FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Ohio" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ohio
State of Ohio
Flag of Ohio State seal of Ohio
Flag of Ohio Seal
Nickname(s): The Buckeye State,
"Birthplace of Aviation" "The Heart Of It All"
Motto(s): With God, all things are possible
Official language(s) English de facto
Demonym Ohioan or Buckeye[1]
Capital Columbus
Largest city Columbus
Largest metro area Greater Cleveland
Area  Ranked 34th in the US
 - Total 44,825 sq mi
(116,096 km²)
 - Width 220 miles (355 km)
 - Length 220 miles (355 km)
 - % water 8.7
 - Latitude 38° 24′ N to 41° 59′ N
 - Longitude 80° 31′ W to 84° 49′ W
Population  Ranked 7th in the US
 - Total 11,353,140
 - Density 277.26/sq mi 
107.05/km² (9th in the US)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Campbell Hill[2]
1,550 ft  (472 m)
 - Mean 853 ft  (260 m)
 - Lowest point Ohio River[2]
455 ft  (139 m)
Admission to Union  March 1, 1803 (17th,
declared retroactively on
August 7, 1953)
Governor Ted Strickland (D)
Lieutenant Governor Lee Fisher (D)
U.S. Senators George V. Voinovich (R)
Sherrod Brown (D)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Abbreviations OH US-OH
Website www.ohio.gov

Ohio (IPA: /oʊˈhaɪoʊ/) is a Midwestern state of the United States.[3] Part of the Great Lakes region, Ohio has long been a cultural and geographical crossroads in North America. At the time of European contact and in the years that followed, Native Americans in today's Ohio included the Shawnee, Iroquois, Miamis, and Wyandots. Beginning in the 1700s, the area was settled by people from New England, the Mid-Atlantic States, Appalachia, and the Upper South. Look up Ohio in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ohio. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The flag of Ohio was adopted in 1902 and designed by John Eisemann. ... The Ohio Stae Seal features The Scioto River, as it flows across the center of the seal, separating cultivated fields from Mount Logan. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... With God, all things are possible is the state motto of the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_OH.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ohio ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language, with a majority of English speakers being monolingual. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... NASA image of Greater Cleveland and Lake Erie Greater Cleveland is a nickname for the metropolitan area surrounding Cleveland in Ohio. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Campbell Hill is Ohios highest point in elevation. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Ted Strickland (born August 4, 1941) is an American politician of the Democratic Party, and the current Governor of the state of Ohio. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Lee Fisher (born 7 August 1951, in Ann Arbor, Mich. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) is the senior United States Senator from the state of Ohio, and a member of the Republican Party. ... Sherrod Campbell Brown (born November 9, 1952) is the Democratic Junior United States Senator from the state of Ohio. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... // These are complete tables of congressional delegations from Ohio to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Midwest redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The Great Lakes states of the U.S. are colored red in this map. ... North American redirects here. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States and their history after European contact, chiefly in what is now the United States. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... The Miami are a Native American tribe originally found in Indiana and Ohio, and now living also in Oklahoma. ... The Wyandot and Huron are indigenous peoples of North America known in their native language as the Wendat. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... Areas included within the Appalachian Regional Commissions charter. ...


Prior to 1984, the United States Census Bureau considered Ohio part of the North Central Region.[4] That region was renamed "Midwest" and split into two divisions. Ohio is now in the East North Central States division.[5] Ohio has the highest population density of any state not on the Eastern Seaboard, and it is the seventh-largest state by population in the U.S. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The East North Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States which are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ...


Ohio was the first state admitted to the Union under the Northwest Ordinance. Its U.S. postal abbreviation is OH; its old-style abbreviation was O. Natives of Ohio are known as Ohioans or Buckeyes, after the buckeye tree.[1] Northwest Territory (1787). ... States AK: Alaska AL: Alabama AR: Arkansas AZ: Arizona CA: California CO: Colorado CT: Connecticut DE: Delaware FL: Florida GA: Georgia HI: Hawaii IA: Iowa ID: Idaho IL: Illinois IN: Indiana KS: Kansas KY: Kentucky LA: Louisiana MA: Massachusetts MD: Maryland ME: Maine MI: Michigan MN: Minnesota MO: Missouri MS...

Contents

Etymology

See also: U.S. state name etymologies

The name "Ohio" is derived from the Seneca word ohi:yo’, meaning "beautiful river" (French mistranslation) or "large creek", which was originally the name of both the Ohio River and Allegheny River.[6][7][8][9][10] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Seneca is the language of the Seneca Native Band, one of the Six Nations of the Iroquois League. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Allegheny River watershed Much of the area through which the Allegheny River flows consists of hilly woodlands. ...


History

Plaque commemorating the Northwest Ordinance outside Federal Hall in lower Manhattan
Plaque commemorating the Northwest Ordinance outside Federal Hall in lower Manhattan
Main article: History of Ohio

Plaque commeorating the passage of the Northwest Ordinance outside Federal Hall in Manhattan. ... Plaque commeorating the passage of the Northwest Ordinance outside Federal Hall in Manhattan. ... Northwest Territory (1787). ... Federal Hall, once located at 26 Wall Street in New York City, was the first capitol of the United States. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... The history of Ohio is composed of many thousands of years of human activity. ...

Native Americans

After the so-called Beaver Wars in the mid-1600s, the powerful Iroquois confederation of the New York-area claimed much of the Ohio country as a hunting and, probably most importantly, a beaver-trapping ground. After the devastation of epidemics and war in the mid-1600s, which had largely emptied the Ohio country of indigenous people by the mid-to-late seventeenth century, the land gradually became repopulated by the mostly Algonquian-speaking descendants of its ancient inhabitants, that is, descendants of the Adena, Hopewell, and Mississippian cultures. Many of these Ohio-country nations were multi-ethnic and sometimes multi-linguistic societies born out of the earlier devastation brought about by disease, war, and the subsequent social instability. They subsisted on agriculture (corn, sunflowers, beans, etc.) supplemented by seasonal hunts. By the 1650s they were very much part of a larger global economy brought about by fur trade. The French and Iroquois Wars (also called the Iroquois Wars or the Beaver Wars) were an intermittent series of conflicts fought in the late 17th century in eastern North America, in which the Iroquois sought to expand their territory and take control of the role of middleman in the fur... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... The Adena culture was a Pre-Columbian Native American culture that existed from c. ... Hopewell mounds from the Mound City Group in Ohio Hopewell culture is the term used to describe common aspects of the Native American culture that flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States from 200 BC to 400 A.D. At its greatest extent, Hopewell culture stretched from... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... For other uses, see Sunflower (disambiguation). ... Green beans Bean is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of Fabaceae (formerly Leguminosae) used for food or feed. ...


The indigenous nations to inhabit Ohio in the historical period (most clearly after 1700), included the Miamis (a large confederation), Wyandots (made up of refugees, especially from the fractured Huron confederacy), Delawares (pushed west from their historic homeland in New Jersey), Shawnees (also pushed west, although they may be descended from the Fort Ancient people of Ohio), Ottawas (more commonly associated with the upper Great Lakes region), Mingos (like the Wyandot, a recently formed composite of refugees from Iroquois and other societies), and Eries (gradually absorbed into the new, multi-ethnic "republics," namely the Wyandot). The Miami are a Native American tribe originally found in Indiana and Ohio. ... This article is about the First Nations people, the Wyandot, also known as the Huron. ... This article is about the First Nations people, the Wyandot, also known as the Huron. ... The Lenape or Lenni-Lenape (later named Delaware Indians by Europeans) were, in the 1600s, loosely organized bands of Native American people practicing small-scale agriculture to augment a largely mobile hunter-gatherer society in the region around the Delaware River, the lower Hudson River, and western Long Island Sound. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... Fort Ancient is a name for a Native American culture that flourished from 1000-1550 among a people who predominantly inhabited land along the Ohio River in areas of southern modern day Ohio and northern Kentucky. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa, Odaawa, Outaouais, or Trader) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... The Eries were a Native American tribe. ...


Ohio country was also the site of Indian massacres, such as the Yellow Creek Massacre and Gnadenhutten. Chief Logan statue, Logan, West Virginia Chief Logan (c. ... The Gnadenhütten massacre (8 March 1782) was a mass murder of nearly 100 Native Americans (mostly women and children) by American militiamen during the American Revolutionary War. ...


Colonial and Revolutionary Eras

During the 18th century, the French set up a system of trading posts to control the fur trade in the region. // North America The French established colonies across the New World in the 17th century. ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ...


In 1754, France and Great Britain fought a war known in the United States as the French and Indian War. As a result of the Treaty of Paris, the French ceded control of Ohio and the rest of the Old Northwest to Great Britain. Pontiac's Rebellion in the 1760s challenged British military control, which ended with the American victory in the American Revolution. In the Treaty of Paris in 1783 Britain ceded all claims to Ohio to the United States. Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... This article is about the historic region of the United States; you may be looking for: North-Western Territory, British North American territory Northwest Territories, present-day Canadian territory Pacific Northwest, unofficial region in the United States The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North... Combatants British Empire American Indians Commanders Jeffrey Amherst, Henry Bouquet Pontiac, Guyasuta Strength ~3,000 soldiers[1] ~3,500 warriors[2] Casualties 450 soldiers killed, 2,000 civilians killed or captured, 4,000 civilians displaced ~200 warriors killed, possible additional war-related deaths from disease Pontiacs Rebellion was a... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Painting by Benjamin West depicting (from left to right) John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ...


Northwest Territory: 1787–1803

The United States created the Northwest Territory under the Northwest Ordinance of 1787. Slavery was not permitted. Settlement began with the founding of Marietta by the Ohio Company of Associates, which had been formed by a group of American Revolutionary War veterans. Following the Ohio Company, the Miami Company (also referred to as the "Symmes Purchase") claimed the southwestern section and the Connecticut Land Company surveyed and settled the Connecticut Western Reserve in present-day Northeast Ohio. The old Northwest Territory originally included areas that had previously been known as Ohio Country and Illinois Country. As Ohio prepared for statehood, Indiana Territory was created, reducing the Northwest Territory to approximately the size of present-day Ohio plus the eastern half of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan and the eastern tip of the Upper Peninsula. The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... Northwest Territory (1787). ... Downtown Marietta and the Muskingum River in July 2006 Marietta is a city in Washington County, Ohio, United States. ... Ohio Company was the name of 18th century companies organized for the colonization of the Ohio River Valley. ... The Symmes Purchase, also known as the Miami Purchase, a section of land in Southwestern Ohio in what is now Hamilton, Butler, and Warren Counties. ... The Symmes Purchase, also known as the Miami Purchase, a section of land in Southwestern Ohio in what is now Hamilton, Butler, and Warren Counties. ... The Connecticut Land Company was formed in the late eighteenth century to survey and encourage settlement in the Connecticut Western Reserve, part of the Old Northwest Territory. ... Connecticuts land claims in the West The Connecticut Western Reserve was land claimed by Connecticut in the Northwest Territory in what is now northeastern Ohio. ... Greater Cleveland and Northeast Ohio are nicknames for the metropolitan area surrounding Cleveland in Ohio. ... The Ohio Country, showing the present-day U.S. state boundaries The Ohio Country (sometimes called the Ohio Territory) was the name used in the 18th century for the regions of North America west of the Appalachian Mountains and in the region of the upper Ohio River south of Lake... French settlements and forts in the Illinois Country in 1763, showing U.S. current state boundaries. ... Map of the Indiana Territory Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... Regions and major cities of the Lower Peninsula can be seen here. ... The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is the northern of the two major land masses that comprise the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


Under the Northwest Ordinance, any of the states to be formed out of the Northwest Territory would be admitted as a state once the population exceeded 60,000. Although Ohio's population numbered only 45,000 in December 1801, Congress determined that the population was growing rapidly and Ohio could begin the path to statehood with the assumption that it would exceed 60,000 residents by the time it would become a state. Northwest Territory (1787). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...


