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Encyclopedia > Occidental College

Occidental College

Image File history File links Oxyseal. ...

Motto Occidens Proximus Orienti
Established 1887
Type Private
Endowment US $377 million (2007)
President Susan Westerberg Prager
Faculty 145
Undergraduates 1,839
Location Los Angeles, CA, USA
Campus Urban/Residential
Colors Orange and Black            
Mascot Tiger
Website www.oxy.edu

Occidental College is a small private coeducational liberal arts college located in Los Angeles, California. Occidental is nationally recognized for its rigorous academic programs, small size, diverse student body, and its location within the city of Los Angeles.[1] Since the 1960s, Occidental has been recognized as a national leader in promoting diversity and social awareness.[2] Occidental is also an athletic powerhouse, producing many NCAA Division III national championship teams and Olympic athletes. Occidental College’s Latin name literally translates to “Of the West.” For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Susan Westerberg Prager (1942-) is the current president of Occidental College. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... A residential area is a type of land use where the predominant use is residential. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The orange, the fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... Black is a colour with several subtle differences in meaning. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

President Taft at Occidental in October 1911
President Taft at Occidental in October 1911

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... William Howard Taft I (September 15, 1857–March 8, 1930) was the 27th President of the United States (1909-1913), and the 10th Chief Justice of the United States (1921 - 1930). ...

The Birth of Occidental College

Occidental College (commonly referred to as Oxy) was founded on April 20, 1887, by a group of Presbyterian clergy and laymen. The college’s first term began a year later with 27 men and 13 women students, and tuition of $50 a year. Initially located in Boyle Heights, the college moved to a new campus in Los Angeles’ Highland Park neighborhood in 1898. Despite a strong Presbyterian presence on its campus, Occidental cut ties to the church in 1910. In 1912 the school began construction of a new campus located in Los Angeles’ Eagle Rock neighborhood. The Eagle Rock campus was to be designed by noted California Architect Myron Hunt. That same year, Occidental President John Willis Baer announced the trustees’ decision to convert Oxy into an all-men’s institution. However, students protested, and the idea was abandoned. is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Boyle Heights is a district on the east side of Los Angeles, California. ... Highland Park is a district in on the East Side of Los Angeles. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Eagle Rock Eagle Rock is a neighborhood in northeastern Los Angeles, California. ... Myron Hunt (February 27, 1868–May 26, 1952) was an American architect whose numerous projects include many noted landmarks in Southern California. ...

Occidental College in the 1920s
Occidental College in the 1920s

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ...

On to Eagle Rock

Two weeks after Booker T. Washington came to visit Occidental, on March 27, 1914 — the school’s 25th anniversary, Swan, Fowler, and Johnson halls were dedicated at its new Eagle Rock campus. The Eagle Rock campus covers over 120 acres (0.5 km), much of which is undeveloped land on a hill known as “Mt. Fiji.” In April 1917, the college formed an Army Corps to aid the war effort. The college opened its Hillside Theatre in 1925, and a student union in 1928. During World War II, many students left Occidental to fight the war. In July 1943, 53 students established a Navy V-12 unit on campus and left for active duty. Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the neighborhood in Los Angeles, see Eagle Rock, Los Angeles, California Eagle Rock, was an early name for Idaho Falls, Idaho. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A Little Giant

In 1962, Time Magazine described Occidental as a little giant in a story about the college’s rise to national prominence. Indeed, this moniker was characteristic of the college’s growth. Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ...


During the late 1960’s, a strong anti-war sentiment made its presence felt at Occidental. The students’ activism was characteristic of a rise of liberalism across campus. In 1969, the school opened its first to co-ed dormitories, and two more followed a year later. On May 6, 1970, the faculty voted to suspend classes in the wake of the Kent State shootings and America’s invasion of Cambodia. Subsequently, Oxy students wrote 7,000 letters to Washington D.C., protesting U.S. involvement in the war in Southeast Asia. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... A typical American college dorm room A dormitory or dorm is a place to sleep. ... John Filos iconic Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph of Mary Ann Vecchio, a fourteen-year-old runaway, kneeling over the dead body of Jeffrey Miller after he was shot by the National Guard. ...


