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Encyclopedia > Octavio Paz
Octavio Paz

Born March 31, 1914(1914-03-31)
Mexico City, D.F., Mexico
Died April 19, 1998 (age 84)
Mexico City, D.F., Mexico
Occupation Writer, Poet, and Diplomat.
Nationality Mexican
Writing period 1931 - 1965
Literary movement Marxism, Surrealism, and Existentialism
Debut works Caballera (1931)
Influences Gerardo Diego, Juan Ramón Jiménez, Sor Juana de la Cruz, D.H. Lawrence, Nathaniel Hawthorne, William Butler Yeats, Alfonso Reyes, and Antonio Machado.
Influenced Guillermo Sheridan, Eric Whitacre, Carlos Fuentes, Eliot Weinberger, Ilan Stavans and Monique Fong Wust.

Octavio Paz Lozano (March 31, 1914April 19, 1998) was a Mexican writer, poet, and diplomat, and the winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Octavio_Paz. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the federal capital of and largest city in Mexico. ... DF or df may stand for: df (Unix), a Unix command to report disk space usage by filesystem Danish Peoples Party (Dansk Folkeparti) Direction finding, a technique used to locate a radio transmitter Distrito Federal, e. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the federal capital of and largest city in Mexico. ... DF or df may stand for: df (Unix), a Unix command to report disk space usage by filesystem Danish Peoples Party (Dansk Folkeparti) Direction finding, a technique used to locate a radio transmitter Distrito Federal, e. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... ... Marxism is both the theory and the political practice (that is, the praxis) derived from the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. ... Max Ernst. ... Existentialism is the philosophical movement positing that individual human beings create the meaning and essence of their lives as persons. ... Statue of Gerardo Diego in Santander Gerardo Diego (3 October 1896 – 8 July 1987) was a Spanish poet and member of the Generation of 27. ... Juan Ramón Jiménez (Moguer, Spain, 24 December 1881 – Santurce, Puerto Rico, 29 May 1958) was a Spanish poet. ... Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz de Asbaje y Ramírez Sor Juana (November 12, 1651 [or 1648, according to some biographers] – 17 April 1695), also known as Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz or, in full, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz de Asbaje y Ram... D. H. Lawrence David Herbert Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was one of the most important, certainly one of the most controversial, English writers of the 20th century, who wrote novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, and letters. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... William Butler Yeats, 1933. ... Alfonso Reyes El regiomontano universal was born in Monterrey, Mexico, in 1889, and died in Mexico City in 1959. ... // Antonio Machado y Ruiz (July 26, 1875 – February 22, 1939) was a Spanish poet and one of the leading figures of the Spanish literary movement known as the Generation of 98. ... Guillermo Sheridan, Mexican scholar and writer, was born in Mexico City in 1950. ... Image:Ew-bw-lowres. ... Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes Macías (born November 11, 1928) is a Mexican writer and one of the best-known living novelists and essayists in the Spanish-speaking world. ... Eliot Weinberger (b. ... Ilan Stavans Ilan Stavans (born Ilan Stavchansky on April 7, 1961, in Mexico City) is an American intellectual, essayist, lexicographer, cultural commentator, translator, short-story author, TV personality, teacher, and man of letters known for his insights into American, Hispanic, and Jewish cultures. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... This article is about negotiations. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ...

Contents

Early life and writings

Paz was born in 1914 in Mexico City to Andalusian Josefina Lozano and Octavio Paz Solórzano, a journalist and lawyer for Emiliano Zapata involved in agrarian reform following the revolution, activities which caused him to be largely absent from home. Paz was raised in the village of Mixcoac (now a part of Mexico City) by his mother, his aunt and by his paternal grandfather, Ireneo Paz, a liberal intellectual, novelist, publisher and former soldier supporter of President Porfirio Díaz. Because of his family's public support of Emiliano Zapata they were forced into exile after Zapata's assassination. They served their exile in the United States. Mexico City (in Spanish: Ciudad de México, México, D.F. or simply México) is the capital city of Mexico. ... Andalusian Referring to Andalusia A type of horse: see Andalusian horse This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Emiliano Zapata (disambiguation). ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... José de la Cruz Porfirio Díaz Mory (15 September 1830 – 2 July 1915), Mexican war volunteer and French intervention hero; later President. ...


