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Encyclopedia > Ojibwa
Ojibwa

"One Called From A Distance" (Midwewinind) of the White Earth Band, 1894.
Total population

175,000 Ojibway, Ojibwa, or Ojibwe may refer to: The Ojibwa (or Chippewa) people, a native people of North America The Ojibwe language, also called Anishinaabe, an Algonquian language traditionally spoken by the Algonquin, Nipissing, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Mississaugas, and Odawa, native peoples of North America The town of Ojibwa, Wisconsin, U.S... There are many uses of the word Chippewa, which is an alternate spelling/pronunciation of the Ojibwe tribe. ... Original caption states: One-Called-From-A-Distance (Midwewinind), a Chippewa from White Earth Reservation, Minnesota; half-length, seated, showing beadwork sash and vest, 1894. ... The White Earth Indian Reservation is the largest and historically poorest Indian reservation in Minnesota. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

Regions with significant populations
United States, Canada
Language(s)
English, Ojibwe
Religion(s)
Catholicism, Methodism, Midewiwin
Related ethnic groups
Ottawa, Potawatomi and other Algonquian peoples

The Ojibwa, Anishinaabe, or Chippewa (also Ojibwe, Ojibway, Chippeway, Aanishanabe, or Anishinabek) is the largest group of Native Americans. First Nations north of Mexico, including Métis. They are the third largest in the United States, surpassed only by Cherokee and Navajo. They are equally divided between the United States and Canada. Because they were formerly located mainly around Sault Ste. Marie, at the outlet of Lake Superior, the French referred to them as Saulteurs. Ojibwa who subsequently moved to the prairie provinces of Canada have retained the name Saulteaux. The major component group of the Anishinaabe, in the US they number over 100,000 living in an area stretching across the north from Michigan to Montana. Another 76,000, in 125 bands, live in Canada, stretching from western Québec to eastern British Columbia. They are known for their birch bark canoes, sacred birch bark scrolls, the use of cowrie shells, wild rice, copper points, and for the fact that they were the only Native Americans to come close to defeating the Dakota band of the Sioux. The Ojibwe Nation was the first to set the agenda for signing more detailed treaties with Canada's leaders before many settlers were allowed too far west. The Midewiwin Society was well respected as the keeper of detailed and complex scrolls of events, history, songs, maps, memories, stories, geometry, and mathematics.[1] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Anishinaabe language or the Ojibwe group of languages or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      As a... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... The Midewiwin (also spelled Midewin and Medewiwin) is from the term for the Grand Medicine Society of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England and Great Lakes regions in North America. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa, Odaawa, Outaouais, or Trader) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... First Nations is a Canadian term of ethnicity which refers to the aboriginal peoples located in what is now Canada, and their descendants who are neither Inuit nor Métis. ... The Métis (pronounced MAY tee, IPA: , in French or , in Michif ), also historically known as Bois Brule, mixed-bloods, Countryborn (or Anglo-Métis), are one of three recognized Aboriginal peoples in Canada. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... Map of the Navajo Nation The Navajo Nation (Diné in Navajo language) encompasses all things important to the Navajo. ... Sault Sainte Marie — pronounced Soo Saint Marie (IPA ) — is the name of two cities on the Saint Marys River, which forms part of the boundary between the United States and Canada. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... The Canadian prairies is a vast area of flat sedimentary land that stretches from Ontario and the Canadian Shield to the Canadian Rockies covering much of the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta - the Prairie Provinces. ... The Saulteaux are a First Nation in Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, Canada. ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44° 21′ N to 49° N  - Longitude 104° 2′ W to 116° 3′ W Population  Ranked... During the 1960s, a terrorist group known as the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) launched a decade of bombings, robberies and attacks on government offices. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Binomial name Betula papyrifera Marsh. ... It has been suggested that Canadian canoe be merged into this article or section. ... The Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) people of North America had written down complex geometrical patterns and shapes on birch bark scrolls. ... Cowry shells (also spelled cowrie), are marine snails of the genus Cypraea (family Cypraeidae), found chiefly in tropical regions, especially around the Maldives or the East Indies. ... Species Zizania aquatica Zizania latifolia Zizania palustris Zizania texana Zizania aquatica L. Hitchc. ... Look up Dakota in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Midewiwin (also spelled Midewin and Medewiwin) is from the term for the Grand Medicine Society of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England and Great Lakes regions in North America. ...

Contents

Name

The autonym for this group of Anishinaabeg is "Ojibwe" (plural: Ojibweg). This name is commonly anglicized as "Ojibwa." The name "Chippewa" is an anglicized corruption of "Ojibwa." Although many variations exist in literature, "Chippewa" is more common in the United States and "Ojibwa" predominates in Canada, but both terms do exist in both countries. The exact meaning of the name "Ojibwe" is not known; however, two most common explanations are 1) it is derived from "Ojiibwabwe" meaning "[Those who] cook until it puckers" referring to their fire-curing of moccasin seams to make them water-proof[1] and 2) the most likely, it is derived from the word "Ozhibii'iweg" meaning "[Those who] keep Records of a Vision" referring to their form of pictorial writing, and pictographs used in Midewiwin rites[2]. Across many Ojibwa communities across Canada and the US, the more generalized name of "Anishinaabe(-g)" is becoming more common. It has been suggested that Ethnonym be merged into this article or section. ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... This is a list of various names the Ojibwa have been recorded. ... Moccasin is a word originating from the scottish Gaelic Mo Caisan meaning my feet. ... Pictogram for public toilets A pictogram or pictograph is a symbol which represents an object or a concept by illustration. ... The Midewiwin (also spelled Midewin and Medewiwin) is from the term for the Grand Medicine Society of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England and Great Lakes regions in North America. ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ...


Language

Main article: Anishinaabe language

Many still speak the Ojibwe language known as Anishinaabemowin or Ojibwemowin. The language belongs to the Algonquian linguistic group, and is descended from Proto-Algonquian. Among its sister languages are Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Cree, Fox, Menominee, Potawatomi, and Shawnee. Anishinaabemowin is frequently referred to as a "Central Algonquian" language; however, Central Algonquian is an areal grouping rather than a genetic one. Ojibwemowin is the fourth most spoken Native language in North America (after Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). Many decades of fur trading with the French established the language as one of the key trade languages of the Great Lakes and the northern Great Plains. The Ojibwe presence was made highly visible among non-Native Americans and around the world by the popularity of Longfellow's 1855 epic poem, The Song of Hiawatha. Many toponyms with an origin in Ojibwa words are found in this epic. The Anishinaabe language or the Ojibwe group of languages or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). ... The Anishinaabe language or the Ojibwe group of languages or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (the two Algic languages that are not Algonquian are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... Proto-Algonquian (commonly abbreviated PA) is the name given to the posited proto-language of the languages of the Algonquian family. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Reading Adahooniigii — The Navajo Language Monthly Navajo or Navaho (native name: Diné bizaad) is an Athabaskan language (of Na-Dené stock) spoken in the southwest United States by the Navajo people (Diné). It is geographically and linguistically one of the Southern Athabaskan languages (the majority of Athabaskan languages are spoken... Cree is the name for a group of closely-related Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 50,000 speakers across Canada, from Alberta to Labrador. ... Inuktitut (Inuktitut syllabics: ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ, literally like the Inuit) is the language of the Inuit people. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members... In mathematics, see epic morphism. ... Statue of Hiawatha carrying Minnehaha at Minnehaha Park in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


