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Encyclopedia > Oak Island

Coordinates: 44°31′00″N, 64°17′57″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Oak Island, Nova Scotia.
Oak Island, Nova Scotia.

Oak Island is a 140 acre (570,000 m²) island in Lunenberg County on the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada. The tree-covered island is one of about 360 small islands in Mahone Bay, and rises to a maximum of 35 feet (11 m) above sea level. Oak Island arial view Oak Island is a barrier island on the Atlantic coast of southeastern North Carolina in Brunswick County. ... Oak Island is a town located in Brunswick County, North Carolina. ... Oak Island, Minnesota is the name of an island and a post office on that island in Lake of the Woods, on the Minnesota/Ontario border. ... Download high resolution version (777x609, 94 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (777x609, 94 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Lunenburg County is a county located on the South Shore of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... Mahone Bay is a bay located on the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia, Canada along the eastern end of Lunenburg County. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...

Contents

The Money Pit

Oak Island is noted as the location of the so-called Money Pit, a site of numerous excavations to recover treasure believed by many to be buried there. The island is privately owned and advance permission is required for any visitation. Rescue excavation in Southwark, London by the Museum of London Excavation is the best-known and most commonly used technique within the science of archaeology. ... Treasure Originates from the Greek work the(from Greek θησαυρος; thesaurus, meaning a treasure of words, is a cognate) is a concentration of riches, often one which is considered lost or forgotten until being rediscovered. ...


Early history

Mid-19th century newspaper stories recount that, in 1795, 16 year old Donald Daniel McGinnis discovered a circular depression on the south eastern end of the island with an adjacent tree which had a tackle block on one of its overhanging branches. McGinnis, with the help of friends John Smith and Anthony Vaughan, excavated the depression and discovered a layer of flagstones a few feet below. On the pit walls there were visible markings from a pick. As they dug down they discovered layers of logs at about every ten feet (3 m). They abandoned the excavation at 30 feet (10 m). Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This block and tackle on a davit of the Mercator is used to help lower a boat. ... Flagstone is a type of flat stone, usually used for paving slabs, but also for making fences or roofing. ...


About eight years later, according to the original nineteenth century article, and the memories of Vaughan, another company examined what was to become known as the Money Pit. The Onslow Company sailed 300 nautical miles from central Nova Scotia near Truro to Oak Island with the goal of recovering what they believed to be secret treasure. They continued the excavation down to approximately 90 feet (27.43 m), and found layers of logs or "marks" about every ten feet (3 m) and layers of charcoal, putty and coconut fibre at 40, 50 and 60 feet (12, 15 and 18 m). A nautical mile is a unit of distance, or, as physical scientists like to call it, length. ... One of Truros tree sculptures Truro (2001 population 11,457; area population 44,276) is a town in central Nova Scotia, Canada. ... Charcoal is the blackish residue consisting of impure carbon obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. ... PuTTY is a free software SSH, Telnet, rlogin, and raw TCP client. ... Binomial name L. For other uses, see Coconut (disambiguation). ... For the meaning of fiber in nutrition, see dietary fiber. ...


According to one of the earliest written accounts, a newspaper article called "The Oak Island Diggings" from the Liverpool Transcript (Oct 1862), at 80 or 90 feet (27 m) they recovered a large stone bearing an inscription of symbols reading: "forty feet below, two million pounds lie buried." The pit subsequently flooded up to the 33-foot (10 m) level. Bailing did not reduce the water level and the excavation was abandoned. Liverpool (2001 pop. ... “GBP” redirects here. ...


Investors formed The Truro Company in 1849, which re-excavated the shaft back down to the 86 foot (26 m) level, where it flooded again. They then drilled into the ground below the bottom of the shaft. According to the nineteenth century account, the drill or "pod auger" passed through a spruce platform at 98 feet (30 m), a 12-inch head space, 22 inches (560 mm) of what was described as "metal in pieces", 8 inches (200 mm) of oak, another 22 inches (560 mm) of metal, 4 inches (100 mm) of oak, another spruce layer, and finally into clay for 7 feet without striking anything else. 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Species About 35; see text. ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ...


Documented history

The Money Pit was first mentioned in print by the Liverpool Transcript in October, 1856. More accounts followed in the Liverpool Transcript, the Novascotian newspaper and A History Of Lunenburg County *, but this last account was based on the earlier Liverpool Transcript articles and does not represent an independent source. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Liverpool (2001 pop. ... This article is about the Oak Island in Nova Scotia. ...


