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Encyclopedia > Occultation
In this July, 1997 still frame captured from video, the bright star Aldebaran has just reappeared on the dark limb of the waning crescent moon in this predawn occultation.
In this July, 1997 still frame captured from video, the bright star Aldebaran has just reappeared on the dark limb of the waning crescent moon in this predawn occultation.

An occultation is an event that occurs when one object is hidden by another object that passes between it and the observer. The word is used in astronomy (see below) and can also be used in a general (non-astronomical) sense to describe when an object in the foreground occults (covers up) objects in the background. In the general sense, occulation applies to the visual scene from low-flying aircraft and in Computer-Generated Image (CGI) technology, where foreground objects obscure distant ones in a dynamic way as the scene changes. Occultation of Aldebaran File links The following pages link to this file: Occultation ... Occultation of Aldebaran File links The following pages link to this file: Occultation ... A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant Astronomy (also frequently referred to as astrophysics) is the scientific study of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere (such as the cosmic background radiation). ... The word occult comes from the Latin occultus (clandestine, hidden, secret), referring to knowledge of the hidden.[1] In the medical sense it is used commonly to refer to a structure or process that is hidden, e. ... CGI may mean: Computer-generated imagery, a film-making technology Common Gateway Interface, a technology used in web servers CGI.pm, a Perl module used for dealing with it CGI Group, a Canadian headquartered information management company (formerly ) Computer graphics interface, a low-level interface between the Graphical Kernel System...


Astronomical events. These include transits and eclipses. The word transit refers to cases where the nearer object appears smaller in apparent size than the more distant object, such as transit of Mercury or Venus across the Sun's disk. The word eclipse generally refers to those instances in which one object moves into the shadow of another. Each of these three events is the visible effect of a syzygy. 2003 Transit of Mercury The term transit or astronomical transit has two meanings in astronomy: A transit is the astronomical event that occurs when one celestial body appears to move across the face of another celestial body, as seen by an observer at some particular vantage point. ... “Total eclipse” redirects here. ... 2003 Transit of Mercury The term transit or astronomical transit has two meanings in astronomy: A transit is the astronomical event that occurs when one celestial body appears to move across the face of another celestial body, as seen by an observer at some particular vantage point. ... This article is about the planet. ... (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... “Sol” redirects here. ... “Total eclipse” redirects here. ... Look up Syzygy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Every time an occultation occurs, an eclipse also occurs. Consider a so-called "eclipse" of the Sun by the Moon, as seen from Earth. In this event, the Moon physically moves between Earth and the Sun, thus blocking out a portion or all of the bright disk of the Sun. Although this phenomenon is usually referred to as an "eclipse", this term is a misnomer, because the Moon is not eclipsing the Sun; instead the Moon is occulting the Sun. When the Moon occults the Sun, it casts a small shadow on the surface of the Earth, and therefore the Moon's shadow is partially eclipsing Earth. So a so-called "solar eclipse" actually consists of (i) an occultation of the Sun by the Moon, as seen from Earth, and (ii) a partial eclipse of Earth by the Moon's shadow. “Total eclipse” redirects here. ... “Total eclipse” redirects here. ...


By contrast, an "eclipse" of the Moon is in fact a true eclipse: the Moon moves into the shadow cast back into space by Earth, and is said to be eclipsed by Earth's shadow. As seen from the surface of the Moon, Earth passes directly between the Moon and the Sun, thus blocking or occulting the Sun as seen by a hypothetical lunar observer. Again, every eclipse also entails an occultation.

Contents

Occultations by the Moon

The term occultation is most frequently used to describe those relatively frequent occasions when the Moon passes in front of a star during the course of its orbital motion around the Earth. Since the Moon has no atmosphere and stars have no appreciable angular size, a star that is occulted by the moon will disappear or reappear very nearly instantaneously on the moon's edge, or limb. Events that take place on the Moon's dark limb are of particular interest to observers, because the lack of glare allows these occultations to more easily be observed and timed. Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ...