History

Pre-contact

According to their tradition, and from recordings in birch bark scrolls, many more of them came from the eastern areas of North America, or Turtle Island, and from along the east coast. They traded widely across the Continent for thousands of years, and knew of the canoe routes west, and a land route to the west coast. According to the oral history, seven great miigis (radiant/iridescent) beings appeared to the peoples in the Waabanakiing (Land of the Dawn, i.e. Eastern Land) to teach the peoples of the mide way of life. However, the one of the seven great miigis beings was too spiritually powerful and killed the peoples in the Waabanakiing whenever the people were in its presence. The six great miigis beings remained to teach while the one returned into the ocean. The six great miigis beings then established doodem (clans) for the peoples in the east. Of these doodem, the five original Anishinaabe doodem were the Wawaazisii (Bullhead), Baswenaazhi (Echo-maker, i.e., Crane), Aan'aawenh (Pintail Duck), Nooke (Tender, i.e., Bear) and Moozoonsii (Little Moose), then these six miigis beings returned into the ocean as well. If the seventh miigis being stayed, it would have established the Thunderbird doodem. At a later time, one of these miigis beings appeared in a vision to relate a prophecy. The prophecy stated that if more of the Anishinaabeg did not move further west, they would not be able to keep their traditional ways alive because of the many new settlements and European immigrants that would arrive soon in the east. Their migration path would be symbolized by a series of smaller Turtle Islands, which was confirmed with miigis shells (i.e., cowry shells). After receiving assurance from the their "Allied Brothers" (i.e., Mi'kmaq) and "Father" (i.e., Abnaki) of their safety in having many more of the Anishinaabeg move inland, they advanced along the St. Lawrence River to the Ottawa River to Lake Nipissing, and then to the Great Lakes. First of these smaller Turtle Islands was Mooniyaa, which Mooniyaang (Montreal, Quebec) now stands. The "second stopping place" was in the vicinity of the Wayaanag-gakaabikaa (Concave Waterfalls, i.e. Niagara Falls). At their "third stopping place" near the present-day city of Detroit, Michigan, the Anishinaabeg divided into six divisions, of which the Ojibwa was one of these six. The first significant new Ojibwa culture-centre was their "fourth stopping place" on Manidoo Minising (Manitoulin Island). Their first new political-centre was referred as their "fifth stopping place", in their present country at Baawiting (Sault Ste. Marie). Continuing their westward expansion, the Ojibwa divided into the "northern branch" following the north-shore of Lake Superior, and "southern branch" following the south-shore of the same lake. In their expansion westward, the "northern branch" divided into a "westerly group" and a "southerly group". The "southern branch" and the "southerly group" of the "northern branch" came together at their "sixth stopping place" on Spirit Island ( 46°41′15″N, 092°11′21″W) located in the St. Louis River estuary of Duluth/Superior region where the people were directed by the miigis being in a vision to go to the "place where there are food (i.e. wild rice) upon the waters." Their second major settlement, referred as their "seventh stopping place", was at Shaugawaumikong (or Zhaagawaamikong, French, Chequamegon) on the southern shore of Lake Superior, near the present La Pointe near Bayfield, Wisconsin. The "westerly group" of the "northern branch" continued their westward expansion along the Rainy River, Red River of the North, and across the northern Great Plains until reaching the Pacific Northwest. Along their migration to the west they came across many miigis, or cowry shells, as told in the prophecy. The Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) people of North America had written down complex geometrical patterns and shapes on birch bark scrolls. ... Turtle Island may refer to: A Native American term for the North American continent Another name for Nanuya Levu, a privately owned island of the Yasawa Group in Fiji Another name for Vatoa, in the Lau Group in Fiji Turtle Island, the 1974 book of poetry by Gary Snyder, winner... The Abenaki (also Wabanuok or Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans/First Nations belonging to the Algonquian peoples of northeastern North America. ... The Midewiwin (also spelled Midewin and Medewiwin) is from the term for the Grand Medicine Society of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England and Great Lakes regions in North America. ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... [[{{{diversity_link}}}|Diversity]] {{{diversity}}} Binomial name Ameiurus nebulosus Trinomial name {{{trinomial}}} Type Species {{{type_species}}} {{{subdivision_ranks}}} [[Image:{{{range_map}}}|{{{range_map_width}}}|]] Synonyms {{{synonyms}}} The Brown Bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) is a fish of the Ictaluridae family that is widely distributed in North America. ... Genera Grus Anthropoides Balearica Bugeranus Cranes are large, long-legged and long-necked birds of the order Gruiformes, and family Gruidae. ... Binomial name Anas acuta Linnaeus, 1758 The Pintail or Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northern areas of Europe and Asia and across most of Canada, Alaska and the midwestern United States. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Depiction of a Thunderbird on a Totem Pole The mythological Thunderbird is a mythical creature common to Indigenous spirituality in North America . ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... Turtle Island may refer to: A Native American term for the North American continent Another name for Nanuya Levu, a privately owned island of the Yasawa Group in Fiji Another name for Vatoa, in the Lau Group in Fiji Turtle Island, the 1974 book of poetry by Gary Snyder, winner... Species See text. ... The Mikmaq The Mikmaq (; (also spelled Míkmaq, Migmaq, Micmac or MicMac) are a First Nations people, indigenous to northeastern New England, Canadas Atlantic Provinces, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ... Abenaki wigwam with birch bark covering The Abenaki (also Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans belonging to the Algonquian peoples of the Northeast portion of North America. ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... This is about the river in Canada. ... Ominous storm approaching the south of Lake Nipissing Lake Nipissing (French: lac Nipissing) is a lake in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... This article needs cleanup. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... Detroit redirects here. ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... Manitoulin Island is the worlds largest freshwater lake island, with an area of 2,766 square kilometres (1068 square miles). ... Sault Sainte Marie — pronounced Soo Saint Marie (IPA ) — is the name of two cities on the Saint Marys River, which forms part of the boundary between the United States and Canada. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... The Saint Louis River is a river in Minnesota that flows into Lake Superior. ... Duluth is the county seat of St. ... The Fairlawn Mansion, a 42 room mansion built in 1890 by Superiors three-time mayor Martin Pattison, is now a museum Downtown Superior, Duluth is on the horizon. ... Species Zizania aquatica Zizania latifolia Zizania palustris Zizania texana Zizania aquatica L. Hitchc. ... Chequamegon Bay (pronounced sha-wa-magon), is an inlet of Lake Superior, 12 miles NE-SW and 2-6 miles wide, in Ashland and Bayfield counties in the extreme northern part of Wisconsin. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... La Pointe is a town located in Ashland County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... This page refers to the city of Bayfield. ... Rainy River can refer to: The Rainy River in Michigan in the United States The Rainy River that forms part of the United States-Canada border between Minnesota and Ontario The Rainy River in New Zealand This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... The Red River drainage basin, with the Red River highlighted The Red River in Greater Grand Forks, as viewed from the Grand Forks side of the river The Red River in Fargo-Moorhead, as viewed from the Fargo side of the river For other things named Red River, see the... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... Species See text. ...