Paz was introduced to literature early in his life through the influence of his grandfather's library, filled with classic Mexican and European literature. During the 1920s, he discovered the European poets Gerardo Diego, Juan Ramón Jiménez, and Antonio Machado, Spanish writers who had a great influence on his early writings. As a teenager in 1931, under the influence of D.H. Lawrence, Paz published his first poems, like Caballera. Two years later, at the age of 19, Octavio Paz published Luna Silvestre ("Wild Moon"), a collection of poems. In 1932, with some friends, he founded his first literary review, Barandal. By 1939, Paz considered himself first and foremost a poet. Statue of Gerardo Diego in Santander Gerardo Diego (3 October 1896 – 8 July 1987) was a Spanish poet and member of the Generation of 27. ... Juan Ramón Jiménez (Moguer, Spain, 24 December 1881 – Santurce, Puerto Rico, 29 May 1958) was a Spanish poet. ... // Antonio Machado y Ruiz (July 26, 1875 – February 22, 1939) was a Spanish poet and one of the leading figures of the Spanish literary movement known as the Generation of 98. ... D. H. Lawrence David Herbert Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was one of the most important, certainly one of the most controversial, English writers of the 20th century, who wrote novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, and letters. ...


In 1937, Paz abandoned his law studies and left for Yucatán to work at a school in Mérida for sons of peasants and workers. There, he began working on the first of his long ambitious poems, Entre la piedra y la flor ("Between the stone and the flower") (1941, revised in 1976), obviously influenced by T.S. Eliot, which describes the situation of the Mexican campesino (peasant) under the greedy landlords of the day.[1] Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 106 Government  - Governor Ivonne Ortega Pacheco PRI  - Federal Deputies PAN: 4 PRI: 1  - Federal Senators Hugo Laviada (PAN) Alfredo Rodríguez (PAN) Cleominio Zoreda (PRI) Area Ranked 20th  - State 38,402 km²  (14,827. ... Cathedral on the Plaza Mayor, the oldest in North America [1]. Mérida is the capital and largest city of the Mexican state of Yucatán. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot (September 26, 1888 - January 4, 1965), was a major Modernist Anglo-American poet, dramatist, and literary critic. ... Campesino may refer to A simple farmer is referred to as a campesino in Spanish. ...


In 1937, Paz was invited to the Second International Writers Congress in Defense of Culture in Spain during the country's Civil War, showing his solidarity with the Republican side and against fascism. Upon his return to Mexico, Paz co-founded a literary journal, Taller ("Workshop") in 1938, and wrote for the magazine until 1941. In 1938 he also met and married Elena Garro, now considered one of Mexico's finest writers. They had one daughter, Helena. They were divorced in 1959. In 1943 Paz received a Guggenheim fellowship and began studying at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and two years later he entered the Mexican diplomatic service, working in New York for a while. In 1945 he was sent to Paris, where he wrote El Laberinto de la Soledad ("The Labyrinth of Solitude"), a groundbreaking study of Mexican identity and thought. In 1952 he travelled to India for the first time and, in the same year, to Tokyo, as chargé d'affairs, and then to Geneva, in Switzerland. He returned to Mexico City in 1954, where he wrote his great poem Piedra de sol (Sunstone) in 1957 and Libertad bajo palabra (Liberty Under Oath), a compilation of his poetry up to that time. He was sent again to Paris in 1959, following the steps of his lover, the Italian painter Bona Tibertelli de Pisis. In 1962 he was named Mexico's ambassador to India. Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... Elena Garro (December 12, 1920 – August 22, 1998) was a Mexican writer. ... Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded annually by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The Labyrinth of Solitude (Spanish: El Laberinto de la soledad) is an essay, published in 1950, written by the Mexican author and poet, Octavio Paz. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Octavio Paz’s route was his own, not mine, but behind that route a path is traceable, and in that path I recognize an invaluable lesson: society and solitude — how to make these two compatible? His answer was to live life in full, alone and with others. To make oneself present by tracing one’s past and betting on the future.
Ilan Stavans[2]

