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Odin / Woden
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Odin (Old Norse Óðinn), is considered the chief god in Norse paganism. Homologous with the Anglo-Saxon Woden, it is descended from Proto-Germanic *Wōđinaz or *Wōđanaz. The name Odin is generally accepted as the modern translation however in some cases older translations of his name may be used or preferred. His name is related to óðr, meaning "fury, excitation", besides "mind" or "poetry". His role, like many of the Norse pantheon, is complex. He is a god of wisdom, war, battle and death. He is also attested as being a god of magic, poetry, prophecy, victory and the hunt.[citations needed] The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The 6th century Vadstena bracteate, showing a horse, a bird and a human head commonly identified as an early form of Scandinavian Odin. ... Odin is considered the highest god in Norse mythology and Norse paganism. ... This is the article about the belief in Odin among West Germanic peoples, for other uses see Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... The wild hunt: Ã…sgÃ¥rdsreien (1872) by Peter Nicolai Arbo The Wild Hunt was a folk myth prevalent in former times across Northern, Western and Central Europe. ... A Valkyrie is waiting at the gates of Valhalla on the Tjängvide image stone from Gotland, in the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm. ... In Norse religion the einherjar or einheriar were spirits of warriors who had died bravely in battle. ... Huginn and Muninn sit on Odins shoulders in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ... Geri and Freki (also spelled Gere and Freke) are a pair of wolves, companions of the god Odin in Norse mythology. ... In Norse mythology, Hlidskjalf (also spelt Hlidhskjalf) is Odins throne where none may sit save Odin himself and his wife Frigg. ... In Norse mythology, Gungnir (also Gungni, Gungner, or Gungrir) was the name of Odins javelin. ... Odin with Sleipnir, Valknuts are drawn beneath the horse (Tängelgarda stone) The valknut (Old Norse valr, slain warriors + knut, knot) is a symbol consisting of three interlocked triangles. ... Odin was referred to by many names in the skaldic tradition. ... Ódr (ON: Óðr) is the husband of Freyja in Norse mythology. ... Various gods and men appear as Sons of Odin or Sons of Woden in old Old Norse and Old English texts. ... Many toponyms (place names) contain the name of *Wodanaz (Norse Odin, West Germanic Woden) Scandinavia Odense (Denmark) Odensbacken (Sweden) England: Wansdyke - Wodens embankment Grimsdyke - From Grim, hooded, a description of his appearance Wednesfield - Wodens field Wensley - Wodens meadow Wednesbury - Wodens burgh Woodnesborough, Kent - also translates as... Reconstructions of the traditions of Germanic paganism began with 19th century Romanticism. ... Odin, Woden, Wotan, Wodan or Oden is usually considered the supreme god of Germanic and Norse mythology. ... The 6th century Vadstena bracteate, showing a horse, a bird and a human head commonly identified as an early form of Scandinavian Odin. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... In Old Norse, áss (or ǫ́ss, ás, plural æsir, feminine ásynja, feminine plural ásynjur) is the term denoting one of the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse paganism. ... Norse paganism is a term used to describe the religious traditions which were common amongst the Germanic tribes living in Nordic countries prior to and during the process of the Christianization in Northern Europe. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... This is the article about the belief in Odin among West Germanic peoples, for other uses see Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The 6th century Vadstena bracteate, showing a horse, a bird and a human head commonly identified as an early form of Scandinavian Odin. ... Ódr (ON: Óðr) is the husband of Freyja in Norse mythology. ... A pantheon (from Greek Πάνθειον, temple of all gods, from πᾶν, all + θεός, god) is a set of all the gods of a particular religion or mythology, such as the gods of Hinduism, Norse, Egyptian, Shintoism, Greek, vodun, Yoruba Mythology and Roman mythology. ... For the apocryphal book of the Bible, see Book of Wisdom. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... This article is about the art form. ... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Origins

Main article: Wodanaz
7th century depiction of Odin on a Vendel helmet plate, found in Uppland.
The 7th century Tängelgarda stone shows Odin leading a troop of warriors all bearing rings. Valknut symbols are drawn beneath his horse, which is depicted with four legs.

Worship of Odin may date to Proto-Germanic paganism. The Roman historian Tacitus may refer to Odin when he talks of Mercury. The reason is that, like Mercury, Odin was regarded as Psychopompos,"the leader of souls." Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The 6th century Vadstena bracteate, showing a horse, a bird and a human head commonly identified as an early form of Scandinavian Odin. ... Image File history File links Odin_Vendel_helmet. ... Image File history File links Odin_Vendel_helmet. ... Ohtheres mound Vendel is a parish in the Swedish province of Uppland. ... Uppland ( ) is a historical province or landskap on the eastern coast of Sweden. ... The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The image stone at Tängelgarda, Lärbro parish, Gotland, Sweden (57°49′N 18°43′E) is decorated with a scene of warriors holding rings, one (possibly Odin) horsed, with Valknut symbols drawn beneath. ... Odin with Sleipnir, Valknuts are drawn beneath the horse (Tängelgarda stone) The valknut (Old Norse valr, slain warriors + knut, knot) is a symbol consisting of three interlocked triangles. ... Taken during a Hindu prayer ceremony on the eve of Diwali. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... ROSIE IS A GERMN LADYGermanic paganism refers to the religion of the Germanic nations preceding Christianization. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius or Gaius Cornelius Tacitus (c. ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... This is an article about the mythology of the Psychopomp. ...


As Oden is closely connected with a horse and spear, and transformation/shape shifting into animal shapes, an alternative theory of origin contends that Oden, or at least some of his key characteristics, may have arisen just prior to the sixth century as a nightmareish horse god (Echwaz), later signified by the eight legged Sleipnir. The original function of this horse was to carry the dead to wherever they were going and to sometimes snack on their flesh. Some support for Odin as a late comer to the Scandinavian Norse pantheon can be found in the Sagas where, for example, at one time he is thrown out of Asgard by the other gods - a seemingly unlikely tale for a well established "all father". Scholars who have linked Odin with the "Death God" template include E. A. Ebbinghaus, Jan de Vries and Thor Templin. The later two also link Loki and Oden as being one-and-the-same until the early Norse Period. The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Jan de Vries (born 1890 in Amsterdam, died 1964 in Utrecht) was a Dutch scholar of Germanic linguistics and Germanic mythology, ordinarius 1926 to 1945 at Leiden University. ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ...


Scandinavian Óðinn emerged from Proto-Norse *Wōdin during the Migration period, Vendel artwork (bracteates, image stones) depicting the earliest scenes that can be aligned with the High Medieval Norse mythological texts. The context of the new elites emerging in this period aligns with Snorri's tale of the indigenous Vanir who were eventually replaced by the Æsir, intruders from the Continent.[1] Proto-Norse, Proto-Nordic, Ancient Nordic or Proto-North Germanic was an Indo-European language spoken in Scandinavia that is thought to have evolved from Proto-Germanic between the 1st century BC and the 2nd century, and was spoken until ca 800, when it evolved into the Old Norse language. ... Human migration denotes any movement of groups of people from one locality to another, rather than of individual wanderers. ... Ohtheres mound Vendel is a parish in the Swedish province of Uppland. ... A bracteate (from the Latin bractea, a thin piece of metal) is a flat, thin, single-sided gold coin produced in Northern Europe predominantly during the Migration Period of the Germanic Iron Age, but the name is also used for later produced coins of silver produced in Central Europe during... A rune stone Rune stones are somewhat flat standing stones with runic stone carvings from the Iron Age (Viking Age) and early middle ages found in most parts of Scandinavia. ... Snorri Sturlason (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. ... In Old Norse, áss (or ǫ́ss, ás, plural æsir, feminine ásynja, feminine plural ásynjur) is the term denoting one of the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse paganism. ...


