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Encyclopedia > Numa Pompilius
Roman religion series
Offices
Augur | Flamen | Haruspex | Pontifex Maximus | Rex Nemorensis | Sacred king | Vestal Virgin
Beliefs and practices
Apotheosis | Festivals | Funerals | Imperial cult | Mythology | Persecution | Sibylline Books | Temple

rome hotel Religion in ancient Rome combined several different cult practices and embraced more than a single set of beliefs. ... The Augur was a priest or official in ancient Rome. ... Bust of a flamen, 3rd century, Louvre A flamen was a name given to a priest assigned to a state supported god or goddess in Roman religion. ... The bronze sheeps liver of Piacenza, with Etruscan inscriptions In the Roman religion, a haruspex was a man trained to practice divination by the inspection of the entrails of sacrificed animals, especially the livers of sacrificed sheep; and in the interpretation of lightning strikes and other unusual omens. ... Alternate meanings: see Pontifex (disambiguation) In Ancient Rome, the Pontifex Maximus was the high priest of the collegium of the Pontifices, the most august position in Roman religion, open only to a patrician, until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. ... The rex Nemorensis, (Latin: the king of Nemi or the king of the grove) was a sort of sacred king who served as priest of the goddess Diana at Aricia in Italy, by the shores of lake Nemi. ... A sacred king, according to the systematic interpretation of mythology developed by Sir James George Frazer in his influential book The Golden Bough, was a king who represented a solar deity in a periodically re-enacted fertility rite. ... A vestal Virgin, engraving by Sir Frederick Leighton, ca 1890: Leightons artistic sense has won over his passion for historical accuracy in showing the veil over the Vestals head at sacrifices, the suffibulum, as translucent, instead of fine white wool. ... Apotheosis means glorification, usually to a divine level, coming from the Greek word apotheoun, to deify. ... Festivals were Roman holidays to worship and celebrate a certain god or mythological occurance. ... Roman Funerals and Burial Introduction In ancient Rome, important people had elaborate funerals. ... The Imperial cult in Ancient Rome was the worship of the Roman Emperor as a god. ... Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Many adherents of Roman religion have been persecuted, mainly by Christians. ... The Sibylline Books or Sibyllae were a collection of oracular utterances, set out in Greek hexameters, purchased from a sibyl by the semi-legendary last king of Rome, Tarquinius Superbus, and consulted at momentous crises through the history of the Republic and the Empire. ... The Temple of Hercules Victor, near the Teatro di Marcello in Rome (a Greek-style Roman temple) // Pagan history and architecture Originally in Roman paganism, a templum was not (necessarily) a cultic building but any ritually marked observation site for natural phenomena believed to allow predictions, such as the flight...


According to legend, Numa Pompilius was the second of the Kings of Rome, succeeding Romulus. Romans in the city, after Romulus died, elected a Sabine man to be king, so as to make him loyal to both tribes in Rome. A legend (Latin, legenda, things to be read) is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. ... There were seven traditional Kings of Rome before the establishment of the Roman Republic. ... Romulus may refer to any of these articles: Romulus is a mythical founder of Rome, brother of Remus. ... The Rape of the Sabine Women by Giambologna The tribe of the Sabines (Latin Sabini) was an Italic tribe of ancient Italy. ...


His father was Pomponius; Numa was the youngest of his four sons, being born on the day of the foundation of Rome. He lived a severe life of discipline and he banished all luxury from his home. Tatius, colleague of Romulus, married his only daughter, Tatia, to Numa. She died after being married to Numa for 13 years and Numa retired to a country life, advised by the nymph Egeria who met him by her spring in a sacred grove and taught him to be a wise legislator. He had one daughter, Pompilia (who some say was his first wife Tatia's daughter and some say she was his second wife Lucretia's daughter), who married Marcius II and had the future King Ancus Marcius. Plutarch (Life) credited him with four sons, Pompo, Pinus, Calpus and Mamercus, but the claim that from them descended the noble families of Pomponii, Pinarii, Calpurnii and Aemilii was a flattery invented after the early records were destroyed by the Gauls. In Roman mythology, the goddess Egeria (of the black poplar) was a goddess of childbirth, wisdom and prophecy and was one of the Camenae. ... Ancus Marcius (r. ... Mestrius Plutarchus (c. ... Gallia (in English Gaul) is the Latin name for the region of western Europe occupied by present-day France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ...


