ponca City Oklahoma I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 468 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1235 × 1582 pixel, file size: 112 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is my photo of the Pioneer Woman Statue in Ponca City Oklahoma I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public... Ponca City is a city located in north central Oklahoma, 18 miles south of the Kansas border and 15 miles east of Interstate 35. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ... Cultural region is a term used mainly in the study of geography. ... The Upland South does not correspond well to state lines, although the term Upper South is sometimes defined by states. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Stereotype (disambiguation). ... For other members of the family, see Steinbeck (disambiguation). ... The Grapes of Wrath book cover The Grapes of Wrath is a work of fiction published by John Steinbeck in 1939, in which descriptive, narrative, and philosophical passages succeed one another. ... Farmer and two sons during a dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936 The Dust Bowl, or the dirty thirties, was a period of horrible dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940), caused by severe... Rear view of an Okies car, passing through Amarillo, Texas, heading west, 1941 Okie, also known as a Pafundi in Northern Oklahoma, is a synonym, dating from as early as 1905, denoting a resident or native of Oklahoma. ...

Philbrook Museum is one of the top 50 fine art museums in the United States.
Philbrook Museum is one of the top 50 fine art museums in the United States.[90]

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1360x2048, 1447 KB) Photograph of the Philbrook Museum of Art and formal gardens as taken from the steps of the tempietto at the east end of the gardens on 16 September 2004 by Dustin M. Ramsey. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1360x2048, 1447 KB) Photograph of the Philbrook Museum of Art and formal gardens as taken from the steps of the tempietto at the east end of the gardens on 16 September 2004 by Dustin M. Ramsey. ... William-Adolphe Bouguereaus painting The Shepherdess is in the collection of the Philbrook Museum. ...

Arts and theater

In the state's largest urban areas, pockets of jazz culture flourish,[91] and Native American, Mexican, and Asian enclaves produce music and art of their respective cultures.[92] The Oklahoma Mozart Festival in Bartlesville is one of the largest classical music festivals in the southern United States,[93] and Oklahoma City's Festival of the Arts has been named one of the top fine arts festivals in the nation.[91] When the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian opened in Washington D.C., native prima ballerinas of Oklahoma Yvonne Chouteau, Rosella Hightower, Moscelyne Larkin, Maria and Marjorie Tallchief were honored with the inaugural National Cultural Treasures Award. The award celebrated their contribution to the nation's cultural heritage. They are featured in the "Five Moons", a bronze sculpture by artist Gary Henson on the west lawn of the Tulsa Historical Society. The Tulsa Ballet, one of the state's five major city ballet companies, is rated as one of the top ballet companies in the United States by the New York Times.[91] In Sand Springs, an outdoor amphitheater called "Discoveryland!" is the official performance headquarters for the musical Oklahoma![94] Historically, the state has produced musical styles such as The Tulsa Sound and Western Swing, which was popularized at Cain's Ballroom in Tulsa. The building, known as the "Carnegie Hall of Western Swing",[95] served as the performance headquarters of Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys during the 1930s.[96] For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Mexican may have several meanings. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Bartlesville is a city located in Oklahoma. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... Tulsa Ballet is a proffessional American Ballet company located in Tulsa, OK. The artistic mission of Tulsa Ballet is To combine the beauty and joy expressed by dance with the drama and entertainment of the theatre. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Location Location of Sand Springs within Tulsa County, Oklahoma. ... Oklahoma! was the first musical play written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (see Rodgers and Hammerstein). ... The Tulsa Sound is a musical style that came from Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Western swing is, first and foremost, a fusion of country music, several styles of jazz, pop music and blues aimed at dancers. ... Cains Ballroom is a music venue in Tulsa, OK. It was built in 1924 to serve as a garage for one of Tulsas founders, Tate Brady. ... James Robert (Bob) Wills (March 6, 1905 – May 13, 1975) was an American country musician, songwriter, and big band leader. ... The Texas Playboys were a Western Swing band, long led by Bob Wills, and considered by many to be the definitive progenitor of that musical genre. ...


Oklahoma is in the nation's middle percentile in per capita spending on the arts, ranking 17th, and contains more than 300 museums.[91] The Philbrook Museum of Tulsa is considered one of the top 50 fine art museums in the United States,[90] and the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in Norman, one of the largest university-based art and history museums in the country, documents the natural history of the region.[91] The collections of Thomas Gilcrease are housed in the Gilcrease Museum of Tulsa, which also holds the world's largest, most comprehensive collection of art and artifacts of the American West.[97] The Oklahoma City Museum of Art contains the most comprehensive collection of glass sculptures by artist Dale Chihuly in the world,[98] and Oklahoma City's National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum documents the heritage of the American Western frontier.[91] With remnants of the Holocaust and artifacts relevant to Judaism, the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art of Tulsa preserves the largest collection of Jewish art in the Southwest United States.[99] William-Adolphe Bouguereaus painting The Shepherdess is in the collection of the Philbrook Museum. ... Fine art refers to arts that are concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste (SOED 1991). ... A natural history museum in Norman, Oklahoma, operated by the University of Oklahoma. ... William Thomas Gilcrease (1890–1962) was an American oilman, art collector and philanthropist. ... Gilcrease Museum Gilcrease Museum is a museum located northwest of downtown Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Dale Chihuly. ... The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is a museum and art gallery, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, housing one of the largest collections of: Western, American cowboy, American rodeo, and American Indian; art, artifacts, and archival materials, in the world. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ...

Native American cultural events like pow wows are common in Oklahoma.
Native American cultural events like pow wows are common in Oklahoma.

Download high resolution version (977x655, 302 KB)Public domain (Library of Congress) photo of Grand Entry at the 1983 Omaha pow-wow. ... Download high resolution version (977x655, 302 KB)Public domain (Library of Congress) photo of Grand Entry at the 1983 Omaha pow-wow. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Pow wow redirects here. ...

