FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Nymph" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Nymph
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Titans and Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Nymphs

In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. Nymphs were the frequent target of lusty satyrs. The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek Τιτάν, plural Τιτάνες) were a race of powerful deities that ruled during the legendary Golden Age. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think, from which mind and mental are also derived[1] are nine goddesses who embody the right evocation of myth, inspired through remembered and improvised song, traditional music. ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... Medicine is a branch of health science and the sector of public life concerned with maintaining or restoring human health through the study, diagnosis, treatment and possible prevention of disease and injury. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros, was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a bringer of death... The Diana of Versailles, a Roman copy of a sculpture by Leochares (Louvre Museum) Artemis (Greek: nominative , genitive ), in Olympian Greek mythology the daughter of Zeus and of Leto and the twin sister of Apollo, was one of the most widely venerated gods and manifestly one of the oldest deities... Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... In a draw in a mountainous region, a shepherd guides a flock of about 20 sheep amidst scrub and olive trees. ... Alseid - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The names of the species of the nymphs varied according to their natural abode. ... In Greek mythology, the Crinaeae were a type of nymph associated with fountains. ... The Dryad by Evelyn De Morgan Dryads are female tree spirits in Greek mythology. ... Categories: Mythology stubs | Nymphs ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... In Greek mythology, the Limnades were a type of nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Meliae were nymphs of the manna-ash tree. ... Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893 In Greek mythology, the Naiads (from the Greek νάειν, to flow, and νἃμα, running water) were a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks, as river gods embodied rivers, and some very... In Greek mythology, the Napaeae (νάπη, a wooded dell) were a type of shy but mirthful nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are blue-haired sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, Oreads (ὄρος, mountain) were a type of nymph that lived in mountains. ... In Greek mythology, the Pegaeae were a type of nymph that lived in springs. ... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... Image from a Greek chalice depicting a satyr with a tail and erect penis, Euphronios, 510–500 BC, Athens In Greek mythology, satyrs (in Greek, Σάτυροι — Sátyroi) are young humans, possibly with horse ears, that roamed the woods and mountains, and were the companions of Pan and Dionysus. ...


"The idea that rivers are gods and springs divine nymphs," Walter Burkert remarks (Burkert III.3.3) "is deeply rooted not only in poetry but in belief and ritual; the worship of these deities is limited only by the fact that they are inseparably identified with a specific locality." Nymphs are personifications of the creative and fostering activities of nature, most often identified with the life-giving outflow of springs. The Greek word νύμφη has "bride" and "veiled" among its meanings: hence, a marriagable young woman. Other readers refer the word (and also Latin nubere and German Knospe) to a root expressing the idea of "swelling" (according to Hesychius, one of the meanings of νύμφη is "rose-bud"). The home of the nymphs is on mountains and in groves, by springs and rivers, in valleys and cool grottoes. They are frequently associated with the superior divinities: the huntress Artemis; the prophetic Apollo; the reveller and god of wine, Dionysus; and with rustic gods such as Pan and Hermes (as the god of shepherds). Walter Burkert (born Neuendettelsau (Bavaria), February 2, 1931), the most eminent living scholar of Greek myth and cult, is an emeritus professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland who has also taught in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... page of Marc. ... The Diana of Versailles, a Roman copy of a sculpture by Leochares (Louvre Museum) Artemis (Greek: nominative , genitive ), in Olympian Greek mythology the daughter of Zeus and of Leto and the twin sister of Apollo, was one of the most widely venerated gods and manifestly one of the oldest deities... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... Dionysus and Eros Naples Archeological Museum This article is about the ancient deity. ... Marble sculpture of Pan copulating with a goat, recovered from Herculaneum Pan (Greek Παν, genitive Πανος) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ...


The symbolic marriage with a nymph of a patriarchal leader, often the eponym of a people, is repeated endlessly in Greek origin myths; clearly such a union lent authority to the archaic king and to his line. An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, which has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery or other item. ...

Contents

Nymph classifications

A fourth-century Roman depiction of Hylas and the Nymphs
A fourth-century Roman depiction of Hylas and the Nymphs

The different species of nymph are sometimes distinguished according to the different spheres of nature with which they were connected. However, many of these distinctions may not have existed in popular belief at any time, being late inventions. As Rose (1959, p. 173) states, "the fact is that all these names are simply feminine adjectives, agreeing with the substantive nympha, and there was no orthodox and exhaustive classification of these shadowy beings." He mentions (pp. 172–3) dryads and hamadryads as nymphs of trees generally, meliai as nymphs of ash trees, and naiads as nymphs of water, but no others specifically. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2400x1670, 2843 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nymph Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2400x1670, 2843 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nymph Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Two Argonauts before a hunt. ... Species See text European Ash in flower Narrow-leafed Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia) shoot with leaves Closeup of European Ash seeds 19th century illustration of Manna Ash (Fraxinus ornus) An ash can be any of four different tree genera from four very distinct families (see end of page for disambiguation), but...


