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Encyclopedia > Ohio University
Ohio University

Motto: Religio Doctrina Civilitas, Prae Omnibus Virtus (Religion, Learning, Civility; Above All, Virtue)
Established 1804
Type: Public
Endowment: $ 208 million
President: Roderick J. McDavis
Faculty: 2,187
Students: 20,437 (Athens Campus)
Undergraduates: 17,176 (Athens Campus)
Postgraduates: 3,261 (Athens Campus)
Location: Athens, Ohio, United States
Campus: 1,800 acres (7.3 km²) on the Athens Campus
Former names: American Western University
Athletics: Ohio Bobcats (6 men's varsity teams, 10 women's)
Colors: Hunter Green and White
Mascot: Rufus the Bobcat [2]
Website: University: www.ohio.edu
Athletics: www.ohiobobcats.com

Ohio University (OHIO) is a public university located in Athens, Ohio that is situated on a 1,800 acre (7.3 km²) campus. Founded in 1804, it is the oldest college in Ohio and the first in the Northwest Territory.
For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... General public redirects here. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... Look up million in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Roderick J. McDavis became Ohio Universitys 20th president on July 1, 2004. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Athens is a historic college town in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Ohio, best known as the home of Ohio University. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Ohio University features 20 varsity sports teams called the Bobcats. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Athens is a historic college town in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Ohio, best known as the home of Ohio University. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ...

Contents

History

Ohio University

The Northwest Ordinance of 1800 called for educational institutions as part of the settlement and eventual statehood of the Northwest Territory: "Religion, morality, and knowledge being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged." In 1797, settlers from Marietta traveled up the Hocking River to establish a location for the school, choosing Athens due to its location directly between Chillicothe (the original capital of Ohio) and Marietta. At first called American Western University, Ohio University was founded on February 18, 1804, a year after Ohio was admitted to the Union. The first three students enrolled in 1808 . Ohio University graduated two students with bachelor's degrees in 1815 . The famous E.W. Scripps School of Journalism was established with a grant from the Scripps Foundation. In 1975, Ohio University opened the College of Osteopathic Medicine, which remains the only college in Ohio to award the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree. Today the university is known for its strong journalism and visual communication programs, as well as its Avionics Engineering Center. The Avionics Engineering Center, part of the Russ College of Engineering and Technology, specializes in the research, development, and evaluation of electronic navigation, communication, and surveillance systems. The center, the largest at Ohio University, was established in 1963 to support a combination of theoreticians, technical specialists and graduate students to study navigation issues encountered in air transportation. Currently the university's [medical school] and college of engineering are engaging in a major collaboration to develop the Academic & Research Center funded by physician and engineering alumni. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1278x506, 323 KB) Summary view of campus, Ohio University. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1278x506, 323 KB) Summary view of campus, Ohio University. ... Northwest Territory (1787). ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... Downtown Marietta and the Muskingum River in July 2006 Marietta is a city in Washington County, Ohio, United States. ... The Hocking River is a river that drains part of southeast Ohio, mostly within the unglaciated Allegheny Plateau, although its headwaters are within glaciated territory. ... Athens is a historic college town in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Ohio, best known as the home of Ohio University. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country United States State Ohio Counties Ross Government  - Mayor Joseph P. Sulzer (D) Area  - City 9. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Downtown Marietta and the Muskingum River in July 2006 Marietta is a city in Washington County, Ohio, United States. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Edward W. Scripps was a United States publisher and media financier. ... Avionics is a portmanteau which literally means aviation electronics. ...


Baker University Center

The newly constructed John Calhoun Baker Center opened in January, 2007. The $65 million dollar student center features Georgian-style architecture and expansive windows throughout the building that offer spectacular views of campus and allow a great deal of natural light to enter. In contrast to the exterior's red brick, and white columns, the interior has a more contemporary style. The interior has high ceilings, ergonomic furniture and a color scheme of sage, plum and mocha.


The six-story student center contains a large food court (West 82), a fine dining restaurant (Latitude 39), a ballroom, student shop, coffee shop, theater, many study areas, several computer labs, administrative offices, and other amenities connected by three sets of escalators that gives it very much a mall feel.