In 1979, Occidental installed Water Forms II, a kinetic fountain designed by professor George Baker. The fountain is a campus landmark and was featured prominently in the 1984 film Star Trek III: The Search for Spock. During the 1984 Olympic Games, some track events were held at Occidental’s Patterson Field. By 1986, for the first time since World War II, women students outnumbered men. Today, the college is approximately 60 percent female and 40 percent male; roughly equivalent to the national average. On July 1, 2006, Susan Prager was named Occidental’s first female president.[3] Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... This article is about the year. ... Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984; see also 1984 in film) is the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... (Redirected from 1984 Olympic Games) There were two Olympic Games in the year 1984: 1984 Summer Olympics 1984 Winter Olympics This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Academics, Resources, and Rankings

Core Program

Johnson Hall, one of the three original buildings of the 1914 campus
Johnson Hall, one of the three original buildings of the 1914 campus

Divided in three parts, the Core Program was designed by the faculty of Occidental to unify and enhance the liberal arts education offered by the school. The Core Program requires students to achieve the following: (1) complete a first-year seminar and colloquia; (2) complete a set number of courses in geographical areas, languages, and the arts; and, (3) submit a senior-year comprehensive examination within the student’s chosen field. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 642 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 642 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ...


First-year seminars and colloquia (12 course hours in total) are the centerpiece of the Core Program. Students are given a variety of class choices to fulfill the seminar and colloquia requirement, and to satisfy the first-year writing requirement. While the classes range in topic, each is based on a curriculum of cultural studies. The classes are designed to expose students to the rigor of college academics and to the four principles of the college mission—Excellence, Equity, Community, and Service.


The Core Program’s emphasis on global literacy requires students to take a minimum of three courses that touch on at least three of the following geographical areas: Africa and the Middle East; Asia and the Pacific; Europe; Latin America; the United States; and Intercultural. Students are also require to demonstrate proficiency in writing and in a foreign language and take courses in the fine arts and in the sciences, mathematics, or other courses that address formal methods of reasoning.


The final portion of the Core Program requires students to pass a senior comprehensive examination in their chosen field. Comprehensive examinations may include seminars, creative projects, fieldwork, oral exams, theses, or field research projects.


Student Research

Occidental provides its students unique opportunities to research in their chosen field. Many students collaborate on research with their professors in the lab, at other local institutions, including the City of Hope National Cancer Research Center, and overseas. Research fellowships are provided to students in all fields of study. Over the past five years, more than 280 students received funding to undertake joint research with faculty—research that often results in co-authored publication in peer-reviewed journals. [4]


International Programs

Many Occidental students participate in off-campus programs in the United States and in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and Oceania. Annually, nearly one third of the junior class participates. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ...


Occidental offers a unique Occidental-at-the-United Nations Program in New York. When selected, students intern in the United Nations Secretariat or with a related institution, such as the US State Department or an international NGO. Some students also study in Washington, D.C. through American University. UN and U.N. redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... NGO is an abbreviation or code for: Non-governmental organization Nagoya Airport (IATA code) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For other universities known as American University, see American University (disambiguation). ...


Occidental is among a handful of American colleges that participates in the Richter Summer Research Program, in which students compete for a chance to pursue independent research or creative work anywhere in the world. Exchange students also are welcomed to Occidental. The school maintains exchange agreements with the University of Bristol, Cambridge University, University of East Anglia, University of Sussex, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong.