Ilan Stavans Ilan Stavans (born Ilan Stavchansky on April 7, 1961, in Mexico City) is an American intellectual, essayist, lexicographer, cultural commentator, translator, short-story author, TV personality, teacher, and man of letters known for his insights into American, Hispanic, and Jewish cultures. ...

Later life

In India, Paz completed hundreds of works, including El mono gramático (The Monkey Grammarian) and Ladera este (Eastern Slope). In 1965 he broke up with Bona and married Marie-José Tramini, a French woman who would be his wife to the end of his days. In October 1968, he resigned from the diplomatic corps in protest of the Mexican government's repression of students who were fighting to achieve true democracy in the country, a movement that ended abruptly when the army opened fire against demonstrators in the Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Tlatelolco. He sought refuge in Paris for a while and returned to Mexico in 1969, where he founded his magazine Plural (1970-1976) with a group of liberal Mexican and Latin American writers. From 1970 to 1974 he lectured at Harvard University in Cambridge, where he held the Charles Norton Chair. His book Los hijos del limo ("Children of the Mire") was the result of those courses. After the government closed Plural in 1975, Paz founded Vuelta, a publication with a focus similar to that of Plural and continued editing that magazine until his death. He won the 1977 Jerusalem Prize for literature on the theme of individual freedom. In 1980 he was awarded an honorary doctorate from Harvard University and in 1982 he won the Neustadt Prize. A collection of his poems (written between 1957 and 1987) was published in 1988. In 1990, he was awarded the Nobel Prize."[3] A 1978 silkscreen poster by Rini Templeton and Malaquías Montoya created to commemorate the ten-year anniversary of the massacre. ... The Plaza de las Tres Culturas (Three Cultures Square) is the main square surrounded by the Tlatelolco neighbourhood of Mexico City. ... Tlaltelolco is an area in Mexico City, centered on the Plaza de las Tres Culturas, a square surrounded on three sides by an excavated Aztec pyramid, the 17th century church Templo de Santiago, and the modern office complex of the Mexican foreign ministry. ... The Jerusalem Prize for the Freedom of the Individual in Society is a biennial literary award given to writers whose work has dealt with themes of human freedom, society, politics, and government. ... Harvard redirects here. ... The Neustadt International Prize for Literature is a biennial award sponsored by the University of Oklahoma and World Literature Today. ...


He died of cancer in 1998. In his 2003 essay on Paz, Ilan Stavans wrote that he was “the quintessential surveyor, a Dante's Virgil, a Renaissance man”.[4] Guillermo Sheridan, who was named by Paz as director of the Octavio Paz Foundation in 1998, published a book, Poeta con Paisaje (2004) with several biographical essays about the poet's life until 1968. Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... Guillermo Sheridan, Mexican scholar and writer, was born in Mexico City in 1950. ...