The "Main Street effect" is something planners prepared for from the start – by incorporating an escalator system (the only one in Athens County) to carry people through the atrium that cuts through the building and connects the upper and lower portions of the campus. This design feature earned the facility mention in a 2006 Association of College Unions International book as a best practice[citation needed].[1]


Organization

Ohio University is organized into several colleges:

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Scripps College of Communication
  • Russ College of Engineering and Technology
  • College of Business
  • College of Fine Arts
  • College of Education
  • College of Health and Human Services
  • Honors Tutorial College
  • University College
  • College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Center for International Studies

More than 8,100 students attend Ohio University's five regional campuses:

St. ... Muskingum County Courthouse (Photo ©2004 Leslie K. Dellovade) Zanesville is a city in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States. ... West Main Street in downtown Lancaster in 2006 Lancaster is a city in Fairfield County, Ohio, in the United States. ... Ohio University Southern Campus is located at 1804 Liberty Avenue in Ironton, Ohio. ... Ironton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Lawrence County. ... Ohio University-Chillicothe (OU-C) is a regional campus of Ohio University located in Chillicothe, the first state capital of Ohio. ...

Classification

Stocker Center, College of Engineering

Ohio University was named by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as a Doctoral/High Research Activity institution to reflect its growing number of graduate programs. Other public universities in Ohio with this classification are Bowling Green State University, Kent State University, Miami University, the University of Akron, the University of Toledo and Wright State University. University libraries contain more than 2.4 million bound volumes.[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 283 KB) Summary Stocker Center at Ohio University. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 283 KB) Summary Stocker Center at Ohio University. ... Carnagie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching was founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1905 and chartered in 1906 by an Act of Congress. ... Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is a public four-year institution located in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA; about 20 miles south of Toledo, Ohio on I-75. ... For the events of May 4, 1970, see Kent State shootings Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is one of America’s largest university systems, the third largest university in Ohio after Ohio State University (57,748) and the University of Cincinnati (35,364), and... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... The University of Toledo is a public university situated in Toledo, Ohio. ... Wright State University is a public university in Ohio, U.S. The university uses Dayton as its postal address but the campus is actually completely within the city limits of Fairborn. ...


Nationally competitive awards

Ohio University is recognized for its student success rate in competing for nationally competitive awards. In 2006, twelve Ohio University students received Fulbright scholarships. In 2005, Ohio University had 9 Fulbright Scholars. Fulbright redirects here. ...


Other awards received by recent Ohio University students include the Mitchell Scholarship, the Truman Scholarship, Morris K. Udall Scholarship, and the Goldwater Scholarship and Hollings Scholarship, which were won by the same student during the 2005-2006 academic year. Morris Udall Morris King Udall (June 15, 1922 – December 12, 1998), better known as Mo, was an American politician who served as a U.S. Representative from Arizona from May 2, 1961 to May 4, 1991. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ...


Research at Ohio University

Ohio University offers a fertile environment for research. A variety of unique research programs and institutes bring top practitioners who provide students with opportunities to work with and learn from world-class scientists and scholars actively engaged in advancing their disciplines.


Ohio University's Board of Trustees approved Research Centers and Institutes include:

  • Ohio University's renowned College of Osteopathic Medicine sponsors: The Interdisciplinary Institute for Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine; The Tropical Disease Institute; The Edison Biotechnology Institute; The Appalachian Rural Health Institute; Academic & Research Center.
  • In Engineering and Technology, Ohio University sponsors: The Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Environment; The Center for Advanced Materials Processing; The Center for Advanced Software Systems Integration; The Automatic Identification Education and Research Center; The Avionics Engineering Research Center; The Institute for Corrosion & Multiphase Technology; The Center for Intelligent, Distributed and Dependable Systems; The Ohio Research Institute for Transportation and the Environment; and, The T. Richard and Eleanora K. Robe Leadership Institute.
  • The Institute for Applied and Professional Ethics; The Charles J. Ping Institute for the Teaching of the Humanities; Institute for the Empirical Study of Language; The University's Business Incubator, The Innovation Center; and, The Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute.
  • The College of Arts and Sciences sponsors: The African American Research and Service Institute; The Astrophysical Institute; The Contemporary History Institute; The George V. Voinovich Center for Leadership and Public Affairs; The Center for Intelligent Chemical Instrumentation; The Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics; The Ohio University Cartographic Center; The Institute for Quantitative Biology; and, The Center for Ring Theory and Its Applications.
  • The School of Business sponsors: The Center for eBusiness; The Center for International Business Education and Development; The Ohio University Insurance Institute; and, The Sales Center.
  • In Communications disciplines, Ohio University sponsors: The Institute for International Journalism; The Scripps Survey Research Center; The Telecommunications Center; and, The Institute for Telecommunication Studies.
  • In Education, Ohio University sponsors: The Center for Cooperative Curriculum Development and Partnerships; The Institute for Democracy in Education; The George Hill Center for Counseling & Research; The Center for Higher Education; and, The Center for the Study and Development of Literacy and Language.
  • In Health and Human Services, Ohio University sponsors: The Child Development Center and The Center for Sports Administration.
  • In International Studies, Ohio University sponsors The Institute for the African Child.