Reputation

In U.S. News and World Report's [5] of American liberal arts colleges, Occidental is 36th. Throughout the years, many of Occidental’s students and faculty have been honored with prestigious awards.[6] The 2007 Princeton Review describes Occidental as having a “rising star quality”. Additionally, Occidental’s professors have been called “top quality.” [7] Occidental is a “highly selective” college[8] and “is committed to recruiting top students regardless of their financial background.” [9] The College Prowler says that people “look at Occidental degrees very highly,” but that Occidental often does not receive the attention it deserves. [10] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


Campus

Architect Myron Hunt, who also designed the Rose Bowl Stadium, designed Oxy's original buildings in a Mediterranean style, with covered walkways and tile roofs. Currently, there are 11 on-campus residence halls with one more hall under construction. The three original buildings of the 1914 campus still stand today, although seismic concerns have limited them to classrooms and academic offices. Most of the rest of the buildings match the original style with a few exceptions. The Arthur G. Coons Administration Building has been dubbed "the Chrysler Showroom" by campus wags — a reference to its boxy glass lobby. As the seat of power, Coons has also been compared to Foucault's "panopticon." The most notable aberration, however, is Stearns Hall, which has been described as "Barbie meets Escher" for its angular, post-modern style and its shrunken scale (it is supposedly built at 90% of scale, an idea supported by the feeling of claustrophobia often encountered there). Occidental's newest building, the Hameetman Science Center, was built in 2003 to provide new research facilities for Occidental's geology and physics departments. A new residence hall Rangeview Hall, scheduled to open in the spring of 2008, is under construction.[11] Myron Hunt (February 27, 1868–May 26, 1952) was an American architect whose numerous projects include many noted landmarks in Southern California. ... This article is about the Los Angeles stadium. ... People with the surname Escher include: Alfred Escher (1819-1882), Swiss politician and railway pioneer Arnold Escher von der Linth Felix Escher Hans Conrad Escher von der Linth (1767-1823) Josef Escher (1885-1954), Swiss Federal Councilor M. C. Escher (1898-1972), Dutch illustrator Esher (misspelling), character in Myst V... Claustrophobia is an anxiety disorder that involves the fear of enclosed or confined spaces. ...


Athletics

Johnson Student Center and Freeman College Union
Johnson Student Center and Freeman College Union

Occidental has a long and proud history of intercollegiate athletics. The college has produced dozens of Olympians and hundreds of All Americans. Occidental is a member of the Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) and NCAA Division III and features 19 varsity sports teams. Additionally, the school has a thriving program of club sports and intramural competition. Approximately 25 per cent of the student body participates in a varsity sports program [12]. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 830 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 830 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Olympians can refer to any of the following: The Twelve Olympians of Ancient Greek mythology. ... The term All-American has two uses: It can be used as a reference to an athlete selected as a member of an All_America team, as in Eddie George was named an All-American football player by both wire services in 1995. ... The Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) is a College Athletic Conference that operates in the NCAAs Division III. It consists of eleven small private schools which are located in Southern California and organized into eight athletic programs. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


During the 20062007 athletic season, the Tiger’s cross country, American football and basketball teams were SCIAC champions. The school’s Blackshirts Rugby team was also league champion for the first time in five years. Occidental looks forward to future athletic success and hopes to further cement its legacy as a pioneer in intercollegiate athletics [13]. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The term cross-country, when used by itself, can refer to: Sports Cross-country running, a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain Cross-country skiing, a winter sport for skiing Fell running also known as hill running and mountain running... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) is a College Athletic Conference that operates in the NCAAs Division III. It consists of eleven small private schools which are located in Southern California and organized into eight athletic programs. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


Film and Television at Occidental

Occidental’s beautiful campus, unique architecture, and proximity to Hollywood have made it a desired location for a number of film and television shots.[14] Credits include:

TV credits include Dragnet and The West Wing (2002), Beverly Hills 90210 (1993-94) and a host of other shows and made-for-TV movies, including Lou Grant , Remington Steele , and Cannon . Horse Feathers (1932) was the fourth Marx Brothers film. ... This article is about the comedian siblings. ... Pigskin Parade is a 1936 musical comedy film which tells the story of husband and wife college football coaches who convince a backwoods player to play for their team so they can go to the big Bowl Game. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Betty Grable (December 18, 1916 – July 2, 1973) was an American dancer, singer, and actress. ... Second Chorus is a 1940 Hollywood musical comedy film starring Fred Astaire, Burgess Meredith, Paulette Goddard, Artie Shaw and Charles Butterworth, with music by Artie Shaw, Bernie Hanighen, Hal Borne and lyrics by Johnny Mercer. ... Fred Astaire Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 - June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska, was an American film and Broadway ballroom dancer and actor. ... That Hagen Girl was an American film released in 1947. ... Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928) is an American former child actress. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Goodbye My Francy is 1951 American romantic comedy film, directed by Vincent Sherman. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... Robert Young or Bob Young may refer to several different people: Robert J Young (historian) Robert Young (politician) (1834–1904), New Brunswick politician and businessman Robert Young (Biblical scholar), author of Youngs Literal Translation of the Bible Robert Young (actor) (1907-1998), star of US television programs Father Knows... Pat and Mike is 1952 comedy starring Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. ... It has been suggested that Tom Hepburn be merged into this article or section. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Jane Fonda (born December 21, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, writer, political activist, former fashion model, and fitness guru. ... Anthony Perkins (April 4, 1932 – September 12, 1992) was an Academy Award-nominated American stage and screen actor best known for his role as Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho and its three sequels, Psycho II, Psycho III and Psycho IV: The Beginning. ... Jimmy Stewart, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 James Maitland Stewart (May 20, 1908 – July 2, 1997) was an American film actor beloved for his persona as an average guy who faces adversity and tries to do the right thing, an image which was largely reflected in his own... The Impossible Years is a play by Robert Fisher and Arthur Marx. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Dr. Henry Franklin Jameson Frederick Winkler (born October 30, 1945) is a Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, director, producer and author. ... Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984; see also 1984 in film) is the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Real Genius is a 1985 comedy film starring Val Kilmer and Gabriel Jarret. ... Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ... House, see Clueless (House episode). ... Alicia Silverstone, (born October 4, 1976) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... Kicking and Screaming (1995) is a film by Noah Baumbach about a group of college graduates who refuse to move on with their lives, each in his own peculiar way. ... Josh Hamilton (born on 9 June 1969 in New York City, New York, USA) is an American actor. ... The Wayans Brothers are a group of American comedians who are brothers. ... Boys and Girls is a 2000 American film. ... Freddie Prinze, Jr. ... Jurassic Park III is a 2001 film that is the third film as part of the Jurassic Park franchise. ... Sam Neill (born Nigel John Dermot Neill), DCNZM, OBE (born 14 September 1947) is a New Zealand-Australian film and television actor, and owner of the Two Paddocks winery in Central Otago. ... Orange County is the name of several counties in the United States of America: Orange County, California: probably named for the city of Orange, California, which in turn may have been named after the orange groves that used to exist there. ... Colin Lewes Hanks (born November 24, 1977) is an American actor. ... For other persons named Jack Black, see Jack Black (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Holiday (disambiguation). ... Cameron Michelle Diaz (born August 30, 1972) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born October 5, 1975) is a five time Academy Award-nominated Emmy Award-nominated BAFTA, Grammy and Screen Actors Guild Award winning English actress. ... David Jude Heyworth Law (born 29 December 1972) is an Academy Award-nominated English actor. ... For other persons named Jack Black, see Jack Black (disambiguation). ... A dragnet is any system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects; including road barricades and traffic stops, widespread DNA tests, and general increased police alertness. ... This article is about a TV show. ... Beverly Hills 90210 was a popular primetime television soap opera that aired from October 1990 to May 2000 on the Fox Network in the United States and subsequently on various networks around the world. ... Lou Grant is a fictional character played by Ed Asner in two shows on CBS. The first was Mary Tyler Moore in which the character was the producer of the fictional WJM-TV news. ... Remington Steele was an American television series first broadcast on the NBC network from 1982 to 1987. ... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ...


Occidental in Fiction

  • Aldous Huxley was close friends with college president Remsen Bird during Huxley's time living in Southern California. He spent much time at the college during this period and the college is portrayed under the name of Tarzana College in his 1939 satircal novel After Many a Summer. Huxley also incorporated Bird into the novel.
  • Gary Shteyngart's novel, Absurdistan, is partly set at the apocryphal "Accidental College," which is clearly a riff on Occidental's name, though its Midwestern setting is more akin to Shteyngart's alma mater, Oberlin.

Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... After Many a Summer is a novel by Aldous Huxley. ... Gary Shteyngart (born 1972) is an American writer born in Leningrad, USSR (he alternately calls it St. ... Absurdistan is a 2006 novel by Gary Shteyngart. ... Oberlin College is a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ...

Notable Faculty

Herrick Interfaith Center, built 1964
Herrick Interfaith Center, built 1964

Several Occidental professors have received awards in recent years and some have held prominent positions in government and the private sector: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 797 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 797 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ...

The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The National War College (NWC) of the United States is a school in the National Defense University. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... The International Institute for Strategic Studies is a British think tank based in London. ... PEN American Center (PEN), founded in 1922 and based in New York City, works to advance literature, to defend free expression, and to foster international literary fellowship. ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing has been awarded since 1917 for distinguished editorial writing, the test of excellence being clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction. ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... The International Peace Academy (IPA) is an independent non-profit research and policy development institution in New York. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ...

Notable Oxy Alumni

Benjamin Géza Affleck (born August 15, 1972) is an American Golden Globe Award-nominated film actor, director, an Academy Award-winning and Golden Globe Award-winning screenwriter. ... Kathy Augustine Kathy Augustine (May 29, 1956 - July 11, 2006) was a U.S. Republican Party politician from Nevada. ... Howard Ahmanson, Jr. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Alphonzo E. Bell, Jr. ... Ronald Leslie Ron Botchan (born February 15, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York) was an American football linebacker in the American Football League from 1960 to 1962 and later as American football official in the National Football League (NFL) from 1980 to 2002. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... NFL redirects here. ... Olin Browne (born May 22, 1959) is a PGA Tour golfer. ... Steve Coll (born October 8, 1958 in Washington, DC) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist and writer. ... Glenn Corbett as Zefram Cochrane Glenn Corbett (August 17, 1930-January 16, 1993) was an American actor born Glenn Rothenburg in El Monte, California. ... W. Don Cornwell W. Don Cornwell is CEO, Chairman, and co-founder of Granite Broadcasting. ... Granite Broadcasting Corporation is a broadcaster that own and operate eight stations across the United States. ... G. Brent Dalrymple is an American geologist, author of The Age of the Earth and National Medal of Science winner. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mark Dery (born 1959) is an American author, lecturer and cultural critic. ... Ramesh Flinders is an 27-year-old American screenwriter who, along with Miles Beckett, created the lonelygirl15 video series. ... lonelygirl15 is an interactive web-based video series, centering on the life of a fictional teenage girl named Bree, whose YouTube username is the eponymous lonelygirl15. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Eddie Galan (born February 4, 1979) is a Los Angeles born singer/musician, 4 time #1 Hit Billboard songwriter and record producer, with 14x Platinum status. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Joanna Gleason (born Joanne Halprin on June 2, 1950 in Winnipeg, Manitoba), is a Canadian-born actress, who has been a successful character actor in film, television and on stage. ... John Robinson Jeffers (January 10, 1887–January 20, 1962) was an American poet, known for his work about the central California coast. ... Ural Alexis Johnson (b. ... Dr. Howard L. Judd (28 December 1935–19 July 2007) was an American doctor and medical researcher. ... Jack French Kemp Jr. ... Terry Kitchen (born Max Pokrivchak in Phillipsburg, New Jersey) is an American folk singer-songwriter. ... Loren Lester is an actor of stage, screen, and voice, best known for his portrayal of DC Comics superhero Dick Grayson/Robin/Nightwing in the numerous Batman animated series and features. ... Linda A. Malcor Ph. ... Paul Norton Pete McCloskey Jr. ... James Jim Earnst Mora (born May 24, 1935 in Glendale, California) is the former head coach of the USFLs Philadelphia/Baltimore Stars and the NFLs New Orleans Saints and Indianapolis Colts. ... Patt Morrison is a columnist for the Los Angeles Times and frequent commentator on National Public Radio. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Marcel Ophüls (born November 1, 1927) is a documentary film maker. ... Jake Shears (born Jason Sellards on October 3, 1977 in Arizona) is the vocalist for the American music group the Scissor Sisters. ... Roger Guenveur Smith in Final Destination (2000) Roger Guenveur Smith (born July 27, 1959 in Berkeley, California) is an American writer, director, and actor. ... Jim Tunney Jim Tunney was a American football official in the National Football League (NFL) from 1960 to 1991. ... Tui St. ... Carrie Vaughn is an American author who writes the fantasy Kitty Norville series. ... Fred Lawrence Whipple (November 5, 1906 – August 30, 2004) was an American astronomer. ... Luke Cunningham Wilson (born September 21, 1971) is an American film actor. ... MediaDefender is a company which offers services designed to prevent and stop people who engage in alleged copyright infringement using peer-to-peer distribution, using unusual tactics such as flooding peer-to-peer networks with decoy files that tie up a users computer. ...