Festivals and events

Oklahoma's centennial celebration was named the top event in the United States for 2007 by the American Bus Association,[100] and consisted of multiple celebrations ending with the 100th anniversary of statehood on November 16, 2007. Annual ethnic festivals and events take place throughout the state, and include festivals in Scottish, Italian, Vietnamese, Irish, Native American, Czech, Jewish, and African American communities depicting cultural heritage or traditions. During a 10-day run in Oklahoma City, the Oklahoma State Fair attracts close to one million people,[101] and large pow-wows, Asian festivals, and Juneteenth celebrations are held in the city each year. The Tulsa State Fair attracts over one million people during its 10-day run,[102] and the city's Mayfest festival entertained more than 375,000 people in four days during 2007.[103] In 2006, Tulsa's Oktoberfest was named one of the top 10 in the world by USA Today and one of the top German food festivals in the nation by Bon Appetit magazine.[104] This article discusses states as sovereign political entities. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the country. ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... Irish Americans (Irish: Gael-Mheiriceánach) are citizens of the United States who can claim ancestry originating in the west European island of Ireland. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The Oklahoma State Fair is a large fair and exposition in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... This article is about a Native American gathering. ... The culture of Asia is the artificial aggregate of the cultural heritage of many nationalities, societies, religions, and ethnic groups in the region, traditionally called a continent from a Western-centric perspective, of Asia. ... For other uses, see Juneteenth (disambiguation). ... The Tulsa State Fair is a large fair in Tulsa, Oklahoma which operates for a couple weeks in the late summer months. ... For the beer, see Oktoberfestbier. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Bon Appétit describes itself as, a food and entertaining magazine. It is published monthly by Condé Nast Publications Inc. ...


Education

See also: List of School Districts in Oklahoma and List of Colleges and Universities in Oklahoma
Oklahoma's system of public regional universities includes Northeastern State University in Tahlequah.
Oklahoma's system of public regional universities includes Northeastern State University in Tahlequah.

With an educational system made up of public school districts and independent private institutions, Oklahoma had 631,337 students enrolled in 1,849 public primary, secondary, and vocational schools in 540 school districts as of 2006.[105] Ranked near the bottom of states in expenditures per student, Oklahoma spent $6,614 for each student in 2005, 47th in the nation,[105] though its growth of total education expenditures between 1992 and 2002 ranked 22nd.[106] The state is among the best in pre-kindergarten education, and the National Institute for Early Education Research rated it first in the United States with regard to standards, quality, and access to pre-kindergarten education in 2004, calling it a model for early childhood schooling.[107] While high school dropout rates decreased 29 percent between 2005 and 2006, Oklahoma ranked in the bottom three states in the nation for retaining high school seniors,[108] with a 3.2 percent dropout rate.[105] In 2004, the state ranked 36th in the nation for the relative number of adults with high school diplomas, though at 85.2 percent, it had the highest rate among southern states.[109][110] Oklahoma has 537 Public school districts—425 independent and 111 dependent. ... See Oklahoma state entry. ... Northeastern State University (NSU) is located in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, with branches in Broken Arrow and Muskogee. ... Tahlequah is a city in Cherokee County, Oklahoma, United States. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A primary school in Český Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A blacksmith is a traditional trade. ... School Districts are a form of Special-purpose district in the United States which serves to operate the local public primary, middle, and secondary schools. ... Pre-Kindergarten (also called Pre-K) refers to the first formal academic classroom-based learning environment that a child customarily attends in the United States. ... Infant playing with a book. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... A high school diploma is a diploma awarded for the completion of high school. ...


The University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University are the largest public institutions of higher education in Oklahoma, both operating through one primary campus and satellite campuses throughout the state. The two colleges, along with the University of Tulsa, rank among the country's best in undergraduate business programs,[111] and the University of Oklahoma and University of Tulsa are in the top percentage of universities nationally for academic ratings.[10] Oklahoma holds eleven public regional universities,[112] including Northeastern State University, the second-oldest institution of higher education west of the Mississippi River,[113] also containing the only College of Optometry in Oklahoma[114] and the largest enrollment of Native American students in the nation by percentage and amount.[113][115] Six of the state's universities were placed in the Princeton Review's list of best 122 regional colleges in 2007,[116] and three made the list of top colleges for best value.[117] The state has 54 post-secondary technical institutions operated by Oklahoma's CareerTech program for training in specific fields of industry or trade.[105] University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... The University of Tulsa is a private, comprehensive university awarding bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Northeastern State University (NSU) is located in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, with branches in Broken Arrow and Muskogee. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Optometry is a doctoral-degree health care profession concerned with eyes and related structures, as well as vision, visual systems, and vision information processing in humans. ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education is located in the north-central Oklahoma town of Stillwater. ...


Sports

Oklahoma has minor league professional sports teams in basketball, football, arena football, baseball, soccer, and hockey, located in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Enid, and Lawton. Minor league baseball at the AAA and AA levels, hockey in the Central Hockey League, and arena football in the af2 league are hosted by Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Oklahoma City also hosts the Oklahoma City Lightning playing in the National Women's Football Association, and Tulsa serves as the base for the Tulsa 66ers of the NBA Development League and the Tulsa Revolution, playing in the American Indoor Soccer League.[118] Enid and Lawton host professional basketball teams in the USBL and the CBA. Image File history File links Memorial Stadium in Baltimore. ... Image File history File links Memorial Stadium in Baltimore. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... The Gaylord Family - Oklahoma Memorial Stadium is the on-campus football facility for the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma, United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... This article is about the current CHL. For earlier leagues also called the Central Hockey League, see Central Hockey League (disambiguation). ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... The Oklahoma City Lightning is Oklahoma Citys full-contact womens American football team in the National Womens Football Association. ... The National Womens Football Association (NWFA) is a full-contact American football league for women. ... The Tulsa 66ers is the name of a NBA Development League team based in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... The NBA Development League, or D-League, is the National Basketball Associations officially sponsored and operated developmental basketball organization. ... The Tulsa Revolution is a professional soccer team from Tulsa, Oklahoma that plays in the Central Division of the American Indoor Soccer League. ... The American Indoor Soccer League or AISL considered itself a minor indoor soccer league. ... The United States Basketball League is a professional mens summer basketball league. ... The Continental Basketball Association (CBA) is a professional mens basketball league in the United States. ...


The NBA's New Orleans Hornets became the first major league sports franchise based in Oklahoma when it was forced to relocate to Oklahoma City's Ford Center for two seasons following Hurricane Katrina in 2005.[119] In July 2006, a group of Oklahoma City businessmen, led by Clayton Bennett, purchased the Seattle SuperSonics and attempted negotiations for a new arena in the Seattle area. When funding did not surface, the group requested permission from the NBA to relocate the team to Oklahoma City.[120] On April 18, 2008, the NBA gave approval for the move for the 2008-2009 season, which depends on the outcome of litigation surrounding the ownership of the team and its attempt to break a lease with KeyArena early.[121] The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The New Orleans Hornets are a professional basketball team based in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The term major professional sports league is used to describe the most important and well regarded leagues in the biggest professional sports in a country or region. ... For the rehabilitation facility in California, sometimes referred to in the media as the Ford Center, see Betty Ford Clinic. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Clayton Clay Ike[1] Bennett is an American businessman and the majority owner of the Seattle SuperSonics NBA franchise. ... The Seattle SuperSonics (also called the Seattle Sonics) are an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington. ... Seattle redirects here. ... The Seattle SuperSonics (also called the Seattle Sonics) are an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... KeyArena at Seattle Center is located north of downtown Seattle, USA on the grounds of Seattle Center (the site of 1962s Century 21 Exposition, a Worlds Fair). ...