The Moon's orbit is inclined to the ecliptic (see orbit of the Moon), and any stars with an ecliptic latitude of less than about 6.5 degrees may be occulted by it. There are three first magnitude stars that are sufficiently close to the ecliptic that they may be occulted by the Moon and by planets -- Regulus, Spica and Antares. Occultations of Aldebaran are presently only possible by the Moon, because the planets pass Aldebaran to the north. Neither planetary nor lunar occultations of Pollux are currently possible. However, in the far future, occultations of Aldebaran and Pollux will be possible, as they were in the far past. The plane of the ecliptic is well seen in this picture from the 1994 lunar prospecting Clementine spacecraft. ... The orbit of the Moon around the Earth is completed in approximately 27. ... Regulus (α Leo / α Leonis / Alpha Leonis) is the brightest star in the constellation Leo and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ... Spica (α Vir / α Virginis / Alpha Virginis) is the brightest star in the constellation Virgo, and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Aldebaran from the Arabic (الدبران al-dabarān) meaning the follower, (α Tau / α Tauri / Alpha Tauri) is the brightest star in the constellation Taurus and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ... Pollux (β Gem / β Geminorum / Beta Geminorum) is one of the brightest star in the constellation Gemini and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ...

Jupiter (the bright object in the upper right) a few minutes before being occulted by the Moon on June 7, 2005
Jupiter (the bright object in the upper right) a few minutes before being occulted by the Moon on June 7, 2005

Within a mile or two of the edge of an occultation's predicted path, referred to as its northern or southern limit, an observer may see the star intermittently disappearing and reappearing as the irregular limb of the Moon moves past the star, creating what is known as a Grazing lunar occultation. From an observational and scientific standpoint, these "grazes" are the most dynamic and interesting of lunar occultations. Image File history File links Photo of Jupiter being occulted by the moon, taken on 6/7/2005 at about 6:10 PM in Nelson New Zealand (NZ Time) Taken with cheap digital camera through binoculars. ... Image File history File links Photo of Jupiter being occulted by the moon, taken on 6/7/2005 at about 6:10 PM in Nelson New Zealand (NZ Time) Taken with cheap digital camera through binoculars. ... A lunar occultation occurs when the Moon, moving along its orbital path, passes in front of a star or other celestial object, as seen by an observer (normally on the Earth). ...


The accurate timing of lunar occultations is performed regularly by (primarily amateur) astronomers. Lunar occultations timed to an accuracy of a few tenths of a second have various scientific uses, particularly in refining our knowledge of lunar topography. Photoelectric analysis of lunar occultations have also discovered some stars to be very close visual or spectroscopic binaries. Early radio astronomers found occultations of radio sources by the Moon valuable for determining their exact positions, because the long wavelength of radio waves limited the resolution available through direct observation. Artists impression of a binary system consisting of a black hole, with an accretion disc around it, and a main sequence star. ...


Several times during the year, someone on Earth can usually observe the Moon occulting a planet. Since planets, unlike stars, have significant angular sizes, lunar occultations of planets will create a narrow zone on earth from which a partial occultation of the planet will occur. An observer located within that narrow zone could observe the planet's disk partly blocked by the slowly moving moon.


On the 20th of January 2007, an occultation of Venus by the Moon was seen on the southern tip of Africa.


On 3rd of February 2007, an occultation of Saturn by the Moon was seen.


Occultation by planets

Stars may also be occulted by planets. In 1959, Venus occulted Regulus. Uranus' rings were first discovered when that planet occulted a star in 1977. On the evening of July 2-July 3, 1989, Saturn passed in front of the 5th magnitude star 28 Sagitarii. Pluto, which was re-designated as a "dwarf planet" in 2006, occulted stars in 1988, 2002, and 2006, allowing its tenuous atmosphere to be studied. (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... Regulus (α Leo / α Leonis / Alpha Leonis) is the brightest star in the constellation Leo and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 120 kPa Hydrogen 83% Helium 15% Methane 1. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 140 kPa Hydrogen >93% Helium >5% Methane 0. ...


It is also possible for one planet to occult another planet. However, these mutual occultations of planets are extremely rare. The last such event occurred on January 3, 1818 and will next occur on November 22, 2065, in both cases involving the same two planets -- Venus and Jupiter. Technically speaking, when the foreground planet is smaller in apparent size than the background planet, the event should be called a "mutual planetary transit." When the foreground planet is larger in apparent size than the background planet, the event should be called a "mutual planetary occultation." (See Transit for a list of past and future events). January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2065) Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 2010s 2020s 2030s 2040s 2050s - 2060s - 2070s 2080s 2090s Years: 2060 2061 2062 2063 2064 2065 2066 2067 2068 2069 The Decade as a Whole This decade is expected to be called... 2003 Transit of Mercury The term transit or astronomical transit has two meanings in astronomy: A transit is the astronomical event that occurs when one celestial body appears to move across the face of another celestial body, as seen by an observer at some particular vantage point. ...

