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Encyclopedia > Oberlin College

Coordinates: 41.292929° N 82.218576° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Oberlin College
Oberlin College seal

Motto: Learning and Labor
Established: September 2, 1833
Type: Liberal Arts college
Endowment: 816,135,000 USD (2007)[1]
President: Marvin Krislov
Staff: 1,058
Students: 2,850
Location: Oberlin, Ohio, United States
Campus: Rural
Mascot: Yeomen (men's teams) & Yeowomen (women's teams)
Website: http://www.oberlin.edu/

Oberlin College is a highly selective[citation needed] liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. It was founded in 1833 by abolitionist Congregational Christians, and is home to the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, making it the only top-ranked liberal arts college (#20 according to US News & World Report) with a top-ranked conservatory. A study found that more 1999-2003 Oberlin College alumni receive doctorates than do alumni from any other liberal arts college in the country.[2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Marvin Krislov is the 14th president of Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Oberlin is a city in Lorain County, Ohio, to the south and west of Cleveland. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Yeoman is an antiquated term for farmers, tradesmen and other members of the early English middle class. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Oberlin is a city in Lorain County, Ohio, to the south and west of Cleveland. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Musician entering the Oberlin Conservatory The Oberlin Conservatory of Music, located in Oberlin, Ohio, was founded in 1865 and is the nations oldest continuously operating conservatory. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Oberlin College is a member of the Great Lakes Colleges Association and The Five Colleges of Ohio consortium, including Ohio Wesleyan University, Denison University, Kenyon College, and The College of Wooster. The Great Lakes Colleges Association, Inc. ... The Five Colleges of Ohio is an academic consortium of five selective private liberal arts colleges in the U.S. state of Ohio. ... “OWU” redirects here. ... Denison University is a highly selective private liberal arts and sciences college in Granville, Ohio, approximately 30 miles (50 km) east of Columbus. ... Kenyon College is a private liberal arts college in Gambier, Ohio, founded in 1824 by Bishop Philander Chase of the The Episcopal Church, in parallel with the Bexley Hall seminary. ... The College of Wooster is a private liberal arts college primarily known for its Independent Study program (see below). ...


Oberlin College's motto is "Learning and Labor". Its school colors are crimson and gold.


The newspaper of record is The Oberlin Review. There is also an "alternative" student-run newspaper called The Grape. The Oberlin Review is the student-run weekly newspaper of record for Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio. ...

Contents

History

The Oberlin campus in 1909
The Oberlin campus in 1909

Both the college and the town of Oberlin were founded in 1833 by a pair of Presbyterian ministers, John Shipherd and Philo P. Stewart. The ministers named their project after Jean-Frédéric Oberlin, an Alsatian minister whom they both admired. Oberlin attained prominence because of the influence of its second president, the evangelist Charles Finney, after whom one of the College's chapels and performance spaces is named. Its first president was Asa Mahan (1800-1889), who served as president from 1835-1850. Oberlin College 1909 (from LOC). ... Oberlin College 1909 (from LOC). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Jean-Frédéric Oberlin (German: Johann Friedrich Oberlin) (August 3, 1740 - June 1, 1826) was an Alsatian pastor and philanthropist. ... Elsaß redirects here. ... Charles Grandison Finney (1792-1875), often called Americas foremost revivalist, was a major leader of the Second Great Awakening in America that had a profound impact on the history of the United States. ... Asa Mahan (November 9, 1800, Vernon, New York - 1889), U.S. Congregational clergyman & educator; 1st pres. ...


The college was built on 500 acres (2 km²) of land specifically donated by the previous owner, who lived in Connecticut. Shipherd and Stewart's vision was for both a religious community and school. For a more detailed history of the founding of the town and the college, see Oberlin, Ohio. Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Oberlin is a city in Lorain County, Ohio, to the south and west of Cleveland. ...


