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Encyclopedia > October surprise

An October surprise is American political jargon describing a stunning news event with the potential to influence the outcome of an election, particularly one for the presidency. It is so called because Election Day in the U.S. is the Tuesday after the first Monday in November, and events shortly before the election have greater potential to swing votes. Most of the time, the term is used to label actions of a sitting president, especially with regard to military or foreign policy matters, but it can also apply to news stories unfavorable to the incumbent administration. "Historically, news outlets avoid investigative pieces critical of candidates within days of an election to avoid appearing partisan." [1] Particularly since the 1980 election, the term has been pre-emptively used to discredit late-campaign news by one side or the other. Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Election Day in the United States is the day when polls most often open for the election of elected public officials. ... A foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how a particular country will interact with the other countries of the world. ...

Contents

1968 Humphrey vs. Nixon

Citing progress with the Paris peace talks, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced to the nation on March 31, 1968 that he had ordered a cessation of "all air, naval, and artillery bombardment of North Vietnam" above the 20th parallel. Additionally, and quite surprisingly, Johnson stated that he would not accept the Democratic nomination for a second term. As the race between Humphrey and Nixon was winding down by October 1968, with the polls indicating Nixon was in the lead, Johnson announced on October 31 a complete bombing halt of North Vietnam, once again citing that progress had been made in the Paris negotiations. Johnson hoped that the negotiations would bear fruit by the time of the election, and the Vietnam War would be officially over. However, Nixon and his team pulled off an "October surprise" by secretly convincing the South Vietnamese to pull out of the talks. With the war continuing, many liberal voters would not vote for Humphrey, and Nixon won by only 500,000 popular votes (though he did gain 110 more electoral votes than Humphrey - 301 to Humphrey's 191). Bombing above the 20th parallel in North Vietnam would not resume again until May 1972 with Operation Linebacker. A vast majority of the sorties that had been flown over North Vietnam would be shifted to Vietnamese strongholds in Laos and later in Cambodia. Part of the Paris skyline with from left to right: Montparnasse Tower, Eiffel Tower, and in the background, towers of neighboring La Défense. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN), or less commonly, Vietnamese Democratic Republic (Vietnamese: Việt Nam Dân Chủ Cộng Hòa), also known as North Vietnam, was proclaimed by Ho Chi Minh in Hanoi, September 2nd1945 and was recognized by the Peoples Republic of China and the... On the Earth, a circle of latitude or parallel is an imaginary east-west circle that connects all locations with a given latitude. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Electoral votes by state, as of 2006 The United States Electoral College the official name of the group of Presidential Electors who are chosen every four years to cast the electoral vote and thereby elect the President and Vice President of the United States. ... Operation Linebacker was the name of a United States military operation during the Vietnam War. ...


1972 Nixon vs. McGovern

With less than a month remaining until the presidential election between President Richard Nixon and Democrat George McGovern, Nixon's Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, announced that "peace is at hand" in the unpopular Vietnam War, in which Nixon, who four years earlier that vowed to cease or gradually bring to a close, had actually continued American involvement in. At the time, President Nixon was still assured an easy reelection victory against McGovern yet Kissinger's statement increased Nixon's already high standing with the public and such proved true when the President defeated McGovern by a 20-point margin in the nationwide popular vote in the general election in one of the largest landslides in American election history. In political science, a democrat is an advocate, follower, or proponent of democracy. ... George McGovern Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate, losing the 1972 presidential election to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May 27, 1923) is a German-born Jewish American diplomat, Nobel laureate and statesman. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


1976 Carter vs. Ford

The 1970s Team B experiment to study Soviet military capabilities was created by conservative cold warriors determined to stop détente and the SALT process. Panel members were all hard-liners. Some believe experiment was leaked to the press in an unsuccessful attempt at an October surprise to derail Jimmy Carter's 1976 presidential bid. In fact, it may have had some effect considering Carter, who was leading by double digits earlier in the campaign, ended up defeating President Gerald Ford in a race that was closer than anticipated with Carter winning 50.1 percent of the popular vote to Ford's 48 percent and also beating Ford in a close electoral outcome. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... Team B was part of a competitive analysis exercise initiated by U.S. government officials in the 1970s to analyze intelligence on the Soviet Union. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... The Cold War (Russian: Холодная Война Holodnaya Voina) was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between a worldwide military alliance of capitalist states led by the United States and a rival alliance of communist states led by the Soviet Union. ... Détente is a French term meaning relaxation, which has been used in international politics since the early 1970s. ... The Strategic Arms Limitation Talks refers to two rounds of bilateral talks and corresponding international treaties between the Soviet Union and United States, the Cold War superpowers, on the issue of armament control. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


1980 Carter vs. Reagan

Main article: October surprise conspiracy The October Surprise Conspiracy was an alleged plot that claimed representatives of the 1980 Ronald Reagan presidential campaign had conspired with Islamic Republic of Iran to delay the release of 66 Americans held hostage in Tehran until after the 1980 U.S. Presidential election. ...