Writings

A prolific author and poet, Paz published scores of works during his lifetime, many of which are translated into other languages. His poetry, for example, has been translated into English by Samuel Beckett, Charles Tomlinson, Elizabeth Bishop and Mark Strand. His early poetry was influenced by Marxism, surrealism, existentialism, as well as religions such as Buddhism and Hinduism. His poem, Piedra de Sol ("Sunstone") written in 1957, was praised as a "magnificent" example of surrealist poetry in the presentation speech of his Nobel Prize. His later poetry dealt with love and eroticism, the nature of time, and buddhism. He also wrote poetry about his other passion, modern painting, dedicating poems to the work of Balthus, Joan Miró, Marcel Duchamp, Antoni Tapies, Robert Rauschenberg, and Roberto Matta. Several of his poems have also been adapted into choral music by composer Eric Whitacre, including Water Night, Cloudburst, and A Boy and a Girl. Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... Alfred Charles Tomlinson, CBE (born January 8, 1927) is a major British poet and translator, and also an academic and artist. ... Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979), was an American poet and writer. ... Mark Strand (born April 11, 1934) is an American poet, born in Canada. ... Marxism is both the theory and the political practice (that is, the praxis) derived from the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. ... Max Ernst. ... Existentialism is the philosophical movement positing that individual human beings create the meaning and essence of their lives as persons. ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages)[1] is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Nude with arms raised, oil on canvas, 1951 by Balthus Balthazar Klossowski de Rola (February 29, 1908 in Paris – February 18, 2001) was an esteemed Polish/French modern artist whose work was ultimately anti-modern. ... Joan Miró i Ferrà (April 20, 1893 – December 25, 1983) was a Spanish (Catalan) painter, sculptor, and ceramist born in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain to the family of a Goldsmith and Watchmaker. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the... Antoni Tàpies (born in Barcelona, 1923) is a catalan spanish painter. ... Robert Rauschenberg, Canyon, 1959. ... Invasion of the Night, oil on canvas, 1940, SFMOMA. Roberto Sebastian Matta Echaurren (1911-2002), usually known as Matta, was one of Chiles best-known painters. ... Image:Ew-bw-lowres. ...


As an essayist Paz wrote on topics like Mexican politics and economics, Aztec art, anthropology, and sexuality. His book-length essay, The Labyrinth of Solitude (Spanish: El laberinto de la soledad), delves into the minds of his countrymen, describing them as hidden behind masks of solitude. Due to their history, their identity is lost between a precolombian and a Spanish culture, negating either. A key work in understanding Mexican culture, it greatly influenced other Mexican writers, such as Carlos Fuentes. Politics of Mexico takes place in a framework of a federal presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of Mexico is both head of state and head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... The economy of Mexico was the 14th largest in the world in 2006[1] with a gross domestic product (by PPP estimate) that surpassed a trillion dollars in 2004,[2] measured in purchasing power parity. ... Pre-Columbian art is the art of Central and South America in the time prior to the arrival of European colonizers in the 16th century. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... The Labyrinth of Solitude (Spanish: El Laberinto de la soledad) is an essay, published in 1950, written by the Mexican author and poet, Octavio Paz. ... Mexico is a country in North America and the largest Spanish-speaking country in the world. ... The culture of Mexico reflects the complexity of Mexicos history through the blending of pre-Hispanic Mesoamerican civilizations and the European culture, imported during Spains 300-year colonization of Mexico. ... Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes Macías (born November 11, 1928) is a Mexican writer and one of the best-known living novelists and essayists in the Spanish-speaking world. ...


After a tale by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paz wrote the play, La hija de Rappaccini (1956), a lyrical tale of love, death and the loss of innocence. The plot centers around a young Italian student who wonders about the beautiful gardens and even more beautiful daughter (Beatrice) of the mysterious Professor Rappaccini. He is horrified when he discovers the poisonous nature of their beauty. Paz adapted the play from the eponymous 1844 short story by Nathaniel Hawthorne, combining it with sources from the Indian poet [Vishakadatta]. Paz also cited influences from Japanese Noh theatre, the Spanish auto sacramental and the poetry of William Butler Yeats. Its opening performance was designed by the Mexican painter Andrea J. First performed in English in 1996 at the Gate Theatre in London, the play was translated and directed by Sebastian Doggart and starred Sarah Alexander as Beatrice. In 1972, Surrealist author André Pieyre de Mandiargues translated the play into French as La fille de Rappaccini (Editions Mercure de France). Mexican composer Daniel Catán turned the play into an opera in 1992. Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... William Butler Yeats, 1933. ... The Gate Theatre, in Dublin, was founded in 1928 by Hilton Edwards and Micheál MacLiammoir, initially using the Abbey Theatres Peacock studio theatre space to stage important works by European and American dramatists. ... Sebastian Doggart Sebastian Doggart (b. ... Sarah Alexander (born 3 January 1971) is an English actress, best known for her roles in various British comedy series. ... André Pieyre de Mandiargues (1909 - 1991) was a French writer. ...