Post-contact with Europeans

Kay be sen day way We Win 1857
Kay be sen day way We Win 1857

Their first historical mention occurs in the Jesuit Relation of 1640. Through their friendship with the French traders they were able to obtain guns and thus successfully end their hereditary wars with the Sioux and Foxes on their west and south, with the result that the Sioux were driven out from the Upper Mississippi region, and the Foxes forced down from northern Wisconsin and compelled to ally with the Sauk. By the end of the eighteenth century the Ojibwa were the nearly unchallenged owners of almost all of present-day Michigan, northern Wisconsin, and Minnesota, including most of the Red River area, together with the entire northern shores of Lakes Huron and Superior on the Canadian side and extending westward to the Turtle Mountains of North Dakota, where they became known as the Plains Ojibwa or Saulteaux. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1094x811, 341 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ojibwa Eastman Johnson Wikipedia:WikiProject Indigenous peoples of North America/Anishinaabe/Images Metadata This file contains additional information... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1094x811, 341 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ojibwa Eastman Johnson Wikipedia:WikiProject Indigenous peoples of North America/Anishinaabe/Images Metadata This file contains additional information... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... The Fox tribe of Native Americans are an Algonquian language-speaking group that are now merged with the allied Sac tribe as the Sac and Fox Nation. ... The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Fox tribe of Native Americans are an Algonquian language-speaking group that are now merged with the allied Sac tribe as the Sac and Fox Nation. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... The Sauks or Sacs (Asakiwaki in their own language or Osakiwug) are a group of First Nations/Native Americans whose original territory may have been along the St. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... The Red River drainage basin, with the Red River highlighted The Red River in Greater Grand Forks, as viewed from the Grand Forks side of the river The Red River in Fargo-Moorhead, as viewed from the Fargo side of the river For other things named Red River, see the... Ipperwash Beach, Lake Huron. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... Turtle Mountain, or the Turtle Mountains, generally refers to an area in the north-central portion of the U.S. state of North Dakota and southwestern portion of the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... The Saulteaux are a First Nation in Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, Canada. ...


The Ojibwa were part of a long term alliance with the Ottawa and Potawatomi First Nations, called the Council of Three Fires and which fought with the Iroquois Confederacy and the Sioux. The Ojibwa expanded eastward taking over the lands alongside the eastern shores of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. The Ojibwa allied themselves with the French in the French and Indian War, and with the British in the War of 1812. The Ottawa (also Odawa, Odaawa, Outaouais, or Trader) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... First Nations is a Canadian term of ethnicity which refers to the aboriginal peoples located in what is now Canada, and their descendants who are neither Inuit nor Métis. ... The Council of Three Fires, also known as the People of the Three Fires, was a long-standing Anishinaabe alliance of the Ojibwe, Ottawa, and Potawatomi Native American tribes and First Nations. ... The Iroquois Confederacy (also known as the League of Peace and Power) is a group of First Nations/Native Americans. ... The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... Ipperwash Beach, Lake Huron. ... Georgian Bay (French: baie Georgienne) is a large bay of Lake Huron, located in Ontario, Canada. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ...


In the USA, the government attempted to remove all the Ojibwa to Minnesota west of Mississippi River culminating in the Sandy Lake Tragedy and several hundred deaths. Through the efforts of Chief Buffalo and popular opinion against Ojibwa removal, the bands east of the Mississippi were allowed to return to permanent reservations on ceded territory. A few families were removed to Kansas as part of the Potawatomi removal. Indian Removal was a nineteenth century policy of the government of the United States that sought to relocate Native American tribes living east of the Mississippi River to lands west of the river. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Sandy Lake Tragedy was the death of several hundred Ojibwe during the US Governments attempt at removal of the tribe in 1850. ... Chief Buffalo (Ojibwe: Gichi Waish-Ke or Bizhiki(1759?-1855) was an Ojibwe leader from La Pointe, Wisconsin USA. He is most widely known for persuading President Millard Fillmore to allow the Ojibwe to stay on their lands on the south shore of Lake Superior. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ...


In British North America, the cession of land by treaty or purchase was governed by the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and subsequently most of the land in Upper Canada was ceded to the Crown. Even with the Jay Treaty signed between the Crown and the United States, the then newly formed United States did not fully uphold the treaty, causing illegal immigration into Ojibwa and other Native American lands, which culminated in the Northwest War. Subsequently, much of the lands in Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, parts of Illinois and Wisconsin, and northern Minnesota and North Dakota were ceded to the United States. However, provisions were made in many of the land cession treaties to allow for continued hunting, fishing and gathering of natural resources by the Ojibwe even after the land sales. In northwestern Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta the numbered treaties were signed. British Columbia had no signed treaties until the late 1900's, and most areas have no treaties yet. There are ongoing treaty land entitlements to settle and negotiate. The treaties are constantly being reinterpreted by the courts because many of them are vague and difficult to apply in modern times. However, the numbered treaties were some of the most detailed treaties signed for their time. The Ojibwa Nation set the agenda and negotiated the first numbered treaties before they would allow safe passage of many more settlers to the prairies. This does not cite any references or sources. ... A portion of eastern North America; the 1763 Proclamation line is the border between the red and the pink areas. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... This article refers to the Commonwealths concept of the monarchys legal authority. ... The Treaty The Jay Treaty between the United States and Great Britain averted war, solved many issues left over from the Revolution, and opened ten years of peaceful trade in the midst of a large war. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... This article is about the Canadian province. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944...


Often, earlier treaties were known as "Peace and Friendship Treaties" to establish community bonds between the Ojibwa and the European settlers. These earlier treaties established the groundwork for cooperative resource sharing between the Ojibwa and the settlers. However, later treaties involving land cessions were seen as territorial advantages for both the United States and Canada, but the land cession terms were often not fully understood by the Ojibwa due to the cultural differences in understanding of the land. For the governments of the United States and the Canada, land was considered a commodity of value that could be freely bought, owned and sold. For the Ojibwa, land was considered a fully-shared resource, along with air, water and sunlight; concept of land sales or exclusive ownership of land was a foreign concept not known to the Ojibwa at the time of the treaty councils. Consequently, today in both Canada and the United States, legal arguments in treaty-rights and treaty interpretations often bring to light the differences in cultural understanding of these treaty terms in order to come to legal understanding of the treaty obligations.


See Treaty Timeline below - and see Individual Treaties with maps at [2]. This article is about the native North American people. ...


Culture

Ojibwe Wigwam at Grand Portage - Unknown
Ojibwe Wigwam at Grand Portage - Unknown

The Ojibwa live in groups (otherwise known as "bands"). Most Ojibwa, except for the Plains bands, lived a sedentary lifestyle, engaging in fishing, hunting, the farming of maize and squash, and the harvesting of Manoomin (wild rice). Their typical dwelling was the wiigiwaam (wigwam), built either as a waaginogaan (domed-lodge) or as a nasawa'ogaan (pointed-lodge), made of birch bark, juniper bark and willow saplings. They also developed a form of pictorial writing used in religious rites of the Midewiwin and recorded on birch bark scrolls and possibly on rock. The sacred scrolls are complicated with a lot of historical, geometrical, and mathematical knowledge communicated through the many complex pictures. The miigis shell (cowry shell) was also used in ceremonies, and this shell can only be found from far away coastal areas, indicating a vast trade network at some time across the continent. The use and trade of copper across the continent is also proof of a very large area of trading that took place thousands of years ago, as far back as the Hopewell culture. Certain types of rock used for spear and arrow heads were also traded over large distances. The use of petroforms, petroglyphs, and pictographs was common throughout their traditional territories. Petroforms and medicine wheels were a way to teach the important concepts of four directions, astronomical observations about the seasons, and as a memorizing tool for certain stories and beliefs. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1515x1056, 627 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ojibwa Eastman Johnson Wikipedia:WikiProject Indigenous peoples of North America/Anishinaabe/Images Metadata This file contains additional information... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1515x1056, 627 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ojibwa Eastman Johnson Wikipedia:WikiProject Indigenous peoples of North America/Anishinaabe/Images Metadata This file contains additional information... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Species - hubbard squash, buttercup squash - cushaw squash - butternut squash - most pumpkins, acorn squash, summer squash References: ITIS 22365 2002-11-06 Hortus Third Squashes are four species of the genus Cucurbita, also called pumpkins and marrows depending on variety or the nationality of the speaker. ... Species Zizania aquatica Zizania latifolia Zizania palustris Zizania texana Zizania aquatica L. Hitchc. ... Apache wickiup, by Edward S. Curtis, 1903 A wigwam or wickiup is a domed single-room dwelling used by certain Native American tribes. ... Species Many species; see text and classification Birch is the name of any tree of the genus Betula, in the family Betulaceae, closely related to the beech/oak family, Fagaceae. ... For other uses, see Bark (disambiguation). ... Species Junipers are coniferous plants in the genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. ... Species About 350, including: Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow Salix alba - White Willow Salix alpina - Alpine Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow Salix arctica - Arctic Willow Salix atrocinerea Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix bakko Salix barrattiana... “Write” redirects here. ... The Midewiwin (also spelled Midewin and Medewiwin) is from the term for the Grand Medicine Society of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England and Great Lakes regions in North America. ... The Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) people of North America had written down complex geometrical patterns and shapes on birch bark scrolls. ... Species See text. ... Copper has played a significant part in the history of mankind, which has used the easily accessible uncompounded metal for nearly 10,000 years. ... Hopewell mounds from the Mound City Group in Ohio Hopewell culture is the term used to describe common aspects of the Native American culture that flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States from 200 BC to 400 A.D. At its greatest extent, Hopewell culture stretched from... Petroforms are large shapes that were made out of large rocks. ... Petroglyphs on a Bishop Tuff tableland Petroglyph on Petroglyph Point Petroglyphs on Petroglyph Point Petroglyphs on Petroglyph Point Petroglyphs on Newspaper Rock State Historic Monument Petroglyphs from Scandinavia (Häljesta, Västmanland in Sweden). ... Pictogram for public toilets A pictogram or pictograph is a symbol which represents an object or a concept by illustration. ... Medicine wheels were commonly used by North American natives such as the Ojibwa. ...


