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Encyclopedia > Oakwood College

Oakwood College

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Motto Education. Excellence. Eternity.
Established 1896
Type Private
President Delbert Baker
Students 1,800
Location Huntsville, AL, USA
Campus Suburban
Colors Blue       and Gold      
Website www.oakwood.edu

Oakwood College is a historically black college located in Huntsville, Alabama. It is affiliated with the Seventh-day Adventist Church. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Delbert W. Baker is a Seventh-day Adventist minister, author, educator and administrator. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Huntsville is the county seat of Madison County, Alabama. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Huntsville, Alabama (top center), near the Tennessee border, is north of Birmingham and northeast of Decatur, across the Tennessee River flowing northwest. ... The Seventh-day Adventist (abbreviated Adventist[1]) Church is a Christian denomination which is distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week, as the Sabbath. ...


Oakwood College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and the Department of Education of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists to award the associate and baccalaureate degrees. Oakwood College was approved by SACS in June 2007 to begin its first master's degree program (Master of Arts degree in Pastoral Studies). The college aims to offer a liberal arts curriculum in a Christ-centered atmosphere. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ...


Oakwood has performed well in external rankings, having listed on a regular basis among the top 15-20 institutions of higher learning that provide African-Americans to medical schools. [1]

Contents

History

Oakwood College was founded in 1896 as Oakwood Industrial School. The school was located on land that had previously been a plantation. Legend has it that the school was named for a stand of oak trees found on the campus.


The school first opened in 1896 with 16 students. Classes were offered in various trades and skills. In 1904, the name was changed to Oakwood Manual Training School, and it was chartered to grant degrees in 1907. In 1917, the school offered its first instruction at the postsecondary level, and in that same year it changed its name to Oakwood Junior College. In 1944, the present name, Oakwood College, was adopted. The first bachelor’s degrees were awarded in 1945.


Oakwood College has been a member institution of the United Negro College Fund since 1964. United Negro College Fund logo The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is a Fairfax, Virginia-based American philanthropic organization that fundraises college tuition money for African-American students and general scholarship funds for 39 historically black colleges and universities. ...


Campus

Moran Hall, one of the oldest buildings on campus
Moran Hall, one of the oldest buildings on campus

Oakwood College owns 1,185 acres (5 km²) in Huntsville, Alabama. The main campus consists of 23 buildings spread across 105 acres (0.4 km²). Another 500 acres (2 km²) under cultivation. Building developments are continuing. The J. L. Moran Hall, completed in 1944 and named after the first Black president of Oakwood College, stands with more recently erected buildings such as the McKee Business & Technology Building, completed in 2002. Image File history File linksMetadata Moran_hall2. ...


The college also houses a branch office of the Ellen G. White Estate. The Ellen G. White Estate, Incorporated, or simply the (Ellen) White Estate, is the official organization created by Ellen G. White to act as the custodian of her writings. ...


The campus has two major construction projects that are currently in progress. One project is the Bradford-Cleveland-Brooks (BCB) Leadership Center. This building will house a training center for evangelists and ministers as well as provide more room for the Department of Religion and Theology. This building will also be used to introduce the first master's degree program for the college (Master of Arts degree in Pastoral Studies). The BCB Leadership Center is scheduled to be completed in November 2007. The second project is Holland Hall, a new male residence hall complex which will house approximately 300 students. This complex will be completed in spring 2008.


Student life

Students at Oakwood College, or "Oakwoodites" as they are sometimes called, either live on campus in any of the five residence halls/areas, rent an apartment from the school's own West Oaks Apartment Complex, or live in the Huntsville/Madison area or beyond. Freshmen males live in the Peterson Hall dormitory while freshmen women live in Carter Hall. There are two more residential complexes for women: Wade Hall and the Annex are for senior female students. Edwards Hall is the dormitory for senior male students. A new male residence hall to be named Holland Hall is now under construction and will open in the spring of 2008.


The majority of the student body are members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Weekly church services are held at the campus church. Friday evening vespers services (AYS) are held weekly as are Religion & Theology Forums.


Basketball and football are the major sports on campus, with intramural basketball activities taking place during the spring semesters. The school's basketball teams are the Oakwood College Ambassadors and Lady Ambassadors.


The school is noted for its touring choir, the Aeolians[citation needed]. The Aeolians was founded in 1946 by former professor, Dr. Eva B. Dykes[citation needed]. Other musical ensembles on campus include the Oakwood College Choir and gospel choirs Dynamic Praise and the Voices of Triumph.


Oakwood began offering graduate courses in 2007. In January 2008, Oakwood College will become Oakwood University.