Parallels between Odin and Celtic Lugus have often been pointed out: both are intellectual gods, commanding magic and poetry. Both have ravens and a spear as their attributes, and both are one-eyed. Julius Caesar (de bello Gallico, 6.17.1) mentions Mercury as the chief god of Celtic religion. A likely context of the diffusion of elements of Celtic ritual into Germanic culture is that of the Chatti, who lived at the Celtic-Germanic boundary in Hesse during the final centuries before the Common Era. (It must be remembered that Odin in his Proto-Germanic form was not the chief god, but that he only gradually replaced Tyr during the Migration period.) Lugus was a deity widely hypothesized to have been worshipped in Gaul, Britain, Ireland, Spain and other ancient Celtic regions. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Celtic Religion Celtic religion refers the pre-Christian religious beliefs and practices of the Celtic speaking peoples. ... The Chatti (also Catti) were an ancient Germanic tribe settled in central and northern Hesse and southern Lower Saxony, along the upper reaches of the Weser river and in the valleys and mountains of the Eder, Fulda and Werra river regions, a district approximately corresponding to Hesse-Cassel, though probably... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE7 Capital Wiesbaden Largest city Frankfurt Minister-President Roland Koch (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 5 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  21,100 km² (8,147 sq mi) Population 6,077,000 (08/2006)[1]  - Density... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Human migration denotes any movement of groups of people from one locality to another, rather than of individual wanderers. ...


Adam of Bremen

Written around 1080, one of the oldest written sources on pre-Christian Scandinavian religious practices is Adam of Bremen's Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum. Adam claimed to have access to first-hand accounts on pagan practices in Sweden. His description of the Temple at Uppsala gives some details on the god. Adam of Bremen (also: Adam Bremensis) was one of the most important German medieval chroniclers. ... Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum is a historical treatise written between 1075 and 1080 by Adam of Bremen. ... The Temple at Uppsala was a temple in Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), near modern Uppsala, Sweden, that was created to worship the Norse gods of ancient times. ...

In hoc templo, quod totum ex auro paratum est, statuas trium deorum veneratur populus, ita ut potentissimus eorum Thor in medio solium habeat triclinio; hinc et inde locum possident Wodan et Fricco. Quorum significationes eiusmodi sunt: 'Thor', inquiunt, 'praesidet in aere, qui tonitrus et fulmina, ventos ymbresque, serena et fruges gubernat. Alter Wodan, id est furor, bella gerit, hominique ministrat virtutem contra inimicos. Tertius est Fricco, pacem voluptatemque largiens mortalibus'. Cuius etiam simulacrum fingunt cum ingenti priapo.

Gesta Hammaburgensis 26, Waitz' edition

In this temple, entirely decked out in gold, the people worship the statues of three gods in such wise that the mightiest of them, Thor, occupies a throne in the middle of the chamber; Wotan and Frikko have places on either side. The significance of these gods is as follows: Thor, they say, presides over the air, which governs the thunder and lightning, the winds and rains, fair weather and crops. The other, Wotan—that is, the Furious—carries on war and imparts to man strength against his enemies. The third is Frikko, who bestows peace and pleasure on mortals. His likeness, too, they fashion with an immense phallus. For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... This 19th century representation of Freyr shows him with his boar Gullinbursti and his sword. ...

Gesta Hammaburgensis 26, Tschan's translation

Gesta Danorum

In the 12th century, Saxo Grammaticus, in the service of Archbishop Absalon in Denmark, presented in his Latin language work Gesta Danorum euhemerized accounts of Thor and Odin as cunning sorcerers that, Saxo states, had fooled the people of Norway, Sweden and Denmark into their recognition as gods: Saxo, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857 – 1945) Saxo Grammaticus (estimated. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... Statue of Absalon in Copenhagen Absalon (c. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Bishop Asgar, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857—1945) Gesta Danorum (Deeds of the Danes) is a work of Danish history, by 12th century author Saxo Grammaticus (Saxo the Grammarian). It is the most ambitious literary undertaking of medieval Denmark. ... John Dee and Edward Kelley evoking a spirit: Elizabethans who claimed magical knowledge A magician is a person skilled in the mysterious and hidden art of magic, which can be described as either the act of entertaining with tricks that are in apparent violation of natural law, such as those...

"There were of old certain men versed in sorcery, Thor, namely, and Odin, and many others, who were cunning in contriving marvellous sleights; and they, winning the minds of the simple, began to claim the rank of gods. For, in particular, they ensnared Norway, Sweden and Denmark in the vainest credulity, and by prompting these lands to worship them, infected them with their imposture. The effects of their deceit spread so far, that all other men adored a sort of divine power in them, and, thinking them either gods or in league with gods, offered up solemn prayers to these inventors of sorceries, and gave to blasphemous error the honour due to religion. Some say that the gods, whom our countrymen worshipped, shared only the title with those honoured by Greece or Latium, but that, being in a manner nearly equal to them in dignity, they borrowed from them the worship as well as the name. This must be sufficient discourse upon the deities of Danish antiquity. I have expounded this briefly for the general profit, that my readers may know clearly to what worship in its heathen superstition our country has bowed the knee." (Gesta Danorum, Book I)[2] Bishop Asgar, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857—1945) Gesta Danorum (Deeds of the Danes) is a work of Danish history, by 12th century author Saxo Grammaticus (Saxo the Grammarian). It is the most ambitious literary undertaking of medieval Denmark. ...

Saxo also wrote a story about how Odin's wife, Frigg, slept with a servant to obtain a device steal Odin's gold.

"At this time there was one Odin, who was credited over all Europe with the honour, which was false, of godhead, but used more continually to sojourn at Upsala; and in this spot, either from the sloth of the inhabitants or from its own pleasantness, he vouchsafed to dwell with somewhat especial constancy. Gamla Uppsala is an area rich in archaeological remains seen from the grave field whose larger mounds (left part) are close to the royal mounds. ...

The kings of the North, desiring more zealously to worship his deity, embounded his likeness in a golden image; and this statue, which betokened their homage, they transmitted with much show of worship to Byzantium, fettering even the effigied arms with a serried mass of bracelets. Odin was overjoyed at such notoriety, and greeted warmly the devotion of the senders. But his queen Frigg, desiring to go forth more beautified, called smiths, and had the gold stripped from the statue.

Odin hanged them, and mounted the statue upon a pedestal, which by the marvellous skill of his art he made to speak when a mortal touched it. But still Frigg preferred the splendour of her own apparel to the divine honours of her husband, and submitted herself to the embraces of one of her servants; and it was by this man's device she broke down the image, and turned to the service of her private wantonness that gold which had been devoted to public idolatry. Little thought she of practicing unchastity, that she might the easier satisfy her greed, this woman so unworthy to be the consort of a god; but what should I here add, save that such a godhead was worthy of such a wife? So great was the error that of old befooled the minds of men.

Thus Odin, wounded by the double trespass of his wife, resented the outrage to his image as keenly as that to his bed; and, ruffled by these two stinging dishonours, took to an exile overflowing with noble shame, imagining so to wipe off the slur of his ignominy. At home, Frigg went with a certain Mith-Othin and took over Odin's properties, until Odin came back and drove them away. Frigg's death later cleared Odin's name and he regained his reputation." (Gesta Danorum, Book I)[3] Bishop Asgar, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857—1945) Gesta Danorum (Deeds of the Danes) is a work of Danish history, by 12th century author Saxo Grammaticus (Saxo the Grammarian). It is the most ambitious literary undertaking of medieval Denmark. ...