The next excavation attempt was made in 1861 by a new company called the Oak Island Association and apparently led to the collapse of the bottom of the shaft into a suspected void or booby trap underneath. The first fatality during excavations occurred when the boiler of a pumping engine burst.[1] The company gave up when their funds were exhausted in 1864. 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... This article is about an antipersonnel trap designed for use against humans. ... An electrically driven pump (electropump) for waterworks near the Hengsteysee, Germany. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Further excavations were made in 1866, 1893, 1909, 1931,1935, 1936, and 1959, none of which were successful. Another fatality occurred in 1887, when a worker fell to his death.[1] Franklin Roosevelt (later President of the United States) was part of the Old Gold Salvage group of 1909 and kept up with news and developments for most of his life. About six people have been killed in accidents during various excavations. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A railing accidentally collapses at a college football game, spilling fans onto the sidelines An accident is something going wrong unexpectedly. ...


In 1928, a New York newspaper printed a feature story about the strange history of the island. Gilbert Hedden, operator of a steel fabricating concern, saw the article and was fascinated by the engineering problems in recovering the putative treasure. Hedden collected books and articles on the island, and made six trips there. Wholly convinced that there was buried treasure on Oak Island, Mr. Hedden even ventured to England to converse with Harold Tom Wilkins, the author of Captain Kidd and His Skeleton Island. Gilbert believed he had found a link between Oak Island and a mysterious map in Wilkins' book. Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “NY” redirects here. ... Gilbert D. Hedden of Chatham, New Jersey, achieved the most remarkable progress towards solving the Oak Island treasure mystery. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ...


The very wealthy Hedden then bought the southeast end of the island. He did not start digging until the summer of 1935, following excavations by William Chappell in 1931. In 1939, he even informed King George VI of England about developments on Oak Island. George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George) (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ...


The 1931 excavations by William Chappell sank a 163 foot shaft 12x14 feet to the southwest of what they believed was the site of the 1897 shaft, close to the original pit. At 127 feet, a number of artifacts, including an axe, anchor fluke, and pick were found. The pick has been identified as a Cornish miner's poll pick. By this time the entire area around the Money Pit was littered with the debris and refuse of numerous prior excavation attempts so it is unlikely the pick belonged to the original party (if any) that created the hole, however, that is not known with certainty. 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... In archaeology, an artifact or artefact is any object made or modified by a human culture, and often one later recovered by some archaeological endeavor. ...


Excavation by the Restall family in the early 1960s ended tragically when four men died when overcome by fumes in a shaft near the beach. In 1965, Robert Dunfield leased the island and, using a 70-ton digging crane with a clam bucket, dug out the pit area to a depth of 134 feet (41 m) and width of 100 feet (30 m). The removed soil was carefully inspected for artifacts. Transportation of the crane to the island required the construction of a causeway (which still exists) from the western end of the island to Crandall's Point on the mainland two hundred meters away.[1] Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... A modern crawler type derrick crane with outriggers. ... Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland Technically, soil forms the pedosphere: the interface between the lithosphere (rocky part of the planet) and the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. ... The Hindenburgdamm rail causeway across the Wadden Sea to the island of Sylt in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany In modern usage, a causeway is a road or railway elevated by a bank, usually across a broad body of water or wetland. ...


Around 1967, Daniel C. Blankenship and David Tobias formed Triton Alliance, Ltd. and bought most of the island. In 1971, Triton workers excavated a 235 foot (72 m) shaft supported by a steel caisson to bedrock. Cameras lowered down the shaft into a cave below were said to have recorded the presence of some chests, human remains, wooden cribbing and tools, but the images were unclear and none of these claims have been confirmed. The shaft subsequently collapsed and the excavation was again abandoned. This shaft was later successfully re-dug to 181 feet, reaching bedrock; work was halted due to lack of funds and the collapse of the partnership. Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... The steel cable of a colliery winding tower. ... In engineering, a caisson is a retaining, watertight structure used, for example, to work on the foundations of a bridge pier, for the construction of a concrete dam, or for the repair of ships. ... Large format camera lens. ... Lechuguilla Cave, New Mexico A cave is a natural underground void large enough for a human to enter. ... Bedrock is the native consolidated rock underlying the Earths surface. ...


The "Money Pit Mystery" was the subject of an episode of the television series In Search of... which first aired January 18, 1979, bringing the legend of Oak Island to a wider audience. Previously the story had only been known among locals, treasure hunting groups, and readers of sensational magazines and anthologies. The island has been loosely associated with the Freemasons and Templars, but none of this is proven. In Search Of . ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ... The Seal of the Knights — the two riders have been interpreted as a sign of poverty or the duality of monk/soldier. ...


During the 1990s, further exploration was stalled because of legal battles.[1] As of 2005, a portion of the island was for sale with an estimated price tag of $7 million. A group called the Oak Island Tourism Society had hoped the Government of Canada would purchase the island, but a group of American businessmen in the drilling industry did so instead.[2] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bold text The Canada wordmark, used by most agencies of the Canadian federal government. ...