The Contemporary History Institute is an interdisciplinary academic research institute at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. ...

Scripps College of Communication

Fox News Chairman and CEO Roger Ailes gave a sizeable donation to Ohio University for a renovated student newsroom. The new facility, set to open in spring of 2008, will double the size of the university's existing newsroom - last upgraded in the 1960s - and allow more students to participate in the school's WOUB radio station and television programs. Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... Roger Eugene Ailes (born May 15, 1940) is the president of Fox News Channel and chairman of the Fox Television Stations Group. ...


Ailes majored in radio and television while at Ohio University and served two years as manager of the school's radio station. Since 1994 he has funded scholarships for Ohio University students in the school's telecommunications programs.


Ailes' fondness for OU is matched by his generosity. Although the size of the donation was not revealed, it was described as substantial. The 67-year-old credits the school with making him the successful man he is today.


"Ohio University ignited my interest in broadcasting, which became my lifetime career. The education I received there gave me the opportunity to take on my first managerial responsibilities and provided early lessons in leadership. I'm happy to contribute to a great university." Ailes said in a written statement.


The newsroom is a small part of a planned $34.4 million integrated communication facility for the college. That project is a new building that will have more than 118,000 square feet (11,000 m²) of assignable space, joining the adjacent, vacated former student union with the Radio-Television Building.


E.W. Scripps School of Journalism

One of the flagship programs of Ohio University, the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, is in the Scripps College of Communication. The school was named one of the nation's top five programs in a survey conducted by Youngs, Walter & Co., a Chicago-based management consulting firm. The E.W. Scripps School of Journalism is one of five schools in the College of Communication at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. ...


The school's graduate program was ranked seventh in U.S. News and World Report's journalism education ranking.[2] Undergraduates select from six sequence options -- advertising management, broadcast news, magazine journalism, news writing & editing, online journalism and public relations.


College of Business

Ohio University's College of Business was ranked 62nd in the nation by Business Week.[3] The CoB offers nine different majors and a general business minor for students with non-business majors. Despite University measures to increase enrollment, the CoB prides itself on staying smaller than other business schools. All business classes are taught by professors, never graduate students.


The Ralph and Luci Schey Sales Centre is one of only about three dozen schools in the US offering a professional sales certificate[4]. This certificate is open to any OU student, including those with non-business majors.


The Accountancy school uses the Business Activity Model ("BAM") in its intermediate classes. Designed to mimic the experiences of an auditor, Accounting students often credit BAM with preparing them for internships. One of the authors of BAM, Connie Esmond-Kiger, was named Dean of the School of Accountancy in Fall 2007. She is also the adviser for OU's chapter of Beta Alpha Psi, the financial majors fraternity. OU's chapter of BAP has been achieved Superior status for several years and has won several awards at the regional and national level. [5]


The CoB's Student Equity Management Group, which was started in 2002, was afforded $1.5 million from the University to invest. Unlike many other schools, OU's group is open to undergraduate students. The group was praised by University administrators when it was reported in Fall 2007 the group achieved a 28% return on its portfolio.[6]


There are 16 active students organizations in the CoB. In addition to the two discussed above, there are chapters of two national Business fraternities, a Christian group, and societies or fraternities for almost every major.[7] Copeland Hall boasts six computer labs and two study lounges with computers, as well as many conference rooms and small group rooms. Many business students strongly prefer to study and work in Copeland instead of the library.


The CoB requires students take five classes in the cluster format. In the cluster, students are teamed up and complete research projects. The students then receive a grade in all four of their classes on the project. This program is an opportunity for students of different majors to interact and is considered a good illustration of how situations are often structured in the business world.[8]


The College of Fine Arts and the Kennedy Museum of Art

The Ohio University College of Fine Arts aspires to educate artists and scholars to articulate and express themselves through intellectual examination, participatory training, and research practice. Members of Ohio University's world-class faculty are working artists, instructors, and researchers who both teach and practice their arts. The residential learning community emphasizes an arts culture that crosses the boundaries of the majors and disciplines within the Arts. The College's approach to education is diverse, dynamic, and international providing an environment rich and deep with opportunities for expression.