Oakwood College Histories

Two books have been written about the history of Oakwood College: Oakwood! A Vision Splendid and A Place Called Oakwood.


Oakwood! A Vision Splendid


Oakwood! A Vision Splendid was written by Dr. Mervyn A. Warren in 1996 to celebrate Oakwood's century of existence. The book is 280 pages long and contains information and photographs not previously published about Oakwood. Dr. Warren is currently the Provost and Senior Vice President at Oakwood.


A Place Called Oakwood


A Place Called Oakwood is a 180-page history of the first 20 years of Oakwood. It was edited by Benjamin J. Baker, an almnus of Oakwood and educator and author.


Notable Alumni

  • Alvin Chea - Member of the gospel group Take 6
  • Little Richard (Penniman) - Rock and Roll pioneer
  • Walter Wraggs Fordham - Author, president of several SDA regional conferences
  • Claude McKnight - Member of the gospel group Take 6
  • Joel "Joey" Kibble - Member of the gospel group Take 6
  • Mark Kibble - Member of the gospel group Take 6
  • Mervyn Warren - Member of the gospel group Take 6
  • Ebony Holland (Trotter) - Member of the gospel group Virtue
  • Heather Martin (Trotter) - Member of the gospel group Virtue
  • Brian McKnight - R&B Singer/musician, and also brother of alumnus Claude McKnight
  • John F. Street - Mayor of Philadelphia
  • Barry Black- Chaplain of the U.S. Senate
  • Clifton Davis- Actor, Songwriter
  • Angela Brown- Soprano Opera Singer
  • Dr. Earl Moore- Pastor, Civil Rights Activist
  • Brenda Blackmon Wood- News Anchor, WXIA-TV
  • E. E. Cleveland- Renowned Evangelist, Author, Civil Rights Activist
  • C. D. Brooks - Renowned Evangelist
  • Shari Loveday- Playwright from Christian Fellowship Halla
  • Wintley Phipps- Pastor, Founder and President of U.S. Dream Academy
  • Frank Hale- Famed administrator of Ohio State University
  • Dr. Delbert Baker- Administrator, educator, author and president of Oakwood College (currently serves on the White House Board for HBCUs)
  • Henry M. Wright- Renowned Evangelist

Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Take 6 is an American a cappella gospel music sextet formed in 1985 on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Take 6 is an American a cappella gospel music sextet formed in 1985 on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Take 6 is an American a cappella gospel music sextet formed in 1985 on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Take 6 is an American a cappella gospel music sextet formed in 1985 on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Take 6 is an American a cappella gospel music sextet formed in 1985 on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Ebony Holland is a Gospel singer and a founding member of the gospel group Virtue. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Virtue is a popular Gospel music group. ... Heather Martin is a Gospel singer, and a current member of the gospel group Virtue with her sisters Ebony Holland and Karima Kibble. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Virtue is a popular Gospel music group. ... Brian McKnight on the cover of his 2005 album Gemini Brian McKnight (born June 5, 1969 in Buffalo, New York) is a Grammy nominated American singer, songwriter, arranger, producer and one of the prominent singers of his years, specializing in pop and R&B. He is a multi-instrumentalist and... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... John Franklin Street (born October 15, 1943) is the 97th Mayor of the City of Philadelphia. ... Barry Black is the 62nd Chaplain of the United States Senate. ... Clifton Davis (born October 4, 1945) is an American actor who has appeared on television shows such as Thats My Mama (on which he had the lead role) in the 1970s and on Amen in the 1980s. ... Image:Angie photo1. ... Wintley Augustus Phipps (b. ... Delbert W. Baker is a Seventh-day Adventist minister, author, educator and administrator. ...

See also

Trivia

The famous slave Dred Scott once lived and worked on a plantation that eventually became part of Oakwood's campus. Dred Scott Dred Scott (ca. ...


Famous people who have visited: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Julius Erving (Dr. J), Muhammad Ali, Debbye Turner (Miss America 1990), Marla Gibbs, Peabo Bryson, Florence Griffith Joyner, Kirk Franklin, Trin-i-tee 5:7, Willie Gary, Gen. Colin Powell, Hon. Johnnie Cochran, Sheryl Lee Ralph, and Dr. Benjamin Carson Martin Luther King Jr. ... Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a former American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Debbye Turner was born September 19, 1965 in Honolulu, where her father was serving in the military. ... Marla Gibbs (June 14, 1931, Chicago, Illinois) is an Golden Globe winning and Emmy Award nominated African American actress, primarily in sitcoms, movies and television. ... Peabo Bryson (born Robert Peabo Bryson on April 13, 1951) is an American R&B and soul singer, born in Greenville, South Carolina. ... Florence Griffith-Joyner, also known as Flo-Jo (December 21, 1959 – September 21, 1998) was an American athlete, still holder of the World Records in the 100 m and 200 m as of 2006. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Willie E. Gary (born on July 12, 1947), once a migrant worker, is an attorney, motivational speaker and cable television executive. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Johnnie L. Cochran, Jr. ... Sheryl Lee Ralph (born on December 30, 1956 in Waterbury, Connecticut, USA) is an African-American actress and singer of Jamaican descent, best known for her work in musical theatre productions such as Dreamgirls, her co-starring role in the 1980s television sitcom Its A Living and as Brandy... Dr. Ben Carson Ben Carson (born September 18, 1951) is a renowned American neurosurgeon. ...