Statehood: 1803–present

Eight U.S. presidents hailed from Ohio at the time of their elections, giving rise to the nickname "Mother of Presidents", a sobriquet it shares with Virginia. Seven presidents were born in Ohio, making it second to Virginia's eight, but Virginia-born William Henry Harrison lived most of his life in Ohio and is also buried there. Harrison conducted his political career while living on the family compound, founded by William's father-in-law John Cleves Symmes, in North Bend, Ohio. This article is about the U.S. state. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... John Cleves Symmes (1742-1814) was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and later a pioneer in the Northwest Territory. ... North Bend is a village in Hamilton County, Ohio, along the Ohio River. ...


The seven presidents born in Ohio were Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, Benjamin Harrison (grandson of William Henry Harrison), William McKinley, William Howard Taft and Warren G. Harding. Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... For his son, also a prominent politician, see James Rudolph Garfield. ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... Warren Harding redirects here. ...


In 1835, Ohio fought with Michigan in the Toledo War, a mostly bloodless boundary war over the Toledo Strip. Congress intervened and, as a condition for admittance as a state of the Union, Michigan was forced to accept the western two-thirds of the Upper Peninsula, in addition to the eastern third that was already part of the state, in exchange for giving up its claim to the Toledo Strip. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Map of the Toledo Strip, the disputed region. ... The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is the northern of the two major land masses that comprise the U.S. state of Michigan. ...

Ohio state welcome sign, in an older (1990s) style
Ohio state welcome sign, in an older (1990s) style

Ohio's central position and its population gave it an important place during the Civil War, and the Ohio River was a vital artery for troop and supply movements, as were Ohio's railroads. At the end of the Civil War, three top Union generals were all from Ohio: Grant, Sherman, and Sheridan. Ohio also contributed more soldiers per-capita than any other state in the Union. Image File history File links Publicity photo for Wonderful Town Source: Downloaded from http://www. ... Image File history File links Publicity photo for Wonderful Town Source: Downloaded from http://www. ...


In 1912 a Constitutional Convention was held with Charles B. Galbreath as Secretary. The result reflected the concerns of the Progressive Era. It introduced the initiative and the referendum, allowed the General Assembly to put questions on the ballot for the people to ratify laws and constitutional amendments originating in the Legislature as well. Under the Jeffersonian principle that laws should be reviewed once a generation, the constitution provided for a recurring question to appear on Ohio's general election ballots every 20 years. The question asks whether a new convention is required. Although the question has appeared in 1932, 1952, 1972, and 1992, it has never been approved. Instead constitutional amendments have been proposed by petition to the legislature hundreds of times and adopted in a majority of cases.


On February 19, 1803, President Jefferson signed an act of Congress that approved Ohio's boundaries and constitution. However, Congress had never passed a resolution formally admitting Ohio as the 17th state. The current custom of Congress declaring an official date of statehood did not begin until 1812, with Louisiana's admission as the 18th state. Although no formal resolution of admission was required, when the oversight was discovered in 1953, Ohio congressman George H. Bender introduced a bill in Congress to admit Ohio to the Union retroactive to March 1, 1803. At a special session at the old state capital in Chillicothe, the Ohio state legislature approved a new petition for statehood that was delivered to Washington, D.C. on horseback. On August 7, 1953 (the year of Ohio's 150th anniversary), President Eisenhower signed an act that officially declared March 1, 1803 the date of Ohio's admittance into the Union.[11] [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... George Harrison Bender (September 29, 1896, Cleveland, Ohio - June 18, 1961, Chagrin Falls, Ohio) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country United States State Ohio Counties Ross Government  - Mayor Joseph P. Sulzer (D) Area  - City 9. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

See also: Category:History of Ohio

Law and government

Main article: Government of Ohio

Ohio's capital is Columbus, located close to the center of the state. The executive branch is made up of six officers: Governor and lieutenant governor, Secretary of state, Attorney general, Auditor, and Treasurer. Governor Ted Strickland took office as governor in January 2007. The legislative branch of Ohio government, the Ohio General Assembly, is made up of two houses--the senate, which has 33 members, and the house of representatives, which has 99 members.The judicial branch is headed by the supreme court, which has one chief justice and six associate justices. The Rhodes State Office Tower adjacent to the Statehouse The Government of the State of Ohio comprises three branches -- executive, legislative, and judicial. ... Listed are the 88 counties of the state of Ohio. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... The position of lieutenant governor of Ohio was established in 1852. ... The Ohio Secretary of State is responsible for overseeing the elections in the state of Ohio. ... The office of Attorney General of Ohio was first created by the Ohio General Assembly by statute in 1846. ... The Ohio State Auditor is responsible for auditing all the public offices of the state of Ohio, from the largest to the smallest. ... Category: ... Categories: | ... Ted Strickland (born August 4, 1941) is an American politician of the Democratic Party, and the current Governor of the state of Ohio. ... The Ohio General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Ohio. ... The Ohio Senate is the upper house in Ohios bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly; the lower house is the Ohio House of Representatives. ... Ohio has a bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly, consisting a House of Representatives and Senate (the Ohio State Senate), based on its constitution of 1851. ... The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of Ohio law and the Ohio Constitution. ...


In the United States federal government, Ohio has 18 seats (see congressional districts map) in the United States House of Representatives. Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...


Geography

Further information: List of Ohio countiesList of cities in OhioList of villages in OhioList of Ohio townshipsOhio public lands, and List of lakes in Ohio

Ohio's geographic location has proved to be an asset for economic growth and expansion. Because Ohio links the Northeast to the Midwest, much cargo and business traffic passes through its borders on its well-developed highways. Ohio has the nation's 10th largest highway network, and is within a one-day drive of 50% of North America's population and 70% of North America's manufacturing capacity.[12] To the North, Lake Erie gives Ohio 312 miles (502 km) of coastline,[13] which allows for numerous seaports. Ohio's southern border is defined by the Ohio River (with the border being at the 1793 low-water mark on the north side of the river), and much of the northern border is defined by Lake Erie. Ohio's neighbors are Pennsylvania to the east, Michigan to the northwest, Ontario Canada, to the north, Indiana to the west, Kentucky on the south, and West Virginia on the southeast. Ohio's borders were defined by metes and bounds in the Enabling Act of 1802 as follows: This is a list of Ohio counties: Adams County (West Union, Ohio) Allen County (Lima, Ohio) Ashland County (Ashland, Ohio) Ashtabula County (Jefferson, Ohio) Athens County (Athens, Ohio) Auglaize County (Wapakoneta, Ohio) Belmont County (St. ... List of cities in Ohio, arranged in alphabetical order. ... List of villages in Ohio, arranged in alphabetical order. ... The List of Ohio Townships provides an alphabetic list of the 1340 current and historic townships in Ohio. ... Ohio public lands include national forest lands, Army Corps of Engineers areas, state parks, state forests, state nature preserves, state wildlife management areas, and other areas. ... Ohio has more than 2,500 lakes larger than 2 acres[1]. The following is an incomplete list of named lakes and reservoirs in the US state of Ohio that are 10 acres or greater. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Metes and bounds is a system or method of describing land, real property (in contrast to personal property) or real estate. ... The Enabling Act of 1802 was made into law on April 30, 1802 by the Seventh Congress of the United States. ...

Bounded on the east by the Pennsylvania line, on the south by the Ohio River, to the mouth of the Great Miami River, on the west by the line drawn due north from the mouth of the Great Miami aforesaid, and on the north by an east and west line drawn through the southerly extreme of Lake Michigan, running east after intersecting the due north line aforesaid, from the mouth of the Great Miami until it shall intersect Lake Erie or the territorial line, and thence with the same through Lake Erie to the Pennsylvania line aforesaid.
The Ohio coast of Lake Erie.
The Ohio coast of Lake Erie.

Note that Ohio is bounded by the Ohio River, but nearly all of the river itself belongs to Kentucky and West Virginia. In 1980, the U.S. Supreme Court held that, based on the wording of the cessation of territory by Virginia (which, at that time included what is now Kentucky and West Virginia), the boundary between Ohio and Kentucky (and by implication, West Virginia) is the northern low-water mark of the river as it existed in 1792.[14] Ohio has only that portion of the river between the river's 1792 low-water mark and the present high-water mark. The Great Miami River (also called the Miami River) is a tributary of the Ohio River, approximately 160 mi (257 km) long, in southwestern Ohio in the United States. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... Download high resolution version (596x701, 51 KB)Ohio state flag in Conneaut, Ohio with lighthouse in the background (taken Sept. ... Download high resolution version (596x701, 51 KB)Ohio state flag in Conneaut, Ohio with lighthouse in the background (taken Sept. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The border with Michigan has also changed, as a result of the Toledo War, to angle slightly northeast to the north shore of the mouth of the Maumee River. Map of the Toledo Strip, the disputed region. ...


Much of Ohio features glaciated plains, with an exceptionally flat area in the northwest being known as the Great Black Swamp. This glaciated region in the northwest and central state is bordered to the east and southeast first by a belt known as the glaciated Allegheny Plateau, and then by another belt known as the unglaciated Allegheny Plateau. Most of Ohio is of low relief, but the unglaciated Allegheny Plateau features rugged hills and forests. The Great Black Swamp roughly covered the black area within the green shaded counties. ... The Glaciated Allegheny Plateau is that portion of the Allegheny Plateau that lies within the area covered by the last glaciation. ... The Unglaciated Allegheny Plateau is located in an arc around southeastern Ohio into western Pennsylvania and West Virginia. ...

Physical geography of Ohio.
Physical geography of Ohio.

The rugged southeastern quadrant of Ohio, stretching in an outward bow-like arc along the Ohio River from the West Virginia Panhandle to the outskirts of Cincinnati, forms a distinct socio-economic unit. Geologically similar to parts of West Virginia and southwestern Pennsylvania, this area's coal mining legacy, dependence on small pockets of old manufacturing establishments, and distinctive regional dialect set this section off from the rest of the state and, unfortunately, create a limited opportunity to participate in the generally high economic standards of Ohio. In 1965 the United States Congress passed the Appalachian Regional Development Act, at attempt to "address the persistent poverty and growing economic despair of the Appalachian Region."[15] This act defines 29 Ohio counties as part of Appalachia.[16] While 1/3 of Ohio's land mass is part of the federally defined Appalachian region, only 12.8% of Ohioans live there (1.476 million people.)[17] Image File history File links Geographic_regions_ohio. ... Image File history File links Geographic_regions_ohio. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...