Oberlin has long been associated with progressive causes. Its founders bragged that "Oberlin is peculiar in that which is good." Oberlin was the first college in the United States to regularly admit African-American students (1835). It is also the oldest continuously operating coeducational institution, since having admitted four women in 1837. These four women, who were the first to enter as full students, were Mary Kellogg (Fairchild), Mary Caroline Rudd, Mary Hosford, and Elizabeth Prall. All but Kellogg graduated. The college was listed as a National Historic Landmark on December 21, 1965 for its significance in admitting African-Americans and women.[3] Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


One historian called Oberlin, "the town that started the Civil War" due to its reputation as a hotbed of abolitionism.[4] Oberlin was a key stop along the Underground Railroad, station number 99. In 1858, both students and faculty were involved in the controversial Oberlin-Wellington Rescue of a fugitive slave, which received national press coverage. This heritage was commemorated on campus by the 1977 installation of sculptor Cameron Armstrong's "Underground Railroad Monument," a railroad track rising from the ground toward the sky.[5] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... This article is about a 19th-century slave escape route. ... The ‘’’Oberlin-Wellington Rescue’’’ was a landmark event in the Abolitionist movement before the American Civil War. ...


Pre 1950

Prior to 1950, most of Oberlin's students lived in large houses around town, some owned by the College, and others owned by individual landlords. Starting with the G.I. Bill and continuing with the Baby Boom, Oberlin's student body swelled during the years after World War II. The College's president, William Stevenson, decided to house this influx in large dormitories on campus. In Oberlin's own version of urban renewal, many wooden houses were torn down to make way for Dascomb Hall and its fraternal twin, Barrows Hall, both completed in 1956. Dascomb replaced the former residence of Dr. James Dascomb and Marianne Parker Dascomb, the first principal of the Oberlin Female Department. Dascomb Hall was specifically named after Mrs. Dascomb.[6] The Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 (better known as the G.I. Bill) provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as GIs or G.I.s) as well as one year of unemployment compensation. ... For further information, see Baby boomer. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Introduction of co-ed dormitories

In 1970, Oberlin made the cover of Life Magazine as one of the first colleges in the country to have co-ed dormitories. A cover of Life Magazine from 1911 Life has been the name of two notable magazines published in the United States. ...


Historian Geoffrey Blodgett, a professor and graduate of Oberlin, pointed out that campus dorms were a cause of anger among students during the 1960's. Students reacted vocally against the new dorms of the 1950s (Dascomb, East, North and South), calling them expedient "slabs" of "sleeping and feeding space,"[7] and this protest soon took on other controversies, including the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. Dascomb went from being the impetus for protest to the vehicle of social change in 1967 when it was transformed into a co-ed dorm during winter term of 1969. Hebrew House, as it was known, was set up as winter term project to operate similar to an Israeli kibbutz. In January 1969, with the approval of Dean of Students George Langeler, Dascomb became the first co-ed college dormitory in the United States. The experiment was a success, and now all but one of Oberlin College's dormitories are coed. The Baldwin Cottage dorm is open only to women and transgendered people. Geoffrey Blodgett (1931-November 15, 2001) was Robert S. Danforth Professor of History at Oberlin College, located in Oberlin, Ohio. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1960-1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Hebrew people. ... Kibbutz Merom Golan as seen from Bental mountain A Kibbutz (Hebrew: Translit. ... A transgender woman at New York Citys gay pride parade Transgender (IPA: , from trans (Latin) and gender (English)) is a general term applied to a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups involving tendencies that diverge from the normative gender role (woman or man) commonly, but not always, assigned at...


Sports teams

The school's varsity sports teams are the Yeomen and Yeowomen. They participate in the NCAA's Division III and the North Coast Athletic Conference. Oberlin's football team was the first team coached by legendary coach John Heisman, who led the team to a 7–0 record in 1892. Oberlin is the last college in Ohio to beat Ohio State (winning 7-6 in 1921). Though in modern times the football team was more famous for losing streaks of 40 games (1992–1996) and 44 games (1997–2001), the Yeomen have enjoyed limited success in recent years. The college also hosts several club sports teams, including the Oberlin Ultimate team. Oberlin Ultimate was founded in 1976 and is often among the top 10 teams in its region. Yeoman is an antiquated term for farmers, tradesmen and other members of the early English middle class. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The North Coast Athletic Conference (NCAC) is a US midwest NCAA Division III athletic conference. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... John Heisman John William Heisman (October 23, 1869 – October 3, 1936) was a prominent American football player and college football coach in the early era of the sport and is the namesake of the Heisman Trophy awarded annually to the seasons best college football player. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ...