It was announced in April 2006 that partners from Michigan purchased a 50% stake in Oak Island Tours Inc., for an undisclosed amount of money. The shares were previously owned by David Tobias, and the remaining shares are owned by Dan Blankenship. Center Road Developments, in conjunction with Allan Kostrzewa, a member of the 'Michigan Group', purchased Lot 25 from David Tobias for a reported $230,000 one year previously. Working closely with Dan Blankenship, the 'Michigan Group' has said they will resume operations on Oak Island in the hope of discovering buried treasure and the mystery of Oak Island. Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ...


Pit flooding

Treasure hunters discovered fibers beneath the surface of one beach called Smith's Cove. This was discovered in 1850 and led to the theory that the beach had been converted into a giant "sponge", feeding water from the ocean into the pit via a man made tunnel. Ninety Mile Beach Australia. ...


The purpose of these fibers has been a source of heated debate among Oak Island researchers; a sample of this material was sent to the Smithsonian Institute in the early 20th century, where it was concluded that the material was coconut fiber.[citation needed] Carbon dating was conducted on a sample in the 1960s, and returned a date of 1200-1400 CE. However, this testing method reveals only when the material began to degrade, not when it was deposited at the site. The Smithsonian castle, as seen through the garden gate. ... Radiocarbon dating is the use of the naturally occurring isotope of carbon-14 in radiometric dating to determine the age of organic materials, up to ca. ...


Oak Island lies on a glacial tumulus system and is underlain by a series of water-filled limestone cavities (Anhydrite) which could be responsible for the repeated flooding of the pit. Bedrock lies at a depth of 160–180 feet in the Money Pit area. However, bedrock does not come to the surface at that end of the island. Glacial and Glaciation redirect here. ... A tumulus (plural tumuli, from the Latin word for mound or small hill, from the root to bulge, swell also found in ) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. ... -1... Anhydrite is a mineral - anhydrous calcium sulfate, CaSO4. ... Bedrock is the native consolidated rock underlying the Earths surface. ...


Upon the invitation of Boston-area businessman David Mugar, a two-week survey was conducted by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in 1995. This is the only known scientific study that has been conducted on the site. After running dye tests in the bore hole, they concluded that the flooding was caused by a natural interaction between the island's freshwater lens and tidal pressures in the underlying geology, refuting the idea of artificially constructed flood tunnels. The Woods Hole scientists who viewed the videos taken in 1971 concluded that nothing of value could be determined from the murky images. The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is devoted to scientific research and science- and engineering-education leading to MS and PhD degrees in oceanography and related fields. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...


Suspicions

There has been wide speculation about what the pit might contain. Most suggestions include treasure buried by either Captain Kidd, British troops during the American revolution, Spanish sailors from a wrecked galleon, the Inca or even exiled Knights Templar hiding the Holy Grail in the pit. A theory published by Penn Leary in his The Oak Island enigma: A history and inquiry into the origin of the money pit from 1953, claims that English philosopher Francis Bacon used the pit to hide documents proving him to be the author of William Shakespeare's plays, a theory recently picked up on in the book Organisten (The Organ Player) by Norwegian Petter Amundsen and novelist Erlend Loe. The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... A troop is a military unit. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... Three types of mariners are seen here in the wheelhouse: a master, an able seaman, and a harbour pilot. ... A Spanish galleon. ... Capital Cusco 1197-1533 Vilcabamba 1533-1572 Language(s) Quechua, Aymara, Jaqi family, Mochic and scores of smaller languages. ... The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon (Latin: Pauperes commilitones Christi Templique Solomonici), popularly known as the Knights Templar or the Order of the Temple, were among the most famous of the Christian military orders. ... For historical artifacts associated with the cup of the Last Supper, see Holy Chalice. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The notorious pirate Edward Teach (Blackbeard) claimed he buried his treasure "where none but Satan and myself can find it," leading to inevitable suggestions that he dug the pit, but there is no evidence to support this. The pit may contain nothing at all. Since the 1970s fewer people have believed the pit has any connection to pirates, due to the massive scale of the subterranean structure. Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Blackbeard (1680? РNovember 22, 1718) was the nickname of Edward Teach alias Edward Thatch, a notorious English pirate who had a short reign of terror in the Caribbean Sea between 1716 and 1718. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gustave Dor̩s depiction of Satan from John Miltons Paradise Lost Satan - from the Hebrew word for adversary - is a term that originates from the Abrahamic faiths, being traditionally applied to an angel. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Advancing this theory, journalist John Godwin, in his book This Baffling World, postulated that the pit was dug by French army engineers as an attempt to hide money and gold from the treasury of Louisbourg after the fort fell to the British during the French and Indian War of 1754-1763. While there is no evidence supporting this theory, it is much more plausible than that of piratanical connection. John B. Goodwin Categories: American politician stubs | Mayors of Atlanta ... Fortress Louisbourg (fr. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: * Algonquin * Lenape * Wyandot * Ojibwa * Ottawa * Shawnee Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy American Colonies Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,400 killed, wounded or captured The French and...