Paz's other works translated into English include volumes of essays, some of the more prominent of which are: Alternating Current (tr. 1973), Configurations (tr. 1971), The Labyrinth of Solitude (tr. 1963), The Other Mexico (tr. 1972); and El Arco y la Lira (1956; tr. The Bow and the Lyre, 1973). Along with these are volumes of critical studies and biographies, including Claude Lévi-Strauss and Marcel Duchamp (both, tr. 1970) and The Traps of Faith, an analytical biography of the Mexican 16th century nun, poet and thinker Sor Juana de la Cruz. The Labyrinth of Solitude (Spanish: El Laberinto de la soledad) is an essay, published in 1950, written by the Mexican author and poet, Octavio Paz. ... This article is about the anthropologist. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the... Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz de Asbaje y Ramírez Sor Juana (November 12, 1651 [or 1648, according to some biographers] – 17 April 1695), also known as Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz or, in full, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz de Asbaje y Ram...


His works include the poetry collections La Estación Violenta, (1956), Piedra de Sol (1957), and in English translation the most prominent include two volumes which include most of Paz in English: Early Poems: 1935–1955 (tr. 1974), and Collected Poems, 1957–1987 (1987). Many of these volumes have been edited and translated by Eliot Weinberger, who is Paz's principal translator into American English. // City Lights Books publishes Howl and Other Poems by Allen Ginsburg Aniara - Harry Martinson National Book Award for Poetry: W.H. Auden, The Shield of Achilles Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Elizabeth Bishop: Poems - North & South Queens Gold Medal for Poetry: Edmund Blunden date unknown - Amy Gerstler, poet June 22... // Howl obscenity trial in San Francisco brings significant attention to beat poetry, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Allen Ginsberg Donald Hall, Robert Pack and Louis Simpson, New Poets of England and America, anthology (Meridian Books) Harry Ammos, Churchill and Other Poems Dick Diespecker, Windows West Joan Finnegan, through The Glass, Darkly Northrop... // The Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics is founded by Allen Ginsberg and Anne Waldman. ... // Charles Bukowski, fictionalised as alter ego Henry Chinaski, becomes the subject of the film Barfly starring Mickey Rourke. ... Eliot Weinberger (b. ...


Disillusioned with communism

Originally Paz showed his solidarity with the Republicans during the Spanish Civil War, but after learning of the murder of one of his comrades by the Republicans themselves he became gradually disillusioned. While in Paris in the early fifties, influenced by David Rousset, André Breton and Albert Camus, he started publishing his critical views on totalitarianism in general, and against Stalin in particular. André Breton André Breton (French IPA: ) (February 19, 1896 – September 28, 1966) was a French writer, poet, and surrealist theorist, and is best known as the main founder of surrealism. ... For other uses, see Camus. ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314...


Later, in both Plural and Vuelta, Paz exposed the violations of human rights in the Stalinist regimes. This brought him much animosity from the Latin American left and some university students. In the Prologue of the IX volume of his completed works, Paz stated that from the time when he abandoned communist dogma, the mistrust of many in the Mexican intelligentsia started to transform into an intense and open enmity; he did not suspect that the vituperation would follow him for decades. Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... For architecture, see Stalinist architecture. ... The notion of an intellectual elite as a distinguished social stratum can be traced far back in history. ...