Map of Ohio.
Map of Ohio.

Significant rivers within the state include the Cuyahoga River, Great Miami River, Maumee River, Muskingum River, and Scioto River. The rivers in the northern part of the state drain into the northern Atlantic Ocean via Lake Erie and the St. Lawrence River, and the rivers in the southern part of the state drain into the Gulf of Mexico via the Ohio and then the Mississippi. The worst weather disaster in Ohio history occurred along the Great Miami River in 1913. Known as the Great Dayton Flood, the entire Miami River watershed flooded, including the downtown business district of Dayton. As a result, the Miami Conservancy District was created as the first major flood plain engineering project in Ohio and the United States.[18] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (1967 × 1333 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (1967 × 1333 pixel, file size: 2. ... Ohio has more than 2,500 lakes larger than 2 acres[1]. The following is an incomplete list of named lakes and reservoirs in the US state of Ohio that are 10 acres or greater. ... The Cuyahoga River (IPA pronunciation: , or kuy-a-HAW-ga, locally kie-uh-HOE-guh) is located in Northeast Ohio in the United States. ... The Great Miami River (also called the Miami River) is a tributary of the Ohio River, approximately 160 mi (257 km) long, in southwestern Ohio in the United States. ... The Maumee River at Grand Rapids, Ohio. ... Map of the Muskingum River watershed. ... Perspective view looking upstream of Scioto River valley near Portsmouth, Ohio. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Great Dayton Flood of 1913 flooded Dayton, Ohio and the surrounding area with water from the Great Miami River, causing the greatest natural disaster[1] in Ohio history. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... The Miami Conservancy District is a river management agency operating in Southwest Ohio to control flooding of the Great Miami River and its tributaries. ...


Grand Lake St. Marys in the west central part of the state was constructed as a supply of water for canals in the canal-building era of 1820–1850. For many years this body of water, over 20 square miles (52 km²), was the largest artificial lake in the world. It should be noted that Ohio's canal-building projects were not the economic fiasco that similar efforts were in other states. Some cities, such as Dayton, owe their industrial emergence to location on canals, and as late as 1910 interior canals carried much of the bulk freight of the state. Grand Lake St. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ...


Climate

The climate of Ohio is a humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfa) throughout most of the state except in the extreme southern counties of Ohio's Bluegrass region section which are located on the northern periphery of the humid subtropical climate and Upland South region of the United States. Summers are typically hot and humid throughout the State, while winters generally range from cool to cold. Precipitation in Ohio is moderate year-round. Severe weather is not uncommon in the state, although there are typically fewer tornadoes in Ohio than in states located in the so-called Tornado Alley. Severe lake effect snowstorms are also not uncommon on the southeast shore of Lake Erie, which is located in an area designated as the Snowbelt. The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... Regions of Kentucky, with the bluegrass region in green and light green. ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... The Upland South does not correspond well to state lines, although the term Upper South is sometimes defined by states. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... An outline of Significant Tornado Alley in the United States, where the highest percentage of violent tornadoes occur Tornado Alley is a colloquial term most often used in reference to the area of the United States in which tornadoes are most frequent. ... Lake-effect precipitation coming off the Great Lakes, as seen from NEXRAD. Lake effect snow, which can be a type of snowsquall, is produced in the winter when cold, artic dry winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, picking up water vapor which freezes and is deposited on... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... A snowbelt is a region, many of which lie downwind of the Great Lakes, where heavy snowfall is particularly common. ...


Although predominantly not in a subtropical climate, some warmer-climate flora and fauna does reach well into Ohio. For instance, a number of trees with more southern ranges, such as the blackjack oak, Quercus marilandica, are found at their northernmost in Ohio just north of the Ohio River. Also evidencing this climatic transition from a subtropical to continental climate, several plants such as the Southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), Albizia julibrissin (mimosa), Crape Myrtle, and even the occasional Needle Palm are hardy landscape materials regularly used as street, yard, and garden plantings in the Bluegrass region of Ohio; but these same plants will simply not thrive in much of the rest of the State. This interesting change may be observed while traveling through Ohio on Interstate 75 from Cincinnati to Toledo; the observant traveler of this diverse state may even catch a glimpse of Cincinnati's common wall lizard, one of the few examples of permanent "subtropical" fauna in Ohio. Binomial name Quercus marilandica Muenchh. ... Subtropical (or semitropical) areas are those adjacent to the tropics, usually roughly defined as the ranges 23. ... Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. ... Binomial name Magnolia grandiflora L. The Southern magnolia, also known as bull bay, is a magnolia native to the southeastern United States, from coastal North Carolina south to central Florida, and west to East Texas. ... Binomial name Albizia julibrissin (Willd. ... Species About 50, including: Lagerstroemia indica Lagerstroemia speciosa The Crape-myrtles Lagerstroemia are a genus of about 50 species of deciduous and evergreen trees or large shrubs native to east Asia and Australia. ... Binomial name Rhapidophyllum hystrix (Pursh) H.Wendl. ... Regions of Kentucky, with the bluegrass region in green and light green. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 75 Interstate 75 (I-75) is a major north-south interstate highway in the midwest and southeastern United States. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ... Binomial name Podarcis muralis Laurenti, 1768 The Wall lizard (Podarcis muralis) is a species of lizard, native to Europe. ...


Records

The highest recorded temperature was 113 °F (45 °C), near Gallipolis on July 21, 1934.[19] The lowest recorded temperature was -39 °F (-39 °C), at Milligan on February 10, 1899.[20] For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... Downtown Gallipolis has maintained much of its original character. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Earthquakes

Earthquakes are rare, but not unheard of, in Ohio. More than 30 earthquakes occurred in Ohio between 2002 and 2007, and more than 200 quakes with a magnitude of 2.0 or higher have occurred since 1776.[21] This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... The Richter magnitude scale, or more correctly local magnitude ML scale, assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. ...


The most substantial known earthquake in Ohio history was the Anna (Shelby County) earthquake,[22] which occurred on March 9, 1937. It was centered in western Ohio, and had a magnitude of 5.4, and was of intensity VIII.[23] is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Mercalli intensity scale is a scale used for measuring the intensity of an earthquake. ...


Other significant earthquakes in Ohio include:[24] one of magnitude 4.8 near Lima on September 19, 1884;[25] one of magnitude 4.2 near Portsmouth on May 17, 1901;[26] and one of 5.0 in northeast Ohio on January 31, 1986, which continued to trigger 13 aftershocks of magnitude 0.5 to 2.4 for two months.[27] Location in the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Allen Founded 1831 Government  - Mayor David Berger (D) Area  - Total 12. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Portsmouth is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Scioto County. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...


The most recent earthquake in Ohio of any appreciable magnitude occurred on January 8, 2008, at 8:34:46 PM local time. It had a magnitude of 3.1, and its epicenter was under Lake Erie, northeast of Cleveland, approximately 9.7 km (6 mi) west of Mentor-on-the-Lake.[28] is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Mentor-on-the-Lake is a city located in Lake County, Ohio. ...


The Ohio Seismic Network (OhioSeis), a group of seismograph stations at several colleges, universities, and other institutions, and coordinated by the Division of Geological Survey of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources,[29] maintains an extensive catalog of Ohio earthquakes from 1776 to the present day, as well as earthquakes located in other states whose effects were felt in Ohio.[30]


Major cities

See also: List of cities in Ohio
Rank City 2006 Population[31] 2006 Metro Population[32]
1 Columbus 733,203 1,725,570
2 Cleveland 444,313 2,114,155
3 Cincinnati 332,252 2,104,218
4 Toledo 298,446 653,695
5 Akron 209,704 700,943
6 Dayton 156,771 835,537
7 Youngstown 81,520 586,939
8 Parma 80,009 *
9 Canton 78,924 409,764
10 Lorain 70,592 *
11 Springfield 62,844 141,872
12 Hamilton 62,130 **
13 Elyria 55,745 *
14 Kettering 54,666 ***
15 Lakewood 52,194 *
16 Mentor 51,593 *
17 Middletown 51,290 **
18 Cuyahoga Falls 50,398 ****
19 Mansfield 50,212 127,010
20 Euclid 48,717 *
*Greater Cleveland, **Cincinnati Metro, ***Dayton Metro, ****Akron Metro

Columbus (home of The Ohio State University, Franklin University, Capital University, and Ohio Dominican University) is the capital of Ohio, near the geographic center of the state. List of cities in Ohio, arranged in alphabetical order. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Ohio Location within Summit County, Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City 62. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State Counties Mahoning, Trumbull Founded 1796 Incorporated 1848 (village) - 1867 (city) Government  - Mayor Jay Williams (I) Area  - City  34. ... Parma is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio in Cuyahoga County and is the largest suburb of Cleveland. ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Lorain Founded 1807 Government  - Mayor John Romoser (R) Area  - City  24. ... Springfield is the county seat of Clark County in the State of Ohio. ... Hamilton is a city in Butler County, Ohio, United States. ... Old county building. ... Official Logo of the City of Kettering Kettering is a city in Montgomery County and part of Greene County in Ohio. ... Lakewood is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. ... Mentor is a city in Lake County, Ohio, United States. ... Middletown is an All-American City[1] located in Butler and Warren counties in southwestern Ohio. ... Nickname: The Falls, C-Town, C-Falls, Caucasian Falls, CFO Location within the state of Ohio County Summit  - Mayor Don L. Robart Area    - City 66. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Richland Founded 1808 Incorporated 1828 (village) - 1857 (city) Government  - Mayor Donald Culliver (D) Area [1]  - City 29. ... Euclid is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. ... NASA image of Greater Cleveland and Lake Erie Greater Cleveland is a nickname for the metropolitan area surrounding Cleveland in Ohio. ... The Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky metropolitan area The Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky____the worst place on the planet____ metropolitan area is a metropolitan area that includes 15 counties in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. ... The Miami Valley, broadly, refers to the land area surrounding the Great Miami River in southwest Ohio, USA, and also includes the Little Miami, Mad, and Stillwater Rivers as well. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... Franklin University is a private university in downtown Columbus, Ohio. ... Capital University is a university of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America located in Bexley, Ohio, founded in 1830, that offers five schools of study: College of Arts and Sciences; the Conservatory of Music; Capital University Law School; School of Management; and School of Nursing. ... Ohio Dominican University is a coed, four-year private Catholic liberal arts university in Columbus, Ohio, USA, with nearly 3000 students from 13 states and 20 foreign countries. ...


Other Ohio cities functioning as centers of United States metropolitan areas include: In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ...

