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Encyclopedia > Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age
The Silmarillion
Ainulindalë
Valaquenta
Quenta Silmarillion
Akallabêth
Of the Rings of Power
and the Third Age
Middle-earth Portal

Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age is the fifth and last part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. It is relatively short, consisting of about 20 pages. The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher R. Tolkien, with assistance from fantasy fiction writer Guy Gavriel Kay. ... Ainulindalë is the first section and chapter of The Silmarillion (an abridged and condensed collection of fictional myths presented as histories, written over some 60+ years by J. R. R. Tolkien, edited and published posthumously in 1977 by his son, Christopher Tolkien). ... Valaquenta is the second part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... ... Quenta Silmarillion is the third part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Akallabêth is the fourth part of the fictional work The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Image File history File links Arda. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher R. Tolkien, with assistance from fantasy fiction writer Guy Gavriel Kay. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, as well as many other works. ...


The work is a fictional historical essay dealing with the preamble to the events described in Tolkien's epic novel The Lord of the Rings, and the events themselves, in the style of The Silmarillion. The fact that those events are explored in a mere handful of pages suggests that if the events described in the rest of The Silmarillion had been written in the style of The Lord of the Rings they would have filled hundreds of volumes. The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


After Tolkien's death in 1973, Christopher Tolkien completed this part, assisted by Guy Gavriel Kay. Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age bears some similarities to Elrond's narrative in The Fellowship of the Ring during the chapter The Council of Elrond; both do not divulge any details about how Arnor was destroyed and how Gondor became kingless. The closeness is perhaps intentional; as Elrond told the Second and Third Age through his eyes, The Silmarillion is supposed to be told through the point of the view of the Eldar. Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... Guy Gavriel Kay (born November 7, 1954) is a Canadian author of fantasy fiction. ... Spoiler warning: Elrond the Half-elven (F.A. 525 – ?) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by fantasy author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J.R.R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... Gondor is a fictional country in the southern part of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Eldar Djangirov a jazz pianist. ...


Information on the background and development of this essay can be found in The Treason of Isengard. The History of The Lord of the Rings is a 4-volume work by Christopher Tolkien that documents the process of J. R. R. Tolkiens writing of his masterwork The Lord of the Rings (LotR). ...


Summary

As the name implies, the events of the essay are focused around magical artifacts: the Rings of Power. The bearers of the Rings of Power in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring The Rings of Power are fictional artifacts from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


The Elves of Eregion forged many rings, including nineteen Rings of Power. But Sauron had deceived them, for he made the One Ring for himself, which was the master of the rest. location of Eregion in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eregion or Hollin was a kingdom of the Noldorin Elves in Eriador during the Second Age, located near the West Gate of Khazad-dûm under the shadow of the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ... Sauron (IPA: , Quenya: Abhorred) is the eponymous title character and main antagonist of The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The One Ring, also known as The Ruling Ring, or the Great Ring of Power, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ...


However Sauron's plan failed: the Elves discovered his plot and discarded their Rings until they could be shielded from his influence. Sauron then waged war upon the Elves. He captured all the Rings of Power except three. While many Elves were killed and the kingdom in Eregion destroyed, the Men of Númenor helped the Elves and repelled Sauron. After the war, Sauron distributed seven rings to Dwarves and Nine to Men. Hundreds of years later, the Men of Númenor decided to capture Sauron to demonstrate their might. As it is described in Akallabêth, Sauron was brought to Númenor as a slave; however, he soon corrupted most Númenóreans, encouraging them to replace their traditional reverence for Eru Ilúvatar with worship of Melkor, or Morgoth, Sauron's previous master. Under Sauron's influence, the Númenóreans decided to challenge the Valar by invading Aman. As a result, Númenor was destroyed and sank beneath the waves. location of Eregion in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eregion or Hollin was a kingdom of the Noldorin Elves in Eriador during the Second Age, located near the West Gate of Khazad-dûm under the shadow of the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... Akallabêth is the fourth part of the fictional work The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Eru, also called Ilúvatar (the All High or the Father of All as defined in the index of name elements in The Silmarillion), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God. ... Morgoth Bauglir (Morgoth means The Dark Enemy, Bauglir is The Constrainer), originally named Melkor (He Who Arises in Might), is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Morgoth Bauglir (originally known as Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens mythology, the Valar (singular Vala) are the Powers of Arda, or direct representatives of Eru Ilúvatar (God). ... In J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium, Aman (blessed realm) is a continent that lies to the west of Middle-earth (although it lay in another dimension during the time of The Lord of the Rings), across the great ocean Belegaer. ...


Only a few survivors left Númenor before it was too late, and led by Elendil the Tall and his two sons Isildur and Anárion, they had settled in Middle-earth. They created realms that were governed in Númenórean style: Elendil ruled over Arnor in the North, and Isildur and Anárion ruled together in the great country of Gondor in the South. However, Sauron survived the disaster too, and although he had lost his fair appearance, both he and his One Ring returned safely to his stronghold of old in the land of Mordor. In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Elendil was a heroic figure. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... Anárion is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, born S.A. 3219 and killed S.A. 3440 (lived 221 years). ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... Gondor is a fictional country in the southern part of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mordor is the dwelling place of Sauron, in the southeast of Middle-earth to the East of Anduin, the great river. ...