Student Cooperative Association

The Oberlin Student Cooperative Association, or OSCA, is a non-profit corporation that houses 175 students and feeds 630 students in multiple sites. Its budget is nearly $2 million, making it the third-largest of its kind in North America,[citation needed] and by far the largest relative to the size of the institution whose students it serves.[citation needed] OSCA, or the Oberlin Student Cooperative Association, is a 1. ...


OSCA is entirely student-run, with all participating students working as cooks, buyers, administrators, organizers, and every participant is required to do at least one hour per week of cleaning, making sure that no one is valued above others. Most decisions within OSCA are made by Consensus. Oberlin bans all fraternities and sororities (although for generations the presence of underground African-American fraternal organizations has been rumored),[citation needed] making the co-ops the largest student-organized social system at the college. Consensus decision-making is a decision-making process that not only seeks the agreement of most participants, but also to resolve or mitigate the objections of the minority to achieve the most agreeable decision. ...


Academics

Of Oberlin's 2,800 or so students, roughly 2,200 are enrolled in the College of Arts & Sciences, a little over 400 in the Conservatory of Music, and the remaining 150 or so in both College and Conservatory under the five-year Double Degree program.Average SAT/ACT scores for advanced classes is around 27 - 29. Standard class scores are between 19 - 20.[8] Musician entering the Oberlin Conservatory The Oberlin Conservatory of Music, located in Oberlin, Ohio, was founded in 1865 and is the nations oldest continuously operating conservatory. ...


College of Arts & Sciences

Peters Hall, home of the language departments.
Peters Hall, home of the language departments.

The College of Arts & Sciences offers over 45 majors, minors and concentrations. Based on students graduating with a given major, its most popular majors over the last ten years have been (in order) English, Biology, History, Politics and Environmental Studies. Sciences are considered strong for a smaller liberal arts college, especially Chemistry and Neuroscience. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 669 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Peters Hall, home of the Department of Languages at Oberlin College. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 669 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Peters Hall, home of the Department of Languages at Oberlin College. ...


Allen Memorial Art Museum and Mudd Library

The Allen Memorial Art Museum, with over 12,000 holdings, was the first college art museum west of the Alleghenies and is held on par with those at Princeton, Harvard, and Yale.[9] The Oberlin College Library System is one of the largest undergraduate library systems in the nation, containing over 2 million volumes and 3,500 print subscriptions in five separate facilities (Main Library, Art Library, Conservatory of Music Library, Science Library and Carnegie Storage), a large Special Collections department with strengths in Oberliniana and anti-slavery material, and 62 staff. In addition to the breadth of its holdings, it is recognized for its quality: the library received the Association of College and Research Libraries Award for Excellence in 2002, and in 2006 Director of Libraries Ray English was named the ALA's "Academic/Research Librarian of the Year". The Allen Memorial Art Museum (abbreviated AMAM) is located in Oberlin, Ohio and is affiliated with Oberlin College. ...


OhioLINK consortium

Oberlin students and faculty benefit by Oberlin's membership in the OhioLINK consortium, providing access to 12,000+ commercially licensed online journals, 130 databases, 18,000+ ebooks and rapidly growing digital media collections. The OhioLINK Central Catalog represents the library holdings of 87 libraries in the state, including the State Library of Ohio, plus the Center for Research Libraries. The collection is nearing 10 million unique records representing 27.5 million holdings in the system, and undergraduates account for the larger percentage of OhioLINK online borrowing - the process by which any enrolled student can readily request the loan of books and other items from any other library in the system. The Ohio Library and Information Network, OhioLINK, is a consortium of Ohio’s college and university libraries and the State Library of Ohio. ...


Experimental College

The college's "Experimental College" or ExCo program, a student-run department, allows any student or interested person to teach their own class for a limited amount of college credit. ExCo classes by definition focus on material not covered by existing departments or faculty. Many courses supplement conventional disciplines, from languages and areas of cinema or literature, to musical ensembles, martial arts and forms of dancing. Other ExCos cover an array of topics, in the past ranging from Aquariums[10] to Wilderness Skills.[11] Due to the nature of ExCo, while some staple courses are continued for years, the overall number and selection of classes offered varies dramatically from semester to semester.[12] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who perform instrumental or vocal music. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ...