The Ojibwe people and culture are alive and growing today. During the summer months, the people attend jiingotamog for the spiritual and niimi'idimaa for a social gathering (pow-wows or "pau waus") at various reservations in the Anishinaabe-Aki (Anishinaabe Country). Many people still follow the traditional ways of harvesting wild rice, picking berries, hunting, making medicines, and making maple sugar. Many of the Ojibwa take part in sun dance ceremonies across the continent. The sacred scrolls are also kept hidden away until those that are worthy and respect them are given permission to see them and then to interpret them properly. This article is about a Native American gathering. ... Binomial name Acer saccharum Marshall The Sugar Maple Acer saccharum is a prominent tree in the hardwood forests of eastern North America. ... Maple sugar is created when the blood of the dingo is boiled for longer than is needed to create maple syrup or [maple toffee. ... Sketch of a Siouan Sun Dance by George Catlin The Sun Dance is a ceremony practiced by a number of native americans. ...


The Ojibwa would bury their dead in a burial mound; many erect a jiibegamig or a "spirit-house" over each mound. Instead of a headstone with the deceased's name inscribed upon it, a traditional burial mound would typically have a wooden marker, inscribed with the deceased's doodem. Due to the distinct features of these burials, Ojibwa graves have been often looted by grave robbers. In the United States, many Ojibwa communities safe-guard their burial mounds through the enforcement of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. Alternate meanings of barrow: see Barrow_in_Furness for the town of Barrow in Cumbria, England; also Barrow, Alaska in the U.S.; also River Barrow in Ireland. ... The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (or NAGPRA) is a United States federal law passed in 1990 requiring that Native Americans cultural items be returned to their respective peoples if and when they have been excavated, and allows archeological teams a short time for analysis before the remains...


The Ojibwa viewed the world in two genders: animate and inanimate, rather than male and female. On the animate gender spectrum, a person could serve the society as a male-role or a female-role. From John Tanner to Anthropologist Hermann Baumann, they have documented Ojibwa peoples not falling into the European ideas of gender and its gender-roles, called egwakwe (or Anglicised to "agokwa"). Though these egwakweg may contribute to their community in whatever fashion that bring out their best character, sometimes these documented male-to-female transsexual Midew among the Ojibwa were more readily noticed by the non-Anishinaabe documenters.[3] A well-known egwakwe warrior and guide in Minnesota history was Ozaawindib. John Tanner (c. ... A transsexual (sometimes transexual) person establishes a permanent identity with the opposite gender to their assigned (usually at birth) sex. ... The Midewiwin (also spelled Midewin and Medewiwin) is from the term for the Grand Medicine Society of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England and Great Lakes regions in North America. ... There are several Anishinaabe peoples with the name Yellow Head. // Ozaawindib (Yellow Head in English, recorded variously as Oza Windib, O-zaw-wen-dib, O-zaw-wan-dib, Ozawondib, etc. ...


Several Ojibwa bands in the United States cooperate in the Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission, which manages their treaty hunting and fishing rights in the Lake Superior-Lake Michigan areas. The commission follows the directives of U.S. agencies to run several wilderness areas. See List of U.S. state and tribal wilderness areas. Some Minnesota Ojibwa tribal councils cooperate in the 1854 Authority, which manages their treaty hunting and fishing rights in the Arrowhead Region. In Michigan, the 1836 Chippewa-Ottawa Resource Authority manages the hunting, fishing and gathering rights about Sault Ste. Marie, and the waters of Lakes Michigan and Huron. In Canada, the Grand Council of Treaty #3 manages the Treaty 3 hunting and fishing rights around Lake of the Woods. For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... --67. ... List of wilderness areas designated by U.S. state and tribal governments. ... The Arrowhead Region of Minnesota is comprised of Carlton, Cook, Lake and St. ... --67. ... Ipperwash Beach, Lake Huron. ... Treaty 3 was a treaty contract signed on 3 October 1887 between the Ojibway Nation and Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom. ... Lake of the Woods from space, May 1998 Lake of the Woods. ...


Kinship and clan system

Ojibwa understanding of kinship is complex, taking into account of the not only the immediate family but also the extended family. It is considered a modified Bifurcate merging kinship system. Siblings generally share the same term with parallel-cousins as with any Bifurcate merging kinship system since they all part of the same clan, but the modified system allows for younger sibling to share the same kinship term with younger cross-cousins. In addition the complexity wanes as one goes away from the speaker's immediate generation, with some degree of complexity retained with female relatives (for example, ninooshenh is "my mother's sister" or "my father's sister-in-law"—i.e., my parallel-aunt—but also "my parent's female cross-cousin"). In both with the great-grandparents and older generations and with the great-grandchildren and younger generations, the Ojibwa collectively calls them aanikoobijigan. This sign of kinship/clans speaks of the very nature of the Anishinaabe's entire philosophy/lifestyle, that is of interconnectedness and balance between all living generations and all generations of the past and of the future. The Anishinaabe, like most Algonquian-speaking groups in North America, base their system of kinship on patrilineal clans or totems. ... Kinship is the most basic principle of organizing individuals into social groups, roles, and categories. ... Iroquois kinship (also known as bifurcate merging) is a kinship system used to define family. ... Kinship and descent is one of the major concepts of cultural anthropology. ... Parallel cousin is an anthropological term denoting consanguinial kin who are in the same descent group as the subject and are from the parents same-sexed sibling. ...