Collegiate athletics are a popular draw in the state. The University of Oklahoma Sooners and the Oklahoma State University Cowboys average well over 60,000 fans attending their football games, and the University of Oklahoma's football program ranked 13th in attendance among American colleges in 2006, with an average of 84,561 people attending its home games.[122] The two universities meet several times each year in rivalry matches known as the Bedlam Series, which are some of the greatest sporting draws to the state. Sports programs from 11 Oklahoma colleges and universities compete within the NCAA, with four participating at the association’s highest level, Division I: University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, University of Tulsa, and Oral Roberts University.[123] Sports Illustrated magazine rates the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University among the top colleges for athletics in the nation.[9][124] In addition, 12 of the state's smaller colleges or universities participate in the NAIA, mostly within the Sooner Athletic Conference.[125] College athletics refers to a set of physical activities comprising sports and games put into place by colleges. ... The University of Oklahoma features 17 varsity sports teams. ... The Oklahoma State Universitys sports teams are called the Cowboys, a nickname adopted after the teams were known as the Tigers or Aggies. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Bedlam Series refers to the athletics rivalry between the University of Oklahoma Sooners and the Oklahoma State University Cowboys, of the Big 12 Conferences South Division. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... NAIA is an acronym (or an initialism) that can refer to the following: National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics in the United States. ... The Sooner Athletic Conference is an affiliate of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). ...


Regular LPGA tournaments are held at Cedar Ridge Country Club in Tulsa, and major championships for the PGA or LPGA have been played at Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, Oak Tree Country Club in Oklahoma City, and Cedar Ridge Country Club in Tulsa.[126] Rated one of the top golf courses in the nation, Southern Hills has hosted four PGA Championships, including one in 2007, and three U.S. Opens, the most recent in 2001.[127] Rodeos are popular throughout the state, and Guymon, in the state's panhandle, hosts one of the largest in the nation.[128] LPGA stands for Ladies Professional Golf Association. ... // The Major Championships, often referred to simply as the majors, are the four most prestigious annual tournaments in professional golf. ... USPGA redirects here. ... LPGA stands for Ladies Professional Golf Association. ... Southern Hills Country Club is a prestigious private golf and country club in Tulsa, Oklahoma in the United States. ... The PGA Championship (often referred to as the U.S. PGA Championship outside of North America) is an annual golf tournament conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA Tour. ... The United States Open Championship, commonly known as the U.S. Open, is the annual open golf tournament of the United States. ... For other uses, see Rodeo (disambiguation). ... The City of Guymon, Oklahoma serves as the seat of Texas County, Oklahoma6. ...


Health

The southwest regional facility for the Cancer Treatment Centers of America is located in Tulsa.
The southwest regional facility for the Cancer Treatment Centers of America is located in Tulsa.

The state was the 21st-largest recipient of medical funding from the federal government in 2005, with health-related federal expenditures in the state totaling $75,801,364; immunizations, bioterrorism preparedness, and health education were the top three most funded medical items.[129] Instances of major diseases are near the national average in Oklahoma, and the state ranks at or slightly above the rest of the country in percentage of people with asthma, diabetes, cancer, and hypertension.[129] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 627 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cancer Treatment Center of America In Tulsa, Oklahoma I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 627 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cancer Treatment Center of America In Tulsa, Oklahoma I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) is a company which operates cancer treatment hospitals and outpatient oncology clinics. ... Immunization (AmE) or Immunisation (BE) has a number of meanings: In medicine immunization is the process by which an individual is exposed to a material that is designed to prime his or her immune system against that material. ... For the use of biological agents in warfare, see Biological warfare. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... For other forms of hypertension, see Hypertension (disambiguation). ...


In 2000, Oklahoma ranked 45th in physicians per capita and slightly below the national average in nurses per capita, but was slightly over the national average in hospital beds per 100,000 people and above the national average in net growth of health services over a 12-year period.[130] One of the worst states for percentage of insured people, nearly 25 percent of Oklahomans between the age of 18 and 64 did not have health insurance in 2005, the fifth-highest rate in the nation.[131] Oklahomans are in the upper half of Americans in terms of obesity prevalence, and the state is the 14th most obese in the nation, with 24 percent of its adults at or near obesity.[132] It ranks 16th in terms of teenage obesity, with 11.1 percent of high school students at or near obesity, and is one of two states that do not have requirements for physical education in public schools.[132] Physical education (PE) is the interdisciplinary study of all area of science relating to the transmission of physical knowledge and skills to an individual or a group, the application of these skills, and their results. ...


The OU Medical Center, Oklahoma's largest hospital, is the only hospital in the state designated a Level I trauma center by the American College of Surgeons, and is located on the grounds of the Oklahoma Health Center, the state's largest concentration of medical research facilities.[133][134] The Regional Medical Center of the Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa is one of four such regional facilities nationwide, offering cancer treatment to the entire southwestern United States, and is one of the largest cancer treatment hospitals in the country.[135] The largest osteopathic teaching facility in the nation, Oklahoma State University Medical Center at Tulsa, also rates as one of the largest facilities in the field of neuroscience.[136][137] Level I trauma center provides the highest level of Surgical care to trauma patients. ... The American College of Surgeons, located in Chicago, Illinois is a scientific and educational association of surgeons in the United States that was founded in 1913 to improve the quality of care for the surgical patient by setting high standards for surgical education and practice. ... Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) is a company which operates cancer treatment hospitals and outpatient oncology clinics. ... Oklahoma State University Medical Center is a health institution located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ...


Media

The second largest newspaper in Oklahoma, the Tulsa World has a circulation of 189,789.
The second largest newspaper in Oklahoma, the Tulsa World has a circulation of 189,789.[138]

Oklahoma City and Tulsa are the 45th and 61st-largest media markets in the United States as ranked by Nielsen Media Research. The state's third-largest media market, Lawton-Wichita Falls, Texas, is ranked 144th nationally by the agency.[139] Broadcast television in Oklahoma began in 1949 when KFOR-TV (then WKY-TV) in Oklahoma City and KOTV-TV in Tulsa began broadcasting a few months apart.[140] Currently, all major American broadcast networks have affiliated television stations in the state.[141] A media market, broadcast market, media region, designated market area, DMA or simply market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet content. ... Nielsen Media Research (NMR) is a U.S. firm, headquartered in New York City, and operating primarily from Oldsmar, FL, which measures media audiences, including television, radio and newspapers. ... Wichita Falls is a city in Wichita County, Texas, United States. ... Terrestrial television (also known as over-the-air, OTA or broadcast television) was the traditional method of television broadcast signal delivery prior to the advent of cable and satellite television. ... KFOR-TV, referred to on-air as Oklahomas NewsChannel4, is the NBC affiliate based out of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and is owned by Local TV, a subsidiary of the private equity group Oak Hill Capital. ... KOTV, KOTV 6 is the CBS affiliate in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ...