Note: The Cincinnati metropolitan area extends into Kentucky and Indiana, and the Youngstown metropolitan area extends into Pennsylvania. Nickname: Location within the state of Ohio Location within Summit County, Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City 62. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company was founded in 1898 by Frank Seiberling. ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Malone College is a private, liberal arts college located in Canton, Ohio. ... The Timken Company is a major manufacturer of tapered roller bearings and specialty steels located in Canton, Ohio. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Xavier University is a name common to several education institutions found around the world. ... Procter & Gamble Co. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Cleveland State University (abbr. ... The Playhouse Square Center, founded in 1921 in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, is the second largest theater complex in the United States (second only to New York Citys Lincoln Center). ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, with some residence halls on the south end of campus located in Cleveland Heights. ... The Cleveland Clinic is a prominent health care center in Cleveland, Ohio, with approximately 1,600 staff physicians providing for 2 million outpatient visits and 50,000 hospital admissions per year. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Forest City Enterprises is a diversified real estate management and development company based in Cleveland, Ohio. ... University Hospitals is a major not-for-profit medical center in Cleveland, Ohio with 150 locations throughout Northeast Ohio, encompassing a network of hospitals, outpatient centers and primary care physicians. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... The University of Dayton is a private Catholic university operated by the Society of Mary located in Dayton, Ohio. ... The National Museum of the United States Air Force (formerly the United States Air Force Museum) is the official national museum of the United States Air Force and is located on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, in Riverside, Ohio, just east of Dayton. ... Location in the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Allen Founded 1831 Government  - Mayor David Berger (D) Area  - Total 12. ... The University of Northwestern Ohio is an entrepreneurial, not-for-profit institution of higher learning, preparing students for careers and productive citizenship that encompass the business, professional, corporate and technological communities by providing quality education and training in response to the needs and aspirations of our constituents. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Richland Founded 1808 Incorporated 1828 (village) - 1857 (city) Government  - Mayor Donald Culliver (D) Area [1]  - City 29. ... Mansfield Motorsports Park is a half-mile automobile race track located on the north-side of Mansfield, Ohio. ... Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Founded 1816 Government  - Mayor Area  - Total 22. ... This article is about the amusement park in Ohio. ... The Kalahari Resort & Convention Center is a resort chain with waterparks that has locations in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin and Sandusky, Ohio. ... Springfield is the county seat of Clark County in the State of Ohio. ... Wittenberg University, located in Springfield, Ohio, is a private, four-year liberal arts college affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. ... Franciscan University of Steubenville is a Franciscan-founded university located in Steubenville, Ohio. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ... The University of Toledo, located in Toledo, Ohio, began in 1872 as a private arts and trades school offering painting and architectural drawing as its only subjects. ... Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State Counties Mahoning, Trumbull Founded 1796 Incorporated 1848 (village) - 1867 (city) Government  - Mayor Jay Williams (I) Area  - City  34. ... Youngstown State University, founded in 1908, is an accredited university located in Youngstown, Ohio US. As of 2005, there were 13,101 students and a student-faculty ratio of 19:1. ...


Ohio cities that function as centers of United States micropolitan areas include: United States micropolitan areas, as defined by the Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget, are areas in the United States based around a core city or town with a population of 10,000 to 49,999. ...

Economy

Main article: Economy of Ohio

Ohio is a major producer of machines, tires and rubber products, steel, processed foods, tools, and other manufactured goods. This is not immediately obvious because Ohio specializes in capital goods (goods used to make other goods, such as machine tools, automobile parts, industrial chemicals, and plastic moldings). Nevertheless, there are well known Ohio consumer items including some Procter & Gamble products, Smuckers jams and jellies, and Day-Glo paints. Download high resolution version (942x936, 103 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Firestone tire This article is about pneumatic tires. ... This article is about the polymeric material. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... A machine tool is a powered mechanical device, typically used to fabricate metal components of machines by machining, which is the selective removal of metal. ... One half of a bronze mold for casting a socketed spear head dated to the period 1400-1000 BC. There are no known parallels for this mold. ... Procter & Gamble Co. ... The J. M. Smucker Company (NYSE: SJM) is a manufacturer of fruit spreads, ice cream toppings, health and natural foods, beverages, shortening, and natural peanut butter in North America. ... Jam from berries Jam (also known as jelly or preserves) is a type of sweet spread or condiment made with fruits or sometimes vegetables, sugar, and sometimes pectin if the fruits natural pectin content is insufficient to produce a thick product. ... Jam from berries Fruit preserves refers to fruit, or vegetables, that have been prepared and canned for long term storage. ... Blacklight paint or blacklight-reactive paint is paint that glows under a blacklight. ...


There are also numerous automobile plants in Ohio that manufacture cars, most notably the Jeep plant in Toledo, where the vehicles have been made since their initial release in World War II. Honda, Ford, and General Motors also have or had automobile plants in Ohio; in the case of the latter, one of their plants in Ohio (Lordstown Assembly, near Youngstown) is located right off the Ohio Turnpike with its own exit. For other uses, see Jeep (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the Japanese motor corporation. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, is a multinational corporation founded in 1908, and is headquartered in the United States. ... Lordstown Complex East and Lordstown Metal Center (formerly known as Lordstown Assembly) are part of a General Motors automobile factory in Lordstown, Ohio. ... Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State Counties Mahoning, Trumbull Founded 1796 Incorporated 1848 (village) - 1867 (city) Government  - Mayor Jay Williams (I) Area  - City  34. ... The westbound Ohio Turnpike Ohio Turnpike (officially James W. Shocknessy Ohio Turnpike) is a -long, limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of Ohio, serving as a primary corridor to Chicago and Pittsburgh. ...


Ohio is the site of the invention of the airplane, resulting from the experiments of the Wright brothers in Dayton. (Wright State University located in Dayton is named in their honor.) Production of aircraft in the USA is now centered elsewhere, but a large experimental and design facility, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base has been located near Dayton and serves in the co-ordination of production of US military aircraft. On the base are located Wright Hill and Huffman Prairie, where many of the earliest aerodynamic experiments of the Wright brothers were performed. Ohio today also has many aerospace, defense, and NASA parts and systems suppliers scattered throughout the state. Airplane and Aeroplane redirect here. ... The Wright brothers, Orville (19 August 1871 – 30 January 1948) and Wilbur (16 April 1867 – 30 May 1912), were two Americans who are generally credited[1][2][3] with inventing and building the worlds first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human... Wright State University is a public university in Ohio, U.S. The university uses Dayton as its postal address but the campus is actually completely within the city limits of Fairborn. ... Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a U.S. Air Force base in Greene and Montgomery counties, adjacent to Riverside, Fairborn, Beavercreek, and Dayton, Ohio. ... Visitors Center at Huffman Prairie Reproduction of the Wright brothers 1905 hangar and catapult Huffman Prairie, JANES OLD HOMEGUESS WHO WAS HERE??, part of Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park, is an 84 acre (.34 km²) patch of rough pasture outside Dayton, Ohio now known as Huffman Prairie Flying... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ...


As part of the Corn Belt, agriculture also plays an important role in the state's economy. There is also a small commercial fishing sector on Lake Erie, and the principal catch is yellow perch. In addition, Ohio's historical attractions, varying landscapes, and recreational opportunities are the basis for a thriving tourist industry. Over 2,500 lakes and 43,000 miles (70,000 km) of river landscapes are a paradise for boaters, fishermen, and swimmers. Of special historical interest are the Native American archaeological sites—including grave mounds[33] and other sites. According to the Ohio Department of Agriculture Ohio in 2001 ranked as 1st in Swiss cheese, 2nd in eggs,3rd in tomatoes, 5th in milk, 6th in corn, 6th in soybean, 8th in grapes, 9th in hogs, 9th in floriculture, and 11th in apples. Categories: US geography stubs | Belt regions of the United States ... Salmon for sale at a marketplace The Fishing industry is the commercial activity of fishing and producing fish and other seafood products. ... For the unit of measurement, see pole. ... Tourist redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States and their history after European contact, chiefly in what is now the United States. ... For other uses, see Mound builder (disambiguation). ...


Two major amusement parks, Cedar Point, and Kings Island, are also important to the tourism industry. Ohio's Amish country is also a major pull for the State's tourism industry. Though still forming itself, tourism is becoming a major industry in Cleveland, especially medical tourism. This article is about the amusement park in Ohio. ... Kings Island is a 364 acre (1. ...


The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that Ohio's gross state product in 2004 was $419 billion[1]. In 2006 the Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that Ohio's gross state product was $461.3 billion ranking it 7th in the nation [2]. If Ohio was its own nation in would be ranked 17th in GDP ranked behind the Netherlands and above Belgium. Per capita personal income in 2003 was $30,129, 25th in the nation. Ohio's agricultural outputs are soybeans, dairy products, corn, tomatoes, hogs, cattle, poultry, and eggs. Its industrial outputs are transportation equipment, fabricated metal products, machinery, food processing, and electricity equipment. According to the 2007 Fortune list Ohio had 28 Fortune 500 companies (ranked 5th nationally) and 60 Fortune 1000 companies (also ranked 5th nationally). 3 Ohio cities (Cincinnati, Columbus, and Cleveland) have 5 or more Fortune 500 Companies (ranked 2nd behind Texas among the states. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides a comprehensive statistical picture of the economy of the United States. ... The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides a comprehensive statistical picture of the economy of the United States. ... Soy redirects here. ... A dairy farm near Oxford, New York in the United States. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... Trinomial name Sus scrofa domestica Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Sus domestica The domestic pig (or in some areas hog) is normally given the scientific name Sus scrofa domestica, though some taxonomists use the term , reserving for the wild boar. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Ducks amongst other poultry The Poultry-dealer, after Cesare Vecellio Poultry is the category of domesticated birds kept for meat, eggs, and feathers. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... Electricity (from New Latin Ä“lectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ...


Ohio's budget could face a deficit as high as $1.9 billion in fiscal year 2009.[34][35] This article is about budget deficits. ...


Ohio is recognized for its health care, due to several flagship hospitals that operate in the northeast region of the state. The Cleveland Clinic, ranked among the three leading hospitals in the U.S., has its world headquarters and main campus in Cleveland. Its partner, the University Hospitals of Cleveland health system, includes the Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, ranked among the top ten children's hospitals in the country. Cincinnati Children's Hospital is the leading center for research into childhood diseases in the state. The Cleveland Clinic (formally known as the Cleveland Clinic Foundation) is a multispecialty academic medical center located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States. ... University Hospitals is a major not-for-profit medical center in Cleveland, Ohio with 150 locations throughout Northeast Ohio, encompassing a network of hospitals, outpatient centers and primary care physicians. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1800 45,365
1810 230,760 408.7%
1820 581,434 152%
1830 937,903 61.3%
1840 1,519,467 62%
1850 1,980,329 30.3%
1860 2,339,511 18.1%
1870 2,665,260 13.9%
1880 3,198,062 20%
1890 3,672,329 14.8%
1900 4,157,545 13.2%
1910 4,767,121 14.7%
1920 5,759,394 20.8%
1930 6,646,697 15.4%
1940 6,907,612 3.9%
1950 7,946,627 15%
1960 9,706,397 22.1%
1970 10,652,017 9.7%
1980 10,797,630 1.4%
1990 10,847,115 0.5%
2000 11,353,140 4.7%
Est. 2006 11,478,006 1.1%
Demographics of Ohio (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 86.83% 12.18% 0.67% 1.41% 0.06%
2000 (Hispanic only) 1.70% 0.19% 0.05% 0.02% 0.01%
2005 (total population) 86.27% 12.66% 0.66% 1.68% 0.07%
2005 (Hispanic only) 2.05% 0.20% 0.05% 0.03% 0.01%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 0.32% 4.98% -1.57% 20.32% 9.32%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) -0.11% 4.97% -1.96% 20.48% 11.15%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 22.11% 5.70% 3.04% 10.81% -0.26%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

As of 2006, Ohio has an estimated population of 11,478,006,[36] which is an increase of 7,321 from the prior year and an increase of 124,861 since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 263,004 people (that is 938,169 births minus 675,165 deaths) and a decrease from net migration of -145,718. Immigration from outside the United States contributed to a growth of 92,101 people, most coming from southeast and south Asia, yet net migration within the country resulted in a decrease of 237,819 people. Ohio has witnessed an increase in the Laotian American and Thai American populations, as well as Asian Indians and Latin Americans. The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Laotian American is a resident of the United States who is of ethnic Laotian descent and also one group of Asian Americans. ... A Thai American is an American of Thai descent. ... For an article on American Indians see Native Americans. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ...


