FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Okakura Kakuzo
Jump to: navigation, search

Okakura Tenshin (岡倉 天心, February 14, 1863 - September 2, 1913) was a Japanese scholar who contributed the development of arts in Japan. Jump to: navigation, search February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (246th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline. ... A precise definition of the arts can be contentious, but the following areas of activity are usually included: Art / Visual arts Architecture Crafts Dance Design / Graphic design Drawing Film Literature Music Painting Photography Pottery Sculpture Theater In academia, the Arts are usually grouped with or a subset of the Humanities. ...


Born in Yokohama, he attended Tokyo Imperial University in which he met Ernest Fenollosa. In 1890, he was one of the principal founders of the first Japanese art academy, Tokyo bijutsu gakko and a year later became the head but then was ousted from the school in an administrative struggle. Later, he also founded Nihon Bijutsuin/Nippon Bijutsu-in with Hashimoto Gaho and Yokoyama Taikan. He held the Asian section/Oriental art division of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in 1904. Jump to: navigation, search Japans tallest building, the Landmark Tower, is in the Minato Mirai 21 district of Yokohama. ... The Yasuda Auditorium on the University of Tokyos Hongo Campus. ... Title page of Cathay, poems by Ezra Pound, 1915, based on translations by Ernest Fenollosa. ... Hashimoto Gaho (橋本 雅邦 Hashimoto Gahō; 1835 - 1908) was a Japanese painter. ... Paul Gauguin, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (Doù venons-nous? Que faisons-nous? Où allons-nous?) (1897). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


He was a high-profile urbanite who had an international sense of self in the Meiji Era (1868-1912), the first dean of the Tokyo Fine Arts School (now the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music). He wrote all of his main works in English. Tenshin researched Japan's traditional art and traveled to Europe, the United States, China and India. He gave the world an image of Japan as a member of the East, in the face of a massive onslaught of Western culture. History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Meiji period (Japanese: Meiji Jidai 明治時代 ) (1868–1912... Jump to: navigation, search 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1912 was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music (東京藝術大学), or Geidai (芸大), is one of the oldest and most prestigious fine art schools in Japan. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... World map showing Europe (geographically) When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... The term Eastern world refers very broadly to the various cultures, social structures and philosophical systems of the East, namely Asia (including China, India, Japan, and surrounding regions). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


His book, The Ideals of the East, published on the eve of the Russo-Japanese War, is famous for its opening line, "Asia is one." He argued that Asia is "one" in its humiliation, of falling behind in achieving modernization, and thus being colonized by the Western powers. Jump to: navigation, search Greater Manchuria, Russian (outer) Manchuria is region to upper right in lighter Red; Liaodong Peninsula is the wedge extending into the Yellow Sea The Russo-Japanese War (1904–1905) was an extremely bloody conflict that grew out of the rival imperialist ambitions of Russia and Japan... Jump to: navigation, search World map showing Asia (geographically) Asia is the central and eastern part of Eurasia and worlds largest continent. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... World map of colonialism circa 1945. ...


But then afterward, Tenshin was compelled to protest against a Japan that tried to catch up with the Western powers by sacrificing other Asian countries in the Russo-Japanese War. Japan rapidly advanced militarily across Asia, but was forced to do an about-face after its defeat in World War II. Jump to: navigation, search World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that...


References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Okakura Kakuzo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (518 words)
Okakura Kakuzo (岡倉覚三, February 14, 1863 - September 2, 1913; also known as Okakura Tenshin) was a Japanese scholar who contributed the development of arts in Japan.
In 1890, Okakura was one of the principal founders of the first Japanese fine-arts academy, Tokyo bijutsu gakko (Tokyo School of Fine Arts) and a year later became the head, though he was later ousted from the school in an administrative struggle.
Okakura was a high-profile urbanite who had an international sense of self in the Meiji Era as the first dean of the Tokyo Fine Arts School (now the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music).
D16 Okakura Kakuzo, Japan, and English-Language Verse (237 words)
Okakura’s Ideals of the East, with Special Reference to the Art of Japan (London: Murray, 1903) and The Book of Tea (London: Putnam, 1906) have been among the most widely-read English works about Japan, and their influence in shaping Western understanding of the internal consistencies and strengths of East Asian aesthetic traditions has been profound.
Ficke acknowledges Okakura as a source for his Chats on Japanese Prints (BG5), Fletcher for his ‘Secret of Far Eastern Painting’ (BH5), and Stevens, who read Ideals in 1909, refers to the work in a letter and diary entries that identify it with ukiyoe and his own early experiments with colour imagery (see CA7).
The importance of Okakura’s writing as a source of Western understanding of Japan is discussed by Hall (A16), Ennis (A22), and Walsh (BK176a).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m