There's also an account about how Odin was exiled by the Latin gods at Byzantium:

But the gods, whose chief seat was then at Byzantium, (Asgard), seeing that Odin had tarnished the fair name of godhead by divers injuries to its majesty, thought that he ought to be removed from their society. And they had him not only ousted from the headship, but outlawed and stripped of all worship and honour at home...[4]

Poetic Edda

Völuspá

In the poem Völuspá, a Völva tells Odin of numerous events reaching into the far past and into the future, including his own doom. The Völva describes creation, recounts the birth of Odin by his father Borr and his mother Bestla, how Odin and his brothers formed Midgard from the sea. She further describes the creation of the first human beings - Ask and Embla - by Hœnir, Lóðurr and Odin. Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ... The völva, vala, wala (Old High German), seiðkona, or wicce was a female shaman in Norse mythology, and among the Germanic tribes. ... Borr or Burr (sometimes anglicized Bor) in Norse mythology was the son of Búri and the father of Odin. ... In Norse mythology, Bestla was an ancient frost giantess, a daughter of Bolthorn. ... For other uses, see Midgard (disambiguation). ... Ask and Embla on a postage stamp of the Faroe Islands, 2003 by Anker Eli Petersen. ... HÅ“nir was an indecisive god and a member of the Æsir in Norse mythology. ... Lóðurr is one of the Æsir in Norse mythology. ...


Amongst various other events, the Völva mentions Odin's sparking of the first war in the world, between the Æsir and Vanir, by the launching of his spear, the self-sacrifice of Odin's eye at Mímir's Well, the death of his son Baldr. She describes how Odin is slain by the wolf Fenrir at Ragnarök, the subsequent avenging of Odin and death of Fenrir by his son Víðarr, how the world disappears into flames and, yet, how the earth again rises from the sea. She then tells how the surviving Æsir remember the deeds of Odin. Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. ... Balder redirects here. ... Fenrir may refer to: Fenrisulfr, a Norse mythological wolf. ... For other uses, see Ragnarök (disambiguation). ...


Lokasenna

In the poem Lokasenna, the conversation of Odin and Loki started with Odin trying to defend Gefjun and ended with his wife, Frigg, defending him. In Lokasenna, Loki derides Odin for practicing seid, implying it was women's work. Another example of this may be found in the Ynglinga saga where Snorri opines that men who used seid were ergi or unmanly. Lokasenna (Lokis flyting, Lokis wrangling, Lokis quarrel) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ... The Gefion fountain in Churchill Park Copenhagen, Denmark. ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ... The Ynglinga saga was originally written in Old Norse by the Icelandic poet Snorri Sturluson about 1225. ... Ergi and argr are two Old Norse terms of insult, denoting effeminacy or other unmanly behavior. ...


Hávamál

In Rúnatal, a section of the Hávamál, Odin is attributed with discovering the runes. He was hung from the world tree, Yggdrasil, while pierced by his own spear for nine days and nights, in order to learn the wisdom that would give him power in the nine worlds. Nine is a significant number in Norse magical practice (there were, for example, nine realms of existence), thereby learning nine (later eighteen) magical songs and eighteen magical runes. Hávamál (Sayings of Hár, Sayings of the high one) is one of the poems of the Poetic Edda. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... For other uses, see Yggdrasil (disambiguation). ... 9 (nine) is the natural number following 8 and preceding 10. ... Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the time of day. ... Norse cosmology has the World Tree Yggdrasill unify nine worlds or nine homelands (Old Norse: níu heimar), that represent all that exists within the infinite abyss of Ginnungagap. ... 18 (eighteen) is the natural number following 17 and preceding 19. ...


One of Odin's names is Ygg, and the Norse name for the World Ash —Yggdrasil—therefore could mean "Ygg's (Odin's) horse". Another of Odin's names is Hangatýr, the god of the hanged. Sacrifices, human or otherwise, in prehistoric times were commonly hung in or from trees, often transfixed by spears. (See also: Peijainen) Spears were one of the most common personal weapons from the late Bronze Age until the advent of firearms. ... In Finland, Peijainen is the ritual burial of a bear that has been communally brought down and has died. ...


Some scholars hypothesize that this legend influenced the story of Christ's crucifixion.[5] However, most of the existing records on Norse mythology date from after the the 12th century, having gone through more than two centuries of oral preservation in what was at least officially a Christian society.[6][7] In Shamanism, the traversal of the axis mundi by the shaman to bring back knowledge is a common pattern. For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... Axis mundi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Hárbarðsljóð

Main article: Hárbarðsljóð

In Hárbarðsljóð, Odin, disguised as the ferryman Hárbarðr, engages his son Thor, unaware of the disguise, in a long argument. Thor is attempting to get around a large lake and Hárbarðr refuses to ferry him. The Hárbarðsljóð (Lay of Hárbarðr; the name can be anglicized as Hárbardsljód, Hárbarthsljóth, Hárbardhsljódh, Harbardsljod and variations on this) is one of the poems of the Poetic Edda, found in the Codex Regius and AM 748 I 4to manuscripts. ...


Prose Edda

A depiction of Odin riding Sleipnir from an eighteenth century Icelandic manuscript.
Odin with his ravens and weapons (MS SÁM 66, eighteenth century)
A detail from a rune- and image stone from Gotland, in the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm. The three men are interpreted as Odin, Thor and Freyr.

Odin had three residences in Asgard. First was Gladsheim, a vast hall where he presided over the twelve Diar or Judges, whom he had appointed to regulate the affairs of Asgard. Second, Valaskjálf, built of solid silver, in which there was an elevated place, Hlidskjalf, from his throne on which he could perceive all that passed throughout the whole earth. Third was Valhalla (the hall of the fallen), where Odin received the souls of the warriors killed in battle, called the Einherjar. The souls of women warriors, and those strong and beautiful women whom Odin favored, became Valkyries, who gather the souls of warriors fallen in battle (the Einherjar), as these would be needed to fight for him in the battle of Ragnarök. They took the souls of the warriors to Valhalla. Valhalla has five hundred and forty gates, and a vast hall of gold, hung around with golden shields, and spears and coats of mail. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (592x764, 389 KB) Odin rides the eight-legged horse Sleipnir from the 18th century Icelandic manuscript NKS 1867 4to now in the care of the Danish Royal Library; taken from the English Wikipedia, see Image:Treated NKS sleipnir. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (592x764, 389 KB) Odin rides the eight-legged horse Sleipnir from the 18th century Icelandic manuscript NKS 1867 4to now in the care of the Danish Royal Library; taken from the English Wikipedia, see Image:Treated NKS sleipnir. ... The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (934x1184, 973 KB)Odin. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (934x1184, 973 KB)Odin. ... SÁM 66 (Stofnun Árna Magnússonar á Íslandi) is an 18th century manuscript now at the Árni Magnússon Institute, Iceland. ... A rune stone in Lund Rune stones are stones with runic inscriptions dating from the early Middle Ages but are found to have been used most prominently during the Viking Age. ... A rune stone Rune stones are somewhat flat standing stones with runic stone carvings from the Iron Age (Viking Age) and early middle ages found in most parts of Scandinavia. ...   is a county, province and municipality of Sweden and the second largest island in the Baltic Sea after Zealand. ... Swedish Museum of National Antiquities (Historiska museet) is a museum located in Stockholm, Sweden that is responsible for Swedish cultural history and art from the Stone Age to the 16th century. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... This 19th century representation of Freyr shows him with his boar Gullinbursti and his sword. ... Gladsheim (place of joy) is the hall of the gods in Asgard, situated on the plain of Ida. ... 12 (twelve) is the natural number following 11 and preceding 13. ... In Norse mythology, Valaskjálf is one of Odins Halls, a great dwelling built and roofed with pure silver. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... In Norse mythology, Hlidskjalf (also spelt Hlidhskjalf) is Odins throne where none may sit save Odin himself and his wife Frigg. ... A Valkyrie is waiting at the gates of Valhalla on the Tjängvide image stone from Gotland, in the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... In Norse religion the einherjar or einheriar were spirits of warriors who had died bravely in battle. ... This article is about the Valkyries, figures of Norse mythology. ... In Norse religion the einherjar or einheriar were spirits of warriors who had died bravely in battle. ... For other uses, see Ragnarök (disambiguation). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ...