During the Iran hostage crisis, the Republican challenger Ronald Reagan feared a last-minute deal to release the hostages, which would hand incumbent Jimmy Carter a goodwill vote winning the election. The Reagan campaign and several well-known Republicans attempt to persuade the public that President Carter was secretly making deals and negotiations to score a hostage release right before the election just for political campaign. The Carter administration denied they were doing such for Carter's own benefit in the election and it turned out that in the days prior to the election, press coverage was consumed with the Iranian government's decision--and Carter's simultaneous announcement--that the hostages would not be released until after the election. In fact, the election coincidentally fell on the one-year anniversary of the 1979 hostage-taking and Carter lost in a huge landslide, both in the popular and electoral vote, to Ronald Reagan. A defaced Great Seal of the United States at the former US embassy, Tehran, Iran, as it appears today The Iran hostage crisis was a 444-day (about 14 months) period during which student proxies of the new Iranian regime held hostage 52 diplomats and citizens of the United States... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989), and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ...


Due to the release of the hostages at the precise moment of Reagan's inauguration on January 20, 1981, rumors surfaced that the Reagan campaign made an "secret hostage deal with the Iranian government" whereby the Iranians would hold the hostages until Reagan was inaugurated, ensuring that Carter would lose the election. Two separate congressional investigations as well as several investigative journalists looked into the charges, both concluding evidence was insufficient. Three books, all titled October Surprise are major sources detailing the allegations by senior Carter and Reagan staffs (Gary Sick, Barbara Hoeneger) and Robert Parry (an investigative journalist). January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The October Surprise Conspiracy was an alleged plot that claimed representatives of the 1980 Ronald Reagan presidential campaign had conspired with Islamic Republic of Iran to delay the release of 66 Americans held hostage in Tehran until after the 1980 U.S. Presidential election. ... An October surprise is American political jargon describing a stunning news event with the potential to influence the outcome of an election, particularly one for the presidency. ...


1992 Bush vs. Clinton

Just four days before the vote that year, Ronald Reagan's defense secretary Caspar Weinberger was implicated in the Iran-Contra scandal. Though he claims to have been opposed to the sale on principle, Weinberger participated in the transfer of United States TOW missiles to Iran, and was later indicted on several felony charges of lying to the Iran-Contra independent counsel during its investigation. The relevance of the situation helped stop a late Bush surge in the polls. [2] Weinberger received a Presidential pardon from President George H.W. Bush on December 24, 1992, just days before his trial was scheduled to begin. The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate, and is a member of the Cabinet. ... Caspar Weinberger in his official Department of Defence publicity photo circa 1983. ... In the Iran-Contra Affair, United States President Ronald Reagans administration secretly sold arms to Iran, which was engaged in a bloody war with its neighbor Iraq from 1980 to 1988 (see Iran-Iraq War), and diverted the proceeds to the Contra rebels fighting to overthrow the leftist and... A TOW missile being fired from a Jeep. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime, whereas misdemeanors are considered to be less serious offenses. ... A pardon is the forgiveness of a crime and the penalty associated with it. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ...


2000 Gore vs. Bush

Columnist James Taranto of the Wall Street Journal held a contest in September 2000 asking readers to submit potential October surprises that President Clinton might utilize to favor Al Gore's candidacy. [3] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Taranto (born 1966) is a Manhattan-based columnist for The Wall Street Journal and editor of its online editorial page, OpinionJournal. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...


Days before the November 7 election, Carl Cameron of Fox News, working with the local Fox affiliate in Maine, unearthed an old report that Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush had been arrested for drunk driving in Texas in 1976, a report which Bush himself confirmed in a press conference moments after it was revealed. At the time, Bush was leading his Democratic opponent, Vice President Al Gore, in the polls in what was clearly a close election. The revelation of Bush's drunk driving arrest eroded his lead and Al Gore eventually defeated Bush by .5 percent in the nationwide popular vote. Gore, however, lost the electoral vote after a highly contested recount in Florida gave Bush an official margin of 537 votes. Carl Cameron is a television journalist for FOX News in the United States, and has served as political correspondent following presidential candidates George W. Bush in 2000 and John Kerry in 2004. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... Official language(s) See: Languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... |- ! Born | March 31, 1948 Washington, D.C. |} Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


2003 California recall election

The Los Angeles Times released a story about Arnold Schwarzenegger and subsequent allegations that he was a womanizer guilty of multiple acts of sexual misconduct in past decades. The story was released just before the 2003 California recall, prompting many pundits to charge that the timing of the story was aimed specifically at derailing the recall campaign. [4] Arnold Schwarzenegger (IPA: ) (born on July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-born bodybuilder, actor and Republican politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... The 2003 California recall was a special election permitted under California law. ...