The state has two primary newspapers. The Oklahoman, based in Oklahoma City, is the largest newspaper in the state and 48th-largest in the nation by circulation, with a weekday readership of 215,102 and a Sunday readership of 287,505. The Tulsa World, the second most widely circulated newspaper in Oklahoma and 77th in the nation, holds a Sunday circulation of 189,789 and a weekday readership of 138,262.[138] Oklahoma's first newspaper was established in 1844, called the Cherokee Advocate, and was written in both Cherokee and English.[142] In 2006, there were more than 220 newspapers located in the state, including 177 with weekly publications and 48 with daily publications.[142] Reading the newspaper: Brookgreen Gardens in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. ... The Oklahoman is the largest daily and statewide newspaper in Oklahoma and is the only daily newspaper that covers the entire Oklahoma City metro area. ... The Tulsa World is the daily newspaper for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is the second-most widely circulated newspaper in the state, after The Oklahoman. ... Original distribution of the Cherokee language Cherokee (; Tsalagi) is an Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee people which uses a unique syllabary writing system. ...


Two large public radio networks are broadcast in Oklahoma: Oklahoma Public Radio and Public Radio International. First launched in 1955, Oklahoma Public Radio was the first public radio network in Oklahoma, and has won 271 awards for outstanding programming.[143] Public Radio International broadcasts on 10 stations throughout the state, and provides more than 400 hours of programming.[144] The state's first radio station, KRFU in Bristow, moved to Tulsa and became KVOO in 1927.[145] In 2006, there were more than 500 radio stations in Oklahoma broadcasting with various local or nationally owned networks.[146] Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... Public Radio International (PRI) is a Minneapolis-based American public radio organization, with locations in Boston, New York, and London. ... Bristow is a city located in Creek County, Oklahoma. ... KVOO is a country music radio station in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ...


Transportation

One of ten major toll highways in Oklahoma, the Will Rogers Turnpike extends northeast from Tulsa.
One of ten major toll highways in Oklahoma, the Will Rogers Turnpike extends northeast from Tulsa.

Transportation in Oklahoma is generated by an anchor system of interstate highways, commuter rail lines, airports, seaports, and mass transit networks. Situated along an integral point in the United States Interstate network, Oklahoma contains three interstate highways and four auxiliary interstate highways. In Oklahoma City, Interstate 35 intersects with Interstate 44 and Interstate 40, forming one of the most important intersections along the United States highway system.[147] More than 12,000 miles (19,000 km) of roads make up the state's major highway skeleton, including state-operated highways, ten turnpikes or major toll roads,[147] and the longest drivable stretch of Route 66 in the nation.[148] In 2005, Interstate 44 in Oklahoma City was Oklahoma's busiest highway, with a daily traffic volume of 131,800 cars.[149] In 2007, the state had the nation's highest number of bridges classified as structurally deficient, with nearly 6,300 bridges in disrepair, including 127 along its primary highway system.[150] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 912 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Will Rogers Turnpike at the Missouri-Oklahoma state line. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 912 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Will Rogers Turnpike at the Missouri-Oklahoma state line. ... The Will Rogers Turnpike runs from Tulsa, Oklahoma to the Missouri state line. ... Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ... railroads redirects here. ... Airport - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Categories: Stub | Commercial item transport and distribution | Transportation ... In the United States of America, transit describes local area common carrier passenger transportation configured to provide scheduled service on fixed routes on a non-reservation basis. ... A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... The auxiliary Interstate Highways (also called 3-digit Interstate Highways) is an additional network of freeways of the Interstate Highway System. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 35 Interstate 35 (abbreviated I-35) is a north–south interstate highway in the central United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 44 Interstate 44 (abbreviated I-44) is an interstate highway in the central United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 40 Interstate 40 (abbreviated I-40) is a major west-east interstate highway in the United States. ... A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ...

Map of Oklahoma showing major roads and thoroughfares
Map of Oklahoma showing major roads and thoroughfares

Oklahoma's largest commercial airport is Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City, averaging a yearly passenger count of more than 3.5 million in 2005.[151] Tulsa International Airport, the state's second largest commercial airport, serves more than three million travelers annually.[152] Between the two, thirteen major airlines operate in Oklahoma.[153][154] In terms of traffic, Riverside-Jones airport in Tulsa is the state's busiest airport, with 235,039 takeoffs and landings in 2006.[155] In total, Oklahoma has over 150 public-use airports.[156] File links The following pages link to this file: Oklahoma Categories: Oklahoma maps | National Atlas images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Oklahoma Categories: Oklahoma maps | National Atlas images ... Will Rogers World Airport (IATA: OKC, ICAO: KOKC) is located in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and is the primary commercial airport in Oklahoma. ... Tulsa International Airport (IATA: TUL, ICAO: KTUL) is a public airport located five miles (8 km) northeast of the city of Tulsa, in Tulsa County, Oklahoma, USA. The airport has three runways. ...


Oklahoma is connected to the nation's rail network via Amtrak's Heartland Flyer, its only regional passenger rail line. It currently stretches from Oklahoma City to Fort Worth, Texas, though lawmakers began seeking funding in early 2007 to connect the Heartland Flyer to Tulsa.[157] Two seaports on rivers serve Oklahoma: the Port of Muskogee and the Tulsa Port of Catoosa. The only port handling international cargo in the state, the Tulsa Port of Catoosa is the most inland ocean-going port in the nation and ships over two million tons of cargo each year.[158][159] Both ports are located on the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System, which connects barge traffic from Tulsa and Muskogee to the Mississippi River via the Verdigris and Arkansas rivers, contributing to one of the busiest waterways in the world.[159] Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... Amtraks Heartland Flyer is a daily train that follows a 206-mile (332-km) route between Fort Worth, Texas and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant, Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City 298. ... Downtown Tulsa Tulsa is the second-largest city in Oklahoma. ... The Port of Muskogee is a regional port, located in Muskogee, Oklahoma, USA. Category: Ports and harbors of the United States ... The Tulsa Port of Catoosa is located in the city of Catoosa in Rogers County, just outside of Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Inland waterway system with McClellan-Kerr Navigation System shown in red. ... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Verdigris River is a tributary of the Arkansas River in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma in the United States. ... The Arkansas River flows through Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. ...