A depiction of Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir from the Tjängvide image stone.

Odin has a number of magical artifacts associated with him: the spear Gungnir, which never misses its target; a magical gold ring (Draupnir), from which every ninth night eight new rings appear; and two ravens Huginn and Muninn (Thought and Memory), who fly around Earth daily and report the happenings of the world to Odin in Valhalla at night. He also owned Sleipnir, an octopedal horse, who was given to Odin by Loki, and the severed head of Mímir, which foretold the future. He also commands a pair of wolves named Geri and Freki, to whom he gives his food in Valhalla since he consumes nothing but mead or wine. From his throne, Hlidskjalf (located in Valaskjalf), Odin could see everything that occurred in the universe. The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... A Valkyrie is waiting at the gates of Valhalla on the Tjängvide image stone from Gotland, in the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm. ... The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ... In Norse mythology, Gungnir (also Gungni, Gungner, or Gungrir) was the name of Odins javelin. ... Draupnir is a golden arm ring possessed by Odin, the ruling god of Norse mythology. ... For other uses, see Raven (disambiguation). ... Hugin and Munin are a pair of ravens associated with the Norse god Odin. ... Personification of thought (Greek Εννοια) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Thought or thinking is a mental process which allows beings to model the world, and so to deal with it effectively according to their goals, plans, ends and desires. ... For other uses, see Memory (disambiguation). ... The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Head (disambiguation). ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ... Geri and Freki (also spelled Gere and Freke) are a pair of wolves, companions of the god Odin in Norse mythology. ... Mead Mead is a fermented alcoholic beverage made of honey, water, and yeast. ... In Norse mythology, Hlidskjalf (also spelt Hlidhskjalf) is Odins throne where none may sit save Odin himself and his wife Frigg. ... This is one of Odins Halls, a great dwelling built and roofed with pure silver. ... For other uses, see Universe (disambiguation). ...


The Valknut (slain warrior's knot) is a symbol associated with Odin. It consists of three interlaced triangles. Odin with Sleipnir, Valknuts are drawn beneath the horse (Tängelgarda stone) The valknut (Old Norse valr, slain warriors + knut, knot) is a symbol consisting of three interlocked triangles. ...


Odin is an ambivalent deity. Old Norse (Viking Age) connotations of Odin lie with "poetry, inspiration" as well as with "fury, madness and the wanderer." Odin sacrificed his eye (which eye he sacrificed is unclear) at Mímir's spring in order to gain the Wisdom of Ages. Odin gives to worthy poets the mead of inspiration, made by the dwarfs, from the vessel Óð-rœrir.[8] Viking Age is the term denoting the years from about 800 to 1066 in Scandinavian History[1][2][3]. // The Vikings have been much maligned in European history, due in large part to their violent attacks on Christians in the first centuries of their excursions out of Scandinavia. ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ... Mead Mead is a fermented alcoholic beverage made of honey, water, and yeast. ...

An 1886 depiction of Odin by Georg von Rosen.

Odin is associated with the concept of the Wild Hunt, a noisy, bellowing movement across the sky, leading a host of slain warriors. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x733, 96 KB) Georg von Rosen - Oden som vandringsman, 1886 (Odin, the Wanderer) Artwork from 1886 by Georg von Rosen (1843-1923). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x733, 96 KB) Georg von Rosen - Oden som vandringsman, 1886 (Odin, the Wanderer) Artwork from 1886 by Georg von Rosen (1843-1923). ... Georg von Rosen (1843-1923), was a Swedish painter, known for his treatment of subjects from Swedish history and Norse mythology. ... The wild hunt: Åsgårdsreien (1872) by Peter Nicolai Arbo The Wild Hunt was a folk myth prevalent in former times across Northern, Western and Central Europe. ...


Consistent with this, Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda depicts Odin as welcoming the great, dead warriors who have died in battle into his hall, Valhalla, which, when literally interpreted, signifies the hall of the slain. The fallen, the einherjar, are assembled and entertained by Odin in order that they in return might fight for, and support, the gods in the final battle of the end of Earth, Ragnarök. Snorri also wrote that Freyja receives half of the fallen in her hall Folkvang. A statue of Snorri Sturluson by Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland was erected at Reykholt in 1947. ... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... A Valkyrie is waiting at the gates of Valhalla on the Tjängvide image stone from Gotland, in the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm. ... In Norse religion the einherjar or einheriar were spirits of warriors who had died bravely in battle. ... For other uses, see Ragnarök (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, Folkvang (field of folk) is an idyllic land in the land of the Aesir. ...


He is also a god of war, appearing throughout Norse myth as the bringer of victory.[citations needed] In the Norse sagas, Odin sometimes acts as the instigator of wars, and is said to have been able to start wars by simply throwing down his spear Gungnir, and/or sending his valkyries, to influence the battle toward the end that he desires. The Valkyries are Odin's beautiful battle maidens that went out to the fields of war to select and collect the worthy men who died in battle to come and sit at Odin's table in Valhalla, feasting and battling until they had to fight in the final battle, Ragnarök. Odin would also appear on the battle-field, sitting upon his eight-legged horse Sleipnir, with his two ravens, one on each shoulder, Hugin (Thought) and Munin (Memory), and two wolves(Geri and Freki) on each side of him. Excerpt NjÃ¥ls saga in the Möðruvallabók (AM 132 folio 13r) circia 1350. ... In Norse mythology, Gungnir (also Gungni, Gungner, or Gungrir) was the name of Odins javelin. ... The Valkyries Vigil, by the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Robert Hughes. ... The Valkyries Vigil, by the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Robert Hughes. ... For other uses, see Ragnarök (disambiguation). ... The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ... Huginn and Muninn sit on Odins shoulders in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Geri and Freki (also spelled Gere and Freke) are a pair of wolves, companions of the god Odin in Norse mythology. ...


Odin is also associated with trickery, cunning, and deception. Most sagas have tales of Odin using his cunning to overcome adversaries and achieve his goals, such as swindling the blood of Kvasir from the dwarves. In literature, a kenning is a poetic phrase, a figure of speech, substituted for the usual name of a person or thing. ... This page is about a mythological race. ...


Prologue

Snorri Sturluson feels compelled to give a rational account of the Æsir in the prologue of his Prose Edda. In this scenario, Snorri speculates that Odin and his peers were originally refugees from the Anatolian city of Troy, folk etymologizing Æsir as derived from the word Asia. In any case, Snorri's writing (particularly in Heimskringla) tries to maintain an essentially scholastic neutrality. That Snorri was correct was one of the last of Thor Heyerdahl's archeoanthropological theories, forming the basis for his Jakten på Odin. A statue of Snorri Sturluson by Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland was erected at Reykholt in 1947. ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Folk etymology is a term used in two distinct ways: A commonly held misunderstanding of the origin of a particular word, a false etymology. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Heimskringla is the Old Norse name of a collection of sagas recorded in Iceland around 1225 by the poet and historian Snorri Sturluson (1179-1242). ... Thor Heyerdahl Thor Heyerdahl (October 6, 1914 Larvik, Norway – April 18, 2002 Colla Micheri, Italy) was a Norwegian ethnographer and adventurer with a scientific background in zoology and geography. ... The Search for Odin (Norwegian: Jakten pÃ¥ Odin) is the project title of Thor Heyerdahls last series of archaeological excavations, which took place in Azov in Russia. ...