A grazing occultation of Rhea, a moon of Saturn, by another moon, Dione
A grazing occultation of Rhea, a moon of Saturn, by another moon, Dione

Twice during the orbital cycles of Jupiter and Saturn, the equatorial (and satellite) planes of those planets are aligned with earth's orbital plane, resulting in a series of mutual occultations and eclipses between the moons of these giant planets. These orbital alignments have also occurred artificially when unmanned spacecraft have traversed these planetary systems, resulting in photographs such as the one shown here. The terms "eclipse," "occultation" and "transit" are also used to describe these events. A satellite of Jupiter (for example) may be eclipsed (i.e. made dimmer because it moves into Jupiter's shadow), occulted (i.e. hidden from view because Jupiter lies on our line of sight), or may transit (i.e. pass in front of) Jupiter's disk. Occulation of Rhea by Dione as seen from Cassini File links The following pages link to this file: Occultation User:Riffsyphon1024 Categories: NASA images ... Occulation of Rhea by Dione as seen from Cassini File links The following pages link to this file: Occultation User:Riffsyphon1024 Categories: NASA images ... Atmosphere none Rhea (ree-a, Greek ‘Ρέα) is the second largest moon of Saturn and was discovered in 1672 by Giovanni Domenico Cassini. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 140 kPa Hydrogen >93% Helium >5% Methane 0. ... Atmosphere none Dione (dye-oe-nee, Greek Διώνη) is a moon of Saturn discovered by Giovanni Cassini in 1684. ...


Double occultations

It is possible, that the moon or another celestial body can occult multiple celestial bodies at the same time. Such events are extremely rare and can be seen only from a small part of the world. The last event of such type was on April 23rd, 1998 when the moon occulted Venus und Jupiter simultaneosly for observers on Ascension Island.


Occulting satellites

The Big Occulting Steerable Satellite (BOSS) was a proposed satellite that would work in conjunction with a telescope to detect planets around distant stars. The satellite consists of a large, very lightweight sheet, and a set of maneuvering thrusters and navigation systems. It would maneuver to a position along the line of sight between the telescope and a nearby star. The satellite would thereby block the radiation from the star, permitting the orbiting planets to be observed.[1] An Earth observation satellite, ERS 2 For other uses, see Satellite (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The eight planets and three dwarf planets of the Solar System. ...


The proposed satellite would have a dimension of 70 m × 70 m, a mass of about 600 kg, and maneuver by means of an ion drive engine in combination with using the sheet as a light sail. Positioned at a distance of 100,000 km from the telescope, it would block more than 99.998% of the starlight. An ion engine test An ion thruster is a type of spacecraft propulsion that uses beams of ions for propulsion. ...


There are two possible configurations of this satellite. The first would work with a space telescope, most likely positioned near the Earth's L2 Lagrangian point. The second would place the satellite in a highly elliptical orbit about the Earth, and work in conjunction with a ground telescope. At the apogee of the orbit, the satellite would remain relatively stationary with respect to the ground, allowing longer exposure times. A space observatory is any object in outer space which is used for observation of distant planets, galaxies, and other outer space objects. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... A contour plot of the effective potential (the Hills Surfaces) of a two-body system (the Sun and Earth here), showing the five Lagrange points. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ...


An updated version of this design is called the Starshade, which uses a sunflower-shaped coronagraph disc. A comparable proposal was also made for a satellite to occult bright X-ray sources, called an X-ray Occulting Steerable Satellite or XOSS.[2] The Starshade is a sunflower shaped coronagraph disc that was designed to block starlight that interferes with telescopic observations of other worlds. ... Binomial name L. The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant native to the Americas in the family Asteraceae, with a large flowering head (inflorescence). ... An example image from SOHO - NASA A coronagraph is a telescopic attachment designed specifically to block out the harsh, direct light from a star, so that nearby objects can be resolved without burning out the telescopes optics. ...