Winter Term

Another aspect of Oberlin's academics is the Winter Term during the month of January. This term was created to allow students to do something outside the regular course offerings of the college. Students may work alone or in groups, either on or off campus, and may design their own project or pick from a list of projects and internships set up by the college each year. Projects range from serious academic research with co-authorship in scientific journals, to humanitarian projects, to learning how to bartend. A full-credit project is suggested to involve five to six hours per weekday.[13]


Culture

Political activism

Students passing through the Memorial Arch in front of Peters Hall. The arch is dedicated to the memory of missionaries from Oberlin who were killed in the Boxer Rebellion.
Students passing through the Memorial Arch in front of Peters Hall. The arch is dedicated to the memory of missionaries from Oberlin who were killed in the Boxer Rebellion.

Oberlin students have a reputation for being radically liberal and/or progressive. Oberlin has a thriving LGBT community, and most students are well informed about the intricacies of gender politics. The college was ranked as the eleventh most politically active by the Princeton Review, in 2005. The college also received an A among so-called "hipster ivy leagues" in Robert Lanham's homage to the eponymous subjects of his 2003 Hipster Handbook, second to The Evergreen State College which received an A+. Students passing through the Oberlin Memorial Arch in front of Peters Hall on the campus of Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio (taken Sept. ... Students passing through the Oberlin Memorial Arch in front of Peters Hall on the campus of Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio (taken Sept. ... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire French Third Republic United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... Robert Lanham is the author of the satiric books The Hipster Handbook and Food Court Druids, Cherohonkees and Other Creatures Unique to the Republic. ... The Hipster Handbook (2003) is a satirical guide to hipster culture by Williamsburg, Brooklyn author Robert Lanham. ... The Evergreen signature clock tower The Evergreen State College is an accredited public liberal arts college and is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. ...


Student unrest following the arrests of protesters on the lawn of then-President S. Frederick Starr's home on April 13, 1990, and his ongoing struggles with the faculty, were major factors in his eventual departure from Oberlin. Recent activism among the student body has resulted in a campus-wide ban on sales of Coca-Cola products[14] and a vote of no confidence in the college's president at the time, Nancy S. Dye, in May 2005.[15] This vote, as well as similar actions by the faculty, likely played a role in her resignation in September of 2006. S. Frederick Starr (b. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... A Motion of No Confidence, also called Motion of Non Confidence is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ... Nancy S. Dye is the 13th president of Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio. ...


A sampling of the school's past commencement speakers reflects its reputation for embracing diversity, ranging from Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Jesse L. Jackson to figures as varied as Pete Seeger and Robert Frost; even Adlai Stevenson appeared, a month prior to his death. Archbishop Desmond Tutu Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born October 7, 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Jesse Jackson The Reverend Jesse Louis Jackson Sr. ... Peter Seeger (born May 3, 1919), better known as Pete Seeger, is a folk singer, political activist, and a key figure in the mid-20th century American folk music revival. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ...


Conservative blogger Michelle Malkin attended Oberlin, showing the politically diverse voice of the campus. Michelle Malkin (née Maglalang) (born October 20, 1970) is a socially and politically conservative American columnist, blogger, author and political commentator. ...


Music

Conservatory of Music at Oberlin College
Conservatory of Music at Oberlin College

The top-ranked Oberlin Conservatory of Music is located on the Oberlin College campus. Conservatory admission is rigorous, with over 1400 applicants worldwide auditioning for 120 seats. As a result, the quality of Oberlin's artistic community is high. Students benefit from over 500 performances yearly, most free of charge, with concerts and recitals almost daily. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3504 × 2336 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3504 × 2336 pixel, file size: 5. ... Musician entering the Oberlin Conservatory The Oberlin Conservatory of Music, located in Oberlin, Ohio, was founded in 1865 and is the nations oldest continuously operating conservatory. ...


In addition, Oberlin has a myriad of musical opportunities available for amateur musicians and students in the college. The Oberlin Gilbert and Sullivan Players (OGASP) perform one Gilbert and Sullivan operetta each semester. The entirely student-run Oberlin College Marching band (OCMB), founded in 1998, performs at football games throughout the year. There are a number of a cappella groups, including the Obertones (all-male), Nothing But Treble (all-female), and the Offbeats (co-ed). In addition, students in the college can form chamber groups and receive coaching through the conservatory. Student composers also provide a demand for musicians to perform their work. W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... This article is about the vocal technique. ... Chamber music is a form of classical music, written for a small group of instruments which traditionally could be accommodated in a palace chamber. ...