Law and government

The Oklahoma State Capitol hosts an oil derrick on its grounds.

The government of Oklahoma is a liberal democracy modeled after the Federal Government of the United States, with executive, legislative, and judicial branches.[160] The state has 77 counties with jurisdiction over most local government functions within each respective domain,[19] five congressional districts, and a voting base with a majority in the Democratic Party.[13] State officials are elected by plurality voting. Flag of the State of Oklahoma The government of the US State of Oklahoma, established by the Oklahoma Constitution, is a republican democracy modeled after the Federal government of the United States. ... Oklahoma State Capitol The Oklahoma State Capitol, located in Oklahoma City, is the seat of government of the U.S. state of Oklahoma and the location of the chambers of the Oklahoma Legislature. ... Liberal democracy is a form of government. ... United States Government redirects here. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... As of the 2000 census, there are five Oklahoma United States congressional districts. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... An example of a plurality ballot. ...


Branches

See also: Governor of Oklahoma, Oklahoma Legislature, and Oklahoma Supreme Court

The Legislature of Oklahoma consists of the Senate and the House of Representatives. As the lawmaking branch of the state government, it is responsible for raising and distributing the money necessary to run the government. The Senate has 48 members serving four-year terms, while the House has 101 members with two year terms. The state has a term limit for its legislature that restricts any one person to a total of twelve cumulative years service between both legislative branches.[161][162] Brad Henry, the 26th and current Governor of Oklahoma The Best Governor of the State of Oklahoma is the head of state for the State of Oklahoma. ... The State Capitol of Oklahoma The Legislature of the State of Oklahoma is the biennial meeting of the legislative branch of the Government of Oklahoma. ... The Supreme Court of Oklahoma is one of the highest judicial body in the U.S. state of Oklahoma and leads the judicial branch of the Oklahoma state government. ... The State Capitol of Oklahoma The Legislature of the State of Oklahoma is the biennial meeting of the legislative branch of the Government of Oklahoma. ... The Oklahoma Senate meets in the State Capitol of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Senate is the smaller body of the two houses of the Legislature of Oklahoma, the other being the Oklahoma House of Representatives. ... The Oklahoma House of Representatives meets in the State Capitol of Oklahoma The Oklahoma House of Representatives is the larger body of the two houses of the Oklahoma Legislature, the other being the Oklahoma Senate. ...


Oklahoma's judicial branch consists of the Oklahoma Supreme Court, the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals, and 77 District Courts that each serves one county. The Oklahoma judiciary also contains two independent courts: a Court of Impeachment and the Oklahoma Court on the Judiciary. Oklahoma has two courts of last resort: the state Supreme Court hears civil cases, and the state Court of Criminal Appeals hears criminal cases. Judges of those two courts, as well as the Court of Civil Appeals are appointed by the Governor upon the recommendation of the state Judicial Nominating Commission, and are subject to a non-partisan retention vote on a six-year rotating schedule.[161] The Supreme Court of Oklahoma is one of the highest judicial body in the U.S. state of Oklahoma and leads the judicial branch of the Oklahoma state government. ... The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals is the last state court of last resort for criminal matters arising in Oklahoma. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Court on the Judiciary is one of the two independent courts in the Oklahoma judiciary and has exclusive jurisdiction over hearing cases involving the removal of any judge of any court, excluding the Oklahoma Supreme Court, exercising judicial power under the... Partisan may refer to: A member of a lightly-equipped irregular military force formed to oppose control of an area by a foreign power or by an army of occupation. ...

The Oklahoma Senate chamber houses the operations of the Oklahoma Senate.
The Oklahoma Senate chamber houses the operations of the Oklahoma Senate.

The executive branch consists of the Governor, his staff, and other elected officials. The principle head of government, the Governor is the chief executive of the Oklahoma executive branch, serving as the ex officio Commander-in-Chief of the Oklahoma National Guard when not called into Federal use and reserving the power to veto bills passed through the Legislature. The responsibilities of the Executive branch include submitting the budget, ensuring that state laws are enforced, and ensuring peace within the state is preserved.[163] Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1395 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1395 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Oklahoma Senate meets in the State Capitol of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Senate is the smaller body of the two houses of the Legislature of Oklahoma, the other being the Oklahoma House of Representatives. ... Brad Henry, the 26th and current Governor of Oklahoma The Best Governor of the State of Oklahoma is the head of state for the State of Oklahoma. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... It has been suggested that National Guard Bureau be merged into this article or section. ... United States Government redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Local government

The state is divided into 77 counties that govern locally, each headed by a three member council of elected commissioners, a tax assessor, clerk, court clerk, treasurer, and sheriff.[164] While each municipality operates as a separate and independent local government with legislative and judicial power, county governments maintain jurisdiction over both incorporated cities and non-incorporated areas within their boundaries, but have no legislative or judicial power. Both county and municipal governments collect taxes, employ a separate police force, hold elections, and operate emergency response services within their jurisdiction.[165][166] Other local government units include school districts, technology center districts, community college districts, rural fire departments, rural water districts, and other special use districts. United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... A court clerk or clerk of the court is an occupation whose responsibilities include maintaining the records of a court. ... Look up Treasurer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ... School Districts are a form of Special-purpose district in the United States which serves to operate the local public primary, middle, and secondary schools. ...


Thirty-nine Native American tribal governments are based in Oklahoma, each holding limited powers within designated areas. While Indian reservations typical in most of the United States are not present in Oklahoma, tribal governments hold land granted during the Indian Territory era, but with limited jurisdiction and no control over state governing bodies such as municipalities and counties. Tribal governments are recognized by the United States as quasi-sovereign entities with executive, judicial, and legislative powers over tribal members and functions, but are subject to the authority of the United States Congress to revoke or withhold certain powers. The tribal governments are required to submit a constitution and any subsequent amendments to the United States Congress for approval.[167][168] BIA map of Indian reservations in the continental United States. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...

Five congressional districts are located in Oklahoma.

This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

National politics

Main article: Politics of Oklahoma

Oklahoma has a voter demographic weighted towards the Democratic Party as of 2007. Though there are 11.6 percent more registered Democrats in Oklahoma than registered Republicans,[13] the state has voted for a Republican in every presidential election from 1968 forward, and in 2004, George W. Bush carried every county in the state and 65.6 percent of the statewide vote.[169] Three third parties have substantial influence in state politics: Oklahoma Libertarian Party, Green Party of Oklahoma, Oklahoma Constitution Party. Until very recently, Oklahoma was considered a swing state in American politics, meaning, Oklahoma went back and forth between supporting the two major parties (Democrats and Republicans). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Third party. ... The Oklahoma Libertarian Party has been active in state politics since the 1970s, but due to Oklahomas restrictive ballot access requirements the party has been an official party during only portions of the last 25 years. ... // Key values The Green Party of Oklahoma is a third party founded on the Four Pillars of the Green Party: ecological wisdom, social justice, grass-roots democracy and non-violence. ... The Oklahoma Constitution Party is a member of the Oklahomans for Ballot Access Reform Coalition (OBAR) and is affiliated with the national Constitution Party. ...