The Ojibwe people were divided into a number of odoodeman (clans; singular: odoodem) named primarily for animal totems (or doodem, as an Ojibwe person would say this word in English). The five original totems were Wawaazisii (Bullhead), Baswenaazhi (Echo-maker, i.e., Crane), Aan'aawenh (Pintail Duck), Nooke (Tender, i.e., Bear) and Moozwaanowe ("Little" Moose-tail). The Crane totem was the most vocal among the Ojibwa, and the Bear was the largest — so large, in fact, that it was sub-divided into body parts such as the head, the ribs and the feet. A totem is any entity which watches over or assists a group of people, such as a family, clan or tribe (Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary [1] and Websters New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition). ... The Anishinaabe, like most Algonquian-speaking groups in North America, base their system of kinship on patrilineal clans or totems. ... [[{{{diversity_link}}}|Diversity]] {{{diversity}}} Binomial name Ameiurus nebulosus Trinomial name {{{trinomial}}} Type Species {{{type_species}}} {{{subdivision_ranks}}} [[Image:{{{range_map}}}|{{{range_map_width}}}|]] Synonyms {{{synonyms}}} The Brown Bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) is a fish of the Ictaluridae family that is widely distributed in North America. ... Genera Grus Anthropoides Balearica Bugeranus Cranes are large, long-legged and long-necked birds of the order Gruiformes, and family Gruidae. ... Binomial name Anas acuta Linnaeus, 1758 The Pintail or Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northern areas of Europe and Asia and across most of Canada, Alaska and the midwestern United States. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ...


Traditionally, each band had a self-regulating council consisting of leaders of the communities' clans or odoodeman, with the band often identified by the principle doodem. In meeting others, the traditional greeting among the Ojibwe peoples is "What is your doodem?" ("Aaniin odoodemaayan?") in order to establish a social conduct between the two meeting parties as family, friends or enemies. Today, the greeting has been shortened to "Aaniin."


Spiritual beliefs

The Ojibwa have a number of spiritual beliefs passed down by oral tradition under the Midewiwin teachings. These include a creation narrative and a recounting of the origins of ceremonies and rituals. Spiritual beliefs and rituals were very important to the Ojibwa because spirits guided them through life. Birch bark scrolls and Petroforms were used to pass along knowledge and information, as well as used for ceremonies. Pictographs were also used for ceremonial use. The sweatlodge is still used during important ceremonies about the four directions and to pass along the oral history of the people. Teaching lodges are still common today to teach the next generations about the language and ancient ways of the past. These old ways, ideas, and teachings are still preserved today with these living ceremonies. Anishinaabe traditional beliefs cover the traditional belief system of the Anishinaabeg peoples, consisting of the Algonquin/Nipissing, Ojibwa/Chippewa/Saulteaux/Mississaugas, Odawa, Potawatomi and Oji-cree, located primarily in the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada. ... Oral tradition or oral culture is a way of transmitting history, literature or law from one generation to the next in a civilization without a writing system. ... The Midewiwin (also spelled Midewin and Medewiwin) is from the term for the Grand Medicine Society of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England and Great Lakes regions in North America. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) people of North America had written down complex geometrical patterns and shapes on birch bark scrolls. ... Petroforms are large shapes that were made out of large rocks. ... Pictogram for public toilets A pictogram or pictograph is a symbol which represents an object or a concept by illustration. ... The sweat lodge is a ceremonial sauna used by North American First Nations or Native American peoples. ...


In popular culture

The legend of the Ojibwa "Windigo," in which tribesmen identify with a cannibalistic monster and prey on their families, is a story with many meanings, one of them points to the consequences of greed and the destruction that results from it. It is mentioned in the fiction of Thomas Pynchon. In his story Of Father's and Sons, Ernest Hemingway uses two Ojibway as secondary characters. The Wendigo in Native American mythology In the mythology of the Algonquin tribe of Native Americans, the Wendigo (or Windigo) is a malevolent supernatural creature. ... Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ...


During the sixth season of The Sopranos, an old Ojibwe proverb is shown in prominence and quoted in at least three episodes. This article is about the television series. ...


In the comic strip For Better or For Worse, Elizabeth was a schoolteacher in Mtigwaki, a fictional Ojibwa village in Northern Ontario. For Better or For Worse is a comic strip by Lynn Johnston that began in September 1979. ... Government Canada Ontario Geographical characteristics Area     City km² Population     City (2005) 350   (not counting the dogs) Time zone   Summer (DST) EST (UTC-5) EDT (UTC-6) Website: http://www. ...


Novelist Louise Erdrich is Anishinabe and has written about characters from her culture in Tracks, Love Medicine, and The Bingo Queen. Medicine woman Keewaydinoquay Peschel has written books on ethnobotany and books for children. Winona LaDuke is a popular political and intellectual voice for the Anishinabe people. Karen Louise Erdrich (born June 7, 1954) is a Native American (Chippewa) author of novels, poetry, and childrens books. ... Keewaydinoquay Pakawakuk Peschel was an Anishinaabeg Elder of the Crane Clan who became known as a scholar, ethnobotanist, herbalist, medicine woman, teacher and author. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Literary theorist and writer Gerald Vizenor has drawn extensively on Anishinabe philosophies of language. Gerald Vizenor (born 1934) is a Native American (Chippewa) writer. ...


Bands and First Nations of Ojibwe people

Chippewa chief Rocky Boy
Chippewa chief Rocky Boy

Warren, in his History of the Ojibway People, records 10 major divisions of the Ojibwa in the United States, omitting the Ojibwa located in Michigan, western Minnesota and westward, and all of Canada; however, when if major historical bands located Michigan and Ontario are added, the count becomes 14: Original caption: Rocky Boy (Stone Child), a Chippewa chief; three-quarter length, standing, dressed in ornate costume. ... Original caption: Rocky Boy (Stone Child), a Chippewa chief; three-quarter length, standing, dressed in ornate costume. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ...

English Name Ojibwa Name
(in Double-vowel spelling)
Location
Saulteaux Baawitigowininiwag about Sault Ste. Marie
Boarder-Sitters Biitan-akiing-enabijig northern Wisconsin
Lake Superior Band Gichi-gamiwininiwag south shore of Lake Superior
Mississippi River Band Gichi-ziibiwininiwag upper Mississippi River in Minnesota
Rainy Lake Band Goojijiwininiwag Rainy Lake and River, about the northern boundary of Minnesota
Ricing-Rails Manoominikeshiinyag along headwaters of St. Croix River in Wisconsin and Minnesota
Pillagers Mekamaadwewininiwag Leech Lake, Minnesota
Mississaugas Misi-zaagiwininiwag north of Lake Erie
Algonquins (Nipissing ) Odishkwaagamiig Quebec-Ontario boarder, about Lake Nipissing
Doki's Band N/A Along French River region in Ontario, near Lake Nipissing
Ottawa Lake (Lac Courte Oreilles) Band Odaawaa-zaaga'iganiwininiwag Lac Courte Oreilles, Wisconsin
Bois Forte Band Zagaakwaandagowininiwag north of Lake Superior
Torch (Flambeau) Band Waaswaaganiwininiwag head of Wisconsin River
Muskrat Portage Band Wazhashk-Onigamininiwag northwest side of Lake Superior at the Canadian border

These 10 major divisions and other major groups that Warren did not record developed into these Ojibwa Bands and First Nations of today. Bands are listed under their respective tribes where possible. The Saulteaux are a First Nation in Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, Canada. ... Sault Sainte Marie — pronounced Soo Saint Marie (IPA ) — is the name of two cities on the Saint Marys River, which forms part of the boundary between the United States and Canada. ... Tribes Location St. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... The Lake Superior Chippewa (Anishinaabe: Gichigamiwininiwag) were a historical band of Ojibwe Indians living around Lake Superior in what is now the northern parts of Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... Mississippi River Band of Chippewa Indians or simply the Mississippi Chippewa, are a historical Ojibwa Band inhabiting the head-waters of the Mississippi River and its tributaries. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... The Rainy River is a river, approximately 85 mi (140 km), that forms part of the U.S.-Canada border separating northern Minnesota and northwestern Ontario. ... Rainy River can refer to: The Rainy River in Michigan in the United States The Rainy River that forms part of the United States-Canada border between Minnesota and Ontario The Rainy River in New Zealand This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Tribes Location St. ... The St. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Pillager Band of Chippewa Indians is a historical band of Chippewa (Ojibwe), originally living at the headwaters of the Mississippi River. ... Leech Lake is a lake located in north central Minnesota, United States. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... The Mississaugas are a native people located in Southern Ontario. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... The Nipissing First Nation consists of first nation (i. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Ominous storm approaching the south of Lake Nipissing Lake Nipissing (French: lac Nipissing) is a lake in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The French River (or Rivière des Français) is a river in central Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Ominous storm approaching the south of Lake Nipissing Lake Nipissing (French: lac Nipissing) is a lake in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Lac Courte Oreilles are one of 7 Wisconsin bands of Ojibwa. ... Lac Courte Oreilles is a lake in Sawyer County, Wisconsin near the town of Hayward. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Bois Forte Indian Reservation is an Indian reservation formed of three regions in the northern Minnesota. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa are an Ojibwa Native American tribe, with an Indian reservation in the Town of Lac du Flambeau, Vilas County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... The Wisconsin River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 430 mi (692 km) long, in the state of Wisconsin in the United States. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ...