The Kennedy Museum of Art, named to honor Edwin L. and Ruth E. Kennedy, is housed at the Ridges in historic Lin Hall. It contains noteworthy collections including significant southwest Native American textiles, jewelry, and a celebrated contemporary collection of prints. This exceptional institution offers a wide array of exhibitions, a line-up of educational offerings, tours, and more.


School of Recreation and Sports Sciences

Considered one of the top schools of its kind in the country, with its Graduate Programs often referred to as the best in the country, the School of Recreation and Sport Sciences offers an array of prominent, nationally recognized academic programs at the graduate and undergraduate levels. The Sport Management Program is one of approximately thirty such programs in the country to have won program approval by the Sport Management Program Review Council (SMPRC). Programs of study in the School emphasize an accommodating learning atmosphere that promotes high academic standards and a commitment to encouraging an active and healthy lifestyle. The School is dedicated to creating, improving, and propagating theoretical and practical information through its distinct programs.


Russ College of Engineering and Technology

This college is the home to the University's programs in the traditional fields of engineering at the undergraduate and graduate level.[9] It enrolls approximately 1,400 undergraduates and almost 300 graduate students. It is named in honor of Dr. Fritz J. Russ, an alumnus in electrical engineering and the founder of Systems Research Laboratories, a major bioengineering concern.[10]


The Russ' left the college that bears their name approximately $80 million in real estate and securities, though details of how the money will be spent — and how much money the college will actually receive — has yet to be determined.[11]


The college is also mired in an ongoing plagiarism scandal that began in 2004. It has revoked one degree.[12]


Athletics

Ohio Bobcats logo
Main article: Ohio Bobcats
Main article: Ohio Bobcats football

Men's and women's athletics teams at Ohio University are nicknamed the Bobcats, with the school colors being hunter green and white. The Bobcats compete in NCAA Division I as a member of the Mid-American Conference. They maintain strong rivalries with the other MAC schools in Ohio, particularly Miami University and the University of Akron. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ohio University features 20 varsity sports teams called the Bobcats. ... Ohio University features 20 varsity sports teams called the Bobcats. ... The Ohio Bobcats men’s basketball team is an intercollegiate varsity sports program of Ohio University. ... The Mid-American Conference (MAC) is a college athletic conference with a membership base that stretches from New York to Illinois. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ...


The long and storied tradition of Ohio Bobcats football began in 1894 with an 8-0 loss to Marietta College. Since that day, the Bobcats have posted a 485-503-48 record over their 112 year existence and a 191-232-12 record over their 60 years in the Mid-American Conference. The Bobcats have won 5 MAC Football Championships in 1953, 1960, 1963, 1967, and 1968 and a MAC East Division Championship in 2006 . Prior to joining the MAC, the Bobcats won 6 Buckeye Athletic Association Championships in 1929, 1930, 1931, 1935, 1936, and 1938 . In 1960, the Bobcats were crowned National Small College Champions after compiling a 10-0 record under Coach Bill Hess. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Marietta College is a co-educational private college in Marietta, Ohio, which was the first permanent settlement of the Northwest Territory. ...


The Bobcats have appeared in three bowl games, losing 14-15 to West Texas State in the 1962 Sun Bowl, losing 42-49 to Richmond in the 1968 Tangerine Bowl, and most recently falling to Southern Mississippi 28-7 in the 2007 GMAC Bowl. West Texas A&M University (also known as WTAMU, or WT), part of the Texas A&M University System, is a public university located in Canyon, Texas, a small city south of Amarillo, Texas. ... The Brut Sun Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played usually at the end of December in El Paso, Texas. ... The University of Richmond is a private, nonsectarian, liberal arts university located on the border of the city of Richmond and Henrico County, Virginia. ... The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl, and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2001). ... The University of Southern Mississippi (USM, but frequently referred to as Southern Miss) is a four-year public university located primarily in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. ... The GMAC Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division 1-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at 40,646-seat Ladd Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, since 1999. ...


The Bobcats' September 7, 2005 win against the #24 ranked Pittsburgh Panthers was the first under head coach Frank Solich and the first ever game on ESPN at Peden Stadium. A home record crowd of 24,545 saw a Bobcats' 16-10 overtime win spurred by two interception returns for touchdowns by Dion Byrum. The Pitt-Ohio game also ranks among the Top 15 most viewed regular season college football telecasts on ESPN2 since the network debuted in 1994. The Pittsburgh Panthers is the name given to the sports teams of University of Pittsburgh. ... Frank Solich (born September 8, 1944 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, U.S.) is the head football coach of the Ohio Bobcats. ...