Gylfaginning

According to the Prose Edda, Odin, the first and most powerful of the Æsir, was a son of Bestla and Borr and brother of Ve and Vili. With these brothers, he cast down the frost giant Ymir and made Earth from Ymir's body. The three brothers are often mentioned together. "Wille" is the German word for "will" (English), "Weh" is the German word (Gothic wai) for "woe" (English: great sorrow, grief, misery) but is more likely related to the archaic German "Wei" meaning 'sacred'. The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... In Norse mythology, Bestla was an ancient frost giantess, a daughter of Bolthorn. ... Borr or Burr (sometimes anglicized Bor) in Norse mythology was the son of Búri and the father of Odin. ... Ve was one of the Æsir and a son of Bestla and Borr in Norse mythology. ... Vili was one of the Æsir and a son of Bestla and Borr in Norse mythology. ... Frost on black pipes Frost is a solid deposition of water vapor from saturated air. ... Look up giant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ymir is killed by the sons of Borr in this artwork by Lorenz Frølich In Norse mythology, Ymir, also named Aurgelmir (Old Norse gravel-yeller) among the giants themselves, was the founder of the race of frost giants and an important figure in Norse cosmology. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... With regard to living things, a body is the integral physical material of an individual. ... For the numeral, see 3 (number). ... It has been suggested that Anticipatory Grief be merged into this article or section. ...


Odin has fathered numerous children. With his wife, Frigg, he fathered his doomed son Baldr and fathered the blind god Höðr. By the personification of earth, Fjörgyn, Odin was the father of his most famous son, Thor. By the giantess Gríðr, Odin was the father of Vídar, and by Rinda he was father of Váli. Also, many royal families claimed descent from Odin through other sons. For traditions about Odin's offspring, see Sons of Odin. For other uses, see Frigg (disambiguation). ... Balder redirects here. ... Loki tricks Höðr into shooting Baldr. ... Moder Jord by Stephan Sinding In Norse mythology, Jörð (or Jarð in Old East Norse; Earth, sometimes Anglicized Jord or Jorth) is a goddess and the personification of the Earth. ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... Vidar (Víðar, Viðarr, Widar) is the son of Odin and the giantess Grid (Jotun) in Norse mythology. ... In botany, a rind is the thick outer skin of various structures such as fruit. ... In Norse mythology, Váli is a son of the god Odin and the giantess Rindr. ... Various gods and men appear as Sons of Odin or Sons of Woden in old Old Norse and Old English texts. ...


Odin and his brothers, Vili and Ve, are attributed with slaying Ymir, the Ancient Giant, to form Midgard. From Ymir's flesh, the brothers made the earth, and from his shattered bones and teeth they made the rocks and stones. From Ymir's blood, they made the rivers and lakes. Ymir's skull was made into the sky, secured at four points by four dwarfs named East, West, North, and South. From Ymir's brains, the three Gods shaped the clouds, whereas Ymir's eye-brows became a barrier between Jotunheim (giant's home) and Midgard, the place where men now dwell. Odin and his brothers are also attributed with making humans. Ymir is killed by the sons of Borr in this artwork by Lorenz Frølich In Norse mythology, Ymir, also named Aurgelmir (Old Norse gravel-yeller) among the giants themselves, was the founder of the race of frost giants and an important figure in Norse cosmology. ... For other uses, see Midgard (disambiguation). ... This article is about the skeletal organs. ... Types of teeth Molars are used for grinding up foods Carnassials are used for slicing food. ... This article is about the geological substance. ... For other uses, see Blood (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Skull, see Skull (disambiguation). ... A compass rose For other uses, see East (disambiguation). ... A compass rose with west highlighted This article refers to the cardinal direction; for other uses see West (disambiguation). ... Look up North in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see South (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Brain (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses, see Cloud (disambiguation). ...


After having made earth from Ymir's flesh, the three brothers came across two logs (or an ash and an elm tree). Odin gave them breath and life; Vili gave them brains and feelings; and Ve gave them hearing and sight. The first man was Ask and the first woman was Embla. Species See text. ... This article is about life in general. ... Hearing (or audition) is one of the traditional five senses, and refers to the ability to detect sound. ... Visual perception is one of the senses, consisting of the ability to detect light and interpret (see) it as the perception known as sight or naked eye vision. ... Ask and Embla on a postage stamp of the Faroe Islands, 2003 by Anker Eli Petersen. ... Ask and Embla on a postage stamp of the Faroe Islands, 2003 by Anker Eli Petersen. ...


Odin was said to have learned the mysteries of seid from the Vanic goddess and völva Freyja, despite the unwarriorly connotations of using magic. Seid or seiðr is an Old Norse term for a type of sorcery or witchcraft which was practiced by the pre-Christian Norse. ... Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. ... The völva, vala, wala (Old High German), seiðkona, or wicce was a female shaman in Norse mythology, and among the Germanic tribes. ... Freya, in an illustration to Wagners operas by Arthur Rackham. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ...


Skáldskaparmál

In section 2 of Skáldskaparmál, Odin's quest for wisdom can also be seen in his work as a farmhand for a summer, for Baugi, and his seduction of Gunnlod in order to obtain the mead of poetry. (See Fjalar and Galar for more details.) The second part of the Younger Edda of Snorri Sturluson the Skáldskaparmál or language of poetry is effectively a dialogue between the Norse god of the sea, Ægir and Bragi, the god of poetry, in which both Norse mythology and discourse on the nature of poetry are intertwined. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, Baugi was a Jotun and brother of Suttung, who had hidden the mead of poetry after obtaining it from Fjalar and Galar, who had murdered Suttungs father (Baugis uncle: Gilling). ... In Norse mythology, Gunnlod was a daughter of Suttung, who was set guard by her father in the cavern where he housed the mead of poetry. ... This article is about the art form. ... In Norse mythology, Fjalar and his brother, Galar, were dwarves who killed Kvasir and turned his blood into the mead of poetry, which inspired poets. ...


In section 5 of Skáldskaparmál, the origins of some of Odin's possessions are described.


Sagas of Icelanders

Ynglinga saga

According to the Ynglinga saga: The Ynglinga saga was originally written in Old Norse by the Icelandic poet Snorri Sturluson about 1225. ...

"Odin had two brothers, the one called Ve, the other Vili, and they governed the kingdom when he was absent. It happened once when Odin had gone to a great distance, and had been so long away that the people Of Asia doubted if he would ever return home, that his two brothers took it upon themselves to divide his estate; but both of them took his wife Frigg to themselves. Odin soon after returned home, and took his wife back."

In Ynglinga saga, Odin is considered the 2nd Mythological king of Sweden, succeeded Gylfi and was succeeded by Njörðr. In sources such as Heimskringla and Ynglinga saga there appear early Swedish kings who belong in the domain of mythology, but it is often suggested that they have a historical basis. ... Gylfi greets Odin Gylfi, Gylfe, Gylvi, or Gylve was the earliest king of Sweden present in Norse mythology. ... Njord or Njordr (Old Norse Njörðr) is one of the Vanir and the god of the fertile land along the seacoast, as well as seamanship and sailing in Norse mythology. ...


Further, in Ynglinga saga, Odin is described as venturing to Mímir's Well, near Jötunheimr, the land of the giants; not as Odin, but as Vegtam the Wanderer, clothed in a dark blue cloak and carrying a traveler's staff. To drink from the Well of Wisdom, Odin had to sacrifice his eye (which eye he sacrified is unclear), symbolizing his willingness to gain the knowledge of the past, present and future. As he drank, he saw all the sorrows and troubles that would fall upon men and the gods. He also saw why the sorrow and troubles had to come to men. In the late 19th century, this Norwegian mountain district was named Jotunheimen after Jötunheimr of Norse mythology. ... This article is about the colour. ... For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Knowledge (disambiguation). ...


Mímir accepted Odin's eye and it sits today at the bottom of the Well of Wisdom as a sign that the father of the gods had paid the price for wisdom.