Thus, the following is not a Greek classification, but simply a handy modern guide:

Alseid - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... In Greek mythology, the Napaeae (νάπη, a wooded dell) were a type of shy but mirthful nymph. ... The names of the species of the nymphs varied according to their natural abode. ... In Greek Mythology, Leimakids were nymphs of meadows. ... In Greek mythology, Oreads (ὄρος, mountain) were a type of nymph that lived in mountains. ... In Greek mythology, Minthe (also Menthe, Mentha, Mintho, in Greek Μένθη) was a nymph associated with the river Cocytus. ... MiNT (MiNT is Now TOS) is an alternative operating system (OS) kernel for the Atari ST computer and its successors which is free software. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... In Greek mythology, there were three different people named Aegle. ... Arethusa means the waterer. In Greek mythology, Arethusa was one of the Hesperides. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... Hesperia may refer to: One of the Hesperides in Greek mythology Hesperia (Evening land, or Western land), a term sometimes applied to Italy and sometimes to Spain Hesperia, also called Asterope, the wife or desired lover of Aesacus and daughter of the river Cebren. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... Categories: Mythology stubs | Nymphs ... The Dryad by Evelyn De Morgan Dryads are female tree spirits in Greek mythology. ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus, and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ... In Greek mythology, the Meliae were nymphs of the manna-ash tree. ... Species See text European Ash in flower Narrow-leafed Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia) shoot with leaves Closeup of European Ash seeds 19th century illustration of Manna Ash (Fraxinus ornus) An ash can be any of four different tree genera from four very distinct families (see end of page for disambiguation), but... A nymph in Greek mythology, daughter of Oceanus, Leuce was carried off by Hades, the god of the underworld. ... This article is about woody plants of the genus Populus. ... In Greek mythology, the Epimeliads are nymphs who are protectors of sheep. ... This article is about the tree and its fruit. ... In Greek Mythology, Heleads were nymphs of fens. ... A fen is a sere, a phase in the natural ecological succession from the open water of a lake to (for example) woodland. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... In the Greek and Roman world-view, Oceanus (Greek , Okeanos), was the world-ocean, which they believed to be an enormous river encircling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are blue-haired sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... Nereus: in Greek Mythology, eldest son of Pontus and Gaia, the Sea and the Earth. ... For the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, see Mediterranean Basin. ... Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893 In Greek mythology, the Naiads (from the Greek νάειν, to flow, and νἃμα, running water) were a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks, as river gods embodied rivers, and some very... In Greek mythology, the Crinaeae were a type of nymph associated with fountains. ... In Greek mythology, the Limnades were a type of nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Limnades were a type of nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Pegaeae were a type of nymph that lived in springs. ... Potameides were graceful nymphs of rivers and streams. ... The Eleionomae were nymphs of marshes in Greek mythology. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses see Muse (disambiguation). ... The Lampades (Greek: Λαμπαδησ) are the nymphs of the Underworld in Greek mythology. ...

Foreign adaptations

The Greek nymphs were spirits invariably bound to places, not unlike the Latin genius loci, and the difficulty of transferring their cult may be seen in the complicated myth that brought Arethusa to Sicily. Among the Greek-educated Latin poets, the nymphs gradually absorbed into their ranks the indigenous Italian divinities of springs and streams (Juturna, Egeria, Cavmentis, Fontus), while the Lymphae (originally Lumpae), Italian water-goddesses, owing to the accidental similarity of name, could be identified with the Greek Nymphae. The mythologies of classicizing Roman poets were unlikely to have affected the rites and cult of individual nymphs venerated by country people in the springs and clefts of Latium. Among the Roman literate class their sphere of influence was restricted, and they appear almost exclusively as divinities of the watery element. In Roman mythology a Genius loci was the protective spirit of a place. ... Arethusa means the waterer. In Greek mythology, Arethusa was one of the Hesperides. ... Latin literature, the body of written works in the Latin language, remains an enduring legacy of the culture of ancient Rome. ... In Roman mythology, Juturna was the goddess of fountains, wells and springs. ... In Roman mythology, the goddess Egeria (of the black poplar) was a goddess of childbirth, wisdom and prophecy and was one of the Camenae. ... In Roman mythology, Fontus was the son of Juturna and Janus. ... Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


Depictions in popular culture

A nineteenth-century depiction of Hylas and the Nymphs by John William Waterhouse

Unlike mermaids, few nymphs have been depicted on film, in television, or in other forms of mass media and popular culture. Among them are: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2124x1317, 1285 KB) Hylas and the Nymphs (1896) John William Waterhouse File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nymph Hylas John William Waterhouse User:Perl User:Perl/Wyndham... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2124x1317, 1285 KB) Hylas and the Nymphs (1896) John William Waterhouse File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nymph Hylas John William Waterhouse User:Perl User:Perl/Wyndham... Two Argonauts before a hunt. ... John William Waterhouse. ... For an article about the 1990 movie Mermaids, see Mermaids (movie) A mermaid is a legendary creature with a female human head and torso (if its male, its called a merman) and the tail of a fish, which inhabits the water. ... // Mass media is a term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, (literally: the culture of the people) consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ...

