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Encyclopedia > Ohio Republican Party


The Ohio Republican Party, the Ohio state affiliate of the United States Republican Party, controls all the elected statewide offices in Ohio as well as both houses of the Ohio General Assembly, the state legislature. Robert T. Bennett has been chairman of the Ohio GOP since 1988. Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 355 km 355 km 8. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 355 km 355 km 8. ... The Ohio General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Robert T. Bennett (born 1939) is the chairman of the Ohio Republican Party, having served in that post since 1988. ...

Contents


History

From the Civil War era, Ohio politics was dominated by the Republican party, with Ohio Republicans playing key roles in the national party. In the 60 years from 1860 to 1920, Ohioans headed the Republican presidential ticket nine times, losing only once (in 1912, when Theodore Roosevelt split the party). Ohio Republicans such as Salmon P. Chase staffed many important national offices. Starting in the 1880s, Ohio's Marcus A. Hanna was a significant power in the back rooms of the national Republican party. In the 1890s, Hanna led the conservative wing of the party against Theodore Roosevelt's progressive movement. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 1,556,678 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 74,500 Total dead: 198,500 Wounded: 137,000+  {{{notes}}} The... Theodore Roosevelt (born Theodore Roosevelt Jr. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Mark Hanna Marcus Alonzo Hanna (also known as Marcus A. Hanna, and Mark A. Hanna ) (September 24, 1837 – February 15, 1904) was an industrialist and Republican politician from Ohio. ...


The national political upheaval that ushered in the New Deal era in the 1930s benefitted the Ohio Democratic Party and party politics in Ohio became very competitive, with Republicans and Democrats trading victories at all levels. However, on a national level, Ohio Democrats did not play a key role, while Ohio Republicans still cut national figures. The prime example of such a figure was Robert Taft, known as "Mr. Republican," the leader of the conservative wing of the Republican party during a time when liberals controlled both major parties. Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal The New Deal is the name given to the series of programs implemented under President Franklin D. Roosevelt with the goal of stabilizing, reforming and stimulating the United States economy during the Great Depression. ... The Ohio Democratic Party is the Ohio affiliate to the national Democratic party. ... For the current Governor of Ohio, see Bob Taft. ...


From the 1930s to the 1970s, Republicans still won the larger share of elective offices in Ohio. However, another national liberalizing trend in the 1960s gave the Ohio Democrats another boost. In addition, a series of rulings by the United States Supreme Court required state legislatures to end the practice of giving disproportionate electoral power to rural areas. The equalization of legislative districts shifted the advantage to the Ohio Democrats, who were strong in Ohio's many large urban centers. By the mid-1980s, Ohio government at all levels was dominated by Democrats. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States...


However, just as Democrats were reaching their peak, the Ohio Republican party was staging a comeback, and by 1990, the Republicans had won a majority on the Ohio Apportionment Board, which draws district lines for federal and state legislative seats. The 1992 adoption of term limits by referendum further strengthened the party's hand and 1992 marked the last victory by a Democrat (John Glenn) in a statewide race. The Ohio Apportionment Board, which convenes every 10 years, following the census, draws the single-member legislative districts for the Ohio General Assembly. ... This article is about the astronaut. ...


By 2004, Republicans hold all six statewide executive offices (governor/lieutenant governor, attorney general, secretary of state, auditor, and treasurer), a two-thirds majority in the state senate and house, a 5-2 majority on the supreme court, both seats in the U.S. Senate, and 12 of Ohio's 18 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Ohio Senate is the upper house in Ohios bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly; the lower house is the Ohio House of Representatives. ... Ohio has a bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly, consisting a House of Representatives and Senate (the Ohio State Senate), based on its constitution of 1851. ... The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of Ohio law and the Ohio Constitution. ...


Current State of the Party

Despite, or perhaps because of, the party's spectacular successes since the mid-1980s, the Ohio Republicans are now beset by extensive infighting and bad blood between party members, perhaps as bad as the situation in the Ohio Democratic Party. Redistricting after the 2000 census combined with Ohio's term limits laws had Republican officeholders at the federal and state levels struggling with each other to draw federal congressional districts to create safe seats, with the interests of incumbent U.S. representatives clashing with the interests of state legislators facing term limits looking to Congress for their next jobs. The Ohio Democratic Party is the Ohio affiliate to the national Democratic party. ...


Joe Hallett wrote in the Columbus Dispatch (January 13, 2002): The Columbus Dispatch is a daily newspaper, based in Columbus, Ohio, that serves the central portion of the state. ...