Following the 2000 census, the Oklahoma delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives was reduced from six to five representatives, each serving one congressional district. For the 110th Congress (2007–2009), there are no changes in party strength, and the delegation has four Republicans and one Democrat. Oklahoma's U.S. senators are Republicans Jim Inhofe and Tom Coburn, and its U.S. Representatives are John Sullivan (R-OK-1), Dan Boren (D-OK-2), Frank D. Lucas (R-OK-3), Tom Cole (R-OK-4), and Mary Fallin (R-OK-5). The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... A congressional district is an electoral constituency that elects a single member of a congress. ... The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ... James Mountain Jim Inhofe (born November 17, 1934) is a conservative American politician from Oklahoma. ... Thomas Allen Tom Coburn, M.D. (born March 14, 1948) is a medical doctor and a Republican U.S. Senator from Oklahoma. ... John A. Sullivan (born January 1, 1965) is an American politician. ... David Daniel Dan Boren (born August 2, 1973) is a Democratic U.S. politician from the state of Oklahoma, representing Oklahomas 2nd congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives (map). ... Frank D. Lucas (b. ... Rep. ... Mary Fallin is the Lt. ...


Cities and towns

See also: List of cities in Oklahoma and List of towns in Oklahoma
Oklahoma City is the state's capital and largest city by population and land area.

Oklahoma had 549 incorporated places in 2006, including three cities over 100,000 in population and 40 over 10,000. Two of the fifty largest cities in the United States are located in Oklahoma, Oklahoma City and Tulsa, and 58 percent of Oklahomans live within their metropolitan areas, or spheres of economic and social influence defined by the United States Census Bureau as a metropolitan statistical area.[170][8] Oklahoma City, the state's capital and largest city, had the largest metropolitan area in the state in 2007, with 1,269,907 people, and the metropolitan area of Tulsa had 905,755 residents.[171] Between 2005 and 2006, the Tulsa suburbs of Jenks, Bixby, and Owasso led the state in population growth, showing percentage growths of 47.9, 44.56, and 34.31, respectively.[172] List of cities in Oklahoma, arranged in alphabetical order. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of cities in Oklahoma. ... Ten most populous cities in the United States Los Angeles San Jose San Diego Phoenix Chicago New York City Houston San Antonio Dallas Philadelphia The following is a list of the most populous incorporated places in the United States. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... Downtown Tulsa Tulsa is the second-largest city in Oklahoma. ... A metropolitan area is a large population center consisting of a large city and its adjacent zone of influence, or of several neighboring cities or towns and adjoining areas, with one or more large cities serving as its hub or hubs. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... The Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area is a large urban region located in the central part of the state of Oklahoma. ... The Tulsa Metropolitan Statistical Area is the second-largest metropolitan area in Oklahoma. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Jenks is a suburb of Tulsa, Oklahoma in Tulsa County, in the northeastern part of Oklahoma. ... Bixby is a city in Oklahoma, and is a suburb of Tulsa, Oklahoma. ...

Tulsa is the state's second largest city by population and land area.
Tulsa is the state's second largest city by population and land area.

In descending order of population, Oklahoma's largest cities in 2007 were: Oklahoma City (537,730), Tulsa (382,870), Norman (102,830), Broken Arrow (88,310), Lawton (87,540), Edmond (76,640), Midwest City (55,160), Moore (49,280), Enid (46,510), and Stillwater (44,820). Of the state's ten largest cities, three are outside the metropolitan areas of Oklahoma City and Tulsa, and only Lawton has a metropolitan statistical area of its own as designated by the United States Census Bureau, though the metropolitan statistical area of Fort Smith, Arkansas extends into the state.[172] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 315 pixelsFull resolution (2154 × 849 pixel, file size: 111 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Than Ball, Taken by myself. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 315 pixelsFull resolution (2154 × 849 pixel, file size: 111 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Than Ball, Taken by myself. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... Downtown Tulsa Tulsa is the second-largest city in Oklahoma. ... Norman, Oklahoma, is the county seat and largest city in Cleveland County in the U.S. state of Oklahoma, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... Broken Arrow is a city located in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma, primarily in Tulsa County with an extension into western Wagoner County. ... Lawton is a city in Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States. ... Edmond is a rapidly growing suburban city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma in the central part of the state. ... Midwest City is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States. ... Moore is a rapidly growing suburb in Cleveland County, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. ... Location in Garfield County and the state of Oklahoma. ... Downtown Stillwater Stillwater is a city in Payne County, Oklahoma, United States. ... Fort Smith is a city situated at the junction of the Arkansas and Poteau rivers. ...


Under Oklahoma law, municipalities are divided into two categories: cities, defined as having more than 1,000 residents, and towns, with under 1,000 residents. Both have legislative, judicial, and public power within their boundaries, but cities can choose between a mayor-council, council-manager, or strong mayor form of government, while towns operate through an elected officer system.[165] A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... The judiciary, also referred to as the judicature, consists of justices, judges and magistrates among other types of adjudicators. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... A mayor (from the Latin maīor, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ...


Demographics

Main article: Demographics of Oklahoma
Oklahoma Population Density Map
Oklahoma Population Density Map
Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1890 258,657
1900 790,391 205.6%
1910 1,657,155 109.7%
1920 2,028,283 22.4%
1930 2,396,040 18.1%
1940 2,336,434 -2.5%
1950 2,233,351 -4.4%
1960 2,328,284 4.3%
1970 2,559,229 9.9%
1980 3,025,290 18.2%
1990 3,145,585 4.0%
2000 3,450,654 9.7%
Est. 2006 3,579,212 3.7%

As of 2006, Oklahoma had an estimated population of 3,579,212, with an ancestral makeup of 14.5% German, 13.1% American, 11.8% Irish, 9.6% English, 8.1% African American, and 11.4% Native American, including 7.9% Cherokee.[173][174] though the percentage of people claiming American Indian as their only race was 8.1%.[1] The state had the second highest number of Native Americans, estimated at 395,219 in 2002, as well as the second highest percentage among all states.[174] As of 2006, 4.7% of Oklahoma's residents were foreign born,[175] compared to 12.4% for the nation.[176] The center of population of Oklahoma is located in Lincoln County near the town of Sparks.[177] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2006, Oklahoma has an estimated population of 3,579,212, which is an increase of 35,770, or 1. ... Image File history File links Oklahoma_population_map. ... Image File history File links Oklahoma_population_map. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... This page contains special characters. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Lincoln County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Sparks is a town located in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. ...