Oakwood Bibliography

Baker, B.J. 2007. A Place Called Oakwood. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Baker, B.J. 2005. Crucial Moments. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Baker, D.W. 1996. Telling the Story. Loma Linda, CA: Loma Linda University Printing Services.


Brown, W.J., comp. 1972. Chronology of Seventh-day Adventist Education. Washington, DC: Department of Education, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.


Cadwallader, E.M. 1958. A History of Seventh-day Adventist Education. Lincoln, NE: Union College Press.


Dudley, C.E. 1997. Thou Who Hast Brought Us. Brushton, NY: Teach Services, Inc.


Dudley, C.E. 2000. Thou Who Hast Brought Us Thus Far on Our Way. Mansfield, OH: Bookmasters Inc.


Fordham, W.W. 1990. Righteous Rebel. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Graybill, R.D. 1970. E.G. White and Church Race Relations. Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Graybill, R.D. 1971. Mission to Black America. Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Greenleaf, F. 2005. In Passion for the World. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association.


Hale, Jr., Frank W. 1996. Angels Watching Over Me. Nashville, TN: James C. Winston Publishing Company.


Hale, Jr., Frank W. ed. 2006. How Black Colleges Empower Black Students. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.


Hilde, R. 1980. Showdown: Can SDA Education Pass the Test? Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Hodgen, M. 1978. School Bells and Gospel Trumpets: A Documentary History of Seventh-day Adventist Education in North America. Loma Linda, CA: Adventist Heritage Publications, Loma Linda University Press.


Knight, G.R. 1999. A Brief History of Seventh-day Adventists. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Justiss, J. 1975. Angels in Ebony. Toledo, OH: Jet Printing Services.


Land, G. 1998. Adventism in America. Berrien Springs, MI: Andrews University Press.


Land, G. 2005. Dictionary of Seventh-day Adventists. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, Inc.


Malcolm, Roy, ed. 1999. The Aeolians: Directors Recall Precious Memories. Huntsville, AL: Oakwood College Press.


Marshall, N., and S. Norman III, eds. 1989. A Star Gives Light. Decatur, GA: Southern Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.


Olsen, M.E. 1925. Origin and Progress of Seventh-day Adventists. Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Reynolds, L.B. 1984. We Have Tomorrow. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Rock, C.B. 1994. Go On! Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Rock, C.B. ed. 1996. Perspectives. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Schwarz, R.W. 2000. Light Bearers. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press.


Sepulveda, C., ed. 1997. Ellen White on the Color Line. Huntsville, AL: Biblos Press.


Sepulveda, C., ed. 2003. The Ladies of Oakwood. Huntsville, AL: Oakwood College Press.


Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia. 1976. Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Spalding, A.W. 1961. Origin and history of Seventh-day Adventists, 4 vols. Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association.


Spalding, A.W. Lights and Shades in the Black Belt. (unpublished book manuscript) Washington, DC. Ellen G. White Estate File: DF3471-1.


Warren, M.A. 1996. Oakwood! A Vision Splendid. Collegedale, TN: College Press.


White, A.L. 1981-1986. Ellen G. White, vols. 4-6. Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association.

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References

  1. ^ [1]

  Results from FactBites:
 
GC Bulletin 10: Oakwood College Report (1171 words)
Oakwood College Archives: Located on the lower floor of the library, the newly expanded Oakwood College Archives houses the largest collection of African-American records and memorabilia in the world.
The academic program is thriving; Oakwood College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
Oakwood remains committed to its God-given vision of Christ-centered education and focused on its Bible-based mission of teaching and learning in the context of the three angels’ messages (Rev. 14:6-12).
Oakwood College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (90 words)
Oakwood College is a historically fl college located in Huntsville, Alabama.
Historically fl universities and colleges in the U.S. Madison County, Alabama
Universities and colleges affiliated with the Seventh-day Adventist Church
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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