"Redistricting should be a happy process for Republicans. ... But the task has hardly been gleeful. Contrarily, it has turned into an embarrassment for Republicans ... Eight-year term limits, more than the state budget, are to blame. These days, state lawmakers constantly are scouting their next jobs. ... [V]isions of Congress dance in their heads. They want districts ready-made for their ascensions. Meanwhile, congressional incumbents constantly angle for districts they can't possibly lose."


The problem for the Republican party is that jury-rigging a sure thing for one party member requires putting another party member on shaky ground -- about 43 percent of the voters voted for Democrats in 2000; it is a delicate balance ensuring that their votes count as little as possible in the results.


Term limits, which were pushed by conservative Republican activists in the 1980s, have come back to bite the party. They forced the retirement of Republican Speaker Jo Ann Davidson (R-Columbus) from the House of Representatives in 2001 as well as the leader of the conservative wing of the party, Deputy Speaker William G. Batchelder (R-Medina). William G. Batchelder is a former judge in the Court of Appeals of Ohio, Ninth Appelate District. ...


In 2001, such soon-to-be-jobless Republicans salivated after the U.S. House of Representatives seats held by Democrats Sherrod Brown and Ted Strickland, and pressured the legislature to gerrymander their districts for Republican majorities. However, when Brown threatened to run for governor in 2002 if he lost his seat through redistricting, the Republican leadership backed down, preferring not to make Governor Taft, whose popularity among Ohioans has always been shaky, face possibly serious competition for re-election. As it happened, Taft was challenged by the weakly funded and name-recognition-challenged Cuyahoga County commissioner Tim Hagan. Both Brown and Strickland managed to hold onto their congressional seats. Sherrod Brown Sherrod Brown (born November 9, 1952), of Lorain, Ohio is an American politician who serves as a U.S. representative from the Democratic party, representing the 13th congressional district of Ohio (map). ... Ted Strickland (born August 4, 1941, in Lucasville, Ohio) is an American politician of the Democratic party who currently serves as a U.S. representative the sixth congressional district of Ohio (map). ... Redrawing electoral districts in this example creates a guaranteed 3-to-1 advantage for Party 1. ... Cuyahoga County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Timothy Hagan (born in 1946 in Youngstown, Ohio), a Democrat, is an American politician of the Ohio Democratic party. ...


The complete domination of the Republican party at the general election has thrown the real competition to the Republican primaries (such as was once the case for Democratic primaries in the solid South). However, it is not the case that the common voter is any more likely to vote in the Republican primaries than before. The result is that the Republican primaries are controlled by the votes of right-wing activists, such as the Ohio Taxpayers Association, which declares which candidates are "real" Republicans. The phrase Solid South describes the reliable electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ...


The state of the party has prompted some to conclude that the party organization's ability to help the Bush re-election campaign in 2004 might be hampered, but after a contentious election, the Bush campaign came out ahead. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ...


The "Coingate" Scandal

In 2005, the party has been rocked by what some have labelled the "Coingate" scandal, in which Republican fund-raiser and coin dealer Tom Noe was awarded contracts by James Conrad, the chief of the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation, to invest $50 million of government funds in rare coin collections. Noe's organization, the Capital Coin Fund has been unable to account for $12 million of that money and 121 coins (worth a total of $400,000) have been lost. This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Thomas Noe, Lucas Co. ...


Noe, who headed the Bush re-election campaign in Lucas County, and his wife, Bernadette Noe (the chairwoman of the Lucas County Republican Party through 2004), had, over a period of 15 years, contributed a total of $200,000 to Republican candidates at the federal, state, and local levels. A grand jury is currently considering whether there is evidence that Noe, a Bush Pioneer, violated campaign funding laws by funneling further donations to Republicans through dummy parties, and whether some or all of this money came from government coffers. Lucas County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Bush Pioneers are people who pledged to gather $100,000 for George W. Bushs 2004 presidential campaign. ...


It has subsequently been revealed that over the course of the Taft administration, the Bureau of Workers' Compensation made more bad investments, resulting in a total loss of $225 million.