The center of population of Ohio is also located in Morrow County, in the county seat of Mount Gilead [3]. Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Morrow County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... Mount Gilead State Park. ...


As of 2004, Ohio's population included about 390,000 foreign-born (3.4%).


The largest ancestry groups in Ohio are German (25.2%), Irish (12.7%), African American (11.5%), English (9.2%), American (8.5%), and Italian (6.0%). An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... By county. ...

Population Density Map
Population Density Map

German is the largest reported ancestry in most of the counties in Ohio, especially in the northwest, central, and the extreme southwest. Ohioans who cited American and British ancestry are present throughout the state as well, particularly in the south-central part of the state. Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Dayton have large African American communities. Cleveland and Toledo have sizable Hispanic populations, while the Cleveland and Columbus areas have the largest Asian populations. Greater Cleveland is home to a notably large Jewish community. Other Ohio cities, such as Cincinnati, also have sizable Hungarian and Jewish populations. Image File history File links Ohio_population_map. ... Image File history File links Ohio_population_map. ... By county. ... British Americans are citizens of the British or partial British ancestry. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... NASA image of Greater Cleveland and Lake Erie Greater Cleveland is a nickname for the metropolitan area surrounding Cleveland in Ohio. ... A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ...


6.6% of Ohio's population were reported as under 5, 25.4% under 18, and 13.3% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 51.4% of the population.


Religion in Ohio

The first religious settlement in Ohio was founded in 1751 among the Huron Indians in what is now the Sandusky area. Shortly afterward, Moravian missionaries converted some Delaware Indians to Christianity; the first Protestant church was founded by Congregationalist ministers at Marietta in 1788. Dissident religious sects such as the Shakers, Amish, and Quakers moved into Ohio from the early 18th century onward,[37] but the majority of settlers in the early 19th century were Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, Disciples of Christ, and Episcopalians.[citation needed] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A... For other uses, see Moravia (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about Old Order Amish, but also refers to other Amish sects. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an Evangelical, Protestant denomination. ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... The Episcopal Church may refer to several members of the Anglican Communion, including: Episcopal Church in the United States of America Scottish Episcopal Church Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East Episcopal Church of Cuba idk of the Sudan Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church ...


According to the 2000 Census, Ohio's reported Roman Catholic population was 2,231,832, and state's Jewish population was 142,255, with the largest Jewish communities being in the Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Columbus metro areas. Muslims in Ohio accounted for 41,281 people, while Ohio's communities of Amish and Mennonites -- among the largest in the nation -- tallied over 24,000 Amish and over 20,000 Mennonites respectively, located primarily in central Ohio.[citation needed] (Redirected from 2000 United States census) The United States 2000 census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...


The largest Protestant denominations and their adherents in 2000 were the United Methodist Church, 566,084; the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, 301,749; the Southern Baptist Convention, 200,232; the Presbyterian Church USA, 160,800; the United Church of Christ, 157,180; Christian Churches and Churches of Christ, 142,571; and the American Baptist Churches USA, 117,757. About 6.2 million people (55.1% of the population) declined to be counted as members of any religious organization.[citation needed] Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination that consists of numerous agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual meetings... This article needs cleanup. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... Description The Independent Christian Churches/Churches of Christ are a part of the Restoration Movement and are in the theological middle ground between the Disciples of Christ and the Church of Christ (non-instrumental). ... ABCUSA American Baptist Churches USA (ABCUSA) is a group of Baptist churches within the United States; headquartered in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. ...


Political demographics and history

See also: U.S. Electoral College, Politics of Ohio, Ohio Democratic Party, and Ohio Republican Party

Politically, Ohio is considered a swing state. The Economist notes that, "This slice of the mid-west contains a bit of everything American—part north-eastern and part southern, part urban and part rural, part hardscrabble poverty and part booming suburb,"[38] The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... Historically control of Ohio has oscillated between the two major parties. ... The Ohio Democratic Party is the Ohio affiliate to the national Democratic Party. ... The Ohio Republican Party, the Ohio state affiliate of the United States Republican Party, controls all the elected statewide offices in Ohio as well as both houses of the Ohio General Assembly, the state legislature. ... For the film of the same name, see Swing State (film). ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ...


The mixture of urban and rural areas, and the presence of both large blue-collar industries and significant white-collar commercial districts leads to a balance of conservative and liberal population that (together with the state's 20 electoral votes, more than most swing states) makes the state very important to the outcome of national elections. Ohio was a deciding state in the 2004 presidential election between George W. Bush and John Kerry. Bush narrowly won the state's 20 electoral votes by a margin of 2 percentage points and 50.8% of the vote [4]. The state supported Democrat Bill Clinton in 1992 and 1996, but supported Republican George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004. Ohio was also a deciding factor in the 1948 presidential election when Democrat Harry S. Truman defeated Republican Thomas Dewey (who had won the state four years earlier) and in the 1976 presidential election when Democrat Jimmy Carter defeated Republican Gerald Ford by a slim margin in Ohio and took the election. American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... American liberalism—that is, liberalism in the United States of America—is a broad political and philosophical mindset, favoring individual liberty, and opposing restrictions on liberty, whether they come from established religion, from government regulation, from the existing class structure, or from multi-national corporations. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004 to elect the president. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The United States presidential elections of 1992 featured a battle between incumbent President, Republican George Bush; Democrat Bill Clinton, the governor of Arkansas; and independent candidate Ross Perot, a Texas businessman. ... Presidential electoral votes. ... GOP redirects here. ... The United States presidential election of 2000 was a contest between the Democratic candidate Al Gore versus the Republican candidate of George W. Bush. ... The United States presidential election of 1948 is considered by most historians as the greatest election upset in American history. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Thomas Edmund Dewey (b. ... The United States presidential election of 1976 followed the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in the wake of the Watergate scandal. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ...


Ohio's demographics cause many to consider the state as a microcosm of the nation as a whole. A Republican presidential candidate has never won the White House without winning Ohio, and Ohio has gone to the winner of the election in all but two contests since 1892, backing only losers Thomas E. Dewey in 1944 (Ohio's John Bricker was his running mate) and Richard M. Nixon in 1960. Consequently, the state is very important to the campaigns of both major parties. Ohio had 20 electoral votes in the Electoral College in 2004.[39] Thomas Edmund Dewey (March 24, 1902 – March 16, 1971) was the Governor of New York (1943-1954) and the unsuccessful Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency in 1944 and 1948. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The United States presidential election of 1960 marked the end of Dwight D. Eisenhowers two terms as President. ... A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent...


Many political analysts divide the state into five distinct regions: a central region and one in each corner. These regions are as different from each other as most states, and the largest (northeast) is only twice the size of the smallest (southeast). The northeast, including Cleveland, Youngstown, Lorain/Elyria, and other industrial areas, votes solidly Democrat largely due to its traditionally strong unions. The northwest is largely farmland with a few small manufacturing cities such as Toledo and Lima, and leans slightly Republican. The southwest is the most heavily Republican part of the state, especially in the suburbs in between Dayton and Cincinnati. Libertarian candidates also run surprisingly strongly in this area. The Appalachian regions in the Southeast are a swing bloc, tending to favor the candidates who have strong economic agendas. The central part of the state, consisting of Columbus and its suburbs, is typical of many newly large cities: a poor urban Democratic core surrounded by a rich suburban Republican ring.


Ohio is known as the "Modern Mother of Presidents", having sent eight of its native sons to the White House. Seven of them were Republicans, and the other was a member of the Whig Party.[40] The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ...


"Ohio has excelled as a recruiting-ground for national political leaders. Between the Civil War and 1920, seven Ohioans were elected to the presidency, ending with Harding's election in 1920. At the same time, six Ohioans sat on the US Supreme Court and two served as Chief Justices....'Not since the Virginia dynasty dominated national government during the early years of the Republic' notes historian R. Douglas Hurt, 'had a state made such a mark on national political affairs.' Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Warren Harding redirects here. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Ohioans dominated national politics for seventy years, because Ohio was to a large extent a microcosm of the nation. Hurt writes that the elements of that microcosm were 'the diversity of the people, the strength of the industrial and agricultural economy, and the balance between rural and urban populations.' He continues: 'The individuals who played major roles in national affairs appealed to broad national constituencies because they learned their skills in Ohio, where political success required candidates to reconcile wide differences among the voters. Ohioans were northerners and southerners as well as easterners and westerners. Consequently, Ohio's politicians addressed constituencies that were the same as those across the nation.' Finally, the pragmatic and centrist character of Ohio politics, Hurt asserts, has made it 'job-oriented rather than issue oriented.'"[41]


Education

Ohio's system of public education is outlined in Article VI of the state constitution, and in Title XXXIII of the Ohio Revised Code. Substantively, Ohio's system is similar to those found in other states. At the State level, the Ohio Department of Education, which is overseen by the Ohio State Board of Education, governs primary and secondary educational institutions. At the municipal level, there are approximately 700 school districts statewide. The Ohio Board of Regents coordinates and assists with Ohio's institutions of higher education which have recently been reorganized into the University System of Ohio under Governor Strickland. The system averages an annual enrollment of over 400,000 students, making it one of the five largest state university systems in the U.S. // Public spending on education in 2005 Public education is education mandated for or offered to the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ... The Ohio Constitution is the basic governing document of the State of Ohio, which in 1803 became the 17th state to join the United States of America. ... The Ohio Revised Code contains all acts passed by the Ohio General Assembly and signed by the governor. ... Educational oversight Secretary Deputy Secretary U.S. Department of Education Margaret Spellings Raymond Simon National education budget $862 billion(public and private, all levels)[1] (2004) Primary language(s) English Federal, state, private system Established Activated Literacy ()  â€¢ Men  â€¢ Women % 97 (citation)% 97 (citation)% Enrollment  â€¢ Primary  â€¢ Secondary  â€¢ Post-secondary 76. ... The Ohio State Board of Education, which has eleven elected members and six appointed members, oversees primary education in the State of Ohio and the Ohio Department of Education. ... The Ohio Board of Regents is the coordinating board for higher education in Ohio. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ...


