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Encyclopedia > Occupied Territories
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Occupied territory is territory — another's sovereign territory — that has been conquered by war, or invaded. It is distinguished from a colony where there is no war, conquest (meaning military), or sovereignty of the territory. Image File history File links Stop_hand. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Belligerent military occupation occurs when one nations military occupies all or part of the territory of another nation or recognized belligerent. ... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... The Golan Heights plateau overlooking the site of the ancient city of Hippos The Israeli-occupied territories is one of a number of terms used to describe areas captured by Israel from Egypt, Jordan, and Syria during the Six-Day War of 1967. ... Look up Sovereign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The adjective sovereign is used to refer to a state of sovereignty. ... Conquer Online is a F2P Chinese fantasy-themed MMORPG (Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game) for Windows PCs, developed by TQ Digital. ... A war is a violent conflict between two or more groups that involve large numbers of individuals. ... Invasion is a military action consisting of troops entering a foreign land (a nation or territory, or part of that), often resulting in the invading power occupying the area, whether briefly or for a long period. ... This article is about a political topic. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme political (e. ...


In most cases the period of occupation is temporary, pending the signing of a peace treaty, the resolution of specific conditions outlined in a peace treaty, or the formation of a new government. Examples of occupied territories include Germany and Japan after World War II; Golan Heights by Israel after the Six-day War in 1967; Egypt's Sinai Peninsula by Israel (from 1973-1979); Cambodia by Vietnam from 1979 until 1989; and Iraq after the 2003 invasion by the United States and allied forces removed the government of Saddam Hussein from power. Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom France Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Charles de Gaulle Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian... Sites on the Golan in blue are Israeli settlement communities. ... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 For other uses of the word Sinai, please see: Sinai (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (Arabic: ‎ [1]; April 28, 1937[2] – December 30, 2006[3]), was the President of Iraq from July 16, 1979 until April 9, 2003. ...


The West Bank (current), and the Gaza Strip (until 2005), are called occupied territories by those advocating the strongest Palestinian position. However, neither territory is deemed sovereign. These lands were allegedly liberated from Turkey in World War I, at the end of which the League of Nations was formed. And the League of Nations had granted Great Britain a mandate over this land, which was then a part of Mandatory Palestine. Accordingly, Great Britain was not an occupying power in relation to this land. It was an occupier when the land belonged to the Ottoman Empire during the Great War. The British subsequently relinquished their mandate and these territories were occupied, as a consequence of war, by Egypt and Jordan. In the 1967 War Israel liberated this land from its late conquerors. The Balfour Declaration had been adopted by the League of Nations, and the United Nations is deemed a successor organization to the League. Accordingly, the terms of this Declaration are deemed International Law. Consequently, Israel has the legal right to claim this land as its own - under International Law. However, the State of Israel has decided that it is not in its best national interests to assert its sovereignty over these two pieces of land. A major reason for this is the existence of a large Arab population, and relatively small Jewish population in settlements. And because Israel has decided to grant the indigenous population sovereignty in relation to these territories, the question remaining only of when and how, Israel calls these two lands disputed territories. The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Look up Sovereign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The adjective sovereign is used to refer to a state of sovereignty. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. ... Mandate can mean: An obligation handed down by an inter-governmental body; see mandate (international law) The power granted by an electorate; see mandate (politics) A League of Nations mandate To some Christians, an order from God; see mandate (theology) The decision of an appeals court; see mandate (law) The... Mandatory Access Control (MAC) It means that Access control policy decisions are made beyond the control of the individual owner of an object. ... The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi Lotter... Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Belligerent military occupation, occurs when one nations military garrisons occupy all or part of a foreign nation during an invasion (during or after a war). ... A war is a violent conflict between two or more groups that involve large numbers of individuals. ... The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... Liberation means to be freed (or change from a state of lacking freedom to having freedom), see freedom. ... The name Balfour Declaration is applied to two key British government policy statements associated with Conservative statesman and former Prime Minister Arthur Balfour. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. ... The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate cooperation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... A successor function is the label in the literature for what is actually an operation. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. ... The name Balfour Declaration is applied to two key British government policy statements associated with Conservative statesman and former Prime Minister Arthur Balfour. ... International law (also called public international law to distinguish from private international law, i. ... International law (also called public international law to distinguish from private international law, i. ... The national interest, often referred to by the French term raison détat, is a countrys goals and ambitions whether economic, military, or cultural. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme political (e. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Map of Israeli settlements (magenta) in the West Bank. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme political (e. ... A territorial dispute is a disagreement over the possession/control of land between two or more states, or over the possession/control of land by one state after it has conquered it from a former state no longer currently recognized by the occupying power. ...

Contents

History and definitions

Most nations in the world are in some way an occupier of a previous inhabitant's land. [citation needed] Generally, any disputed territory can be seen as occupied by the party that lacks control over it at that moment. Thus, the Germanic tribes displaced the Celtic population of Europe; Egypt was conquered and absorbed in the 7th century by Arabs who were not its original population. This is particularly true of the region between Egypt and Turkey where repeated population movements and military conquests have occurred during the past several thousand years. World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب ) are an ethnic group found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ...


Regarding Palestine and Israel, the proper use of this expression is often controversial and hotly disputed; see Occupation of Palestine. The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi Lotter... The occupation of Palestine is a hotly disputed issue in the ongoing Arab-Israeli conflict. ...


Additionally, occupation has two distinct meanings:

  1. The state of being lived in (as in: "Isle of Man is occupied by the Manx", or this house is occupied by the Smith family);
  2. The state of military control following conquest by war.