Occultations and transits between 1800 and 2100

This table lists occultations and transits of bright stars and planets by solar planets.

Day Time (UT) Foreground planet Background object
December 9, 1802 7:36 Mercury Acrab
December 9, 1808 20:34 Mercury Saturn
December 22, 1810 6:32 Venus Xi-2 Sagittarii
January 3, 1818 21:52 Venus Jupiter
July 11, 1825 9:10 Venus Delta-1 Tauri
July 11, 1837 12:50 Mercury Eta Geminorum
May 9, 1841 19:35 Venus 17 Tauri
September 27, 1843 18:00 Venus Eta Virginis
December 16, 1850 11:28 Mercury Lambda Sagittarii
May 22, 1855 5:04 Venus Epsilon Geminorum
June 30, 1857 0:25 Saturn Delta Geminorum
December 5th, 1865 14:20 Mercury Lambda Sagittarii
February 28, 1876 5:13 Jupiter Acrab
June 7, 1881 20:54 Mercury Epsilon Geminorum
December 9, 1906 17:40 Venus Acrab
July 27, 1910 2:53 Venus Eta Geminorum
June 10, 1940 2:21 Mercury Epsilon Geminorum
October 25, 1947 1:45 Venus Zuben-el-genubi
July 7, 1959 14:30 Venus Regulus
September 27, 1965 15:31 Mercury Eta Virginis
May 13, 1971 20:00 Jupiter Beta Scorpii (both components)
April 8, 1976 1:00 Mars Epsilon Geminorum
November 17, 1981 14:27 Venus Nunki
November 19, 1984 1:32 Venus Lambda Sagittarii
February 17, 2035 15:19 Venus Pi Sagittarii
October 1, 2044 22:00 Venus Regulus
February 23, 2046 19:24 Venus Rho-1 Sagittarii
November 10, 2052 7:20 Mercury Zuben-el-genubi
November 22, 2065 12:45 Venus Jupiter
July 15, 2067 11:56 Mercury Neptune
October 3, 2078 22:00 Mars Theta Ophiuchi
August 11, 2079 1:30 Mercury Mars
October 27, 2088 13:43 Mercury Jupiter
April 7, 2094 10:48 Mercury Jupiter

These events are not visible everywhere the occulting body and the occulted body are above the skyline. Some events are barely visible, because they take place in close proximity to the Sun. December 9 is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... --69. ... This article is about the planet. ... Acrab (also known as El Acrab or Graffias) is the proper name name of the star β Xi Scorpii 5 in the constellation of Scorpio. ... December 9 is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Adjectives: Saturnian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 140 kPa Composition: >93% hydrogen >5% helium 0. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... The Bayer designation Xi Sagittarii (ξ Sgr / ξ Sagittarii) is shared by two stars, ξ¹ Sagittarii and ξ² Sagittarii, in the constellation Sagittarius. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Bayer designation Delta Tauri (δ Tau / δ Tauri) is shared by three star systems in the constellation Taurus. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Tejat Prior is the designation of the star Eta Geminorum. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Electra is the name of the star 17 Tauri lain in the pleiads. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Zaniah is the designation of the fixed star Eta Virginis. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Kaus Borealis (elbow, north) is the name for the star? Sagittarii (Lambda Sagittarii). ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Mebsuta (stretching) is the designation of the Epsilon Geminorum. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 140 kPa Hydrogen >93% Helium >5% Methane 0. ... Wasat is the name of the star Delta Geminorum in the constellation of twins. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 9 is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Alpha Librae (α Lib / α Librae) is the second brightest star in the constellation Libra (despite its Bayer designation as alpha). It also has the traditional name Zubenelgenubi. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Regulus (α Leo / α Leonis / Alpha Leonis) is the brightest star in the constellation Leo and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Nunki is the σ star in the constellation of Sagittarius Nunki (Bayer designation Sigma Sagittarii) is the second brightest star in the constellation Sagittarius. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2035 (MMXXXV) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Albaldah is the name of the star pi Sagittarii. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... } 2044 (MMXLIV) will be a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2046 (MMXLVI) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bayer designation Rho Sagittarii (ρ Sgr / ρ Sagittarii) is shared by two stars, ρ¹ Sagittarii and ρ² Sagittarii, in the constellation Sagittarius. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2052 (MMLII) will be a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2065) Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 2010s 2020s 2030s 2040s 2050s - 2060s - 2070s 2080s 2090s Years: 2060 2061 2062 2063 2064 2065 2066 2067 2068 2069 The Decade as a Whole This decade is expected to be called... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2067) Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 2010s 2020s 2030s 2040s 2050s - 2060s - 2070s 2080s 2090s Years: 2060 2061 2062 2063 2064 2065 2066 2067 2068 2069 The Decade as a Whole This decade is expected to be called... Atmospheric characteristics Surface pressure ≫100 MPa Hydrogen - H2 80% ±3. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2078 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2079) (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2000-2099. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2088) (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2000-2099. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... (Redirected from 2094) (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2000-2099. ...