There can be no society without poetry, but society can never be realized as poetry, it is never poetic. Sometimes the two terms seek to break apart. They cannot.
Octavio Paz[5]

In 1990, during the aftermath of the fall of the Berlin wall, Paz and his Vuelta colleagues invited several of the world’s writers and intellectuals to Mexico City to discuss the collapse of communism, including Czeslaw Milosz, Hugh Thomas, Daniel Bell, Agnes Heller, Cornelius Castoriadis, Hugh Trevor-Roper, Jean-Francois Revel, Michael Ignatieff, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Edwards and Carlos Franqui. The Vuelta encounter was broadcast on Mexican television from 27 August to 2 September. Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Berlin Wall on November 16, 1989 The Berlin Wall (German: Berliner Mauer) was a long barrier separating West Berlin from East Berlin and the surrounding territory of East Germany. ... Czesław Miłosz in September 1999 Czesław Miłosz (pronounced [ʧεsȗav miȗɔʃ]; June 30, 1911–August 14, 2004) was a Polish poet and essayist. ... Hugh Thomas, Baron Thomas of Swynnerton (born October 21, 1931 in Windsor), is a British historian. ... Daniel Bell Daniel Bell (born 10 May 1919) is a sociologist and professor emeritus at Harvard University. ... ... Cornelius Castoriadis (Greek: Κορνήλιος Καστοριάδης) (March 11, 1922-December 26, 1997) was a Greek-French philosopher, economist and psychoanalyst. ... Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton (January 15, 1914 – January 26, 2003) was a notable historian of Early Modern Britain and Nazi Germany. ... Jean-Francois Revel (born January 19, 1924 in Marseille, France) is a French politician, journalist, author, philosopher and member of the Academie Francaise. ... Michael Grant Ignatieff, M.P., Ph. ... Mario Vargas Llosa in his youth. ... Jorge Edwards is a Chilean novelist winner of the 1999 Cervantes Prize. ... Carlos Franqui (born 1921) is a Cuban writer, poet, journalist, art critic, and political activist. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The animosity of some Mexican leftists to Paz’s political views persisted until his death, and beyond.


References

  1. ^ Frulle, Ultr4k1cke (1999). Hj4lmar. 
  2. ^ Stavans, Ilan (2003, p. 83). Octavio Paz: A Meditation, University of Arizona Press. 
  3. ^ http://nobelprize.org/literature/laureates/1990
  4. ^ Stavans, Ilan (2003, p. 3). Octavio Paz: A Meditation, University of Arizona Press. 
  5. ^ Paz, Octavio. "Signs in Rotation" (1967), The Bow and the Lyre, trans. Ruth L.C. Simms (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1973), p. 249. 