Although (1) and (2) are obviously distinct, they are sometimes intermingled. Under (1), the territory in question is under normal civilian law; under (2) the territory is usually under military law within the terms of the Laws of war, such as the Fourth Geneva Convention. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The two parts of the laws of war (or Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC)): Law concerning acceptable practices while engaged in war, like the Geneva Conventions, is called jus in bello; while law concerning allowable justifications for armed force is called jus ad bellum. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Fourth Geneva Convention The Fourth Geneva Convention (GCIV) relates to the protection of civilians during times of war in the hands of an enemy and under any occupation by a foreign power. ...


Occupied territories since 1907

For a list of occupied territories since the Hague Convention of 1907 Laws and Customs of War on Land (Hague IV); October 18, 1907 first clarified and supplemented the customary laws of belligerent military occupation see the list of military occupations and the list of territorial disputes. The Hague Conventions were international treaties negotiated at the First and Second Peace Conferences at The Hague, Netherlands in 1899 and 1907, respectively, and were, along with the Geneva Conventions, among the first formal statements of the laws of war and war crimes in the nascent body of international law. ... In times of war, territory belonging to one country will often be placed under the martial law of a hostile army. ... This is a list of extant territorial disputes around the world. ...


Dispute over classification of the West Bank the Gaza Strip after 1967

After the Six-day War in 1967, Israeli troops occupied the Gaza Strip, the West Bank, and the Golan Heights. However, the status of these territories has been the subject of dispute. Most of the world considered them occupied territories, but there is a counterposed view. Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ...


Paul S. Riebenfeld, an international lawyer, who represented Jewish interests at the League of Nations, argued that the West Bank and the Gaza Strip do not belong to any other sovereign state, are part of former Mandate Palestine, and therefore fall legitimately within Israel's jurisdiction. They were "occupied territories" before 1967; and the "occupying powers" had been Egypt and Jordan. Specifically, Egypt's borders had been determined by the international community even before World War I without the Gaza Strip. Jordan had been part of Mandate Palestine; but the British, under the Mandate provisions of the League of Nations had granted His Britannic Majesty, inter alia, the power to divide Palestine. And this was done. First, the region in question was divided, for administrative purposes, into Transjordan (across the Jordan River) and Cisjordan (near side of the Jordan River). Next, His Britannic Majesty, under its Mandatory powers, granted Transjordan independence, in 1947; shortly thereafter, the country changed its name to "Jordan." But the "West Bank" was clearly not on the east side of the Jordan river; although this land was conquerred in the 1948 war with Israel, only two countries recognized Jordan's subsequent annexation of the West Bank. Paul S. Riebenfeld was a political scientist and international jurist and layer. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. ... The British Mandate of Palestine was a swathe of territory in the Middle East, formerly belonging to the Ottoman Empire, which the League of Nations entrusted to the United Kingdom to administer in the aftermath of World War I as a Mandate Territory. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The British Mandate of Palestine was a swathe of territory in the Middle East, formerly belonging to the Ottoman Empire, which the League of Nations entrusted to the United Kingdom to administer in the aftermath of World War I as a Mandate Territory. ... In international law, a mandate is a binding obligation issued from an inter-governmental organization like the United Nations to a country which is bound to follow the instructions of the organization. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. ... His Britannic Majesty, or Her Britannic Majesty, depending on the gender of the monarch, was and remains a formal, or official, term for some time, for the sovereign power of Great Britain in diplomacy, the law of nations, and international relations. ... The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi Lotter... Map of the territory of the British Mandate of Palestine The Emirate of Transjordan was an autonomous political division of the British Mandate of Palestine, created as an administrative entity in April 1921 before the Mandate came into effect. ... Cisjordan is a region in the Middle East. ... His Britannic Majesty, or Her Britannic Majesty, depending on the gender of the monarch, was and remains a formal, or official, term for some time, for the sovereign power of Great Britain in diplomacy, the law of nations, and international relations. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Annexation (Latin ad, to, and nexus, joining) is the legal incorporation of some territory into another geo-political entity (either adjacent or non-contiguous). ...


Reference

Israel's Legitimacy in Law and History, Proceedings of the Conference on International Law and the Arab-Israeli Conflict
Sponsored by The Lois D. Brandeis Society of Zionist Lawyers, October 21, 1990, New York
ed. Edward M. Siegel, Esq.
assoc. ed. Olga Barrekette
(New York: Center for Near East Policy Research, 1993)
ISBN 0-9640145-0-5


  Results from FactBites:
 
Israeli-occupied territories - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1486 words)
The territories are often collectively refered to as simply "the Occupied Territories," although this term is also sometimes loosely used to refer to the Palestinian territories of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, over which Israel and the Palestinian Authority have sporadically negotiated.
The Sinai Peninsula is a sparsely populated territory between the Suez Canal and the Gulf of Aqaba.
Both of these territories were part of former British Mandate of Palestine, and both have populations consisting primarily of Arab Palestinians, including historic residents of the territories and refugees who lost their homes in the territory that became Israel after the 1948 Arab-Israeli War.
israelinsider: Views: The Disputed Territories are not Occupied (1728 words)
The disputed territories are not "occupied territories", as claimed by the Arab, Islamist perpetual political propaganda.
The territories of Gaza, Judea and Samaria (wrongfully called the "West Bank") are orphaned portions of the Palestine Mandate that, since 1948, have never been allocated to a sovereign nation (on that note, there has never ever been a sovereign Arab nation-state of Palestine) or assigned fixed boundaries.
Arguing that these disputed territories are "occupied", or that the so-called "settlements" are illegal, is largely part of a perpetual political propaganda campaign launched by the Arab League, a la the Nazi technique that if you repeat a lie often enough, eventually people will believe it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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