Other Sagas

According to Njáls saga: Hjalti Skeggiason, an Icelander newly converted to Christianity, wished to express his contempt for the native gods, so he sang: Njáls saga (also known as The Story of Burnt Njál) is an epic of Icelandic literature from the 13th century that describes the progress of a 50-year blood feud. ... Hjalti Skeggiason was an Icelandic chieftain who supported Gizzur the White for the introduction of Christianity in Iceland, on the Althing in 1000. ...

"Ever will I Gods blaspheme
Freyja methinks a dog does seem,
Freyja a dog? Aye! Let them be
Both dogs together Odin and she!" [9]

Hjalti was was found guilty of blasphemy for his infamous verse and he ran to Norway with his father-in-law, Gizur the White. Later, with Olaf Tryggvason's support, Gizur and Hjalti came back to Iceland to invite those assembled at the Althing to convert to Christianity (which happened in 999).[10][11] Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... The Alþing, commonly Anglicized as Althing (Modern Icelandic Alþingi; Old Norse Alþing) is the national parliament: literally, the all-thing of Iceland. ... Events Silesia is incorporated into territory ruled by Boleslaus I of Poland Pope Silvester II succeeds Pope Gregory V Sigmundur Brestisson introduces christianity in the Faroe Islands Deaths December 16 - Saint Adelaide of Italy (b. ...


The Saga of King Olaf Tryggvason, composed around 1300, describes that following King Olaf Tryggvason's orders, to prove their piety, people must insult and ridicule major heathen deities when they are newly converted into Christianity. Hallfreðr vandræðaskáld, who was reluctantly converted from paganism to Christianity by Olaf, also had to make a poem to forsake pagan deities. Below is an example:

The whole race of men to win
Odin's grace has wrought poems
(I recall the exquisite
works of my forebears);
but with sorrow, for well did
Viðrir's [Odin's] power please the poet,
do I conceive hate for the first husband of
Frigg [Odin], now I serve Christ. (Lausavísur 10, Whaley's translation)

This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ...

Flateyjarbók

Sörla þáttr is a short narrative from a later and extended version of the Saga of Olaf Tryggvason[12] found in the Flateyjarbók manuscript, which was written and compiled by two Christian priests, Jon Thordson and Magnus Thorhalson, from the late 14th[13] to the 15th century.[14] Sörla þáttr is a short tale which says that it begins 24 years after the death of Frodi, and takes place in the 9th and the 10th centuries. ... The Flatey Book, (in Icelandic the Flateyjarbók Flat-island book) is one of the most important medieval Icelandic manuscripts. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... This article is about religious workers. ...


"Freyja was a human in Asia and was the favorite concubine of Odin, King of Asialand. When this woman wanted to buy a golden necklace (no name given) forged by four dwarves (named Dvalinn, Alfrik, Berling, and Grer), she offered them gold and silver but they replied that they would only sell it to her if she would lie a night by each of them. She came home afterward with the necklace and kept silent as if nothing happened. But a man called Loki somehow knew it, and came to tell Odin. King Odin commanded Loki to steal the necklace, so Loki turned into a fly to sneak into Freyja's bower and stole it. When Freyja found her necklace missing, she came to ask king Odin. In exchange for it, Odin ordered her to make two kings, each served by twenty kings, fight forever unless some christened men so brave would dare to enter the battle and slay them. She said yes, and got that necklace back. Under the spell, king Högni and king Heðinn battled for one hundred and forty-three years, as soon as they fell down they had to stand up again and fight on. But in the end, the great Christian lord Olaf Tryggvason arrived with his brave christened men, and whoever slain by a Christian would stay dead. Thus the pagan curse was finally dissolved by the arrival of Christianity. After that, the noble man, king Olaf, went back to his realm."[15] A swampy marsh area ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... Olav Tryggvason (969 - September 9, 1000) was a great-grandson of Harald Hairfair He began his meteoric career in exile as his ancestors fled from the executions of the royal family by Eric Bloodaxe. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...


Blót

Main article: Blót

It is attested in primary sources that sacrifices were made to Odin during blóts. Adam of Bremen relates that every ninth year, people assembled from all over Sweden to sacrifice at the Temple at Uppsala. Male slaves and males of each species were sacrificed and hung from the branches of the trees. The Blót was the pagan Germanic sacrifice to Norse gods and Elves. ... The Blót was the pagan Germanic sacrifice to Norse gods and Elves. ... Adam of Bremen (also: Adam Bremensis) was one of the most important German medieval chroniclers. ... The Temple at Uppsala was a temple in Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), near modern Uppsala, Sweden, that was created to worship the Norse gods of ancient times. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ...


As the Swedes had the right not only to elect their king but also to depose him, the sagas relate that both King Domalde and King Olof Trätälja were sacrificed to Odin after years of famine. It has been argued that the killing of a combatant in battle was to give a sacrificial offering to Odin. The fickleness of Odin in war was well-documented; in Lokasenna, Loki taunts Odin for his inconsistency. The Norse sagas or Viking sagas (Icelandic: Íslendingasögur), are stories about ancient Scandinavian and Germanic history, about early Viking voyages, about migration to Iceland, and of feuds between Icelandic families. ... Domalde was a Swedish king of the House of Ynglings, in Norse mythology. ... Olaf Tree Feller (Old Norse: Ólafr trételgja, Swedish: Olof Trätälja, Norwegian: Olav Tretelgja) was the son of the Swedish king Ingjald Ill-ruler of the House of Yngling according to Ynglingatal. ... A year (from Old English gÄ“r) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereBold text</nowiki>A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic and increased mortality. ... Lokasenna (Lokis flyting, Lokis wrangling, Lokis quarrel) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ...


Sometimes sacrifices were made to Odin to bring about changes in circumstance. A notable example is the sacrifice of King Víkar that is detailed in Gautrek's Saga and in Saxo Grammaticus' account of the same event. Sailors in a fleet being blown off course drew lots to sacrifice to Odin that he might abate the winds. The king himself drew the lot and was hanged. Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Change For other uses, see Change (disambiguation). ... Víkar (Old Norse nominative case form Víkarr; Latin Wicarus) was a legendary Norwegian king who found himself and his ships becalmed for a long period. ... Gautreks saga (Gautreks Saga) is an Old Norse saga written towards the end of the 13th century which survives only in much later manuscripts. ... Saxo, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857 – 1945) Saxo Grammaticus (estimated. ... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ...


Sacrifices were probably also made to Odin at the beginning of summer (mid April, actually--summer being reckoned essentially the same as did the Celt, at Beltene, Calan Mai [Welsh], which is Mayday--hence as summer's "herald"), since Ynglinga saga states one of the great festivals of the calendar is at sumri, þat var sigrblót "in summer, for victory"; Odin is consistently referred to throughout the Norse mythos as the bringer of victory. The Ynglinga saga also details the sacrifices made by the Swedish king Aun, to whom it was revealed that he would lengthen his life by sacrificing one of his sons every ten years; nine of his ten sons died this way. When he was about to sacrifice his last son Egil, the Swedes stopped him. This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... The Ynglinga saga was originally written in Old Norse by the Icelandic poet Snorri Sturluson about 1225. ... Ane, On, One, Auchun or Aun the Old (Audhun, the same name as the A-S name Edwin) was the son of Jorund and one of the Swedish kings of the House of Yngling, the ancestors of Norways first king, Harald Fairhair. ... One redirects here. ... Ten can refer to: 10, a number AD 10, a year 10 BC, a year 10, a 1979 motion picture Ten, any one of a number of rock albums Network Ten, an Australian television network Trans-European Networks (TEN) Total Entertainment Network, an early-1990s attempt at an online server... Ongenþeow, Ongentheow, Ongendþeow, Egil, Egill, Eigil, or Angantyr (- ca 515) was the name of one or two semi-legendary Swedish kings of the house of Scylfings, who appear in Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian sources. ...