Years passed, and Sauron, who had renewed his might, decided to attack the new realms while they were still weak. His onslaught failed, however, and Elendil, his sons, and the Elven kings fought back. For many years the great coalition (The Last Alliance of Elves and Men, as it became known) besieged Mordor. At last the host broke through to Sauron's fortress Barad-dûr. Anárion died first before Sauron broke the siege. The mighty king of the Elves, Gil-galad challenged Sauron to a duel, but he lost. Then Elendil fought him, and died too; however, he managed to defeat Sauron. Isildur, Elendil's son approached Sauron's body and cut off his finger with the One Ring. In vain the Elven kings tried to convince Isildur to destroy the ring in the fire of Mount Doom where it was made: he took it for his own and declared that it was his and his folk's, a consolation after the enormous losses of the war (beside the death of Elendil, his father, another of those who perished was his brother Anárion, who was killed during the siege of Barad-dûr). Thus began the Third Age of Middle-earth. The Last Alliance of Elves and Men is an episode in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ... Ereinion Gil-galad is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... The Third Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...


Isildur himself died soon in a sudden ambush by a band of Orcs, and the Ring that had betrayed him was lost in the great river Anduin. Heirs of royal blood were chosen to lead Arnor and Gondor. For a millennium, both realms enjoyed relative freedom and prosperity. However afterwards, Arnor became subject to attacks from the north-eastern kingdom of Angmar, a kingdom that was ruled by the Witch-king. More and more people fled from the North, and although Angmar was defeated by the beginning of the third millennium of Third Age, Arnor was no more. Its people were scattered, and its royalty decreased in number and fame; however they remained true to their Númenórean descent. They became the Rangers of the North, protecting the paths of the North from the menace from the East. Orcs in Moria, from the 1978 animated film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings. ... Location of Anduin in Middle Earth In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... location of Angmar in Middle-earth marked in red Angmar (Sindarin: Iron-home) is a fictional kingdom in J.R.R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North, were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ...


As for Gondor, it prospered for much of the Third Age. However in the beginning of its third millennium, this began to change. Gondor was assailed by Orcs and Men from the nearby Mordor. For a long time, no one suspected that the same force that had driven the attacks upon Arnor was now fighting Gondor.


A thousand years earlier, several Wizards had come to the land: Saruman, Radagast, Gandalf, and Two Blue Wizards named in Middle-earth as Morinehtar and Rómestámo. Although it was unknown to the peoples of Middle-earth, they were emissaries from the West, sent on behalf of the Valar to help them to obtain their freedom. For many centuries they were silent, and little was done by them apart from observation and counsel. However as the times darkened, they decided to take action against a mysterious dark force which seemed to dwell in the middle of a giant forest called Mirkwood. During the attack, the force had fled to Mordor. It was Sauron, who was previously thought to have perished. And in the same year, the One Ring was found. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... This article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ... Radagast the Brown is one of the five Wizards in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy epic The Lord of the Rings and is mentioned in The Hobbit. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Gandalf is a fictional character in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, where he appears as an archetypal wizard, taking a key role in the latter books War of the Ring. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens mythology, the Valar (singular Vala) are the Powers of Arda, or direct representatives of Eru Ilúvatar (God). ... It Norse sagas, Mirkwood is a forest which separates Hunaland from other countries. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mordor is the dwelling place of Sauron, in the southeast of Middle-earth to the East of Anduin, the great river. ...


Sauron made war on Middle-earth again, but Frodo the Hobbit went to Mount Doom and destroyed the Ring, defeating Sauron. After this, it was made clear that Gandalf bore the Red Ring, Narya. Galadriel and Elrond had the other two rings. Aragorn son of Arathorn (direct descendant of many of the characters appearing earlier in the printed Silmarillion) is briefly mentioned as returning to claim the kingship and fighting a great field of battle before the City of Gondor, though he is only referred to as the "Heir of Isildur". In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... narya written in Quenya In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Narya (the Ring of Fire or Red Ring) is one of the Rings of Power, specifically one of the Three Rings for the Elven Kings under the sky. Created by Celebrimbor after Annatar had left... The Battle of the Pelennor Fields was a battle for the city of Minas Tirith in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The essay finishes with the departure of the Keepers of the Rings from the Grey Havens (at the end of Lord of the Rings) and then the sailing of the Last Ship of the Eldar ever to leave Middle-earth. Thus, "an end had come to the Eldar, of story and of song".


See also

The Hobbit is a novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien in the tradition of the fairy tale. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

External links

  • The Lord of the Rings Fanatics Library - "Celebrimbor and the Rings"

  Results from FactBites:
 
Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1133 words)
Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age is the fifth and last part of The Silmarillion by J.
Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age bears some similarities to Elrond's narrative in The Fellowship of the Ring during the chapter The Council of Elrond; both do not divulge any details about how Arnor was destroyed and how Gondor became kingless.
The closeness is perhaps intentional; as Elrond told the Second and Third Age through his eyes, The Silmarillion is supposed to be told through the point of the view of the Eldar.
Rings of Power - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2249 words)
The bearers of the Rings of Power in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
The Rings of Power are fictional artifacts from J.
The primary purpose and power of all the Rings was the "prevention or slowing of decay (i.e.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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