The college radio station WOBC, and the party circuit (including the popular on-campus venue, The 'Sco) contribute to the campus music scene. Many alumni have pursued careers in popular and indie music, including members of the bands Come, Deerhoof, Liz Phair, Josh Ritter, Songs: Ohia, The Sea and Cake, Tortoise, Trans Am, Sleepytime Gorilla Museum, and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Due in part to both this and the school's proximity to Cleveland, the college attracts touring artists with a frequency nearly unparalleled among institutions of its size. WOBC is the student operated radio station of Oberlin College, located in Oberlin, Ohio. ... in music that is characterized by its perceived independence from mainstream or pop culture as a whole. ... Hej, jeg kan flyve :) ... Deerhoof is a San Francisco musical group, currently consisting of Satomi Matsuzaki (usually vocals and bass), John Dieterich (usually guitar) and Greg Saunier (usually drums). ... Liz Phair (born Elizabeth Clark Phair on April 17, 1967 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Josh Ritter is an American singer-songwriter born in Moscow, Idaho in 1976. ... Songs: Ohia is largely a solo project for singer-songwriter Jason Molina. ... The Sea and Cake, is a post rock band, formed in Chicago, Illinois. ... Tortoise, an instrumental rock band, formed in Chicago, Illinois in 1990. ... Trans Am is a three-piece band that performs a mix of synth pop and rock music. ... Sleepytime Gorilla Museum (often abbreviated to SGM) are an American avant-rock band, formed in 1999 in Oakland, California. ... Yeah Yeah Yeahs are a Grammy Award-nominated New York City-based rock band. ... Cleveland redirects here. ...


Oberlin College is also home to the steel drum ensemble Oberlin Steel, which has performed at venues including Central Park, New York's Lincoln Center, and the Lincoln Memorial. Oberlin Steel is a steel band based at Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio. ...


Art

Oberlin's museum has a unique art rental program. At the beginning of every semester students camp out in front of the north gate of the college's Allen Memorial Art Museum to get first pick of original etchings, lithographs and paintings by artists including Renoir, Warhol, Dalí, and Picasso. For five dollars per semester, students can hang these works on their dorm room walls. The program was started in the 1940s by Ellen Johnson, a professor of art at Oberlin, in order to "develop the aesthetic sensibilities of students and encourage ordered thinking and discrimination in other areas of their lives."[16] The Allen Memorial Art Museum (abbreviated AMAM) is located in Oberlin, Ohio and is affiliated with Oberlin College. ... Pierre-Auguste Renoir (February 25, 1841–December 3, 1919) was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. ... Andy Warhol (August 6, 1928 - February 22, 1987) was an American painter and major figure in the pop art movement. ... Salvador Dalí as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten Salvador Felip Jacint Dalí Domènech (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989) was an important Catalan-Spanish painter, best known for his surrealist works. ... A young Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso, formally Pablo Ruiz Picasso, (October 25, 1881 - April 8, 1973) was one of the recognized masters of 20th century art. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ...


Events

Oberlin annually holds a Safer Sex Night and the Drag Ball, school-sponsored parties. The former originated in the 1980s as a response to the AIDS crisis, and features costumes, dancing, workshops, and free safe sex supplies provided by the Sexual Information Center.[17] The latter is the last event of Transgender Awareness Week. Two of the largest events on campus each year, they draw large crowds of students, as well as criticism from social conservatives. Safe sex (also called safer sex) is a term describing practices designed to reduce the risk of sustaining or imparting sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) (also known as sexually-transmitted diseases or STDs in the US). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


Athletics

Football

Oberlin played its first football game in 1891, going 2 and 2 that season. In 1892, they were coached by John Heisman; Oberlin went 7 and 0, beating Ohio State twice by scores of 40-0 and 50-0 and the University of Michigan. They outscored opponents 262 to 30. John Heisman John William Heisman (October 23, 1869 – October 3, 1936) was a prominent American football player and college football coach in the early era of the sport and is the namesake of the Heisman Trophy awarded annually to the seasons best college football player. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ...


