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Encyclopedia > Ohio Supreme Court

The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of Ohio law and the Ohio Constitution. The court has seven members, a chief justice and six associate justices, each serving six-year terms. Since 2004, the court has met in the Ohio Judicial Center (formerly known as the Ohio Departments Building) on the east bank of the Scioto River in downtown Columbus. Prior to 2004, the court met in the James A. Rhodes State Office Tower and earlier in the Judiciary Annex (now the Senate Building) of the Ohio Statehouse. A court is an official, public forum which a sovereign establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, along with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 355 km 355 km 8. ... The Ohio Constitution is the basic governing document of the State of Ohio, which in 1803 became the 17th state to join the United States of America. ... See also: List of Justices of the Ohio Supreme Court, Ohio Supreme Court The office of chief justice was created in 1912 as an elected office with a term of six years. ... Bold indicates chief judge or chief justice. ... Skyline of downtown Columbus, Ohio, viewed across the Scioto River. ... Nickname: The Arch City The Discovery City Motto: Official website: http://www. ... The Ohio Statehouse The Ohio Statehouse, located in Columbus, Ohio, is the seat of government for the state of Ohio. ...


All the seats on the court are elected at large by the voters of Ohio. Every two years, two of the associate justice seats are up for election. For one of those three elections in a cycle, the chief justice's seat is up for election. A person need not be a judge or even a lawyer to run for a seat on the court, although almost all are. There is an age limit, however: One may not run for a seat on the court if one is more than 70 years of age. This limit often forces the retirement of long-time justices. Justice Francis E. Sweeney Sr. was barred by this rule from running for re-election in 2004. An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... A judge or justice is an official who presides over a court. ... A lawyer is a person licensed by the state to advise clients in legal matters and represent them in courts of law and in other forms of dispute resolution. ... Francis E. Sweeney Sr. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Officially, these elections are non-partisan. However, in practical terms, all this means is that party designations for the candidates are left off the ballot and justices are restricted in making public political statements. Major and minor parties all nominate candidates for the court in their primary elections. The vast majority of justices have been nominated by the two major parties in Ohio, Democratic or Republican. Many of the individuals who have contested Supreme Court seats have also contested for other political offices, both state and federal. Partisan may refer to: A member of a lightly-equipped irregular military force formed to oppose control of an area by a foreign power or by an army of occupation. ... A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... A ballot is a device used to record choices made by voters. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


Although Republicans have held a majority on the court since 1989, moderate/liberal Republicans Andy Douglas and Paul Pfeifer often allied themselves with the Democratic minority (Francis E. Sweeney Sr. and Alice Robie Resnick) in order to overturn laws adopted by the Republican-controlled Ohio General Assembly. In particular, this majority of the court declared unconstitutional the state's scheme for funding public schools based on local property taxes (the DeRolph case). The court also struck down a law that barred injured workers from seeking both workers compensation and civil damages. In 1999, the court overturned a law that would have limited awards in tort lawsuits, ruling that it was an unconstitutional violation of separation of powers for the Ohio General Assembly (the state legislature) to try to limit the Supreme Court's authority over court procedure (State ex rel. Ohio Academy of Trial Lawyers v. Sheward, 86 Ohio St. 3d 451, 715 N.E.2d 1062 (Ohio 1999)). Each time the court overturned such a law, it was met with howls of protest and derision from the legislature, with calls for impeachment and threats to the salaries of the justices. This era ended with Douglas's retirement in 2001 and his replacement by former lieutenant governor Maureen O'Connor, who joined fellow Republicans in swinging the court in the other direction. Andrew Douglas is a former Republican justice of the Ohio Supreme Court who served in that office from 1985 to 2002. ... Paul E. Pfeifer (born Oct. ... Francis E. Sweeney Sr. ... Alice Robie Resnick is a Supreme Court Justice for the State of Ohio. ... The Ohio General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Workers compensation programs and laws exist to protect employees who are injured while on the job. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... In the common law, a Tort is a civil wrong, other than a breach of contract, for which the law provides a remedy. ... The separation of powers (or trias politica, coined by French political thinker Montesquieu) is a model for the governance of the state which requires the division of political power between an executive, a legislature, and a judiciary. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Maureen OConnor (born 7 August 1951, in Washington, D.C.) is an American politician of the Republican party. ...


From January to May 2003, for the first time since the court's creation, the female justices outnumbered the male justices. This historic female majority comprised Republicans Deborah L. Cook, Maureen O'Connor, and Evelyn Lundberg Stratton, and Democrat Alice Robie Resnick. This majority ended when Cook resigned from the court to accept an appointment to the federal bench. The other three women continued to serve on the court. Beginning on January 1, 2005, female justices again were in the majority with the commencement of her first term by Republican Justice Judith Ann Lanziger (replacing retiring Justice Francis E. Sweeney Sr.). 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Deborah L. Cook (born 1952) is a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. ... Maureen OConnor (born 7 August 1951, in Washington, D.C.) is an American politician of the Republican party. ... Alice Robie Resnick is a Supreme Court Justice for the State of Ohio. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ohio Supreme Court - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (652 words)
The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of Ohio law and the Ohio Constitution.
In 1999, the court overturned a law that would have limited awards in tort lawsuits, ruling that it was an unconstitutional violation of separation of powers for the Ohio General Assembly (the state legislature) to try to limit the Supreme Court's authority over court procedure (State ex rel.
Each time the court overturned such a law, it was met with howls of protest and derision from the legislature, with calls for impeachment and threats to the salaries of the justices.
Ohio Supreme Court - definition of Ohio Supreme Court in Encyclopedia (550 words)
The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of the Ohio constitution.
All the seats on the court are elected at large by the voters of Ohio.
In 1999, the court overturned a bill that would have limited awards in tort lawsuits, ruling that it was an unconstitutional violation of separation of powers for the legislature to try to limit the supreme courts authority over court procedure (State ex rel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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