Current Republican Officeholders

Prominent Republican officeholders include:

  • Governor of Ohio Robert A. Taft II, a centrist-conservative. His term ends in 2007 and he is barred by term limits laws from running for a third consecutive term. He previously served as Ohio Secretary of State. Taft's popularity has taken a nosedive during his second term and it is unknown what his next political goal will be. Taft has drawn the criticism of the conservative wing of his party, led by Secretary of State Ken Blackwell, and the split between Taft and the conservatives have threatened to harm the Republican's prospects in 2004. Democrats, such as the AFL-CIO's William Burga have added fuel to the fire by stating that Taft is much more amenable to compromise than was his predecessor, George Voinovich.
  • U.S. Sen. R. Michael DeWine, a conservative. Former U.S. representative and Lieutenant Governor of Ohio DeWine was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1994. His seat is up for re-election in 2006. It is presumed that he will stand for re-election to a third term.
  • U.S. Sen. George V. Voinovich, a moderate-conservative. Former Governor of Ohio and Cleveland mayor. He easily defeated Ohio State Senator Eric D. Fingerhut in 2004 for a second term.
  • Lieutenant Governor of Ohio Bruce Johnson, appointed by Governor Taft in 2005.
  • Ohio Secretary of State J. Kenneth Blackwell. Blackwell, a former Charterite Cincinnati mayor, is planning to run for the governorship in 2006. Blackwell, who was then the state treasurer, had planned to run for the governorship in 1998, but under pressure from Bennett, he chose instead to run for secretary of state, leaving the governorship open to Bob Taft. Blackwell is a traditional fiscal conservative and has often clashed with Taft over the issue of balancing the state budget. Blackwell, an African American, has often crticized his party for misusing its control of the Ohio Apportionment Board by packing minority voters into as few districts as possible in order to ensure as large a Republican majority as possible in the General Assembly. Such packing, Blackwell warns, prevents the Republican party from paying attention to, and attracting, more black voters.
  • Ohio Attorney General James M. Petro is planning to run for governor in 2006. He is supported by Speaker Larry Householder for his bid for the Republican nomination against Ken Blackwell and Betty Montgomery.
  • Ohio State Treasurer Jennette Bradley, who was elected lieutenant governor in 2002 and was appointed treasurer in 2005.
  • Ohio State Auditor Betty D. Montgomery is planning to run for governor in 2006.
  • President of the Ohio State Senate Doug White is barred by term limits laws from running for another term. It is believed that Bill Harris will replace him as the Republican leader in the senate.
  • Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives Larry Householder is planning to run for auditor in 2006. He and Ken Blackwell, who is also interested in the governorship, have clashed publicly numerous times. It was discovered that Householder had drafted a secret plan to sabotage Blackwell's political future. The issue was Blackwell's wish to repeal a temporary sales tax increase. The 106-page document described Blackwell as "the Enron of Ohio politics, proped up and overvalued, a fraud.". Blackwell has also called for Householder's resignation in connection with a federal investigation into Householder's fund-raising activities.
  • U.S. representatives:
    • Ralph S. Regula is the No. 2 majority member of the powerful Appropriations Committee and chairman of the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee. In January 2004, it was reported that Regula refused to allow any appropriations to be spent in the district of conservative Democratic U.S. Rep. Ralph Hall of Texas, simply on the basis that Hall was a Democrat. This action prompted Hall to switch to the Republican party.
    • Deborah D. Pryce is chairwoman of the Legislative and Budget Process Subcommittee and a member of the House Rules Committee. She is also the chairwoman of the House Republican Conference.
    • John A. Boehner is chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee
    • Paul E. Gillmor, a former President of the Ohio Senate, is chairman of the Environment and Hazardous Materials Subcommittee
    • Steve Chabot is chairman of the Constitution Subcommittee
    • Jean Schmidt
    • Michael R. Turner, former mayor of Dayton
    • Michael G. Oxley is chairman of the House Financial Services Committee
    • David L. Hobson is the chairman of the Energy and Water Development Subcommittee
    • Patrick J. Tiberi
    • Steven C. LaTourette is a member of the House Standards of Official Conduct Committee and chairman of the Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Managemetn Subcommittee. LaTourette is considered vulnerable in his re-election bid in 2004 as the result of the publicization of his extramarital affair with a lobbyist (a former staffer). LaTourette's estranged wife is openly supporting his Democratic opponent, Capri Cafaro.
    • Robert W. Ney is chairman of the Housing and Community Opportunity Subcommittee
  • Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court Thomas J. Moyer
  • Associate Justices:
    • Paul E. Pfeifer, a former member of the Ohio Senate, who has no Democratic opponent for re-election in 2004. Pfeifer and Andy Douglas, though Republicans, often joined the Democratic minority on the court to oppose the court's conservative bloc. This Sweeney-Resnick-Pfeifer-Douglas activist majority ended when Douglas retired from the court.
    • Terrence O'Donnell, who must win an election in 2004 in order to keep his seat
    • Maureen O'Connor, a former lt. governor of Ohio
    • Evelyn Lundberg Stratton

Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... Robert Alphonso Taft II (born January 8, 1942) has been the Republican governor of the U.S. state of Ohio since 1999. ... The Ohio Secretary of State is responsible for overseeing the elections in the state of Ohio. ... The AFL-CIO is the largest labor union federation in the United States. ... William A. Burga of Columbus, Ohio, is chairman of the Ohio AFL-CIO. He served as an unpledged delegate on the Ohio delegation to the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Richard Michael Mike DeWine (born January 5, 1947) is an American politician from Ohio. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... The position of lieutenant governor of Ohio was established in 1852. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... George Victor Voinovich (Vojnović in Serbian) (born July 15, 1936) is an American politician of the Republican party. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... The Mayor of Cleveland is the chief executive of the citys government. ... Eric David Fingerhut (b. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The position of lieutenant governor of Ohio was established in 1852. ... Oink Oink Oink OInk Bruce Edward Johnson (born May 25, 1960) is an American lawyer and Republican politician who became the State of Ohios sixty-third lieutenant governor on January 5, 2005. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ohio Secretary of State is responsible for overseeing the elections in the state of Ohio. ... John Kenneth Blackwell (born February 28, 1948) is an American politician of the Republican party, who currently (as of 2005) serves as the secretary of state for the U.S. state of Ohio. ... The Charter Party of Cincinnati, Ohio, is a minor political party. ... Prior to 1925, the mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio, was elected in a separate, partisan election. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The Ohio Apportionment Board, which convenes every 10 years, following the census, draws the single-member legislative districts for the Ohio General Assembly. ... The office of Attorney General of Ohio was first created by the Ohio General Assembly by statute in 1846. ... James M. Jim Petro is an American politician from the state of Ohio and a member of the Republican Party. ... List of Ohio State Treasurers Categories: Government of Ohio ... Jennette B. Bradley of Columbus, Ohio, is an American politician of the Republican party who currently serves as Ohio State Treasurer. ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ohio State Auditor is responsible for auditing all the public offices of the state of Ohio, from the largest to the smallest. ... Betty Montgomery is an American politician from the state of Ohio. ... Doug White of Manchester, Ohio, is an American politician of the Republican party who served as president of the Ohio Senate for two years, from 2003 to 2005. ... Larry Householder of Glenford, Ohio, is an American politician of the Republican party who served as speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives from 2001 to 2005. ... Ralph Straus Regula (born December 3, 1924) is a Representative in the United States Congress from the 16th District of the State of Ohio (map), elected to his 17th term in November 2004. ... Ralph Moody Hall (born May 3, 1923) is a United States Representative from the Fourth Congressional District in Texas (map). ... Deborah D. Pryce (born July 29, 1951) is an American politician from Ohio. ... John Andrew Boehner (pronounced BAY-ner) (born November 17, 1949), is an American politician of the Republican Party who serves as House Majority Leader, and a U.S. Representative from the eighth congressional district of Ohio (map), which includes several southwestern counties along the Indiana border and which he has... Paul Eugene Gillmor (born February 1, 1939) is an American politician of the Republican party who serves as a U.S. representative from the fifth congressional district of Ohio. ... Steve Chabot (born January 22, 1953) is a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Ohio, representing that states first congressional district (see[map]), in the Cincinnati area. ... Jean Schmidt Jeannette Jean Marie Hoffman Schmidt (born November 29, 1951) is an American politician of the Republican Party who represents a district in southern Ohio stretching from the eastern suburbs of Cincinnati to Portsmouth, the Second District, in the United States House of Representatives. ... For other people named Michael Turner, see Michael Turner. ... Skyline of Dayton from the north, across the Great Miami River. ... Michael Garver Oxley (born February 11, 1944) is an American politician of the Republican party who serves as a U.S. representative from the Fourth Congressional District (map) of Ohio. ... David Lee Hobson (born October 17, 1936) is an American politician of the Republican party who serves as a U.S. representative from the seventh congressional district of Ohio (map), based in Springfield, Ohio. ... Patrick Joseph Tiberi (born October 21, 1962) is an American politician from Ohio. ... Steven C. LaTourette (born July 22, 1954) is an American politician from Ohio. ... Capri Silvestri Cafaro (born November 21, 1977) is an American politician of the Democratic Party in Ohio who lost to Republican Steven C. LaTourette in the 2004 U.S. House of Representatives election. ... Robert William Ney (born July 5, 1954) is an American politician of the Republican Party who serves as a U.S. representative from the 18th District of southeastern Ohio (map). ... The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of Ohio law and the Ohio Constitution. ... Thomas J. Moyer was born on April 18, 1939 in Sandusky, Ohio. ... Paul E. Pfeifer (born Oct. ... Andrew Douglas is a former Republican justice of the Ohio Supreme Court who served in that office from 1985 to 2002. ... Francis E. Sweeney Sr. ... Alice Robie Resnick is a Supreme Court Justice for the State of Ohio. ... Terrence ODonnell is an American jurist of the Ohio Republican party. ... Maureen OConnor (born 7 August 1951, in Washington, D.C.) is an American politician of the Republican party. ...

