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Encyclopedia > Officer (armed forces)

An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... The United States has seven uniformed services as defined by Title 10 of the United States Code. ...


Commissioned officers derive authority directly from a sovereign power and, as such, hold a commission charging them with the duties and responsibilities of a specific office or position. Commissioned officers are typically the only persons in a military environment able to exercise command (according to the most technical definition of the word) over a military unit. Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme political (e. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as...


Non-commissioned officers (NCOs) in positions of authority can be said to have control or charge rather than command per se, although the use of the word "command" to describe any use of authority is widespread and often official. A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or noncom, is a non-commissioned member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ...


Having officers is one requirement for combatant status under the laws of war, though these officers need not have obtained an official commission or warrant. In such case, those persons holding offices of responsibility within the organization are deemed to be the officers, and the presence of these officers connotes a level of organization sufficient to designate a group as being combatant. A combatant is a person who takes a direct part in the hostilities of an armed conflict who upon capture qualifies for prisoner of war under the Third Geneva Convention (GCIII). ... The two parts of the laws of war (or Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC)): Law concerning acceptable practices while engaged in war, like the Geneva Conventions, is called jus in bello; while law concerning allowable justifications for armed force is called jus ad bellum. ...

Contents

Commissioned officers

According to the Canadian system of ranks, officers from the rank of Second Lieutenant (or Acting Sub-Lieutenant) to the rank of General (or Admiral) are the commissioned officers. This allocation is comparable in other countries. This is a table of the ranks and insignia of the Canadian Armed Forces. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... A Sub-Lieutenant is a junior naval commissioned officer, ranking below a Lieutenant. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ...


Commissioned officers generally receive training as leadership and management generalists, in addition to training relating to their specific military occupational specialty or function in the military. Most developed nations have set the goal of having their officer corps university-educated, although exceptions exist in some nations to accommodate officers who have risen from the non-commissioned ranks. Most advanced militaries, however, require university degrees as a prerequisite for commissioning, even from the enlisted ranks. The Australian Defence Force, the British Armed Forces, the Swiss Army, the Israel Defense Forces and the New Zealand Defence Force are different in not requiring a university degree for commissioning. They emphasise military, technical and leadership training and skills over academic qualifications (although a majority of officers are now graduates). The word leadership can refer to: the process of leading. ... Look up Management in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) is a job classification in use in the United States Army and Marine Corps. ... A developed country is a country that has achieved (currently or historically) a high degree of industrialization, and which enjoys the higher standards of living which wealth and technology make possible. ... A corps (plural same as singular; a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: (cor), but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or... The Australian Defence Force numbers about 53,000 full-time active duty personnel plus another 20,700 reservists. ... The armed forces of the United Kingdom, commonly known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, and sometimes legally the Armed Forces of the Crown[1], encompasses a navy, army, and air force. ... Military of Switzerland On May 18, 2003, Swiss voters approved the military reform project Army XXI that will drastically reduce the size of the Swiss Army. ... The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ... The New Zealand Defence Force consists of three branches: the New Zealand Army; the Royal New Zealand Navy; and the Royal New Zealand Air Force. ...


Among the Armed Forces of the United States, military services occasionally commission officers without a university degree, but it is in typically very small numbers. In the U.S. armed forces, a soldier may be selected for and graduate from the Officer Candidate School (OCS), or may be directly commissioned. Army OCS in particular is maintained to facilitate rapid expansion of the U.S. Army officer corps in the event of war, and commissions approximately 700 second lieutenants each year during peacetime. Direct commission in the U.S. military services are typical with credentialed civilian professionals, such as nurses, doctors and lawyers. The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


In the United Kingdom, officers are commissioned both from the ranks and directly into the officer corps as what are known as 'Direct Entry' or DE officers, and commissioned from the ranks as 'Late Entry' or LE officers. LE officers, whilst holding the same Queen's Commission, generally work in different roles to the DE officers. In the infantry a limited number of Warrant Officer Class 1s are commissioned as LE officers, ensuring that British infantry LE officers are in the top 1% of their peers. DE Officers require Secondary Education to A Level standard and generally speaking 80% of officers have a degree. Commissioning for DE officers occurs after a 1 year course at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. The course consists of not only tactical and combat training, but also leadership, management and international affairs training. Warrant Officer Class 1 (abbreviated WO1) is the highest non-commissioned rank in the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, and British Army. ... New College, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst New Colours are presented to RMAS, June 2005. ...


By contrast, non-commissioned members rise from the lowest ranks in most nations. Education standards -- a high school diploma or GED -- for non-commissioned members are typically lower than for officers (with the exception of specialised-military and highly-technical trades). Enlisted members only receive leadership training as they are promoted to positions of responsibility, or as a prerequisite for such. In the past (and in some countries today but to a lesser extent) non-commissioned members were almost exclusively conscripts, whereas officers were volunteers. The GED, General Educational Development, or General Equivalence Degree Test, is a test that certifies the taker has attained American or Canadian high school-level academic skills. ...