Mutual planetary transits and occultations

In rare cases, one planet can transit in front of another. The next time this will happen (as seen from Earth) will be on November 22, 2065 at about 12:43 UTC, when Venus near superior conjunction (with an angular diameter of 10.6") will transit in front of Jupiter (with an angular diameter of 30.9"); however, this will take place only 8° west of the Sun, and will therefore not be visible to the unaided/unprotected eye. When the nearer object has a larger angular diameter than the farther object, thus covering it completely, the event is not a transit but an occultation. Before transiting Jupiter, Venus will occult Jupiter's moon Ganymede at around 11:24 UTC as seen from some southernmost parts of Earth. Parallax will cause actual observed times to vary by a few minutes, depending on the precise location of the observer. November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2065) Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 2010s 2020s 2030s 2040s 2050s - 2060s - 2070s 2080s 2090s Years: 2060 2061 2062 2063 2064 2065 2066 2067 2068 2069 The Decade as a Whole This decade is expected to be called... Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is a high-precision atomic time standard. ... Conjunction is a term used in positional astronomy and astrology. ... The angular diameter of an object as seen from a given position is the diameter measured as an angle. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... The angular diameter of an object as seen from a given position is the diameter measured as an angle. ... A natural satellite is an object that orbits a planet or other body larger than itself and which is not man-made. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


There are only 18 mutual planetary transits and occultations as seen from Earth between 1700 and 2200. Note the long break of events between 1818 and 2065!

  • 19 Sep 1702 - Jupiter occults Neptune
  • 20 Jul 1705 - Mercury transits Jupiter
  • 14 Jul 1708 - Mercury occults Uranus
A simulation of Venus transiting Jupiter, as it did on January 3, 1818.
A simulation of Venus transiting Jupiter, as it did on January 3, 1818.
  • 04 Oct 1708 - Mercury transits Jupiter
  • 28 May 1737 - Venus occults Mercury
  • 29 Aug 1771 - Venus transits Saturn
  • 21 Jul 1793 - Mercury occults Uranus
  • 09 Dec 1808 - Mercury transits Saturn
  • 03 Jan 1818 - Venus transits Jupiter
  • 22 Nov 2065 - Venus transits Jupiter
  • 15 Jul 2067 - Mercury occults Neptune
  • 11 Aug 2079 - Mercury occults Mars
  • 27 Oct 2088 - Mercury transits Jupiter
  • 07 Apr 2094 - Mercury transits Jupiter
  • 21 Aug 2104 - Venus occults Neptune
  • 14 Sep 2123 - Venus transits Jupiter
  • 29 Jul 2126 - Mercury occults Mars
  • 03 Dec 2133 - Venus occults Mercury