The cipher stone (which disappeared from the island in 1919) has been translated many times with multiple decoders to read "Forty feet bellow lies two million pounds." Even this has been argued to be a hoax despite its appearing in nearly all early accounts of the island. The stone existed, but whether or not the often noted decipher is correct remains in dispute. A cipher key and a coded message have been linked to masonic vaults.


Legend

The story of the Money Pit is largely unverified and the gap of sixty years between the supposed discovery and the first known reports is very long. There is no surviving evidence that the nine platforms or "marks" existed other than Vaughan's memories. Indeed, it is noteworthy that almost all of the debris, lost tools and other items mentioned in the early accounts have not been found. But a Multibeam Bathymetry survey by Bedford Institute of Oceanography of Dartmouth Nova Scotia in the mid nineties indicates that there may be tailings off the eastern end of Oak Island. This speculation includes the two links from the gold chain, the inscribed stone, and even the tree itself. The piece of parchment does exist and is in the possession of Dan Blankenship along with a host of other objects.


Many elements contained in the Oak Island story, such as the discovery of tantalising but inconclusive objects and a message in indecipherable code, are common in fictional works on treasure and piracy (such as the Edgar Allan Poe short story "The Gold-Bug"). This has led many to conclude that the early account of the Money Pit is a romanticised combination of several works of nineteenth century fiction conflated with a local story about a search for buried treasure. It is interesting to note, all these popular stories came after the discovery of the Money Pit. FicTioNaL is a Gaming Legend. ... Treasure Originates from the Greek work the(from Greek θησαυρος; thesaurus, meaning a treasure of words, is a cognate) is a concentration of riches, often one which is considered lost or forgotten until being rediscovered. ... The flag of 18th-century pirate Calico Jack Piracy is a robbery committed at sea, or sometimes on the shore, by an agent without a commission from a sovereign nation. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, editor, critic and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The Gold-Bug is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, set on Sullivans Island, South Carolina. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Oak Island in popular culture

  • Several works of fiction have been based upon the Money Pit, including "The Money Pit Mystery", Riptide and The Hand of Robin Squires.
  • An episode of the animated series Hey Arnold! featured the main characters searching for a hidden treasure on the similarly-named Elk Island.
  • The island was featured in a museum display at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in 2007 which displayed many artifacts from various eras of treasure hunting as part of the Museum's exhibit Pirates: Myth and Reality.

Riptide is a novel written by Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston published in 1998 by Warner Books. ... The Hand of Robin Squires was first published in 1977 and is now available from Puffin Books. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Bones is an American drama television series that premiered on the Fox Network on September 13, 2005. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Egrets in Assateagues marshes Assateague Island is a barrier island, comprising the southern portion of Marylands Atlantic coast and part of Virginias Eastern Shore. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... In Search Of . ... Leonard Simon Nimoy (born March 26, 1931) is an American actor, film director, poet, musician and photographer. ... Hey Arnold! was an American animated television series that aired from October 7, 1996 until June 8, 2004 on Nickelodeon. ... Riptide is a novel written by Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston published in 1998 by Warner Books. ... Douglas Preston (born 1956 in Cambridge, Massachusetts) is an author of several techno-thriller and horror novels with Lincoln Child. ... Lincoln Child (born 1957) is an author of techno-thriller and horror novels. ... The Maritime Museum of the Atlantic is a maritime museum located in Halifax, Nova Scotia. ...

Nineteenth century sources

Liverpool (2001 pop. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Acadia University is a university located in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... Acadia University is a university located in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...

External links

The Skeptical Inquirer is a magazine of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal (CSICOP) dedicated to debunking pseudoscience. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d The History Channel, Decoding the Past: The Templar Code, video documentary, November 7, 2005, written by Marcy Marzuni
  2. ^ For Sale: Island with Mysterious Money Pit. Retrieved on December 5, 2005.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Oak Island Secrets; Investigative Files (Skeptical Inquirer March 2000) (4557 words)
The Oak Island Association followed and attempted to intersect the "tunnel" that presumably fed water to the pit.
In this same year Oak Island's second tragedy struck when a worker was being hoisted from one of the pits and the rope slipped from its pulley, plunging him to his death.
The strata beneath Oak Island are basically limestone and anhydrite (Crooker 1978, 85; Blankenship 1999), which are associated with the formation of solution caverns and salt domes (Cavern 1960; Salt Dome 1960).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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