Persisting beliefs in Odin

Odin continued to hunt in Swedish folklore. Illustration by August Malmström.

The Christianization of Scandinavia was slow, and it worked its way downwards from the nobility. Among commoners, beliefs in Odin lingered and legends would be told until modern times. Scandinavian folklore is the folklore of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, the Faroe Islands, and the Swedish speaking parts of Finland. ... Johan August Malmström (1829 – 1901), was a Swedish academic painter associated with the Symbolist movement. ... For the purposes of this article the Christianization of Scandinavia refers to the process of conversion to Christianity of the Scandinavian and Nordic peoples, starting in the 8th century with the arrival of missionaries in Denmark and ending in the 18th century with the conversion of the Inuits and the...


The last battle where Scandinavians attributed a victory to Odin was the Battle of Lena in 1208.[16] The former Swedish king Sverker had arrived with a large Danish army, and the Swedes led by their new king Eric were outnumbered. Odin then appeared riding on Sleipnir and he positioned himself in front of the Swedish battle formation. He led the Swedish charge and gave them victory. The Battle of Lena took place January 31 1208, in Lena which is located in the Tidaholm Municipality in Westrogothia. ... January 31 - Inferior Swedish forces defeats the invading danes in Battle of Lena. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Erik X ( c 1180 – 1216), Erik Knutsson (Eric son of Canute) was the King of Sweden between 1208 and 1216. ...


The Bagler sagas, written in the thirteenth century concerning events in the first two decades of the thirteenth century, tells a story of a one-eyed rider with a broad-brimmed hat and a blue coat who asks a smith to shoe his horse. The suspicious smith asks where the stranger stayed during the previous night. The stranger mentions places so distant that the smith does not believe him. The stranger says that he has stayed for a long time in the north and taken part in many battles, but now he is going to Sweden. When the horse is shod, the rider mounts his horse and says "I am Odin" to the stunned smith, and rides away. The next day, the battle of Lena took place. The context of this tale in the saga is that a peace-treaty has been signed in Norway, and Odin, a god of war, no longer has a place there. The Bagler Sagas (Bøglunga søgur) are Norse sagas relating to the civil wars in Norway in the early 13th century. ...


Hákonar saga Hákonarsonar, written in the 1260s, describes how, at some point in the 1230s, Skule Baardsson has the skald Snorri Sturluson compose a poem comparing one of Skule's enemies to Odin, describing them both as bringers of strife and disagreement. These episodes do not necessarily imply a continued belief in Odin as a god, but show clearly that his name was still widely known at this time. Hákonar saga Hákonarsonar (The Saga of Haakon Haakonsson) is an Old Norse kings saga, telling the story of the life and reign of king Haakon Haakonsson of Norway. ... Skule Baardsson or Duke Skule (old norse Skúli Bárðarson) was an earl and a duke in Norway during the reign of king Haakon Haakonsson. ... A statue of Snorri Sturluson by Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland was erected at Reykholt in 1947. ...


Scandinavian folklore also maintained a belief in Odin as the leader of the Wild Hunt. His main objective seems to have been to track down and kill a lady who could be the forest dweller huldran or skogsrået. In these accounts, Odin was typically a lone hunter, save for his two dogs.[17] Scandinavian folklore is the folklore of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, the Faroe Islands, and the Swedish speaking parts of Finland. ... The wild hunt: Ã…sgÃ¥rdsreien (1872) by Peter Nicolai Arbo The Wild Hunt was a folk myth prevalent in former times across Northern, Western and Central Europe. ... A huldra and Näcken. ...


Names

Main article: List of names of Odin

Odin was referred to by more than 200 names[18] in the skaldic and Eddic traditions of heiti and kennings, a poetic method of indirect reference, as in a riddle. Odin was referred to by many names in the skaldic tradition. ... The skald was a member of a group of courtly poets, whose poetry is associated with the courts of Scandinavian and Icelandic leaders during the Viking age, who composed and performed renditions of aspects of what we now characterise as Old Norse poetry. ... The term Edda (Plural: Eddas or Icelandic plural: Eddur) applies to the Old Norse Poetic Edda and Prose Edda, both of which were written down in Iceland during the 13th century, although some of the poems included in them may be centuries older. ... Heiti is a word used to describe a form of kenning, particularly with reference to a by-name for one of the Norse or Anglo-Saxon deities. ... This article is about kenning as a poetic notion. ...


Some epithets establish Odin as a father god: Alföðr "all-father", "father of all"; Aldaföðr "father of men (or of the age)"; Herjaföðr "father of hosts"; Sigföðr "father of victory"; Valföðr "father of the slain".


Eponyms

Many toponyms ("place names") in Northern Europe where Germanic Tribes existed contain the name of *Wodanaz (Norse Odin, West Germanic Woden). Many toponyms (place names) contain the name of *Wodanaz (Norse Odin, West Germanic Woden) Scandinavia Odense (Denmark) Odensbacken (Sweden) England: Wansdyke - Wodens embankment Grimsdyke - From Grim, hooded, a description of his appearance Wednesfield - Wodens field Wensley - Wodens meadow Wednesbury - Wodens burgh Woodnesborough, Kent - also translates as... Northern Europe Northern Europe is the northern part of the European continent. ...


Wednesday is named after Odin (Old English Wēdnes dæg, "Woden's day"). Its is an early Germanic translation of the Latin dies Mercurii ("Mercury's day"), The god Woden, after whom Wednesday was named. ... Old English redirects here. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...


Odin came to be used as a Norwegian male given name from the 19th century, originally in the context of the Romanticist Viking revival. Look up Appendix:Most popular given names by country in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Early modern publications dealing with what we now call Viking culture appeared in the 16th century, e. ...


Modern age

Germanic neopaganism

Odin, along with the other Germanic Gods and Goddesses, is recognized by Germanic neopagans. His Norse form is particularly acknowledged in Ásatrú, the "faith in the Æsir", an officially recognized religion in Iceland, Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The Mjolnir is one of the primary symbols of Germanic neopaganism. ... Mjolnir, the hammer of Thor, is one of the major symbols of Ásatrú. This article is about the reconstruction of Norse paganism in particular. ...


Modern popular culture

Odin appears in Richard Wagner's opera cycle, Der Ring des Nibelungen. This has led to many portrayals based on Wagner's interpretation, although some are closer to pre-Wagner models. Since Wagner's time, Odin has appeared, either as himself or as the namesake of characters, comic books, on television, in literature and in song lyrics. Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Der Ring des Nibelungen, (The Ring of the Nibelung), is a cycle of four epic music dramas by the German composer Richard Wagner. ...