Under the guidance of Frank Solich, the Ohio football program has enjoyed a return to new levels of national prominence in 2006. On November 16, 2006 the Bobcats secured their first ever Mid-American Conference East Division title and their first football championship of any sort since 1968 with a victory over the University of Akron Zips. They then advanced to the MAC Championship Game in Detroit, Michigan, where they were defeated by Central Michigan 31-10. On January 7, 2007, the Bobcats were the MAC representative to the GMAC Bowl in Mobile, Alabama, losing 28-7 to The University of Southern Mississippi Golden Eagles in a game nationally televised on ESPN. is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Mid-American Conference (MAC) is a college athletic conference with a membership base that stretches from New York to Illinois. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... The Mid-American Conference has played a championship game putting the winners of the East and West divisions against one another since 1997, when the conference was divided into divisions. ... Detroit redirects here. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The GMAC Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division 1-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at 40,646-seat Ladd Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, since 1999. ... It has been suggested that List of people from Mobile, Alabama be merged into this article or section. ... The University of Southern Mississippi (USM, but frequently referred to as Southern Miss) is a four-year public university located primarily in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. ... The University of Southern Mississippi (USM, but frequently referred to as Southern Miss) is a four-year public university located primarily in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ...


One of Ohio's most successful varsity sports is its men's basketball program. Ohio has posted a .565 winning percentage over their 99 year history and a .564 winning percentage in their 60 years in the Mid-American Conference. The Bobcats have won 5 Mid-American Conference Tournament titles in 1983, 1985, 1994, and 2005 as well as numerous MAC regular season titles. In addition, Ohio has played in the NCAA Tournament 11 times, appearing in 1960, 1961, 1964, 1965, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1983, 1985, 1994, and 2005 . The Bobcats have been selected for the National Invitation Tournament 4 times in 1941, 1969, 1986, and 1995, finishing as runner up in 1941 . In addition, the Bobcats won the prestigious Pre-Season National Invitation Tournament in 1994 . As a result of the long and storied tradition of Ohio Bobcats basketball, the program was ranked 86th in Street & Smith's 100 Greatest Basketball Programs of All Time. This article is about the sport. ... NCAA redirects here. ... A tournament is a competition involving a relatively large number of competitors, all participating in a single sport or game. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ...


Ohio's Olympic Sports programs are also among some of the best in the MAC. Ohio's volleyball team has been steadily increasing in popularity. Under the direction of Coach Geoff Carlston, the team has won five consecutive Mid-American Conference regular season titles and made five consecutive NCAA tournament appearances. In 2005, the team made the "sweet 16" of the NCAA tournament. Ohio's women's swimming and diving team consistently has won numerous MAC Championships. The Aquatic Center, one of the finest swimming and diving facilities in the league and in the nation, has hosted numerous MAC Women's Swimming and Diving Tournaments. The Bobcat's wrestling team has a long and storied history and the team has found itself in the national top 25 many times over the years. Recent graduate Jake Percival was a four time All-American. The Ohio baseball program has won numerous MAC titles in baseball, most of them coming under Bob Wren. Current head coach Joe Carbone was part of the only College World Series team in Ohio history (1970), and has had a MAC championship twice in his 20 years as head coach. There have been 23 former Bobcats to make the major leagues, most notably hall of fame third baseman Mike Schmidt, former All-Star Steve Swisher (father of current White Sox outfielder Nick Swisher) and former MLB player and World Series winning manager Bob Brenly. Archery competition at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. ...


Ohio's athletic facilities make up another important component of a winning tradition. Peden Stadium, Ohio's football venue, is one of the best in the conference and the nation. The stadium, though small in size, is big in atmosphere and tradition. The Convocation Center, home of Bobcats basketball, volleyball, and wrestling, is also a great facility. The largest basketball arena in the MAC, and one of the largest in the state, the Convo's hostile environment has allowed the Bobcats to win over 75% of their games in the facility. The "O-Zone" student cheering section for men's basketball games is among the largest and most recognized in the Mid-American Conference and the nation. Peden Stadium is a football stadium at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. ... Convocation Center is a 13,080-seat multi-purpose arena that is home to the Ohio Bobcats basketball, volleyball, and wrestling teams. ...


Ohio University is also home to the nationally-acclaimed Ohio University Marching 110 marching band--"The Most Exciting Band in the Land!", which continually draws crowds at the Bobcat football and basketball games. The band's unique use of contemporary popular music, a "power high-step" stop-action marching style, and high-energy choreographed dance breaks has led the band to perform at many unique venues throughout the years. On October 28, 1976, the Marching 110 became the first marching band in history to perform at Carnegie Hall. On January 20, 1993, the band performed for President Clinton's Presidential Inauguration in Washington, DC. The band has also performed at many professional football games and has taken part in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in 2000 and 2005 [13] The Marching 110 in its Diamond Ohio formation during a pre-game show in 2005 The Ohio University Marching Band, known as the Marching 110, is one of the premiere bands in the Mid-American Conference. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Macys Day Parade redirects here. ...