Further reading

English

  • The writing in the stars : a jungian reading of the poetry of Octavio Paz / Rodney Williamson., 2007
  • Octavio Paz / Nick Caistor., 2006
  • The philosophy of yoga in Octavio Paz's poem Blanco / Richard J Callan., 2005
  • Shipwreck and deliverance : politics, culture and modernity in the works of Octavio Paz / Todd Lutes., 2003
  • Poetry criticism (Gale Group): volume 48 / David Galens., 2003
  • Octavio Paz (Modern Critical Views) / Bloom, Harold., 2002
  • Octavio Paz: a meditation / Stavans, Ilan., 2001
  • Tribute to Octavio Paz / Mexican Cultural Institute of New York., 2001
  • From art to politics: Octavio Paz and the pursuit of freedom / Grenier, Yvon., 2001
  • Understanding Octavio Paz / Quiroga, Jose., 1999
  • The critical poem: Borges, Paz, and other language-centered poets in Latin America / Running, Thorpe., 1996
  • Octavio Paz and the language of poetry: a psycholinguistic approach / Underwood, Leticia Iliana., 1992
  • Orientalism in the Hispanic literary tradition: in dialogue with Borges, Paz, and Sarduy / Kushigian, Julia., 1991
  • Octavio Paz, the mythic dimension / Chiles, Frances., 1987
  • Toward Octavio Paz: a reading of his major poems, 1957-1976 / Fein, John M., 1986
  • Octavio Paz (Twayne's World Authors Series) / Wilson, Jason., 1986
  • Two essays on Latin American political myths : Octavio Paz and Che Guevara / James Wallace Wilkie., 1981
  • Octavio Paz, homage to the poet / Chantikian, Kosrof., 1980
  • Octavio Paz, a study of his poetics / Wilson, Jason., 1979
  • Aspects of surrealism in the work of Octavio Paz / José Gabriel Sánchez., 1976
  • Octavio Paz: critic of modern Mexican poetry / Phillips, Allen Whitmarsh., 1973
  • The universalism of Octavio Paz / Gullón, Ricardo., 1973
  • Octavio Paz : or the revolution in search of an actor / George Gordon Wing., 1973
  • The perpetual present; the poetry and prose of Octavio Paz / Ivar Ivask., 1973
  • The poetic modes of Octavio Paz / Rachel Phillips., 1972
  • Mexico as theme, image, and contribution to myth in the poetry of Octavio Paz / Judith Ann Bernard., 1964
  • Octavio Paz poetry, politics, and the myth of the Mexican / George Gordon Wing., 1961

Spanish

  • Octavio Paz en los debates críticos y estéticos del siglo XX / Clara Román-Odio., 2006
  • Octavio Paz : la dimensión estética del ensayo / Enrico Mario Santí., 2004
  • Espiral de luz : tiempo y amor en Piedra de sol de Octavio Paz / Dante Salgado., 2003
  • Octavio Paz y la poética de la historia mexicana / D A Brading., 2002
  • Camino de ecos : introducción a las ideas políticas de Octavio Paz / Dante Salgado., 2002
  • Octavio Paz: una visión de la poesía de occidente : hermenéutica y horizonte simbólico / Marta Santibáñez., 2002
  • Las primeras voces del poeta Octavio Paz, 1931-1938 / Anthony Stanton., 2001
  • Homenaje a Octavio Paz. / Mexican Cultural Institute., 2001
  • El árbol milenario : un recorrido por la obra de Octavio Paz / Manuel Ulacia., 1999
  • Autor, autoridad y autorización : escritura y poética de Octavio Paz / Rubén Medina., 1999
  • Tránsito poético e intelectual de Octavio Paz / Abelardo M García Viera., 1999
  • Dos grandes latinoamericanos / Karla I Herrera., 1999
  • El acto de las palabras : estudios y diálogos con Octavio Paz / Enrico Mario Santí., 1997
  • Volver al ser : un acercamiento a la poética de Octavio Paz / Mario Pinho., 1997
  • Octavio Paz : viajero del presente / Roberto Hozven., 1994
  • Octavio Paz en sus "Obras completas" / Adolfo Castañón., 1994
  • Festejo : 80 años de Octavio Paz / Adolfo Castañón., 1994
  • Octavio Paz : poética e identidad / Fidel Sepúlveda Llanos., 1993
  • Octavio Paz : el espejo roto / Roland Forgues., 1992
  • Octavio Paz : poética del hombre / Rafael Jiménez Cataño., 1992
  • Octavio Paz : trayectorias y visiones / Maya Schärer-Nussberger., 1989
  • El elemento oriental en la poesía de Octavio Paz / Jung Kim Kwon Tae., 1989
  • El cuerpo y la letra : la cosmologia poetica de Octavio Paz / Javier Gonzalez., 1988
  • Polaridad-unidad, caminos hacia Octavio Paz / Margarita Murillo González., 1987
  • La cabeza rota : la poética de Octavio Paz / Jorge Arturo Ojeda., 1983
  • Octavio Paz / Pere Gimferrer., 1982
  • Lecturas de Octavio Paz / Pere Gimferrer., 1980
  • Variables poéticas de Octavio Paz / Diego Martínez Torrón., 1979
  • Octavio Paz / Alfredo A Roggiano., 1979
  • Reinvención de la palabra : la obra poética de Octavio Paz / Eusebio Rojas Guzmán., 1979
  • La poesía hermética de Octavio Paz / Carlos Horacio Magis., 1978
  • Poesía y conocimiento : Borges, Lezama Lima, Octavio Paz / Ramón Xirau., 1978
  • La divina pareja: historia y mito: valoración e interpretación de la obra ensayística de Octavio Paz / Jorge Mora., 1978
  • Octavio Paz, poesía y poética / Monique J Lemaître., 1976
  • Las estaciones poéticas de Octavio Paz / Rachel Phillips., 1976
  • Homenaje a Octavio Paz / Juan Valencia., 1976
  • Octavio Paz / Jorge Rodríguez Padrón., 1975
  • Aproximaciones a Octavio Paz: un simposio / Angel Flores., 1974
  • Acerca de Octavio Paz / Guillermo Sucre., 1974