2004 Bush vs. Kerry

The 2004 presidential campaign saw more than its share of "October surprises". On September 8, CBS anchor Dan Rather presented a report on 60 Minutes II that alleged that George W. Bush dishonorably avoided full service in the Texas Air National Guard during the 1960's. The report was discovered to have violated journalistic standards as the authenticity of key documents was never established. Several forensic examiners subsequently characterized the documents as possible forgeries. The ensuing controversy became known as "Rathergate". On its face the story was potentially damaging to Bush, but the outcome generated debate about anti-Republican or liberal bias in mainstream media. Many analysts considered the incident a wash as far as voting outcomes, as it chiefly reinforced entrenched opinion. [citation needed] Presidential election results map. ... It has been suggested that CBS evening news anchors be merged into this article or section. ... Dan Rather, from a telecast in October 2004. ... Promotional picture for 60 Minutes II 60 Minutes II, also known as 60 Minutes Wednesday and 60 Minutes, was a weekly primetime newsmagazine television program that purported to replicate the signature style, journalistic quality and integrity of the original 60 Minutes series. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... Shield of the United States Air National Guard In the US military, the Air National Guard (ANG), as part of the National Guard, is the organized militia of a particular US state and is a reserve of the US Air Force (USAF), too. ... Journalistic standards and ethics or, more precisely journalism ethics, include sets of ethical principles tailored to address the specific challenges faced by professional journalisms (non-professional may also benefit from study and application of them as well). ... See also authenticity (philosophy) and authentication (which deals only with computer security). ... One of the Killian documents. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Mass media is the term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ...


On October 27, reports surfaced about the disappearance of huge cache of explosives from a warehouse in al Qa'qaa (see Missing explosives in Iraq). The John Kerry campaign blamed the Bush administration for this supposed mismanagement, while many conservatives cited Kerry's position as a "flip-flop" from his previous statements decrying the Bush administration for misleading the public on the issue of Saddam Hussein's pre-war weapons programs and WMD capabilities. The Al Qaqaa State Establishment in Iraq (also known as al Qaqaa, al Qa Qaa or al QaQa; the difference in spelling is due to differing transliterations of the Arabic name) was a massive weapons facility 48 kilometres south of Baghdad. ... The Al Qaqaa high explosives controversy concerns the removal of about 340 tonnes of high explosives HMX and RDX before, during, or after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... This article is 79 kilobytes or more in size. ...


On October 29, the Arabic news agency Al Jazeera aired a video of Osama bin Laden (see 2004 Osama bin Laden video). In a speech that justifies and takes responsibility for the actions of September 11th, bin Laden calls out the Bush administration and the American position in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. "Your security does not lie in the hands of Kerry, Bush, or al-Qaeda," Osama claimed; "Your security is in your own hands." [5] This is believed to have helped President Bush's campaign as it thrust the War on Terrorism back into the public eye. There is debate as to whether bin Laden was aware of the effect the video would have on the elections; the "Bush bounce" from the video did not surprise most outside observers of the 2004 election. Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (الجزيرة), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula (whence also Algiers) is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957 [1]), most commonly known as Osama bin Laden is a militant Islamist and one of the founders of al-Qaeda. ... A still of 2004 Osama bin Laden video. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The War on Terrorism, (also the Global War on Terrorism or GWOT [1]) is the name used by the United States, initially enlisting the support of NATO members and other allies, for a campaign with the stated goal of ending international terrorism by preventing those groups said to be terrorist...


2006 midterm elections

Bush adviser Karl Rove reportedly informed conservative insiders that the GOP has an October Surprise prepared for the upcoming 2006 congressional elections, according to the conservative website NewsMax.[1] Former Sen. Gary Hart believes that one possibility is an attack on Iran's nuclear program, and possibly a broader attack aimed at regime change.[2] Karl Rove Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush. ... Elections for the United States House of Representatives will be held on November 7, 2006, with all of the 435 seats in the House up for election. ... NewsMax. ... Gary Hart Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Hartpence on November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ... This article is about Irans nuclear power program. ... Regime change is the overthrow of a government (or regime) considered illegitimate by an external force (usually military), and its replacement with a new government according to the ideas and/or interests promoted by that force. ...