The state's 2006 per capita personal income ranked 37th at $32,210, though it has the third-fastest growing per capita income in the nation[6] and ranks consistently among the lowest states in cost of living index.[178] The Oklahoma City suburb Nichols Hills is first on Oklahoma locations by per capita income at $73,661, though Tulsa County holds the highest average.[172] In 2006, 6.8% of Oklahomans were under the age of 5, 25.9% under 18, and 13.2% were 65 or older. Females made up 50.9% of the population. Nichols Hills is an upscale inner-suburb in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. ... Oklahoma is the fourty-third richest state in the United States of America, with a per capita income of $17,646 (2000). ... Tulsa County is a county located in the state of Oklahoma. ...


Religion

Oklahoma is part of a geographical region characterized by widespread beliefs in Biblical Christianity and Evangelical Protestantism known as the "Bible Belt". Spanning the Southeastern United States, the area is known for politically and socially conservative views. Tulsa, the state's second largest city, home to Oral Roberts University, is considered an apex of the region and is known as one of the "buckles of the Bible Belt".[179][180] According to the Pew Research Center, the majority of Oklahoma's religious adherents — 85 percent — are Christian, accounting for about 80 percent of the population. The percentage of Oklahomans affiliated with Catholicism is half of the national average, while the percentage affiliated with Evangelical Protestantism is more than twice the national average — tied with Arkansas for the largest percentage of any state.[181] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red The Bible Belt is an informal term for an area of the United States of America in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a dominant part of the culture. ... An ideology is an organized collection of ideas. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... Oral Roberts University or ORU, based in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is a charismatic Christian university with an enrollment of about 5,300 students from most US states along with a number of international students. ... The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red The Bible Belt is an informal term for an area of the United States of America in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a dominant part of the culture. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic—from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1]—is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or...

Adherents participate in 73 major affiliations spread between 5,854 congregations, ranging from the Southern Baptist Convention, with 1578 churches and 967,223 members, to the Holy Orthodox Church in North America, with 1 church and 6 members. The state's largest church memberships are in the Southern Baptist Convention, the United Methodist Church, with 322,794 members, the Roman Catholic Church, with 168,625, the Assemblies of God, with 88,301, and Churches of Christ, with 83,047.[182] In 2000, there were about 5,000 Jews and 6,000 Muslims, with 10 congregations to each group.[182] Boston Ave. ... Boston Ave. ... The Boston Avenue Methodist Church, located in downtown Tulsa, Oklahoma and completed in 1929, is considered to be one of the finest examples of ecclesiastical Art Deco architecture in the United States, and has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination that consists of numerous agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual meetings... The Holy Orthodox Church in North America or HOCNA is an Eastern Orthodox Christian church located primarily in the United States and Canada, with additional communites in Europe and Africa. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... The Churches of Christ discussed in this article are not part of the United Church of Christ; the International Churches of Christ; the Disciples of Christ; the Church of Christ, Scientist (Christian Science); The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or any other denomination within the Latter Day... Languages Historical Jewish languages Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino, others Liturgical languages: Hebrew and Aramaic Predominant spoken languages: The vernacular language of the home nation in the Diaspora, significantly including English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Arabs and other Semitic groups For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ...


Oklahoma religious makeup:[182][A]

Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... In the United States, the Mainline churches are those Protestant denominations with moderate theologies which attempt to be open to new ideas and societal changes without abandoning what they consider to be the historical basis of the Christian faith. ...

State symbols

The American Bison, Oklahoma's state mammal
The American Bison, Oklahoma's state mammal
Oklahoma's quarter, released in 2008 as part of the state quarters series, depicts Oklahoma's state bird flying above its state wildflower.
Oklahoma's quarter, released in 2008 as part of the state quarters series, depicts Oklahoma's state bird flying above its state wildflower.[183]
See also: list of Oklahoma state symbols

Oklahoma's state emblems and honorary positions are codified by state law;[184] the Oklahoma Senate or House of Representatives may adopt resolutions designating others for special events and to benefit organizations. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2700x1761, 1348 KB) Summary A bison, taken by the USDA http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2700x1761, 1348 KB) Summary A bison, taken by the USDA http://www. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program (Pub. ... State nickname: Sooner State Other U.S. States Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Governor Brad Henry Official languages None Area 181,196 km² (20th)  - Land 178,023 km²  - Water 3,173 km² (1. ...


State symbols:[185]

Binomial name Tyrannus forficatus (Gmelin, 1789) The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus) is a long-tailed insect-eating bird closely related to the kingbirds. ... Binomial name Cercis canadensis Eastern Redbud (Cercis canadensis) is a large shrub or small tree in the pea family Fabaceae, native to eastern North America from southern Ontario, Canada south to northern Florida, United States. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... A glass of cows milk. ... Binomial name Meleagris gallopavo Linnaeus, 1758 For other uses, see Wild Turkey (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Morone chrysops (Rafinesque, 1820) The white bass or sand bass (Morone chrysops) is a freshwater fish of the temperate bass family Moronidae. ... Families Santalaceae (Viscaceae) Loranthaceae Misodendraceae Mistletoe is the common name for a group of hemi-parasitic plants in the order Santalales that grow attached to and within the branches of a tree or shrub. ... Oklahoma Rose (Rosa odorata (Andr. ... Binomial name Gaillardia pulchella Foug. ... Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans), also called Indian grass, is a North American prairie grass, and is the official state grass of Oklahoma. ... The rose rock is a barite (barium sulfate) crystal whose iron content gives it a reddish hue. ... Species Apis andreniformis Apis cerana, or eastern honey bee Apis dorsata, or giant honey bee Apis florea Apis koschevnikovi Apis laboriosa Apis mellifera, or western honey bee Apis nigrocincta Apis nuluensis Honey bees are a subset of bees which represent a far smaller fraction of bee diversity than most people... Port Silt Loam is the state soil of Oklahoma. ... Binomial name Crotaphytus collaris (Say, 1823) The Eastern Collared Lizard or Common Collared Lizard, Crotaphytus collaris, is a North American lizard that can be up to a foot (30 cm) long, with a large head and powerful jaws. ... For other uses, see Bullfrog (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (L.) Moench Okra (American English: , British English ), also known as ladys finger[1], bhindi (Hindustani) and gumbo, is a flowering plant in the mallow family (along with such species as cotton and cocoa) valued for its edible green fruits. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Cornbread or Johnny cake is a generic name for any number of quick breads (a bread leavened chemically, rather than by yeast) containing cornmeal. ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ... For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Biscuit (disambiguation). ... Sausage and gravy is a traditional southern breakfast dish. ... This article is about the corn-based Southern U.S. food. ... Binomial name L. Corn (Zea mays L. ssp. ... Strawberries Promo Strawberries is an album by The Damned released October 1982 on Bronze Records (catalogue #BRON 542). ... Chicken fried steak, served with mashed potatoes and baked beans. ... A slice of pecan pie Pecan Pie is also a 2002 short movie starring Jim Carrey and written/directed by Michel Gondry. ... The Black Eyed Peas are an American hip hop crew from Los Angeles, who have lately enjoyed massive international pop success. ... Square dance is often used as a general term for modern Western square dance. ... For other uses, see Drum (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Papilio polyxenes Fabricius, 1775 The Black Swallowtail, Papilio polyxenes, is a butterfly found throughout much of North America. ... Oklahoma! is the title song from the musical (by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II) This song appears after Curly and Laureys wedding. ...