Colleges and universities

a Included among these is the University of Dayton, which is a private, Roman Catholic university run by the Society of Mary.
b Two of these institutions are ranked among the top 40 in the nation: Case Western Reserve University, and Oberlin College.

The State of Ohio is the home of a number of public and private institutions of higher learning. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Ohio Location within Summit County, Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City 62. ... Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is a public four-year institution located in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA; about 20 miles south of Toledo, Ohio on I-75. ... Nickname: Location in Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Wood incorporated 1901 [3] Government  - Type Mayor-Administrator [1]  - Mayor John Quinn [1]  - Municipal Administrator John Fawcett [2] Area  - City  10. ... Central State University is a historically black university located in Wilberforce, Ohio. ... Wilberforce is an unincorporated community and census-designated place located in Greene County, Ohio. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Cleveland State University (abbr. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... For the events of May 4, 1970, see Kent State shootings Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is one of America’s largest university systems, the third largest university in Ohio after Ohio State University (57,748) and the University of Cincinnati (35,364), and... Nickname: The Tree City Location within the state of Ohio County Portage Mayor John Fender Area    - City 22. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Oxford is a city in northwestern Butler County, Ohio, United States, in the southwestern portion of the state. ... Ohio University (OHIO) is a public university located in Athens, Ohio that is situated on a 1,800 acre (7. ... Athens is a historic college town in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Ohio, best known as the home of Ohio University. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... Shawnee State University is the regional state university of Southern Ohio. ... Portsmouth is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Scioto County. ... The University of Toledo is a public university situated in Toledo, Ohio. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ... Wright State University is a public university in Ohio, U.S. The university uses Dayton as its postal address but the campus is actually completely within the city limits of Fairborn. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... Fairborn is a city in Greene County, Ohio, near Dayton and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. ... Youngstown State University, founded in 1908, is an accredited university located in Youngstown, Ohio US. As of 2005, there were 13,101 students and a student-faculty ratio of 19:1. ... Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State Counties Mahoning, Trumbull Founded 1796 Incorporated 1848 (village) - 1867 (city) Government  - Mayor Jay Williams (I) Area  - City  34. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution — or part of such an institution — that teaches medicine. ... Northeastern Ohio Universities College Of Medicine (NEOUCOM) is a community-based, state medical school that offers a combined B.S./M.D. program that allows students to graduate with their B.S./M.D. in as few as six years. ... The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health is the medical school at The Ohio State University and is located in Columbus, Ohio. ... Ohio University (OHIO) is a public university located in Athens, Ohio that is situated on a 1,800 acre (7. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Wright State University is a public university in Ohio, U.S. The university uses Dayton as its postal address but the campus is actually completely within the city limits of Fairborn. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... The University of Dayton is a private Catholic university operated by the Society of Mary located in Dayton, Ohio. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Society of Mary is a Catholic religious congregation of brothers and priests called the Marianists or Marianist Brothers and Priests. ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, with some residence halls on the south end of campus located in Cleveland Heights. ... Oberlin College is a highly selective liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ...

Libraries

Ohio is home to some of the nation's highest-ranking public libraries.[42] The 2006 study by Thomas J. Hennen Jr. ranked Ohio as number one in a state-by-state comparison. For 2006, Ohio's three largest library systems were all ranked in the top ten for American cities of 500,000 or more:[43]

The Ohio Public Library Information Network (OPLIN) is an organization that provides Ohio residents with internet access to their 251 public libraries. OPLIN also provides Ohioans with free home access to high-quality, subscription research databases. The Cuyahoga County Public Library system serves the suburbs of Cleveland, Ohio and is ranked as one of the nations ten best and busiest library systems. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County (PLCH; originally the Cincinnati Public Library) is a public library system with its main location in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio, and 41 regional and branch locations throughout Hamilton County. ... The Ohio Public Library Information Network (OPLIN) is a compact organization that provides Ohio residents with Internet access to their 251 public libraries. ...


Ohio also offers the OhioLINK program, allowing Ohio's libraries (particularly those from colleges and universities) access to materials in other libraries. The program is largely successful in allowing researchers access to books and other media that might not otherwise be available. The Ohio Library and Information Network, OhioLINK, is a consortium of Ohio’s college and university libraries and the State Library of Ohio. ...


Sports

Professional

The first openly all-professional sports team called Ohio home: The Cincinnati Red Stockings of Major League Baseball formed in 1869. Today, Ohio is home to several professional sports teams, including seven major professional sports league franchises. The Cincinnati Red Stockings of 1869 were baseballs first openly all-professional team. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Year 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The term major professional sports league is used to describe the most important and well regarded leagues in the biggest professional sports in a country or region. ...


Ohio is currently the only state to have teams in each of the major leagues without one city or metro area that can lay claim to the "Grand Slam," though Cleveland briefly held this status from 1976 to 1978. Major professional sporting teams in Ohio include: In the United States, the four prominent major professional sports leagues are the following: Major League Baseball (MLB), in existence de facto since 1903 National Football League (NFL), founded in 1920 National Basketball Association (NBA), founded in 1946 National Hockey League (NHL), founded in 1917 There are currently thirteen metropolitan...

Former major league teams: Major Leagues redirects here. ... For other uses, see Cincinnati Reds (disambiguation). ... National league can refer to: National Basketball League, in the United States and Canada, which merged with the rival Basketball Association of America to form the National Basketball Association National Football League, the major American football league in the United States National Hockey League, the major ice hockey league in... For other uses, see Cleveland Indians (disambiguation). ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... NFL redirects here. ... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Black, Orange, White Mascot Who Dey Personnel Owner Mike Brown General Manager {{{general manager}}} Head Coach... Browns redirects here. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Cleveland Cavaliers (also known as the Cavs) are a professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. ... NHL redirects here. ... The Columbus Blue Jackets are a professional ice hockey team based in Columbus, Ohio, United States. ... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a North America professional soccer league. ... Year founded 1994 League Major League Soccer Nickname The Crew, Americas Hardest Working Team Stadium Columbus Crew Stadium Columbus, OH Coach Sigi Schmid Owner Clark Hunt First Game Columbus Crew 4–0 D.C. United (Ohio Stadium; April 13, 1996) Largest Win Columbus Crew 6–1 New England Revolution...

The Akron Pros was a team in that played in Akron, Ohio in the National Football League from 1920-1925 and as the Akron Indians in 1926. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canton Bulldogs played in Canton, Ohio in the National Football League from 1920 - 1923 and 1925 - 1926. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Detroit Lions are a National Football League team based in Detroit, Michigan. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cincinnati Red Stockings of 1869 were baseballs first openly all-professional team. ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Cleveland Blues were a Major League Baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio that operated in the National League from 1879 to 1884. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Cleveland Spiders were a Major League Baseball team which played between 1887 and 1899 in Cleveland, Ohio. ... The American Association (AA) was a baseball major league from 1882 to 1891. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1936) National Football League (1937–present) Western Division (1937-1949) National Conference (1950-1952) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West (1970-present) Current uniform Team colors Millennium Blue and New Century Gold Personnel Owner Chip... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Cleveland Rebels were a Basketball Association of America (a forerunner of the modern National Basketball Association) team based in Cleveland, Ohio. ... NBA official website NBA News from Pro Sports Daily Dougs NBA Statistics NBA Statistics from 82games. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sacramento Kings are a professional basketball team based in Sacramento, California. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Oakland Seals were a team in the National Hockey League (NHL). ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... The Cleveland Crusaders was an ice hockey team that played in the WHA in Cleveland, Ohio from 1972-1976. ... WHA redirects here. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cincinnati Stingers were an ice hockey team based out of Cincinnati, Ohio that played in the World Hockey Association. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Dayton Triangles of the National Football League played from 1920 to 1929. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cleveland Rockers were a Womens National Basketball Association team. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Other Ohio professional sports teams

This article is about the sport. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The Akron Aeros are a minor league baseball team based in Akron, Ohio, USA. The team, which plays in the Eastern League, is the Double-A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians major-league club. ... The Chillicothe Paints are a minor league baseball team which plays in Chillicothe, Ohio. ... Class-Level Triple-A (1966-Present) Minor League affiliations International League West Division Major League affiliation Washington Nationals (2007-Present) New York Yankees (1979-2006) Pittsburgh Pirates (1977-1978) Current uniform Name Columbus Clippers (1977-Present) Ballpark Cooper Stadium (1977-Present)(formerly known as Franklin County Stadium from 1977-1984... League Midwest League Division Eastern Division Year founded 1998 Major League affiliation Cincinnati Reds Home ballpark Fifth Third Field Previous home ballparks None City Dayton, Ohio Current uniform colors black, green, white, and orange Previous uniform colors None Logo design The wordmark Dragons in white outlined in black and green. ... The Lake County Captains are a minor league baseball team in Eastlake, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. ... The Mahoning Valley Scrappers are a minor league baseball club based in Niles, Ohio, a city in the valley of the Mahoning River. ... Class-Level Triple-A (1902-1913, 1916-1955, 1965-Present) Minor League affiliations International League (1965-Present) West Division American Association (1902-1913, 1916-1955) Major League affiliation Detroit Tigers (1967-1973, 1987-present) Minnesota Twins (1978-1986) Cleveland Indians (1976-1977) Philadelphia Phillies (1974-1975) New York Yankees (1965... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... National Pro Fastpitch (NPF), formerly the Womens Pro Softball League (WPSL), is the only professional womens softball league in the world. ... The Akron Racers are a womens softball team based in Akron, Ohio. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... Conference National Division Eastern Year founded 1999 Home arena Nationwide Arena City, State Columbus, Ohio Head Coach Doug Kay ArenaBowl championships 0 Conference titles 0 Division titles 1: 2007 Wild Card berths 3: 2000, 2002, 2007 The Columbus Destroyers are an Arena Football League team. ... Conference National Division Eastern Year founded 1997 Home arena Quicken Loans Arena City, State Cleveland, Ohio Head Coach Mike Wilpolt ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles 1: 2002 Wild Card berths 3: 1997, 1998, 2003 The Cleveland Gladiators are an Arena Football League team currently relocating to Cleveland... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... The Mahoning Valley Thunder are a professional af2 arena football team. ... National Indoor Football League is a minor league indoor football league that is based in the United States. ... City [[Cincinnati, Ohio]] Team colors {{{colors}}} Head Coach {{{coach}}} Owner(s) {{{owner}}} General manager {{{general manager}}} Local radio Announcer(s): {{{announcers}}} League/Conference affiliations National Indoor Football League ({{{NIFL_start_yr}}}-present) {{{division_hist}}} Team history Cincinnati Marshals ({{{hist_yr}}}-present) League titles League Championships (0) Conference Championships (0) Division Championships (0) Home fields... The CIFLs 2007 game ball The Continental Indoor Football League (CIFL) is a new indoor football league based along the Northeastern United States region. ... The Marion Mayhem is a charter member of the Continental Indoor Football League. ... The Miami Valley Silverbacks are a professional indoor football team based out of Troy, Ohio. ... The American Indoor Football Association(AIFA) was formed in October of 2006. ... AIFL team Name = Canton Legends Conference = North Founded = 2005 Arena = Canton Memorial Civic Center City, State = Canton, Ohio Conference Titles = none Presidents Cup Championships = none The Canton Legends are a professional indoor football team based out of Canton, Ohio. ... The National Womens Football Association (NWFA) is a full-contact American football league for women. ... Cleveland Fusion is a womans American football team in the NWFA. Categories: | | ... The Columbus Comets American football team is a member of the National Womens Football Association. ... The United States Australian Football League (also known informally as the USAFL or US Footy) is the governing body for Australian rules football (or footy) in the United States. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, that serves as the primary developmental circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The Lake Erie Monsters will be an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... This article is about the current CHL. For earlier leagues also called the Central Hockey League, see Central Hockey League (disambiguation). ... The Youngstown SteelHounds are a professional ice hockey team in the Central Hockey League. ... The ECHL is a professional minor-league double-A hockey association based in the United States and Canada. ... The Cincinnati Cyclones are a professional hockey team based in Cincinnati, Ohio who have played in the ECHL and the International Hockey League. ... The Dayton Bombers are entering thier 17 season as an ECHL ice hockey team located in Dayton, Ohio, USA. The team is in the North Division of the ECHLs American Conference and is affiliated with the Syracuse Crunch of the AHL and the Columbus Blue Jackets of the NHL... The North American Hockey League (NAHL) and the defunct America West Hockey League merged in 2003 to form a 21-team Junior A league, sanctioned by USA Hockey. ... The Mahoning Valley Phantoms are a Junior A ice hockey team in the North American Hockey Leagues north division, and play out of Boardman Ice Zone in Boardman, Ohio. ... The Mid-Atlantic Hockey League (MAHL) is an A level Minor Profession ice hockey league in the Mid-Atlantic region of the Eastern United States. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The United Soccer Leagues (USL) is directly affiliated with the United States Soccer Federation (USSF), United States Adult Soccer Association (USASA) and the Canadian Soccer Association (CSA). ... Cincinnati Kings are an American soccer team, founded in 2005. ... The Cleveland City Stars are a team of the USL Second Division scheduled to begin play in 2007. ...