The 1737 event was observed by John Bevis at Greenwich Observatory - it is the only detailed account of a mutual planetary occultation. A transit of Mars across Jupiter on 12 Sep 1170 was observed by the monk Gervase at Canterbury, and by Chinese astronomers. In addition, an occultation of Mars by Venus was observed by M. Möstlin at Heidelberg on October 3, 1590. Illustration created using Starry Night Pro software. ... Illustration created using Starry Night Pro software. ... (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... John Bevis (October 31, 1693 – November 6, 1771) was an English doctor and astronomer. ... Royal Observatory, Greenwich The original site of the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO), which was built as a workplace for the Astronomer Royal, was on a hill in Greenwich Park in Greenwich, London, overlooking the River Thames. ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29: Assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Michael Maestlin (1550-1631) was a German astronomer and mathematician. ... Heidelberg and the other cities of the Neckar valley The castle (Schloss) above the town Main Street (Hauptstrasse) Shopping district View from the so called alley of philosophers (Philosophenweg) towards the Old Town, with Heidelberg Castle, Heiliggeist Church and the Old Bridge Heidelberg is a city in Baden-Württemberg... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bold text{| align=right cellpadding=3 id=toc style=margin-left: 15px; |- | align=center colspan=2 | Years: 1587 1588 1589 - 1590 - 1591 1592 1593 |-vdsf gno[gldw[pvkijxaiamknn csogfhbvdowkhbfkqhjkhrjkhwgfhbjkpnkfokfgok3pkpk9pjhkt9erktyujkip9kijker9thhrkg9hkitr9gtkih9t0ykltk[u0jo0iey9uhyit90ertyhige9rity9riyh9ujirtyuhjnh-4e9tyigh9thiuy0h8tyh34tu8uy8u8u8u8rtu5y8ru8thu0tru0ut0rhutuh0trhu0hseogtrhr8uyhju8t89er9te9r8fy8shit ass dick bitch fuck | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1560s 1570s 1580s - 1590s - 1600s 1610s 1620s |- | align=center | Centuries...


See also

An asteroid occultation occurs when an asteroid passes in front of a star (occults a star), temporarily blocking its light (as seen from Earth). ... 2003 Transit of Mercury The term transit or astronomical transit has two meanings in astronomy: A transit is the astronomical event that occurs when one celestial body appears to move across the face of another celestial body, as seen by an observer at some particular vantage point. ... Transit of Mercury (time lapse showing entire event) Transit of Mercury 11-8-06 - Photographed by Eric S. Kounce of the West Texas Astronomers (www. ... The 2004 transit of Venus A transit of Venus across the Sun takes place when the planet Venus passes directly between the Sun and Earth, obscuring a small portion of the Suns disk. ... Photo taken during the 1999 eclipse. ... A lunar occultation occurs when the Moon, moving along its orbital path, passes in front of a star or other celestial object, as seen by an observer (normally on the Earth). ... An occultation is an astronomical event that occurs when one celestial object is hidden by another celestial object that passes between it and the observer. ... Look up Syzygy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

References

  1. ^ C. J. Copi, G. D. Starkman (2000). "The Big Occulting Steerable Satellite (BOSS)". The Astrophysical Journal 532: 581-592. Retrieved on 2007-02-04. 
  2. ^ The X-ray Occulting Steerable Satellite (XOSS). CASE. Retrieved on 2007-02-09.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

External references

  • Meeus, Jean: Astronomical Tables of the Sun, Moon and Planets. Richmond, Virginia: Willmann-Bell, Inc., 1995, ISBN 0-943396-45-X.
  • Marco Peuschel [1], Astronomische Tabellen für den Mond von 2007 bis 2016,Mondphasen, Apsiden, Knotendurchgänge, Maximale und minimale Deklinationswerte und Sternbedeckungen sowie ausführliche Ephemeriden für jeden Tag des Jahres , inkl. Mondauf-und Untergänge und physische Daten.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Occultation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1473 words)
The term occultation is most frequently used to describe those relatively frequent occasions when the Moon passes in front of a star during the course of its orbital motion around the Earth.
Occultations of Aldebaran are presently only possible by the Moon, because the planets pass Aldebaran to the north.
Within a mile or two of the edge of an occultation's predicted path, referred to as its northern or southern limit, an observer may see the star intermittently disappearing and reappearing as the irregular limb of the Moon moves past the star, creating what is known as a grazing occultation.
Occultation - definition of Occultation in Encyclopedia (388 words)
An occultation is an astronomical event observed when a non-luminous celestial body passes between the observer and a more distant body which is either luminous or shining by reflected light.
An occultation of the Sun by the Moon is commonly called a solar eclipse, though that use of the term eclipse can be confusing.
This last occurred on January 3, 1818 and will next occur on November 22, 2065, in both cases involving the same two planets: Venus and Jupiter (the latter event, however, will be virtually impossible to view because the two planets will lie only 8° west of the Sun).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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