For other definitions of fantasy see fantasy (psychology). ... The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy novels for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... Xanth is a fantasy world created by author Piers Anthony for a series of novels. ... Piers Anthony Dillingham Jacob (born August 6, 1934 in Oxford, England) is a writer in the science fiction and fantasy genres, publishing under the name Piers Anthony. ... The Belgariad is a five-book fantasy epic written by David Eddings. ... David Eddings (born July 7, 1931) is an American author who has written several best-selling series of epic fantasy novels. ... Lady in the Water is a 2006 thriller/fantasy film written, produced, and directed by M. Night Shyamalan and also produced by Sam Mercer and Jose L. Rodriguez. ... Manoj Nelliattu Shyamalan (born August 6, 1970), known professionally as M. Night Shyamalan, is an Academy Award-nominated Indian American film writer, director, and producer. ... Sirens is a 1994 film written and directed by John Duigan and set in Australia between the two World Wars. ... A dream sequence is a technique used in storytelling, particularly in television and film, to set apart a brief interlude from the main story. ... A lesbian is a female who is emotionally, sexually, and/or romantically attracted to other females. ... Chasey Lain (born Tiffany Anne Jones on December 7, 1971 in Newport, North Carolina) is a pornographic actress. ... A role-playing game (RPG, often roleplaying game) is a type of game in which the participants assume the roles of fictional characters and collaboratively create or follow stories. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... EverQuest (EQ) is a 3D fantasy massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) that was released on March 16, 1999. ... Fable is a video game for Xbox. ... The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall is a first-person freeform computer role-playing game (CRPG) for the PC, developed by Bethesda Softworks and released in 1996. ... Miranda and Ferdinand, Angelica Kauffmann, 1782 The Tempest is a comedy written by William Shakespeare. ... Ariel taking on an illusionary form, at Prosperos command Ariel is a fictional sprite who appears in William Shakespeares play The Tempest. ... Frontispage of the First Quarto Richard The Third. ... Hypersexuality describes human sexual behavior at levels high enough to be considered clinically significant. ...

See also

Animism is the belief in personalized, supernatural beings (or souls) that often inhabit ordinary animals and objects, governing their existence. ... In Roman mythology a Genius loci was the protective spirit of a place. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Islamic view of angels. ... In Quechua, a Huaca is an object that represents something revered, such as an ancestor, a god or even a character trait. ... Megami redirects here. ... Wight is an obsolete word for a human or other intelligent being (cognate to modern German Wicht, meaning small person, dwarf, and also unpleasant guy). It is used now only to give an impression of archaism and mystery, for example in the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Melusines secret discovered, from One of sixteen paintings by Guillebert de Mets circa 1410. ... Ondine was a water nymph in German mythology. ... In Norse folklore, a rå is a keeper or warden of a particular location or landform. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The term sprite is a general term referring to a number of legendary creatures. ... A bracket carved as a winged succubus on the outside of an English inn, suggesting that a brothel could have been found inside. ... In Greek mythology Calypso (Greek: Καλυψώ, I will conceal, also transliterated as Kalypsó or Kālypsō), was a sea nymph, daughter of Atlas who lived on the island of Malta. ... Hypersexuality is a desire for human sexual behavior at levels high enough to be considered clinically significant. ...

Footnotes

  • Rose, Herbert Jennings (1959). A Handbook of Greek Mythology, 1st edition, New York: E.P. Dutton & Co.. ISBN 0-525-47041-7. 

Herbert Jennings Rose is remembered as the author of A Handbook of Greek Mythology originally published in 1928, which for many years became the standard student reference book on the subject, reaching a sixth edition by 1958. ...

References

  • Burkert, Walter (1985). Greek Religion, 1st edition, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.. ISBN 0-674-36281-0. 
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • Information page

  Results from FactBites:
 
F-Secure Computer Virus Information Pages: Nymph (1544 words)
Nymph is a mass-mailer with backdoor capabilities created by ASM/iKX group.
It is one of the first worms that uses search engine of a webserver to find victim's e-mail addresses.
When thread 2 is started, it generates a nick from 'nymph' plus random 4-digit number ('nymph1234' for example), connects to 'diemen.nl.eu.undernet.org' IRC server and sets invisible mode for a user with the generated nick.
NYMPHS, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com (4444 words)
The NYMPHS could be aggresive in their love as it is proved by the abduction of Hylas, or by the killing of Hymnus [see below].
A nymph whose tutelary snake punished Philoctetes for having profaned the soil of her shrine.
Nymph of the Ganges and mother of Athis, who was killed in Ethiopia by Perseus 1.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m