Alden Library

Vernon R. Alden Library serves the Athens campus as the central library facility; the building can seat 3,000 people. The collection of the Ohio University library contains over 2.3 million units of microfilm material, 13,500 periodical subscriptions and its 2.4 million printed volumes makes it one of the 100 largest libraries in the United States. The Learning Commons, located on the building's second floor, is open 24 hours, 5 days a week allowing students to meet and use parts of the facility.


Media

Under the umbrella of Ohio University Public Radio, the university operates a number of public FM radio stations. WOUB-FM 91.3 Athens, WOUC-FM 89.1 Cambridge, WOUH-FM 91.9 Chillicothe, WOUL-FM 89.1 Ironton, and WOUZ-FM 90.1 Zanesville broadcast the same programs throughout southeastern Ohio. Separate public radio programming is also heard in Athens on WOUB AM 1340. WOUB-FM is a radio station in the United States, broadcasting at FM 91. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country United States State Ohio Counties Ross Government  - Mayor Joseph P. Sulzer (D) Area  - City 9. ... Ironton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Lawrence County. ... Muskingum County Courthouse (Photo ©2004 Leslie K. Dellovade) Zanesville is a city in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States. ... WOUB (1340 AM), is a public radio station in Athens, Ohio. ...


ACRN, the University's only student-run radio station, recently celebrated 35 years, and features a rock lobster (from The B-52s song "Rock Lobster") as its mascot. The station is internet-only and essentially all matters of running the radio station are officiated by elected student executives. Rock Lobster is The B-52s first single, released in 1978 and in a longer version placed on the bands self-titled debut album, The B-52s, one year later. ... The B-52s are a rock band from Athens, Georgia, the first of many from the college town that has become one of the most important centers in alternative rock. ... Rock Lobster is The B-52s first single, released in 1978 and in a longer version placed on the bands self-titled debut album, The B-52s, one year later. ...


Ohio University Public Television is a PBS affiliate broadcasting on WOUB Athens/WOUC Cambridge. In addition to national PBS programs, WOUB features Newswatch, a nightly news broadcast with student reporters. Other student produced programs include "Gridiron Glory" and "Bobcat Blitz". "Bobcat Blitz" follows the Ohio University Football team during their season and features interviews with players and coaches. "Gridiron Glory" is a student produced program now in it's ninth season (Fall 2007). "Gridiron" follows the Southeastern Ohio football season by covering 7 games a week, and producing a live broadcast every Fall Friday night at 11:30PM. Gridiron Glory has won two Emmys since it began, most recently in 2006. Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... WOUB is the callsign of an AM, an FM, and a television station affiliated with NPR and PBS originating in the telecommunications center at Ohio University. ...


The web site, Wired for Books, has been ranked by the National Endowment for the Humanities as one of the best online resources for education in the humanities. Wired for Books is produced at the WOUB Center for Public Media.


The campus newspaper The Post is officially independent of the university and its administration, as is Speakeasy, a web magazine produced by students in the online journalism major at the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism. Backdrop, another student-run magazine, released its first issue during Winter Quarter 2008.


Presidents of Ohio University

Cutler Hall, Office of the President
Kennedy Museum of Art
  • Edwin Watts Chubb was acting president for one year in 1920 when President Ellis died and again in 1934 when President Bryan died.[14]
20th Roderick J. McDavis (2004-present)
19th Robert Glidden (1994-2004)
18th Charles J. Ping (1975-1994)
17th Harry B. Crewson (1974-1975)
16th Claude R. Sowle (1969-1974)
15th Vernon Roger Alden (1962-1969)
14th John Calhoun Baker (1945-1961)
13th Walter S. Gamertsfelder (1943-1945)
12th Herman Gerlach James (1935-1943)
11th Elmer Burritt Bryan (1921-1934*)
10th Alston Ellis (1901-1920*)
9th Isaac Crook (1896-1898)
8th Charles William Super (1884-1896)
(1899-1901)
7th William Henry Scott (1872-1883)
6th Solomon Howard (1852-1872)
5th Alfred Ryors (1848-1852)
4th William Holmes McGuffey (1839-1843)
3rd Robert G. Wilson (1824-1839)
2nd James Irvine (1822-1824)
1st Jacob Lindley (1809-1822)