The Aamjiwnaang First Nation is located near Sarnia, Ontario, in Canada. ... The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) is an Indian reservation forming the land base of the Sault Ste. ... Cat Lake is an Ojibwa community 180 km northwest of Sioux Lookout in northwestern Ontario with a population as of 2003 of 465. ... Chapleau Ojibway First Nation is an Ojibwa First Nation located in Chapleau Township, Sudbury District, Ontario, Canada. ... Map of York Region showing Fox, Snake, and Georgina islands. ... Chippewas of Kettle and Stony Point First Nation, or Kettle Point No. ... The name Mnjikaning refers to the fishing weirs at the narrows between Lake Simcoe and Lake Couchiching and it means means “in/on/at or near the fence”. Mnjikaning sits on approximately 2,350 acres of land on eight separate parcels. ... Chippewas of Saugeen Ojibway Territory, The Chippewas of Saugeen have lived in Ojibway Tterritory since time immemorial. ... The Chippewa Cree Tribe is a mixed group of Native Americans in Montana, among the last to come into the state. ... Rocky Boys Indian Reservation was created in 1916 and is the home of the Chippewa-Cree Tribe. ... The Curve Lake First Nation is Mississauga Ojibway First Nation located in Peterborough County of Ontario. ... The tribal logo The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians are a United States federally recognized Native American tribal entity. ... Garden River First Nation (or Gitigaan-ziibi Anishinaabe in the Anishinaabe language) is an Ojibwa band located at Garden River 14, Ontario. ... Asubpeeschoseewagong (Asabiinyashkosiwagong, in the Anishinaabe language), also known as Grassy Narrows #149, is an Indian reserve located 80km north of Kenora, Ontario. ... Islands in the Trent Waters is an Indian reserve about 15 km north of Peterborough, Ontario on islands in Buckhorn Lake, Pigeon Lake, and Stony Lake. ... Magnetawan No. ... Lac Seul First Nation is located on the southeastern shores of Lac Seul, 56 km northeast of the city of Dryden, Ontario. ... The Lake Superior Chippewa (Anishinaabe: Gichigamiwininiwag) were a historical band of Ojibwe Indians living around Lake Superior in what is now the northern parts of Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. ... Historical photo of Chippewa at Bad River The Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of the Chippewa is located on a reservation on the south shore of Lake Superior. ... Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (or the Gete-gitigaaniwininiwag in the Anishinaabe language) is a band of the Lake Superior Chippewa, many of whom reside on the Lac Vieux Desert Indian Reservation, an Indian reservation located near Watersmeet, Michigan. ... The LAnse Indian Reservation is the land base of the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community of the Lake Superior Bands of Chippewa Indians (successor of the L’Anse, Lac Vieux Desert, and Ontonagon Bands). ... The Lac Courte Oreilles are one of 7 Wisconsin bands of Ojibwa. ... The Lac Courte Oreilles are one of 7 Wisconsin bands of Ojibwa. ... Tribes Location St. ... The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa are an Ojibwa Native American tribe, with an Indian reservation in the Town of Lac du Flambeau, Vilas County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa is a band of the Lake Superior Chippewa Tribe. ... One Called From A Distance (Midwewinind) of the White Earth Band, 1894 The Ojibwa or Chippewa (also Ojibwe, Ojibway, Chippeway or Anishinabek) are the largest group of Native Americans/First Nations north of Mexico, including Métis. ... Tribes Location St. ... Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe White Earth Band of Ojibwe Notably, the Red Lake Band of Chippewa is not part of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe. ... Bois Forte Indian Reservation is an Indian reservation formed of three regions in the northern Minnesota. ... Bois Forte Indian Reservation is an Indian reservation formed of three regions in the northern Minnesota. ... Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (or Wiikwe-wayekwaa-gichigamiing Gichigamiwininiwag in the Ojibwe language, meaning Lake Superior Men at the far end of the Great Lake) is an Anishinaabe (Ojibwa) band located near Duluth, Minnesota. ... Grand Portage Indian Reservation - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The Leech Lake Indian Reservation is located in the north-central Minnesota counties of Beltrami, Cass, Hubbard, and Itasca. ... The Lake Superior Chippewa (Anishinaabe: Gichigamiwininiwag) were a historical band of Ojibwe Indians living around Lake Superior in what is now the northern parts of Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. ... Mississippi Chippewa Band or the Mississippi Ojibwe are a historical Ojibwe(Chippewa) Band inhabiting the head-waters of the Mississippi River and its tributaries. ... Mille Lacs Indian Reservation is home to the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe in Central Minnesota, about 100 miles north of Minneapolis-St. ... The Mille Lacs Indians are a Band of Indians formed from the unification of the Mille Lacs Band of Mississippi Chippewa (Ojibwe) with the Mille Lacs Band of Mdewakanton Sioux (Dakota). ... Before the arrival of the European settlers around Sandy Lake, the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa became the instrumental tribe controlling the Savannah Portage trade-route that connected the Lake Superior and east with the Mississippi River and west. ... The White Earth Indian Reservation is the largest and historically poorest Indian reservation in Minnesota. ... Mississippi Chippewa Band or the Mississippi Ojibwe are a historical Ojibwe(Chippewa) Band inhabiting the head-waters of the Mississippi River and its tributaries. ... Mississippi Chippewa Band or the Mississippi Ojibwe are a historical Ojibwe(Chippewa) Band inhabiting the head-waters of the Mississippi River and its tributaries. ... The Mille Lacs Indians are a Band of Indians formed from the unification of the Mille Lacs Band of Mississippi Chippewa (Ojibwe) with the Mille Lacs Band of Mdewakanton Sioux (Dakota). ... Before the arrival of the European settlers around Sandy Lake, the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa became the instrumental tribe controlling the Savannah Portage trade-route that connected the Lake Superior and east with the Mississippi River and west. ... The Ojibways are a First Nations tribe located in the Pic River 50 reservation in Ontario, Canada. ... Pembina Band of Chippewa Indians are a historical band of Chippewa (Ojibwe), originally living along the Red River of the North and its tributaries. ... Pikangikum is an Oji-Cree reserve in the Canadian province of Ontario, located in the Kenora District approximately 100 kilometres north of Red Lake. ... The Red Lake Indian Reservation is located in the north-central Minnesota counties of Beltrami and Clearwater. ... The official Saginaw Chippewa Logo designed by Elder Julius Peters. ... The Sagkeeng First Nation is an Anishinaabe First Nation which holds territory east of Lake Winnipeg in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Sault Tribe of Chippewa Indians was formally recognized by the United States Federal government on September 27, 1975, making it one of the newest tribes in the nation. ... The Bloodvein First Nation is located on the east side of Lake Winnipeg, along the Bloodvein River in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Poplar River First Nation is an Ojibwa First Nation in Manitoba, Canada. ... Tribal seal The Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians is a segment of the Chippewa tribe based on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. ... The Wahnapitae First Nation is an Ojibwa First Nation in the Canadian province of Ontario, who primarily reside on the Wahnapitae 11 reserve on the northwestern shore of Lake Wanapitei, surrounded by the city of Greater Sudbury. ... Naotkamegwanning First Nation, formerly known as Whitefish Bay First Nation, is an Ojibwa or Ontario Saulteaux First Nation located in Kenora District, Ontario near Sioux Narrows of Lake of the Woods. ... The Whitefish Lake First Nation is an Ojibwa First Nation in Ontario, Canada. ... Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve (usually known as Wikwemikong, or Wiky) is an Indian reserve in the north-eastern section of Manitoulin Island in Manitoulin District, Ontario, Canada. ... Windigo First Nations Council is a non-political Chiefs Council in northwestern Ontario, Canada, serving its seven member-First Nations. ... The Whitefish Lake First Nation is an Ojibwa First Nation in Ontario, Canada. ... The Yellow Quill First Nation (formerly Nut Lake Indian Reserve) occupies the Yellow Quill Reserve #90, which is situated eight (8) Kilometers east of Rose Valley, SK. The reserve covers 14,000 acres. ...