Oberlin was one of the founding members of the Ohio Athletic Conference in 1902, along with Case, Kenyon College, Ohio State, Ohio Wesleyan University and Western Reserve. The league commonly was known as the "Big Six." Ohio State joined the Big Ten in 1913. Ohio State's all-time highest margin of victory was a 128-0 thrashing of Oberlin in 1916. Oberlin is the last in-state school to defeat Ohio State. The Yeomen upset the Buckeyes 7-6 at Ohio Field in Columbus in 1921. Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Kenyon College is a private liberal arts college in Gambier, Ohio, founded in 1824 by Bishop Philander Chase of the The Episcopal Church, in parallel with the Bexley Hall seminary. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... “OWU” redirects here. ... Big Ten can refer to: Big Ten Conference, a college athletics conference Big Ten (movie studios), the largest movie studios in Hollywood This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


The Oberlin teams of 1994 to 2000 have been rated the fifth worst college football team of all time by ESPN.com's Page 2. In 1994, Oberlin lost all nine games of its season scoring only ten points and giving up 358 points. In 1995, the Yeomen were outscored 469 to 72. In August 1996, Sports Illustrated featured Oberlin in its annual College Football Preview as the worst team in Division III. After four winless seasons from 1993 to 1996, Oberlin opened its 1997 season with an 18-17 victory over Thiel College sparking post-game jubilation with fans rushing the field. The victory garnered national attention as ESPN featured it on SportsCenter. Oberlin would not win again for years. Swarthmore College and Oberlin scheduled a 1999 matchup, with both schools nursing long losing streaks, just so one of them could end their streak. Oberlin lost 6-42 and continued a 40-game losing streak, ending it with a 53-22 victory over Kenyon College at home in October 2001.[18][19] The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Thiel College is a liberal arts, sciences and professional studies college related to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and located in Greenville, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Swarthmore College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States with an enrollment of about 1,450 students. ... Kenyon College is a private liberal arts college in Gambier, Ohio, founded in 1824 by Bishop Philander Chase of the The Episcopal Church, in parallel with the Bexley Hall seminary. ...


Since then the team has enjoyed modest success, staying competitive in most matches and going 5-5 (with better than .500 records in conference) in 2003, 2006, and 2007.


Ultimate

Oberlin has both a men's and a women's Ultimate team, known as the Flying Horsecows and the Preying Manti[20] respectively. The Horsecows have made trips to College Nationals in 1992, 1995, 1997, and 1999. The Manti qualified for Nationals for the first time in 1997. Both teams also maintain a tradition of emphasizing the spirit of Ultimate. Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ...


Notable alumni

Oberlin has graduated three Nobel Laureates and six MacArthur Fellows. Alumni have achieved success in a variety of fields and include the mayor of Washington, D.C.; the co-founder of Ben & Jerry's; the physicist who measured the charge of an electron; the first African American major league baseball player; a former executive director of Amnesty International; a Tony- and Emmy-winning director; a professional wrestler; a lesbian cartoonist; as well as musicians, playwrights, novelists, and activists and commentators spanning the political spectrum. The people listed alphabetically below studied at Oberlin College. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... Ben & Jerrys is a brand of ice cream, frozen yogurt, sorbet, and ice cream novelty products, manufactured by Ben & Jerrys Homemade Holdings, Inc. ...


In popular culture

Oberlin was mentioned in the popular 2004 American movie Eurotrip as the school that the main character attends at the end of the film. It is a joke referring the fact that the plot of the movie has the main character trying to find a girl in Berlin, Germany only to be united with her at the college in Ohio, which sounds like "Oh Berlin." Humorously, the campus portrayed in the movie bears little resemblance to the actual Oberlin campus, including a lake that is conspicuously absent in real life. EuroTrip is a 2004 American comedy film produced by the same people as Road Trip and Old School. ...


The protagonist in H.P. Lovecraft's horror short story The Shadow Over Innsmouth spends his senior year at Oberlin. Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... The Shadow Over Innsmouth is a novella by H.P. Lovecraft. ...


Oberlin features prominently in the novel The Color of Light by William Goldman, an alumnus of the college. William Goldman (born August 12, 1931) is an American novelist, playwright and two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ...