In Commonwealth nations, Commissioned Officers are given commissioning scrolls (a.k.a. commissioning scripts) signed by the Sovereign or the Governor General acting on her behalf. Upon receipt, this is an official legal document that binds the mentioned officer to the commitment stated on the scroll. See also Commissioned Officer The Queens Commisson is awarded to all officers of the British, Canadian, Austrailian and New Zealand armed forces. ... A Governor-General (in Canada always, and frequently in India prior to the abolition of the last monarchy, Governor General) is most generally a governor of high rank, or a principal governor ranking above ordinary governors [1]. The most common contemporary usage of the term is to refer to the...


Subordinate officers

In some armed forces, a further category of officers under training known as subordinate officers may also exist. Subordinate officers, though not yet commissioned, are accorded many of the privileges of commissioned officers. In many navies in the English-speaking world, a subordinate officer is an officer who has not finished his initial training. ...


Non-commissioned officers

A non-commissioned officer (NCO) is an enlisted military member holding a position of some degree of authority who has obtained it by promotion from within the non-officer ranks. They usually receive some leadership training, but their function is to serve as supervisors within their area of trade speciality and, at lower NCO grades, they are not generally considered management generalists. Senior non-commissioned officers serve as advisers and leaders from the duty section level to the highest levels of the military establishment. The duties of an NCO can vary greatly in scope, so that an NCO in one country may hold almost no authority, while others such as the United States and Great Britain consider their NCOs to be "the backbone of the military." A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or noncom, is a non-commissioned member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ... In military service, an enlisted rank is generally any rating below that of a commissioned officer. ...


In most maritime forces (navies and coast guards), the NCO ranks are called Petty Officers and Chief Petty Officers (Chiefs), with enlisted ranks prior to attaining NCO/petty officer status typically being called Seaman, or some derivation thereof. In most traditional infantry, marine and air forces, the NCO ranks are known as Sergeants and Corporals, with non-NCO enlisted ranks referred to as Privates and Aircraftsmen in the case of the UK. A Petty Officer is a noncommissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... Sergeant is a rank used in some form by most militaries, police forces, and other uniformed organisations around the world. ...


Warrant Officers

Main article: Warrant Officer

In some branches of many militaries there exists a third grade of officer known as a Warrant Officer. A Warrant Officer is typically a non-commissioned officer whose position has been affirmed by warrant from the bureaucracy directing the force (as in the armed forces of the Commonwealth nation), or may be a separate cadre altogether (as in the United States armed forces). Sometimes a warrant officer will actually hold a commission (known as a "Commissioned Warrant Officer"). In the United States military, Warrant Officers are officers who, instead of being at the command position of a given unit, are usually instead focused on their technical expertise in a given field -- helicopter pilots and IT specialists, for example. In the United States military they usually do not exercise the same political power that commissioned general officers do, and are paid somewhat less than commissioned officers. However, they are given the same military courtesies (such as salutes, and the practice of being addressed as "sir" or "ma'am"). There are no Warrant Officers in the U.S. Air Force (the ranks exist, but go permanently and completely unfilled), but each of the other U.S. Armed Forces have warrants -- though each warrant commissioning program is unique to the service's needs. Two Bermuda Regiment Warrant Officers. ... Two Bermuda Regiment Warrant Officers. ... Warrant has several meanings: In law, a warrant is a form of authorization, such as A writ issued by a judge. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Bureaucracy. ... Look up cadre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Link title For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... Information technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA)is: the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ...


Officer ranks and accommodation

Officers in nearly every country of the world are segregated from the enlisted soldiers in many facets of military life. Facilities accommodating needs such as the mess hall, bunks and domiciles, and general recreational are separated between officers and enlisted personnel. This system is focused on ensuring completely professional and ethical relations between military personnel.[citation needed] One of a number of cafeterias at Electronic City campus, Infosys Technologies Ltd. ... For the 1914 Charlie Chaplin film, see Recreation (film). ...


See also

Comparative military ranks are a means of comparing military rank systems of different nations as a means of categorizing the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. ... An exchange officer is a commissioned officer in a countrys armed forces who is temporarily attached to a unit of the armed forces of another country. ... The following is a list of military officers who have led divisions of a civil service. ... A Limited Duty Officer (LDO) is an officer in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps who was selected for commissioning based on his skill and expertise, and is not required to have a Bachelors Degree. ... A mustang is United States Military (especially Navy and Marine Corps) slang for a commissioned officer who began his or her career as an enlisted person. ... Military officers who serve on active duty or in the reserves in many cases receive their commission through a Direct Commission Officer (DCO) program. ... Staff officers in the U. S. Navy provide specialized support to Line Officers and to all other persons in the organization. ... Unrestricted Line Officers (URL Officers) are Officers of the Line in the U.S. Navy who are qualified to command ships and aviation squadrons. ...

External links

  • U.S. DoD Officer Rank Insignia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Armed Forces officer, operational: Job description and activities (365 words)
Operational officers in the armed forces lead the fighting arms.
The officer's primary responsibility in operations, which are often dangerous, fast-moving and confused, is to command, lead and inspire service personnel.
An operational or combat officer in the armed forces is first and foremost a leader who must lead and manage a team of fighting specialists, developing their skills to a very high level of competence and readiness.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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