Other tribes known by their Ojibwa/Ottawa names

Known
Name
Ojibwa
Name
Ojibwa
Meaning
Own
Name
Arkansas Aakaanzhish Damn little Kansas Quapaw
Assiniboine Asiniibwaan Stoney 'Asp' (i.e. the Sioux) Nakota
Blackfoot Makadewanazid Black-foot Siksikawa
Chipewyan Ojiibwayaan Pointed Skin Dënesųłiné
Chowanoc Zhaawanoog Southerners Shawnee
Eskimo Ashki-amaw Eats It Raw Inuit
Flathead Nebagindibe Flat-head Salish
Kansas Aakaans [Lives at the] Little Hell-hole Kaw
Kaskaskia Gaaskaaskeyaa Hide-scraper
Kickapoo Giiwigaabaw Stands here-and-there
Menominee Omanoominii Wild Rice People Omāēqnomenew
Miami Omaamii Downstream people Myaamia
Micmac Miigimaa Allied-Brothers Mi'kmaq
Moingwena Moowiingwenaa Have a Filthy Face
Ottawa Odaawaa Trader Odawa
Potawatomi Boodewaadamii Fire Keeper Bodéwadmi
Sauk/Sac Ozaagii [Lives at the] Outlet Asakiwaki
Sioux Naadawensiw Little like the 'Adders' (i.e. the Iroquois) Aioe-Dakota-Lakota-Nakota
Snake Ginebig Snake Shoshoni
Winnebago Wiinibiigoo [Lives at the] Murky Waters Ho-čąk

The Quapaw people are a tribe of Native Americans who historically resided on the west side of the Mississippi River in what is now the state of Arkansas. ... Assiniboine Family, Montana, 1890-1891. ... For other uses, see Blackfoot (disambiguation). ... The Chipewyan are an aboriginal people in Canada. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... For other uses, see Eskimo (disambiguation). ... Kootenai group near tipis (ca 1900) The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation are the Bitterroot Salish, Kootenai and Pend dOreilles Tribes. ... The Kaw (or Kanza ) are an American Indian people of the central Midwestern United States. ... The Kaskaskia were one of the several cognate tribes that made up the Illiniwek Confederation. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... The Menominee are a nation of Native Americans living in Wisconsin. ... The Miami are a Native American tribe originally found in Indiana and Ohio, and now living also in Oklahoma. ... The Mikmaq The Mikmaq (; (also spelled Míkmaq, Migmaq, Micmac or MicMac) are a First Nations people, indigenous to northeastern New England, Canadas Atlantic Provinces, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa, Odaawa, Outaouais, or Trader) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... The Sauks or Sacs (Asakiwaki in their own language or Osakiwug) are a group of First Nations/Native Americans whose original territory may have been along the St. ... Eddie Plenty Holes, a Sioux Indian photographed about 1899. ... The Iowa (also spelled Ioway) are a Native American people. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... The Ho-Chunk or Winnebago (as they are commonly called) are a tribe of Native Americans, native to what are now Wisconsin and Illinois. ...

Ojibwa treaties

Tribal Treaty Administrants

  • 1854 Authority - 1854CT
  • Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority - 1836CT fisheries
  • Grand Council of Treaty 3 - Treaty 3
  • Grand Council of Treaty 8 - Treaty 8
  • Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission - 1837CT, 1836CT, 1842CT and 1854CT
  • Nishnawbe Aski Nation - Treaty 5 and Treaty 9
  • Red Lake Band of Chippewa - 1886CT and 1886JUA
  • Union of Ontario Indians - RS, RH1, RH2, misc. pre-confederation treaties

Nishnawbe Aski Nation (ᐊᓂᐦᔑᓈᐯ ᐊᔅᑭ ᐃᔥᑯᓂᑲᓇᓐ ᐅᑭᒫᐎᓐ (Anishinaabe-aski Ishkoniganan Ogimaawin), unpointed: ᐊᓂᔑᓇᐯ ᐊᔅᑭ ᐃᔥᑯᓂᐊᓇᓐ ᐅᑭᒪᐎᓐ; NAN for short) is a political organization representing 49 First Nation communities across Treaty 9 and Treaty 5 areas of northern Ontario, Canada. ... Flag of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa The Red Lake Indian Reservation covers 3,259. ... The Union of Ontario Indians is an Aboriginal political organization representing 42 Anishinabek First Nations in the Canadian province of Ontario. ...

Treaties with France

The Great Peace of Montreal was a peace treaty between New France and 39 First Nations of North America. ...

Treaties with Great Britain

  • Treaty of Fort Niagara (1764)
  • Treaty of Fort Niagara (1781)
  • Indian Officers' Land Treaty (1783)
  • The Crawford Purchases (1783)
  • Between the Lakes Purchase (1784)
  • The McKee Purchase (1790)
  • Between the Lakes Purchase (1792)
  • Chenail Ecarte (Sombra Township) Purchase (1796)
  • London Township Purchase (1796)
  • Land for Joseph Brant (1797)
  • Penetanguishene Harbour (1798)
  • St. Joseph Island (1798)
  • Toronto Purchase (1805)
  • Head-of-the-Lake Purchase (1806)
  • Lake Simcoe Land (1815)
  • Lake Simcoe-Nottawasaga Purchase (1818)
  • Ajetance Purchase (1818)
  • Rice Lake Purchase (1818)
  • The Rideau Purchase (1819)
  • Long Woods Purchase (1822)
  • Huron Tract Purchase (1827)
  • Saugeen Tract Agreement (1836)
  • Manitoulin Agreement (1836)
  • The Robinson Treaties
  • Manitoulin Island Treaty (1862)

Robinson Treaty may refer to one of two treaties signed between the Ojibwa chiefs and The Crown, represented by William Benjamin Robinson. ... Robinson Treaty may refer to one of two treaties signed between the Ojibwa chiefs and The Crown, represented by William Benjamin Robinson. ... Robinson Treaty may refer to one of two treaties signed between the Ojibwa chiefs and The Crown, represented by William Benjamin Robinson. ...