See also

Oklahoma Portal

List of Oklahoma State Highways Oklahoma has a large network of roads maintained by the state. ... The following are people who were either born/raised or have lived for a significant period of time in Oklahoma. ... The United States Census Bureau has defined 2 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 4 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 17 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of Oklahoma. ...

Notes

A. ^  Determined by a survey by the Pew Research Center in 2008. Percentages represent claimed religious beliefs, not necessarily membership in any particular congregation. Figures have a ±5 percent margin of error.[181]
B. ^  Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, Judiasm, other faiths each account for less than 1 percent. Jehovah's Witness, Mormons, Orthodox Christianity, and other Christian traditions each compose less than .5% percent. 1% refused to answer the Pew Research Center's survey.[181]

Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... For a discussion of Jews as an ethnicity or ethnic group see the article on Jew. ... Jehovahs Witnesses (JW) are members of a worldwide Christian denomination. ... The term Mormon is a colloquial name, most-often used to refer to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... in Christianity: Eastern Christianity Oriental Orthodoxy Orthodox Christianity Orthodoxy by country in Judaism: Orthodox Judaism Modern Orthodox Judaism Jewish organisations: Orthodox Union Categories: ...

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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the U.S. Forest Service. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the U.S. Forest Service. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Canadian equivalent of this channel, see History Television. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USDA redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of New Mexico (UNM) is a public university in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Northern Arizona University (NAU) is a public university in Flagstaff, Arizona in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... California State University, Sacramento, better known as Sacramento State, Sac State, or CSUS, is a public university located in the city of Sacramento, California. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tulsa World is the daily newspaper for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is the second-most widely circulated newspaper in the state, after The Oklahoman. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tulsa World is the daily newspaper for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is the second-most widely circulated newspaper in the state, after The Oklahoman. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tulsa World is the daily newspaper for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is the second-most widely circulated newspaper in the state, after The Oklahoman. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tulsa World is the daily newspaper for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is the second-most widely circulated newspaper in the state, after The Oklahoman. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... KOTV, KOTV 6 is the CBS affiliate in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the university in Columbia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Oklahoma Baptist University is a Christian liberal arts university located in Shawnee, Oklahoma and owned by the Baptist General Convention of Oklahoma. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tulsa World is the daily newspaper for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is the second-most widely circulated newspaper in the state, after The Oklahoman. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NAIA is an acronym (or an initialism) that can refer to the following: National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USPGA redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the United States government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the United States government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) is a company which operates cancer treatment hospitals and outpatient oncology clinics. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the U.S. Mint Denver United States mint building The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Baird, W. David; and Danney Goble (1994). The Story of Oklahoma. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-2650-7. 
  • Dale, Edward Everett; and Morris L. Wardell (1948). History of Oklahoma. New York: Prentice-Hall. 
  • Gibson, Arrell Morgan (1981). Oklahoma: A History of Five Centuries, 2nd ed., Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-1758-3. 
  • Goble, Danney (1980). Progressive Oklahoma: The Making of a New Kind of State. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-1510-6. 
  • Jones, Stephen (1974). Oklahoma Politics in State and Nation, vol. 1 (1907-62), Enid, Okla.: Haymaker Press. 
  • Joyce, Davis D. (ed.) (1994). An Oklahoma I Had Never Seen Before: Alternative Views of Oklahoma History. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-2599-3. 
  • Morgan, Anne Hodges; and H. Wayne Morgan (eds.) (1982). Oklahoma: New Views of the Forty-sixth State. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-1651-X. 
  • Morgan, David R.; Robert E. England, and George G. Humphreys (1991). Oklahoma Politics and Policies: Governing the Sooner State. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 0-8032-3106-7. 
  • Morris, John W.; Charles R. Goins, and Edwin C. McReynolds (1986). Historical Atlas of Oklahoma, 3rd ed., Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-1991-8. 
  • Wishart, David J. (ed.) (2004). Encyclopedia of the Great Plains. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 0-8032-4787-7. 

External links

Find more about Oklahoma on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
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Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
  • Oklahoma travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Oklahoma's official web site
  • USGS real-time, geographic, and other scientific resources of Oklahoma
  • U.S. Census Bureau.
    • Oklahoma QuickFacts. Geographic and demographic information.
    • Oklahoma - Race and Hispanic Origin: 1890 to 1990 (PDF)
  • Oklahoma facts
  • Oklahoma Tourism Board
  • United States Postal Service description of the Oklahoma Statehood Stamp
  • Oklahoma tobacco policymaking


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Preceded by
Utah
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Admitted on November 16, 1907 (46th)
Succeeded by
New Mexico

Coordinates: 35.5° N 98° W Historic Southern United States. ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Oklahoma Historical Society Home (225 words)
The Oklahoma Historical Society has been collecting, preserving, and sharing the history of Oklahoma and its people since before statehood.
Now, OHS has grown from a handful of people with this same desire to collect, preserve, and share the history of the area now known as Oklahoma to several departments, museums, and historical sites from across the state and the Southwest.
An architectural masterpiece, a decade in the making, the Oklahoma History Center is located on 18 acres across from the Capital building.
Oklahoma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5945 words)
Oklahoma is a state located in the southern Great Plains and Eastern Woodlands regions of the United States, and is part of a region referred to locally as the American "Heartland." The Congressional Quarterly and Census report place Oklahoma in the Southern United States.
Oklahoma is a major fuel and food-producing state; thousands of oil and natural gas wells dot the Oklahoma landscape, and the state is among the highest food producing states in the nation.
Oklahoma is unusual in that it has two courts of last resort, the state Supreme Court hears civil cases, and the state Court of Criminal Appeals hears criminal cases (the state of Texas uses a similar system).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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