Awards

  • Nobel Prize for Literature
  • Cervantes Prize
  • National Literature Prize (Mexico)
  • Premio Mondello (Palermo, Italy)
  • Alfonso Reyes Prize
  • Neustadt International Prize for Literature
  • Jerusalem Prize
  • Menendez y Pelayo Prize
  • Alexis de Tocqueville Prize
  • Xavier Villaurrutia Award
  • Doctor Honoris Causa (Harvard)
  • Doctor Honoris Causa (National Autonomous University of Mexico)

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Octavio Paz
  • Interview with Mario Vargas Llosa in Vuelta Magazine by Jaime Perales Contreras
  • Toward a Philosophy of The Present an article about Paz by Yvon Grenier
  • Polemical Paz by Maarten Van Delden
  • Nobel museum biography and list of works
  • Octavio Paz's complete poems and essays from Vuelta magazine and literary criticism on his work (Spanish)
  • Vuelta magazine online (Spanish)
  • Pegasos biography
  • Nobel lecture (English)
  • "Day of the Dead," from The Labyrinth of Solitude. A translation of the first 1/3 of Chapter 3 from Octavio Paz's most famous work.
  • Octavio Paz: 'La verdad contra el compromiso' (Spanish)
  • Octavio Paz's Vuelta and Partisan Reviewessay by Jaime Perales Contreras, published in Estudios, 1994.
  • Theodor W. Adorno and Octavio Paz: Two Visions of Modernity essay by Oliver Kozlarek, published in Culture, Theory & Critique, 2006, 47(1), 39–52

  Results from FactBites:
 
Marie Jose Paz, Octavio Paz - Figuren und Variationen (300 words)
Octavio Paz, Dichter und Essayist, wurde 1914 in Mexiko-Stadt geboren, wo er 1998 starb.
Octavio Paz habe sich von diesen Objekten angesprochen gefühlt und mit Gedichten geantwortet.
Und ganz zuletzt habe Octavio Paz den Wunsch geäußert, sie in einem Buch zu veröffentlichen.
Octavio Paz - MSN Encarta (759 words)
Paz’s poetry captures the nuances of human experience both in the passing moment—“in which the whole being is sculptured and destroyed”—and in the continuity of cyclical and mythic time.
Paz was Mexico’s ambassador to India from 1962 until 1968, when he resigned to protest the Mexican government’s massacre of student demonstrators at the Plaza of Three Cultures in Mexico City.
Paz’s view of the relationship between modern society, art, and literature is most fully developed in the essays Corriente alterna (1967; Alternating Current, 1973) and Los hijos del limo (1974; Children of the Mire, 1974).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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