College and high school

Ohio is also known for being full of enthusiastic fans of college and high school football. Ohio State is the 5th winningest program in NCAA history and has 7 National Championships and 7 Heisman Trophy winners. Akron, Cincinnati, Bowling Green, Kent State, Miami University, Ohio and Toledo all also compete in Division I-A Football Bowl Subdivision, the highest level of College Football. Toledo holds one of the nation's longest Division I football winning streaks, winning 35 consecutive games from 1969 to 1971 under quarterback Chuck Ealey. Youngstown State is a perennial power in Division I-AA Football Championship Subdivision having won 4 I-AA Championships under Jim Tressel (now OSU Head Coach). Mount Union College is the dynasty of Division III college football with 11 National Championships and a record 62 game winning streak at one point. The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Heisman redirects here. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is a public four-year institution located in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA; about 20 miles south of Toledo, Ohio on I-75. ... For the events of May 4, 1970, see Kent State shootings Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is one of America’s largest university systems, the third largest university in Ohio after Ohio State University (57,748) and the University of Cincinnati (35,364), and... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Ohio University (OHIO) is a public university located in Athens, Ohio that is situated on a 1,800 acre (7. ... The University of Toledo is a public university situated in Toledo, Ohio. ... The ball used in American football has a pointed oval shape, and usually has a large set of stitches along one side. ... Youngstown State University, founded in 1908, is an accredited university located in Youngstown, Ohio US. As of 2005, there were 13,101 students and a student-faculty ratio of 19:1. ... James Patrick Tressel,(born December 5, 1952) is the current head football coach at The Ohio State University. ... Mount Union College is a 4-year private, liberal arts college in Alliance, Ohio. ...


Massillon Washington High School in Massillon has won 9 high school football national championship polls and 31 state championships. Colerain High School is rising to be a dynasty in its own right, and is scheduled to face Massillon at Cleveland Browns Stadium in 2008.[citation needed] Massillon Washington High School, is a secondary school located in Massillon, Ohio (2005 enrollment unconfirmed). ...


Cincinnati's Greater Catholic League, consisting of boy's Catholic high schools from the Greater Cincinnati and Dayton areas, is one of the most competitive leagues in the state and the country. Not including its all-girls counterpart, the GGCL, the GCL has laid claim to more than 110 state titles and more than 315 individual state titles, as well as numerous national championships. In particular, the GCL South Division has achieved a great deal of success. Consisting of the four, large all-male schools of Elder, LaSalle, Moeller and St. Xavier, four of the last six Division I State Football Championships have come from this division. Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Elder High School is a parochial all-male, college-preparatory high school in the Price Hill neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. // The cornerstone was laid in 1922. ... La Salle High School is a Catholic parochial high school in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. The school was opened September 6, 1960 and named in honor of Jean-Baptiste de la Salle, a French priest and educational reformer. ... Saint Xavier High School (often abbreviated St. ...


Recent Team State Championships for the GCL South:

  • Elder Panthers: Football (2002, 2003), Baseball (2004)
  • LaSalle Lancers: Cross Country (2005, 2006)
  • Moeller Crusaders: Baseball (2004), Basketball (2003, 2007), Volleyball (2004, 2007)
  • St. Xavier Bombers: Baseball (2003), Cross Country (2003), Football (2005, 2007), Tennis (2006, 2007), Swimming (2002-2004, 2006, 2007), Volleyball (2006)

Ohio High School's Federal League (including the McKinley Bulldogs, Perry Panthers, Jackson Polar Bears, North Canton Hoover Vikings, Lake Blue Streaks, GlenOak Eagles, Austintown Fitch Falcons, and the Boardman Spartans) is one of the most competitive high school athletic leagues in Ohio.


Recent Championships for Federal League: Jackson Polar Bears- State Finalist-Mens Soccer- 2007 Jackson Polar Bears-State Runner-ups-Women's Cross Country-2005 Hoover Vikings- State Finalist- Softball- 2007- D1- Beat by Hudson. Hoover Vikings- State Champs- Softball- 2006- WP- Jessica Simpson- D1. Lake Blue Streaks- State Champs- Softball- 2005 WP- Julie Boyes- D1. Lake Blue Streaks- State Finalist- Softball- 2004- D1- Beat by St. Ursala. Lake Blue Streaks- Mike Miller, three-time Ohio Wrestling State Champion 2003, 2004, 2005 Canton Mckinley Bulldogs - State Champs - Basketball - 2005/2006. First team to win the title back to back.


Transportation

Many major east-west transportation corridors go through Ohio. One of those pioneer routes, known in the early 1900s as "Main Market Route 3", was chosen in 1913 to become part of the historic Lincoln Highway which was the first road across America, connecting New York City to San Francisco. In Ohio, the Lincoln Highway linked many towns and cities together, including Canton, Mansfield, Lima, and Van Wert. The arrival of the Lincoln Highway to Ohio was a major influence on the development of the state. Upon the advent of the federal numbered highway system in 1926, the Lincoln Highway through Ohio became U.S. Highway 30. For the Australian highway, see Lincoln Highway (Australia). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Richland Founded 1808 Incorporated 1828 (village) - 1857 (city) Government  - Mayor Donald Culliver (D) Area [1]  - City 29. ... Location in the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Allen Founded 1831 Government  - Mayor David Berger (D) Area  - Total 12. ... Downtown Van Wert. ... United States Highway 30 is an east-west United States highway that traverses the United States. ...


Ohio also is home to 228 miles (367 km) of the Historic National Road, now U.S. Route 40. Map showing the route of the National Road at its greatest completion in 1839, with historical state boundaries. ... U.S. Route 40 is an east-west United States highway. ...


Ohio has a highly developed network of roads and interstate highways. Major east-west through routes include the Ohio Turnpike (I-80/I-90) in the north, I-76 through Akron to Pennsylvania, I-70 through Columbus and Dayton, and the Appalachian Highway (Ohio 32) running from West Virginia to Cincinnati. Major north-south routes include I-75 in the west through Toledo, Dayton, and Cincinnati, I-71 through the middle of the state from Cleveland through Columbus and Cincinnati into Kentucky, and I-77 in the eastern part of the state from Cleveland through Akron, Canton, New Philadelphia and Marietta down into West Virginia. Interstate 75 between Cincinnati and Dayton is one of the heaviest traveled sections of interstate in Ohio. The westbound Ohio Turnpike Ohio Turnpike (officially James W. Shocknessy Ohio Turnpike) is a -long, limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of Ohio, serving as a primary corridor to Chicago and Pittsburgh. ... Interstate 80 (abbreviated I-80) is the second-longest Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 90 Interstate 90 (abbreviated I-90) is the longest interstate highway in the United States at nearly 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers). ... Interstate 76 (abbreviated I-76) is an Interstate Highway in the United States, running 435 miles (700 km) from an interchange with Interstate 71 west of Akron, Ohio east to Interstate 295 near Camden, New Jersey. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Ohio Location within Summit County, Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City 62. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... In Jackson County, State Route 32 overpasses U.S. Route 35 as State Route 93 (background) overpasses U.S. 35 In southwestern Athens County, State Route 32 is concurrent with U.S. Route 50. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 75 Interstate 75 (I-75) is a major north-south interstate highway in the midwest and southeastern United States. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... Interstate 71 (abbreviated I-71) is an Interstate Highway in the Great Lakes/Midwestern region of the United States. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 77 Interstate 77 (abbreviated I-77) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Ohio Location within Summit County, Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City 62. ... High Street in downtown New Philadelphia in 2006 The Tuscarawas County Courthouse in New Philadelphia in 2006 New Philadelphia is a city in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, 71 miles south of Cleveland on the Tuscarawas River. ... Downtown Marietta and the Muskingum River in July 2006 Marietta is a city in Washington County, Ohio, United States. ...


Air travel includes Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, which is a major hub for Continental Airlines, as well as Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (located in the state of Kentucky), which is a major hub for Delta Air Lines. Other major airports are located in Dayton, Toledo, Columbus, and Akron-Canton. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Continental Airlines (NYSE: CAL) is a U.S. certificated air carrier. ... For the video game magazine known as CVG, see Computer and Video Games Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (IATA: CVG, ICAO: KCVG) is located in Hebron, unincorporated Boone County, Kentucky, United States and serves the Greater Cincinnati metropolitan area. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... James M. Cox Dayton International Airport is an airport located near Dayton, Ohio. ... FAA airport diagram of Toledo Express Airport Toledo Express Airport (IATA: TOL, ICAO: KTOL) is a public airport located 10 miles (16 km) west of the city of Toledo in Lucas County, Ohio, USA. As well as being a main airport for Toledo, it is also a secondary airport for... , Port Columbus International Airport (IATA: CMH, ICAO: KCMH, FAA LID: CMH), commonly shortened to Port Columbus, is an international airport located 6 miles (10 kilometers) east of downtown Columbus, Ohio, USA. It is managed by the Columbus Regional Airport Authority which also oversees operations at Rickenbacker International Airport and Bolton... FAA diagram of Akron-Canton Airport Akron-Canton Airport (IATA: CAK, ICAO: KCAK) is a commercial Class C airport located in southern Summit County, Ohio (a very small portion of both runways extend into Stark County,) roughly 10 miles southeast of Akron, Ohio, and roughly 10 miles northwest of Canton...