Academic Majors

Arts & Humanities The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ...

Social Sciences This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... The Mona Lisa is one of the most recognizable artistic paintings in the Western world. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Religious studies is the designation commonly used in the English-speaking world for a multi-disciplinary, secular study of religion that dates to the late 19th century in Europe (and the influential early work of such scholars as Friedrich Max Müller, in England, and Cornelius P. Tiele, in the... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ...

Natural Sciences Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... This article is about the study of time in human terms. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ...

Interdepartmental Majors Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Psychological science redirects here. ...

Academic Minors American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes in living organisms. ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... This article is about negotiations. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Kinesiology is the scientific study of human movement. ... This article or section should be merged with biological psychology Psychobiology, also called biopsychology, is the scientific study of mental functioning and behavior in relation to other biological processes, or put another way, of the effects of cognition, emotions, and experience on animal physiology. ... Look up urban in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Environmental policy refers to the laws, regulations, and other policy mechanisms concerning environmental issues and sustainability. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... German studies is the field of humanities that researches, documents, and disseminates German language and literature in both its historic and present forms. ... Japanese Language and Literature (JLL) is a journal published twice yearly (in April and November) by the Association of Teachers of Japanese (ATJ). ... Latin American Studies (sometimes abbreviated LAS) is an academic discipline which studies the history and experience of peoples and cultures in the Americas. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... Russian Studies is a field of study first developed during the Cold War. ...

References

  1. ^ "Occidental College Website". 
  2. ^ "Reviews of Occidental College". Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  3. ^ "A Brief History of Occidental College". Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  4. ^ "Occidental College Website". 
  5. ^ "2007 rankings U.S, News and World Report", 2007 Rankings of Top Liberal Arts Colleges. Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  6. ^ "Occidental College Academic Achievements". Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  7. ^ "Reviews of Occidental College", The Princeton Review. Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  8. ^ "Reviews of Occidental College", The Black Student’s Guide to Colleges. Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  9. ^ "Reviews of Occidental College", America's Best Value Colleges. Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  10. ^ "Reviews of Occidental College", The College Prowler. Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  11. ^ "Occidental College Facilities". Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  12. ^ "Occidental College Athletics". Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  13. ^ "Occidental College Athletics". Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  14. ^ "Occidental College as a Movie Location". Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  15. ^ Possley, Maurice. "Obama's political activism started in college", Chicago Tribune, Chicago Tribune, 2007-03-29. Retrieved on 2007-06-13. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Occidental College Baseball Players Who Made it to a Major League Baseball Team (224 words)
Baseball Almanac is pleased to present a comprehensive chart of every Occidental College alumnus who played baseball at Occidental College AND made it to the Major League level.
Occidental College's baseball program started in 1887 and Dutch Hinrichs was their first player to make it to the Major League level.
Grant Dunlap was inducted into the Occidental College Hall of Fame in 1989, but he was not put in because of his time as a player.
Occidental College - Search Results - MSN Encarta (0 words)
Occidental College, private, coeducational liberal arts institution in Los Angeles, California.
Colleges and Universities, institutions of higher education that offer programs beyond the high school level.
Occidental College, located in Los Angeles, California, is a small coeducational liberal arts college.
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