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1042 KB) Summary Cutler Hall at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1042 KB) Summary Cutler Hall at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3200x2400, 1515 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Ohio University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3200x2400, 1515 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Ohio University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Roderick J. McDavis became Ohio Universitys 20th president on July 1, 2004. ... Walter Sylvester Gamertsfelder, Ph. ... William Holmes McGuffey William Holmes McGuffey (September 23, 1800 – May 4, 1873) was an American professor and college president who is best known for writing the McGuffey Readers, one of the nations first and mostly widely used series of textbooks. ... James Irvine (1793-1835) was the second president of Ohio University, located in Athens, Ohio, from 1822-1824. ...

Notable alumni

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Roger Eugene Ailes (born May 15, 1940) is the president of Fox News Channel and chairman of the Fox Television Stations Group. ... Fox News redirects here. ... Richard Dean Anderson (born January 23, 1950 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American television actor. ... MacGyver is an American adventure television series, produced in Canada, about a laid-back, extremely resourceful secret agent, played by Richard Dean Anderson. ... Stargate SG-1 (often abbreviated as SG-1) is a science fiction television series, part of the Stargate franchise. ... The primary role of a television producer is to coordinate and control all aspects of production, ranging from show idea development and cast hiring to shoot supervision and fact-checking. ... Robert Arter (born September 7, 1929) is a retired U.S. Army Major General and commanding general of the Sixth United States Army. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Sixth United States Army was a field army of the United States Army. ... Len Kasper with Bob Brenly during a broadcast. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The position of the catcher Catcher is also a general term for a fielder who catches the ball in cricket. ... he is the best in the world, some call him the junior jose, special 1 version 2 ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) West Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Arizona Diamondbacks (1998–present) Other nicknames The D-backs, The Snakes Ballpark Chase Field (1998–present) a. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Sisters Grimm is a book series by Michael Buckley. ... 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Bob Huggins (born September 21, 1953 in Morgantown, West Virginia[1]) is the head coach of the West Virginia University Mountaineers mens basketball team. ... Brandon Hunter (born November 24, 1980 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American professional basketball player currently with Carpisa Napoli of the Italian basketball league. ... The New Jersey Nets are a professional basketball team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... Dr. Kamil Eltayed Idris is a Sudanese international civil servant. ... The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) (French: Organisation mondiale de la propriété intellectuelle or OMPI) is one of the specialized agencies of the United Nations. ... John David Jamerson (born August 13, 1967, in Clarksburg, West Virginia) is an American former professional basketball player who was selected by the Miami Heat in the 1st round (15th overall) of the 1990 NBA Draft. ... Tony Rizzo (born June 27, 1940 in Italy) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... ÁSammy Kaye (born Samuel Zarnocay, Jr. ... A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... Peter King (born 1957 in Springfield, Massachusetts) is a senior writer for Sports Illustrated,[1] the author of five books, most notably Inside the Helmet, as well as a TV analyst and reporter. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Matthew Todd Lauer (December 30, 1957)[1] is an American television personality, best known as a co-host of NBCs The Today Show (since 1994)[1] after being a news anchor in New York [2] and a local talk-show host in Boston, Philadelphia, Providence, and Richmond. ... This article is about the television network. ... Today, commonly referred to as The Today Show to avoid ambiguity, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on the NBC television network. ... Art Lewis (February 9, 1911) was a football player for the New York Giants and the Cleveland Rams, and was the coach of the Rams during the 1938 season. ... City St. ... Jay Mariotti (born 1961 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American sportswriter. ... Scott Mayle is a wide receiver for the Buffalo Bills. ... For other uses, see Buffalo Bills (disambiguation). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... KTCK (1310 AM, SportsRadio 1310 The Ticket), is a Dallas, Texas based sports talk radio station. ... Matt Muncy is a linebacker for the Cincinnati Bengals. ... Mary Murphy (born March 9) is a ballroom dance champion[1], accredited dance judge, and a regular judge and choreographer on the Fox dance competition-reality show So You Think You Can Dance. ... This article is about the animal. ... So You Think You Can Dance is an American dance reality show and competition that is broadcast on the Fox Network, on Fox Japan, on CTV in Canada, on Living in United Kingdom and Ireland and on Network Ten in Australia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Married. ... Clarence Page (born June 2, 1947) is a journalist, syndicated columnist and member of the editorial board for the Chicago Tribune. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Piper Lisa Perabo (born October 31, 1976) is an American movie actress. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Coyote ugly is a term made famous by the film of the same name (see below). ... Ramalinga Raju Byrraju (born September 16, 1954),in AP(India) is an Indian businessman, and a pioneer of the Information Technology industry in India. ... Satyam Computer Services Limited is a consulting and information technology services company. ... Edward James Roye (February 3, 1815 - 1872) was a American-Liberian political figure. ... The following is a list of Presidents of the Republic of Liberia, made up of the 24 heads of state in the history of Liberia. ... John Sant’Ambrogio is an American cellist who was born on June 12, 1932 in Glen Ridge, New Jersey. ... The Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra (SLSO) was founded in 1880, making it the second oldest symphony in the United States after the New York Philharmonic. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Michael Jack Schmidt (born September 27, 1949 in Dayton, Ohio) is a former American professional baseball player who played his entire career for the Philadelphia Phillies. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... The position of the third baseman “Third base” redirects here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... Don Swaim is an American journalist, writer, and broadcaster. ... The CBS Radio Network provides news, sports and other programming to more than 1,000 radio stations throughout the United States. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... Chuck Swirsky Chuck Swirsky, a. ... 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Cardinal Health (NYSE: CAH) is a premier, global healthcare company dedicated to making healthcare safer and more productive. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... David Wilhelm (born 2 October 1956) is an American political operative and businessman. ... The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal organization governing the United States Democratic Party on a day to day basis. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Biden redirects here. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... David Michael Zastudil (born October 26, 1978 in Bay Village, Ohio) is a punter for the Cleveland Browns. ... [[Image:|frame|right|Todd Sauerbrun punts the ball for the Carolina Panthers. ... Browns redirects here. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.ohio.edu/outlook/06-07/October/125f-067.cfm
  2. ^ http://www.ohio.edu/rankings/usnews.cfm/
  3. ^ http://bwnt.businessweek.com/bschools/undergraduate/07rankings/
  4. ^ http://www.cob.ohiou.edu/newsDetail.aspx?id=524
  5. ^ http://studentorg.cob.ohiou.edu/accounting/Honors.aspx
  6. ^ http://www.cob.ohiou.edu/newsDetail.aspx?id=483
  7. ^ http://www.cob.ohio.edu/cms.aspx?cid=1209
  8. ^ http://www.cob.ohio.edu/cms.aspx?cid=1329
  9. ^ College information.
  10. ^ Tribute.
  11. ^ $80 million gift.
  12. ^ Plagiarism.
  13. ^ Brozak, George (2004). Diamond Ohio: A History of the Ohio University Bands. Mansfield, Ohio: Diamond Ohio Press. ISBN 0-9763538-0-6. 
  14. ^ http://www.ohiou.edu/athens/bldgs/chubb.html
  15. ^ clevelandbrowns.com, [1], accessed October 16, 2007.