See also: List of airports in Ohio

List of airports in Ohio (U.S. state), grouped by type and sorted by location. ...

Transportation Lists

// Ohio State Highways 2-99 Ohio State Highway 2 Ohio State Highway 3 Ohio State Highway 4 Ohio State Highway 4 Bypass Ohio State Highway 5 Ohio State Highway 7 Ohio State Highway 8 Ohio State Highway 9 Ohio State Highway 10 Ohio State Highway 11 Ohio State Highway 12... Amtrak offers three passenger train routes through Ohio, Serving the major cities of Toledo, Cleveland, and Cincinnati. ... Current common carriers Amtrak (AMTK) CSX Transportation (CSXT) Norfolk Southern (NS) Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway (WE) [1] Defunct railroads Akron, Canton and Youngstown Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad Buffalo, Cleveland and Chicago Railway Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Chessie System Cincinnati and Lake Erie Railroad Cincinnati... This is a list of rivers in the state of Ohio in the United States Alum Creek Ashtabula River Auglaize River Bad River Big Darby Creek Blanchard River Cuyahoga River Duck Creek Flatrock River Great Miami River (Miami River) Grand River Huron River Kokosing River Little Auglaize River Little Darby... Image:Ohiocanalmap. ...

State symbols

Main article: List of Ohio state symbols
Ohio quarter showing the "Birthplace of aviation pioneers" slogan.
Ohio quarter showing the "Birthplace of aviation pioneers" slogan.
Ohio buckeyes, the seed from the Ohio buckeye tree.
Ohio buckeyes, the seed from the Ohio buckeye tree.

There has been an attempt to make the pawpaw the state fruit, but this has been blocked by others who wish to make the apple the state fruit. This has resulted in a bumper sticker seen in southeastern Ohio saying "I'm pro-pawpaw - and I vote!"[47] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 598 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (915 × 917 pixel, file size: 641 KB, MIME type: image/png) Source http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 598 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (915 × 917 pixel, file size: 641 KB, MIME type: image/png) Source http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixels, file size: 1. ... Binomial name Aesculus glabra Willd. ... A state animal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America, northern portions of South America as far south as Peru, and... This is a list of official state beverages: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Tomato juice is a juice made from squeezed tomatoes. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Cardinalis cardinalis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a member of the cardinal family of birds in North America. ... In countries with federal constitutions divided into subnational entities known as states, the state capital is the administrative center of a state. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: External link Juelies State Flower Garden of Gifs See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: Lists of flowers | U.S. state insignia ... Binomial name L. The carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) is a flowering plant native to the Near East and has been cultivated for the last 2,000 years. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state dinosaurs be merged into this article or section. ... For the robot vacuum cleaner, see Electrolux Trilobite. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... An asaphid trilobite from the middle and upper Ordovician Period fairly common in the Northeast U.S., northwest Manitoba, southwestern Quebec and southeastern Ontario. ... Gahanna is a city in Franklin County, Ohio, United States. ... This is a list of U.S. state insects: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: U.S. state insignia ... Subfamilies Chilocorinae Coccidulinae Coccinellinae Epilachninae Scymininae Sticholotidinae etc. ... For other uses, see Beetle (disambiguation). ... Here is a list of state mottos for countries and their subdivisions around the world. ... This article is about the genre. ... Hang on Sloopy is a hit song by the pop group The McCoys which was #1 in America in October 1965 and is the official rock song of the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Each state in the United States (except New Jersey) has a state song, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Beautiful Ohio: The Official State Song of Ohio Words by Ballard MacDonald and music by Mary Earl The original words were: Long, long time ago Someone I know Had a little red canoe, In it room for only two. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: U.S. state insignia | Lists of plants | Trees ... Binomial name Aesculus glabra Willd. ... This is a list of official U.S. state reptiles: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: U.S. state insignia ... Coluber constrictor, Baltimore Racer is the name of a group of harmless, fast-moving snakes of the United States. ... List of U.S. state minerals, rocks, stones, and gemstones. ... This article is about the sedimentary rock. ... For other uses, see Wildflower (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Trillium grandiflorum (Michx. ... North Baltimore is a village located in Wood County, Ohio. ... Wood County is the name of several counties in the United States: Wood County, Ohio Wood County, Texas Wood County, West Virginia Wood County, Wisconsin This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program (Pub. ... The United States has 18 Ohio-class submarines: 14 nuclear-powered SSBNs, each armed with 24 Trident II SLBMs; they are also known as Trident submarines, and provide the sea-based leg of the nuclear triad of the United States strategic nuclear weapons arsenal 4 nuclear-powered SSGNs, each armed... USS Ohio (SSBN-726), the lead ship of her class of nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarines, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the 17th state. ... Species See text Pawpaw (Asimina) is a genus of eight or nine species of small trees with large leaves and fruit, native to eastern North America. ... This is a list of official U.S. state foods: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This article is about the fruit. ...


See also

  • List of Ohio-related topics
Ohio portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Ohio. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Why is Ohio known as the Buckeye State and why are Ohioans known as Buckeyes?. Retrieved on 2008-04-21.
  2. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  3. ^ Census Regions of the United States (PDF). Retrieved on 2008-06-14.
  4. ^ "Geographic Definitions"Census Region definition, United States Census Bureau, retrieved December 22, 2005.
  5. ^ "Geographic Definitions" Census Region definition Attachment C, United States Census Bureau, retrieved December 22, 2005
  6. ^ Dow, Dustin (2007-01-22). On the Banks of the Ohi:yo. NCAA Hoops Blog. Retrieved on 2007-02-25.
  7. ^ Mithun, Marianne. 1999. Languages of Native North America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pg. 312
  8. ^ Native Ohio. American Indian Studies. Ohio State University. Retrieved on 2007-02-25.
  9. ^ About. Salamanca Cigarette Outlet. Retrieved on 2007-02-25.
  10. ^ Harvey, Christopher. Seneca. Languagegeek. Retrieved on 2007-02-25.
  11. ^ "The Date of Ohio Statehood", Frederick J. Blue, Ph.D., Ohio Academy of History Newsletter', Volume 23, Autumn 2002
  12. ^ "Transportation delivers for Ohio", Ohio Department of Transportation, retrieved December 22, 2005
  13. ^ "Ohio Coastal Atlas" Page 1 of "County Profiles" subsection, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, retrieved December 22, 2005.
  14. ^ Ohio v. Kentucky, 444 U.S. 335 (1980)
  15. ^ "History of the Appalachian Regional Commission", Appalachian Regional Commission, retrieved January 3, 2006.
  16. ^ "Counties in Appalachia", Appalachian Regional Commission, retrieved January 3, 2006
  17. ^ "GCT-T1 Ohio County Population Estimates--2005", The United States Census Bureau, retrieved January 3, 2006. True summation of Ohio Appalachia counties population (1,476,384) obtained by adding the 29 individual county populations together (July 1, 2005 data). Percentage obtained by dividing that number into that table's estimate of Ohio population as of July 1, 2005 (11,464,042)
  18. ^ The History of the MCD: The Conservancy Act. Miami Conservancy District. Retrieved on 2007-01-13.
  19. ^ All-Time Temperature Maximums By State (2003) (PDF). National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on November 7, 2006.
  20. ^ All-Time Temperature Minimums By State (2003) (PDF). National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on November 7, 2006.
  21. ^ ODNR Updates Ohio Earthquake Map to Reflect Statewide Seismic Activity Since 2002 (news release), Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey (September 18, 2007)
  22. ^ Ohio Seismic Network, What was the biggest earthquake in Ohio?
  23. ^ Historic Earthquakes: Western Ohio, U.S. Geological Survey.
  24. ^ Historic United States Earthquakes: Ohio, U.S. Geological Survey.
  25. ^ Historic Earthquakes: Near Lima, Ohio, U.S. Geological Survey.
  26. ^ Historic Earthquakes: Near Portsmouth, Ohio, U.S. Geological Survey.
  27. ^ Historic Earthquakes: Northeast Ohio, U.S. Geological Survey.
  28. ^ Small earthquake beneath Central Lake Erie, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey.
  29. ^ The Ohio Seismic Network
  30. ^ Catalog of Ohio Earthquakes, at the Ohio Department of Natural Resources web site
  31. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places in Ohio, Listed Alphabetically: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-28.
  32. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  33. ^ Indian Mounds-Ohio
  34. ^ Recession could trigger bigger Ohio budget deficit, Business Courier of Cincinnati
  35. ^ Missed forecasts, bad economy blamed for Ohio budget deficit, cleveland.com
  36. ^ Table 1: Estimates of Population Change for the United States and States, and for Puerto Rico and State Rankings: July 1, 2005 to July 1, 2006. United States Census Bureau (2006-12-22). Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
  37. ^ Religion in Ohio 1-2. Retrieved on 2008-03-04.
  38. ^ " A grain of sand for your thoughts", The Economist, December 20, 2005, retrieved December 23, 2005.
  39. ^ NPR: All Eyes on Ohio's 20 Electoral Votes
  40. ^ 'State of Eight' exhibit brings Ohio's presidential legacy home
  41. ^ The American Mayor, Melvin G. Holli, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999, Page 162. ISBN 0-271-01876-3.
  42. ^ Thomas J. Hennen's American Public Library Ratings for 2006
  43. ^ Library Name
  44. ^ Ohio's State Tourism Slogans - Ohio History Central - A product of the Ohio Historical Society
  45. ^ Ohio: America's Crossroads, Site Selection magazine, Aug/September 1997
  46. ^ Ohio's State Nickname - Ohio History Central - A product of the Ohio Historical Society
  47. ^ http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/16311422.htm

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina is the worlds largest active archive of weather data. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina is the worlds largest active archive of weather data. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Find more about Ohio on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources


Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Coordinates: 40.5° N 82.5° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Ohio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3420 words)
Although Ohio's population numbered only 45,000 in December 1801, Congress determined that the population was growing rapidly and Ohio could begin the path to statehood with the assumption that it would exceed 60,000 residents by the time it would become a state.
Ohio was also a deciding factor in the 1948 presidential election when Democrat Harry S. Truman defeated Republican Thomas Dewey (who had won the state four years earlier) and in the 1976 presidential election when Democrat Jimmy Carter defeated Republican Gerald Ford by a slim margin in Ohio and took the election.
Ohio is known as the "Modern Mother of Presidents," having sent eight of its native sons to the White House.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Ohio (2530 words)
In 1787 an organization known as the Ohio Company of Associates was formed in New England by a number of those who had served in the American Revolutionary War and under their negotiations a purchase of a large tract of land in the territory northwest of the Ohio River was made from the Government.
The Diocese of Columbus (erected 3 March, 1868) comprises that portion of the state south of 40°41" and between the Ohio River on the east and the Scioto River on the west, with Franklin, Delaware and Morrow Counties.
The Ohio courts have held, however, that a bequest to a Roman Catholic priest "for the saying of Masses for the repose of my soul and the soul of my husband" is not within the statute and is good although made within less than a year of the testator's death.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m