Charles Peña of libertarian website Antiwar.com responded to the Rove claim by noting, "So far, however, all the surprises have been unwelcome ones for the Bush administration." The events he included were the 2006 National Intelligence Estimate on Iraq, the Bob Woodward profile of the Bush administration, State of Denial, the news from a biography of Colin Powell that he was "fired" from the administration, and the Mark Foley scandal. "But the biggest October surprise so far," according to Peña, is North Korea's underground test of a nuclear weapon on Monday."[3] See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Antiwar. ... National Intelligence Estimates (NIEs) express the coordinated judgments of the US Intelligence Community, and thus represent the most authoritative assessment of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) with respect to a particular national security issue. ... Bob Woodward Robert Upshur Bob Woodward (born March 26, 1943) is one of the best-known journalists in the United States, thanks largely to his work in helping uncover the Watergate scandal that led to President Richard Nixons resignation, in a historical journalistic partnership with Carl Bernstein, while working... State of Denial: Bush at War, Part III (ISBN 0-74-327223-X) is a book by Bob Woodward, originally due to be published October 2, 2006, but unexpectedly released two days early by the publisher because of the demand for it, that examines how the George W. Bush administration... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... The 2006 North Korean nuclear test was the detonation of a nuclear device conducted on October 9, 2006 by the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea. ...


The Mark Foley scandal, in which the congressman resigned over sexual computer messages he exchanged with underage congressional pages, broke on September 28, 2006 and dominated the news in early October. Bloomberg.com wrote, "The October surprise came early this election year...."[4] Allegations that both Republicans and Democrats had knowledge of Foley's actions months before the breaking of the story only fueled the speculation regarding the possibly politically motivated timing of the story's release.[5] [6] Mark Foley The Mark Foley scandal, which broke in late September 2006, centers on sexually explicit and solicitative e-mails and instant messages sent by Mark Foley, a Republican Congressman from Florida, to congressional pages and former pages. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bloomberg Television is a cable television network that broadcasts business and financial news 24 hours a day, owned by Bloomberg L.P. Bloomberg Television is headquartered in New York City, home of the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ. It is widely known for its unique multiscreen format. ...


News that the Saddam Hussein trial verdict would be rendered on November 5, 2006, just two days ahead of the U.S. midterm elections, led Tom Engelhardt of liberal magazine The Nation to dub it the "November Surprise".[7] Saddam Hussein during his first appearance before the Iraqi Special Tribunal The trial of Saddam Hussein, the former President of Iraq, is being held under the Iraqi Special Tribunal. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S publication. ...


Two studies by The Lancet on mortality in Iraq before and after the 2003 invasion of Iraq have been described as October surprises for the 2004 and 2006 elections. [8] Les Roberts denied that the 2004 study attempted to favor one candidate over another. The Lancet is one of the oldest and most respected peer-reviewed medical journals in the world, published weekly by Elsevier, part of Reed Elsevier. ... Figure 4 from the second The Lancet survey of Iraqi mortality, showing a comparison with two other mortality surveys. ... Thois article covers invasion specifics. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


See also

  • Wag the Dog, a novel and film describing a fictional war started solely to distract attention from a Presidential scandal.

Wag the Dog (1997) is a film starring Dustin Hoffman, Robert De Niro and Anne Heche about a Washington spin doctor (De Niro) who distracts the electorate from a presidential sex scandal by hiring a Hollywood producer (Hoffman) to create a fake war. ...

References

  1. ^ Ronald Kessler. "Karl Rove Promises October Surprise", September 21, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  2. ^ Gary Hart. "The October Surprise", September 23, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  3. ^ Charles Peña (October 11, 2006). Co-Dependency in Iraq (Sidebar: October Surprise). Antiwar.com. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  4. ^ Catherine Dodge and Jay Newton-Small. "October Surprise in This Campaign Puts Republicans On the Spot", October 3, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-10-03.
  5. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/s/ibd/20061002/bs_ibd_ibd/2006102issues01
  6. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,218144,00.html
  7. ^ Tom Engelhardt. "November Surprise?", The Nation, October 17, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  8. ^ Boo!? An Inevitable October Surprise Linton Weeks, Washington Post, October 21, 2006.

September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Gary Hart Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Hartpence on November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Antiwar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... This article is about the U.S publication. ... October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 18 is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years). ... ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
October: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (504 words)
October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days.
October was also the eighth month in the Roman calendar until a monthless winter period (summer in the southern hemisphere) was divided between January and February.
October in the Northern Hemisphere is the seasonal equivalent to April in the Southern Hemisphere and vice versa.
October surprise conspiracy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2774 words)
The October Surprise Conspiracy was an alleged plot that claimed representatives of the 1980 Ronald Reagan presidential campaign had conspired with Islamic Republic of Iran to delay the release of 66 Americans held hostage in Tehran until after the 1980 U.S. Presidential election.
Reporter Danny Casolaro claimed that the Inslaw affair was somehow connected to the October Surprise (he died in 1991).
The "October Surprise" Allegations and the Circumstances Surrounding the Release of the American Hostages Held in Iran.
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