Treaties with the United States

The Treaty of Fort McIntosh was a treaty between the United States government and representatives of the Wyandotte, Delaware, Chippewa and Ottawa nations of Native Americans. ... The Treaty of Fort Harmar was an agreement between the United States government and several Native American tribes with claims to the Ohio Country. ... This depiction of the treaty negotiations may have been painted by one of Anthony Waynes officers. ... The Treaty of Detroit was a treaty between the United States and the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot and Potawatomi Native American nations. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Treaty of St. ... The Treaty of Fort Meigs, also called the Treaty of the Foot of the Rapids, was signed September 29, 1817 between the chiefs and warriors of the Wyandot, Seneca, Delaware, Shawnee, Potawatomi, Ottawa and Chippewa, tribes of native americans and the United States of America. ... The Treaty of Saginaw in 1819 was made between Gen. ... The Treaty of Chicago may refer to either of two treaties between the United States and the the Ottawa, Ojibwe (Chippewa), and Potawatomi Native American peoples. ... The Treaty of Prairie du Chien may refer to either of two treaties made and signed in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin between the United States, representatives from the Sioux, Sac and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Winnebago and the Anishinaabeg (Chippewa, Ottawa and Potawatomi) Native American peoples. ... The Treaty of Fond du Lac may refer to either of two treaties made and signed in Duluth, Minnesota between the United States and the Ojibwe (Chippewa) Native American peoples. ... The Treaty of Prairie du Chien may refer to either of two treaties made and signed in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin between the United States, representatives from the Sioux, Sac and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Winnebago and the Anishinaabeg (Chippewa, Ottawa and Potawatomi) Native American peoples. ... The Treaty of Chicago may refer to either of two treaties between the United States and the the Ottawa, Ojibwe (Chippewa), and Potawatomi Native American peoples. ... Treaty of Washington, 1836, a U.S.-Native American treaty The Treaty of Washington of 1871, a general agreement between the United States and the British Empire The International Meridian Conference of 1884 in Washington DC, establishing the Greenwich Meridian, the world time zone system and the universal day as... Treaty of Washington, 1836, a U.S.-Native American treaty The Treaty of Washington of 1871, a general agreement between the United States and the British Empire The International Meridian Conference of 1884 in Washington DC, establishing the Greenwich Meridian, the world time zone system and the universal day as... The Treaty of Detroit was a treaty between the United States and the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot and Potawatomi Native American nations. ... The Treaty of La Pointe may refer to either of two treaties made and signed in La Pointe, Wisconsin between the United States and the Ojibwe (Chippewa) Native American peoples. ... The Treaty of Fond du Lac may refer to either of two treaties made and signed in Duluth, Minnesota between the United States and the Ojibwe (Chippewa) Native American peoples. ... The Treaty of La Pointe may refer to either of two treaties made and signed in La Pointe, Wisconsin between the United States and the Ojibwe (Chippewa) Native American peoples. ... The Treaty of Detroit was a treaty between the United States and the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot and Potawatomi Native American nations. ... The Treaty of Detroit was a treaty between the United States and the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot and Potawatomi Native American nations. ... The Treaty of Detroit was a treaty between the United States and the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot and Potawatomi Native American nations. ...

Treaties with Canada

Treaty 1 was an agreement established 3 August 1871 between the Canadian government and various First Nations in southern Manitoba including the Chippewa and Swampy Cree tribes. ... Treaty 2 was an agreement established 21 August 1871 between the Canadian government and various First Nations in southwest Manitoba and a small part of southeast Saskatchewan. ... Treaty 3 was a treaty contract signed on 3 October 1887 between the Ojibway Nation and Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom. ... The Northwest Angle (the purple portion) in Minnesota, bordering Manitoba, Ontario, and Lake of the Woods The Northwest Angle viewed from space The Northwest Angle, known simply as the Angle by locals, and coterminous with Angle Township, is a small part of northern Lake of the Woods County, Minnesota that... Treaty no 4 was a treaty between the Government of Canada and the Cree and Saulteaux First Nations. ... Treaty no. ... Treaty no. ... Treaty 8 was an agreement signed on June 21, 1899 between the Government of Canada and various First Nations at Lesser Slave Lake. ... Treaty 9 was an agreement established beginning July 1905 between the Canadian government and various First Nations in northern Ontario. ... James Bay in summer 2000 James Bay (French, Baie James) is a large body of water on the southern end of Hudson Bay in Canada. ... Treaty no. ... Treaty 9 was an agreement established beginning July 1905 between the Canadian government and various First Nations in northern Ontario. ...

Further reading

  • Danziger, E.J., Jr. (1978). The Chippewa of Lake Superior. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.
  • Densmore, F. (1979). Chippewa customs. St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society Press. (Ursprünglich 1929 veröffentlicht)
  • Grim, J.A. (1983). The shaman: Patterns of religious healing among the Ojibway Indians. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.
  • Gross, L.W. (2002). The comic vision of Anishinaabe culture and religion. American Indian Quarterly, 26, 436-459.
  • Howse, Joseph. A Grammar of the Cree Language; With Which Is Combined an Analysis of the Chippeway Dialect. London: J.G.F. & J. Rivington, 1844.
  • Johnston, B. (1976). Ojibway heritage. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart.
  • Long, J. Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader Describing the Manners and Customs of the North American Indians, with an Account of the Posts Situated on the River Saint Laurence, Lake Ontario, & C., to Which Is Added a Vocabulary of the Chippeway Language ... a List of Words in the Iroquois, Mehegan, Shawanee, and Esquimeaux Tongues, and a Table, Shewing the Analogy between the Algonkin and the Chippeway Languages. London: Robson, 1791.
  • Nichols, J.D., & Nyholm, E. (1995). A concise dictionary of Minnesota Ojibwe. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Vizenor, G. (1972). The everlasting sky: New voices from the people named the Chippewa. New York: Crowell-Collier Press.
  • Vizenor, G. (1981). Summer in the spring: Ojibwe lyric poems and tribal stories. Minneapolis: The Nodin Press.
  • Vizenor, G. (1984). The people named the Chippewa: Narrative histories. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Wub-e-ke-niew. (1995). We have the right to exist: A translation of aboriginal indigenous thought. New York: Black Thistle Press.
  • Warren, William W. (1851). History of the Ojibway People.

References

  • F. Densmore, Chippewa Customs (1929, repr. 1970)
  • H. Hickerson, The Chippewa and Their Neighbors (1970)
  • R. Landes, Ojibwa Sociology (1937, repr. 1969)
  • R. Landes, Ojibwa Woman (1938, repr. 1971)
  • F. Symington, The Canadian Indian (1969)
  1. ^ http://www.humiliationstudies.org/documents/DaffernMultilingualDictionary.pdf
  2. ^ L. Erdrich, Books and Islands in Ojibwe Country (2003)
  3. ^ Feinberg, Leslie: Transgender Warriors, page 40. Beacon Press, 1996.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ojibwa (747 words)
At contact, the Ojibwa subsisted by hunting, fishing and gathering, resided in conical or dome-shaped birchbark dwellings, wore animal-skin clothing and travelled by birchbark CANOE in warm weather and SNOWSHOES in winter.
Ojibwa religion was animistic, the natural world being inhabited by numerous spirits both good and evil, some of which required special treatment.
The harsher environment of the coniferous forests of northern Ontario and Manitoba was exploited by the Northern Ojibwa.
Ojibwa - MSN Encarta (776 words)
Ojibwa or Chippewa, Native Americans of the Algonquian language family and of the Northeast, Subarctic, and Great Plains culture areas.
The economy of the Ojibwa was based on hunting and fishing, as well as farming corn, beans, and squash, and the gathering of wild fruits and seeds, particularly the abundant wild rice (a plant of the grass family with a seed resembling rice).
Ojibwa mythology was elaborate; the chief religious and superstitious rites centered around the Medewiwin, or Grand Medicine Society.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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