References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ The Nine Books of the Danish History of Saxo Grammaticus, translated by Oliver Elton (Norroena Society, New York, 1905) Available online: [2]
  3. ^ The Nine Books of the Danish History of Saxo Grammaticus, translated by Oliver Elton (Norroena Society, New York, 1905) Available online: [3]
  4. ^ The Nine Books of the Danish History of Saxo Grammaticus, Book III translated by Oliver Elton (Norroena Society, New York, 1905) Available online: [4]
  5. ^ Viking Religion By Gareth Williams at BBC - History
  6. ^ W. A. Craigie, "Religion of Ancient Scandinavia" (1914)
  7. ^ Viking Religion By Gareth Williams at BBC - History
  8. ^ Skaldskaparmal, in Edda. Anthony Faulkes, Trans., Ed. (London: Everyman, 1996).
  9. ^ Njál's Saga or The Story of Burnt Njal, George W. DaSent transl. (1861).
  10. ^ W. A. Craigie, "Religion of Ancient Scandinavia" (1914)
  11. ^ T. Kendrick, "History of the Vikings" (1930), p.349, 350.
  12. ^ The Younger Edda. Rasmus B. Anderson transl. (1897) Chicago: Scott, Foresman & Co. (1901).
  13. ^ Lindow, John. Norse Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Heroes, Rituals, and Beliefs, pages 280-281. (2001) Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-515382-0.
  14. ^ Rasmus B. Anderson, Introduction to the The Flatey Book. Norræna Society, London (1908).
  15. ^ This short story is also known as "The Saga of Högni and Hedinn". English translation can be found at Northvegr: Three Northern Love Stories and Other Tales.
  16. ^ http://runeberg.org/img/sverhist/1/0325.5.png
  17. ^ Schön, Ebbe. (2004). Asa-Tors hammare, Gudar och jättar i tro och tradition. Fält & Hässler, Värnamo. ISBN 91-89660-41-2 pp. 201-205.
  18. ^ Harrison, D. & Svensson, K. (2007). Vikingaliv Fälth & Hässler, Värnamo. ISBN 978-91-27-35725-9 p. 63

The second part of the Younger Edda of Snorri Sturluson. ... This colourful front page of the Prose Edda in an 18th century Icelandic manuscript shows Odin, Heimdallr, Sleipnir and other figures from Norse mythology. ... Rasmus Björn Anderson (January 12, 1846 - March 2, 1936) was a Norwegian-American author, professor, and diplomat, and the originator of the movement to honor Leif Erikson with a holiday in the United States. ... Rasmus Björn Anderson (January 12, 1846 - March 2, 1936) was a Norwegian-American author, professor, and diplomat, and the originator of the movement to honor Leif Erikson with a holiday in the United States. ... The Flatey Book, (in Icelandic the Flateyjarbók Flat-island book) is one of the most important medieval Icelandic manuscripts. ...

External links

  • A. Asbjorn Jon's "Shamanism and the Image of the Teutonic Deity, Óðinn"
  • Viktor Rydberg's "Teutonic Mythology: Gods and Goddesses of the Northland" e-book
  • W. Wagner's "Asgard and the Home of the Gods" e-book
  • "Myths of Northern Lands" e-book by H. A. Guerber
  • Peter Andreas Munch's "Norse Mythology: Legends of Gods and Heroes" e-book
Preceded by
Gylfi
Mythological king of Sweden Succeeded by
Njörðr

H.A. Guerber, more commonly known as (Hélène Adeline Guerber), born 1859 , died 1929 [1], is a British historian most well known for her written histories of Germanic mythology. ... Norse paganism is a term used to describe the religious traditions which were common amongst the Germanic tribes living in Nordic countries prior to and during the process of the Christianization in Northern Europe. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Divided between the Æsir and the Vanir, and sometimes including the jötnar (giants), the dividing line between these groups is less than clear. ... In Old Norse, áss (or ǫ́ss, ás, plural æsir, feminine ásynja, feminine plural ásynjur) is the term denoting one of the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse paganism. ... Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. ... Read psychedelic section for amazing info! on the experiments of real elves good for school projects This article is about the small mythical creature, for the 2003 film, see Elf (film). ... In Norse mythology, the Light Elves (Old Norse: Liósálfar) live in Álfheim. ... ... In Norse mythology, the dwarves (Old Norse: dvergar, sing. ... For other uses, see Troll (disambiguation). ... The Valkyries Vigil, by the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Robert Hughes. ... In Norse religion the einherjar or einheriar were spirits of warriors who had died bravely in battle. ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... This 19th century representation of Freyr shows him with his boar Gullinbursti and his sword. ... -1... For other uses, see Frigg (disambiguation). ... Heimdall returns Brisingamen to Freya Heimdall (Old Norse Heimdallr, the prefix Heim- means world, the affix -dallr is of uncertain origin, perhaps it means pole, bright, or valley) is one of the Æsir in Norse mythology. ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ... Balder redirects here. ... This picture, from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript in the care of the Árni Magnússon Institute, shows Ullr on his skis and with his bow. ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... For other uses, see Yggdrasil (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, Ginnungagap (seeming emptiness or gaping gap) was a vast chasm that existed before the ordering of the world. ... For other uses, see Ragnarök (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Mjollnir_icon. ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... Excerpt NjÃ¥ls saga in the Möðruvallabók (AM 132 folio 13r) circia 1350. ... The Volsung Cycle is the name of a series of Germanic legends based on the same matter as Niebelungenlied, and which were recorded in medieval Iceland. ... The Tyrfing Cycle is a collection of legends united by the magic sword Tyrfing. ... A rune stone in Lund Rune stones are stones with runic inscriptions dating from the early Middle Ages but are found to have been used most prominently during the Viking Age. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... The orthography of the Old Norse language since the introduction of the Latin alphabet in Iceland is a thorny subject. ... Norse mythology provides a rich and diverse source which many later writers have borrowed from or built upon. ... Viking Age is the term denoting the years from about 800 to 1066 in Scandinavian History[1][2][3]. // The Vikings have been much maligned in European history, due in large part to their violent attacks on Christians in the first centuries of their excursions out of Scandinavia. ... The skald was a member of a group of courtly poets, whose poetry is associated with the courts of Scandinavian and Icelandic leaders during the Viking age, who composed and performed renditions of aspects of what we now characterise as Old Norse poetry. ... In literature, a kenning is a poetic phrase, a figure of speech, substituted for the usual name of a person or thing. ... The Blót was the pagan Germanic sacrifice to Norse gods and Elves. ... Seid or seiðr is an Old Norse term for a type of sorcery or witchcraft which was practiced by the pre-Christian Norse. ... Numbers are significant in Norse mythology although not to the extent which they are in some traditions e. ... // Places Asgard Bifröst Bilskirnir Breidablik Elivagar Fyris Wolds Gandvik Ginnungagap Helgardh Hlidskjalf Hvergelmir Jötunheimr Leipter River Kormet Midgard Muspelheim Nastrond Nidavellir Niflheim Ormet Reidgotaland Slidr River Svartalfheim Utgard Valhalla Vanaheim Vimur Yggdrasil Events Fimbulwinter Ragnarök Artifacts Balmung Brisingamen Draupnir Dromi Eitr Mjolnir Skíðblaðnir Gram Gungnir... Gylfi greets Odin Gylfi, Gylfe, Gylvi, or Gylve was the earliest king of Sweden present in Norse mythology. ... In sources such as Heimskringla and Ynglinga saga there appear early Swedish kings who belong in the domain of mythology, but it is often suggested that they have a historical basis. ... Njord or Njordr (Old Norse Njörðr) is one of the Vanir and the god of the fertile land along the seacoast, as well as seamanship and sailing in Norse mythology. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Odin - LoveToKnow 1911 (361 words)
In notices relating to religious observances Odin appears chiefly as the giver of victory or as the god of the dead.
It is probable, however, that the worship of Odin was once common to most of the Teutonic peoples.
To the Anglo-Saxons he was known as Woden and to the Germans as Wodan (Wuotan), which are the regular forms of the same name in those languages.
The Masks of Odin by Elsa-Brita Titichenell (Edda, ancient norse (2597 words)
The Masks of Odin is a provocative study of "the wisdom of the ancient Norse." While it portrays the various aspects and forms that Odin assumes in order to gain knowledge of the nine worlds inhabited by gods and giants, humans, elves, and dwarfs, Elsa-Brita Titchenell has a larger purpose in view.
As a serious student of both Edda and Theosophy her loom is cosmic in reach, its warp representing the theosophia perennis or enduring god-wisdom and its woof the Edda, whose many-colored threads she weaves into colorful and often inspiring patterns of interpretation.
In the High One's Song, we read of Odin's consummate experience when for nine whole nights he "hung in the windtorn tree," the Tree of Life, so that he might "raise the runes" and drink the mead of omniscience.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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