Prominent Ohio Republicans in the Past

Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822–January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, and military leader from the U.S. state of Ohio. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... The name Mckinley redirects here. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The office of Attorney General of Ohio was first created by the Ohio General Assembly by statute in 1846. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency, and in the calculation of Vice President John Nance Garner, not worth a bucket of warm piss. ... C. William ONeill (February 14, 1916 - August 20, 1978) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... The office of Attorney General of Ohio was first created by the Ohio General Assembly by statute in 1846. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of Ohio law and the Ohio Constitution. ... James Allen Rhodes (September 13, 1909 - March 4, 2001) was a Republican politician from Ohio, and as of 2004 one of only three U.S. state governors to be elected to four four-year terms in office. ... Nickname: The Arch City The Discovery City Motto: Official website: http://www. ... The Ohio State Auditor is responsible for auditing all the public offices of the state of Ohio, from the largest to the smallest. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923, when he became the sixth president to die in office. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The position of lieutenant governor of Ohio was established in 1852. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Benjamin Franklin Wade (October 27, 1800–March 2, 1878) was a U.S. lawyer. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... The Radical Republicans were an influential group of American politicians in the Republican party (GOP) during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras. ... Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska is the current President pro tempore of the Senate. ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 – September 19, 1881) was the 20th President of the United States (1881), and the second U.S. President to be assassinated. ... Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 1,556,678 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 74,500 Total dead: 198,500 Wounded: 137,000+  {{{notes}}} The... Benjamin Harrison VI (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, and the 10th Chief Justice of the United States. ... William Bart Saxbe (born June 24, 1916) was an American politician of the Republican Party, who served as a U.S. Senator from Ohio and as U.S. Attorney General under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The Senate Republican Conference is the formal organization of the (currently) 51 Republican Senators in the United States Senate. ... Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The Sherman Anti-Trust Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1, was the first United States federal government action to limit monopolies held by trust companies. ... Alphonso Taft Alphonso Taft (November 5, 1810 – May 21, 1891) was the Attorney General and Secretary of War under President Ulysses S. Grant and the founder of an American political dynasty. ... For the current Governor of Ohio, see Bob Taft. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The Senate Republican Conference is the formal organization of the (currently) 51 Republican Senators in the United States Senate. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Harold Hitz Burton (June 22, 1888 - October 28, 1964) was an American Senator and Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the supreme court in the United States. ... Simeon Davison Fess (December 11, 1861 - December 23, 1936) was a Republican politician and educator from Ohio. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Cover of Time Magazine (March 9, 1925) Nicholas Longworth (November 5, 1869-April 9, 1931) was a prominent American politician in the Republican Party during the first third of the 20th century. ... Justice Potter Stewart Potter Stewart (January 23, 1915 – December 7, 1985) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Marcus Alonzo Hanna (September 24, 1837 - February 15, 1904) was an American industrialist and politician from Cleveland, Ohio. ... Kingsley Arter Taft (July 19, 1903 – March 28, 1970) was an American politician of Ohios Republican Taft family who served as chief justice of the Ohio Supreme Court and also served briefly as a United States Senator. ... Robert Taft (generally known as Robert Taft Jr. ...

Party Symbols

Ohio Republicans use the same symbols used by the national Republican party, such as the elephant. However, the traditional symbol of the party in state and local elections is the eagle. Genera Several, see below. ...


Resources

  • Ohio Republican Information

See also:


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