is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is a public four-year institution located in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA; about 20 miles south of Toledo, Ohio on I-75. ... Central State University is a historically black university located in Wilberforce, Ohio. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Cleveland State University (abbr. ... For the events of May 4, 1970, see Kent State shootings Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is one of America’s largest university systems, the third largest university in Ohio after Ohio State University (57,748) and the University of Cincinnati (35,364), and... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Northeastern Ohio Universities College Of Medicine (NEOUCOM) is a community-based, state medical school that offers a combined B.S./M.D. program that allows students to graduate with their B.S./M.D. in as few as six years. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... Shawnee State University is the regional state university of Southern Ohio. ... The University of Toledo is a public university situated in Toledo, Ohio. ... Wright State University is a public university in Ohio, U.S. The university uses Dayton as its postal address but the campus is actually completely within the city limits of Fairborn. ... Youngstown State University, founded in 1908, is an accredited university located in Youngstown, Ohio US. As of 2005, there were 13,101 students and a student-faculty ratio of 19:1. ...

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Ohio State University Extension (146 words)
WOOSTER, Ohio -- Ohio State University’s soybean sentinel plot program, established in 2005 to track soybean rust (still a no-show in Ohio), is fulfilling its purpose as the first line of defense against more immediate, threatening diseases.
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OSU Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all educational programs conducted by Ohio State University Extension are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, age, gender identity or expression, disability, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or veteran status.
Ohio State University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5546 words)
Ohio State was the first university in Ohio to be extended membership into the prestigious Association of American Universities in 1916 and remains the only public university in Ohio among the organization's sixty members.
Ohio State is one of only two universities (the University of Michigan being the other) to have won an NCAA national championship in baseball, basketball and football.
Ohio State alumni are enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, the NFL Hall of Fame and the Basketball Hall of Fame.
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