Richard Orloff's play Vietnam 101: The War on Campus depicts the turmoil that occurred on the Oberlin Campus in the 1960s and 1970s as a result of the Vietnam War.[21]


References

  1. ^ National Association of College and University Business Officers 2007 Endowment Study.
  2. ^ US interagency 2003 report of earned doctorates, pg81.
  3. ^ National Historic Landmarks Program - Oberlin College. Retrieved on 8 May, 2007.
  4. ^ Brandt, Nat (1990). The town that started the Civil War. Syracuse University Press. ISBN 0-8156-0243-X.
  5. ^ Underground Railroad Monument
  6. ^ Oberlin College Archives
  7. ^ Blodgett, Geoffrey (May 11, 1995). "The Grand March of Oberlin campus plans". Oberlin Observer. Vol. 16 No. 17 Sec. Observations. (web archive: http://www.oberlin.edu/observer/observer16.17/observations.html)
  8. ^ Office of Admissions (web link: http://www.oberlin.edu/coladm/about/stats/enrollment2005.html)
  9. ^ Short Tour: Allen Art Museum
  10. ^ Fall 2002 Exco course listing
  11. ^ Spring 2003 Exco course listing
  12. ^ EXCO Committee)
  13. ^ Office of Winter Term (web link: http://oberlin.edu/winterterm/)
  14. ^ Taylor, Samantha (November 19, 2004). "College set to ban Coca-Cola". Oberlin Review (web link: http://www.oberlin.edu/stupub/ocreview/2004/11/19/news/article1.html)
  15. ^ Keating, Josh (May 13, 2005). "Students vote 'no-confidence' in Nancy Dye". Oberlin Review (web link: http://www.oberlin.edu/stupub/ocreview/2005/5/13/news/article1.html)
  16. ^ Angell, Sue (September 26, 2005). "Art Rental Still Going Strong After 60 Years". OBERLIN Online: News and Features. (web link: http://oberlin.edu/news-info/05sep/art.html)
  17. ^ SIC | Sexual Information Center
  18. ^ Page2 Staff. "Worst college football teams of all time". ESPN.com's Page2. (web link: http://espn.go.com/page2/s/list/colfootball/teams/worst.html)
  19. ^ 2006 Oberlin College Football Media Guide (web link:http://www.oberlin.edu/athletic/publications/football_2006.pdf , page 39)
  20. ^ The Preying Manti
  21. ^ THE PLAYS OF RICH ORLOFF - Vietnam 101: The War On Campus

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Geoffrey Blodgett (1931-November 15, 2001) was Robert S. Danforth Professor of History at Oberlin College, located in Oberlin, Ohio. ... Among other things, Page2 is a feature of www. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
The North Coast Athletic Conference (NCAC) is a US midwest NCAA Division III athletic conference. ... Allegheny College is a private liberal arts college located in northwestern Pennsylvania which prides itself as being one of the oldest colleges in the United States. ... Denison University is a highly selective private liberal arts and sciences college in Granville, Ohio, approximately 30 miles (50 km) east of Columbus. ... Earlham College is a national, selective Quaker liberal arts college in Richmond, Indiana. ... Hiram College is a liberal arts college located in Hiram, Ohio. ... Kenyon College is a private liberal arts college in Gambier, Ohio, founded in 1824 by Bishop Philander Chase of the The Episcopal Church, in parallel with the Bexley Hall seminary. ... “OWU” redirects here. ... , Wabash College is a small private liberal arts college for men, located in Crawfordsville, Indiana. ... Wittenberg University, located in Springfield, Ohio, is a private, four-year liberal arts college affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. ... The College of Wooster is a private liberal arts college primarily known for its Independent Study program (see below). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Oberlin College: Information from Answers.com (2492 words)
Oberlin was the first college in the United States to regularly admit African-American students (1835), and is also the oldest continuously operating coeducational institution.
Oberlin College is a member of the Great Lakes Colleges Association and The Five Colleges of Ohio consortium, including Ohio Wesleyan University, Denison University, Kenyon College, and The College of Wooster.
Oberlin attained prominence because of the influence of its second president, the evangelist Charles Finney, after whom one of the College's chapels, also a prominent performance space, is named.
Oberlin College - WikiEDU (884 words)
The town of Oberlin and the college were founded in 1833 by two Presbyterian ministers, who named the area after the Alsatian minister Jean Frederic Oberlin.
Oberlin is considered by at least one historian to be the town that started the Civil War.
Oberlin's most notable athletic records are perhaps the football team's losing streaks: 40 games lost in a row between 1992 and 1996, and 44 in a row from 1997 to 2001.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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