Numa was around forty when he was offered the kingship. He was residing "at a famous city of the Sabines called Cures, whence the Romans and Sabines gave themselves the joint name of Quirites" (Plutarch), and he at first refused, but his father and Marcius I (Marcius II's father) took him aside and persuaded him to accept.


He was later celebrated for his natural wisdom and piety. Wishing to show his favour, the god Jupiter caused a shield to fall from the sky on the Palatine Hill, which had letters of prophecy written on it, and in which the fate of Rome as a city was tied up. Recognizing the importance of this sacred shield, King Numa had eleven matching shields made. These shields were the ancilia, the sacred shields of Jupiter, which were carried each year in a procession by the Salii priests. Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... 17th century aviaries on the hill, built by Rainaldi for Odoardo Cardinal Farnese: once wirework cages surmounted them. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 8th century BC Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... The Salii were Roman priests of Mars. ...


By tradition, Numa promulgated a calendar reform that adjusted the solar and lunar years, and he established the original constitution of the priests, called Pontifices. In other Roman institutions established by Numa, Plutarch thought he detected a Laconian influence, attributing the connection to the Sabine culture of Numa, for "Numa was descended of the Sabines, who declare themselves to be a colony of the Lacedaemonians." In the Roman Republic, the Pontifex Maximus was the head of the Roman religion. ... Laconia (; see also List of traditional Greek place names), also known as Lacedaemonia, was in ancient Greece the portion of the Peloponnese of which the most important city was Sparta. ... Laconia (Λακωνία), also known as Lacedaemonia, was in ancient Greece the portion of the Peloponnesus of which the most important city was Sparta. ...


Numa was credited with dividing the immediate territory of Roman into pagi and establishing the traditional occupational guilds of Rome:

"So, distinguishing the whole people by the several arts and trades, he formed the companies of musicians, goldsmiths, carpenters, dyers, shoemakers, skinners, braziers, and potters; and all other handicraftsmen he composed and reduced into a single company, appointing every one their proper courts, councils, and religious observances." (Plutarch)

Plutarch, in like manner, tells of the early religion of the Romans, that it was imageless and spiritual. Their religious lawgiver, Numa, he says, “forbade the Romans to represent the deity in the form either of man or of beast. Nor was there among them formerly any image or statue of the Divine Being; during the first one hundred and seventy years they built temples, indeed, and other sacred domes, but placed in them no figure of any kind; persuaded that it is impious to represent things Divine by what is perishable, and that we can have no conception of God but by the understanding.”


Numa Pompilius died in 673 BC when he was older than eighty. He died of old age and by a gentle and gradual decline. He was succeeded by Tullus Hostilius. Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 720s BC 710s BC 700s BC 690s BC 680s BC - 670s BC - 660s BC 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC Events and Trends 677 BC - Death of Zhou li wang, King of the Zhou Dynasty of China. ... Domus Tullus Hostilius (r. ...


External links


Mestrius Plutarchus (c. ... Project Gutenberg (often abbreviated as PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ...

Kings of Rome
Romulus and Remus 753717 - Numa Pompilius 717673- Tullus Hostilius 673642 - Ancus Marcius 642617 -
Lucius Tarquinius Priscus 616579 - Servius Tullius 578535- Lucius Tarquinius Superbus 535510/509
Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans
Alcibiades and Coriolanus - Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar - Aratus & Artaxerxes and Galba & Otho - Aristides and Cato the Elder
Crassus and Nicias - Demetrius and Antony - Demosthenes and Cicero - Dion and Brutus - Fabius and Pericles - Lucullus and Cimon
Lysander and Sulla - Numa and Lycurgus - Pelopidas and Marcellus - Philopoemen and Flamininus - Phocion and Cato the Younger - Pompey and Agesilaus
Poplicola and Solon - Pyrrhus and Gaius Marius - Romulus and Theseus - Sertorius and Eumenes
Tiberius Gracchus & Gaius Gracchus and Agis & Cleomenes - Timoleon and Aemilius Paullus - Themistocles and Camillus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Numa Pompilius - Crystalinks (513 words)
According to legend, Numa Pompilius was the second of the Kings of Rome, succeeding Romulus.
She died after being married to Numa for 13 years and Numa retired to a country life, advised by the nymph Egeria who met him by her spring in a sacred grove and taught him to be a wise legislator.
Numa Pompilius died in 673 BC when he was older than eighty.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Numa Pompilius (3363 words)
She died after being married to Numa for 13 years and Numa retired to a country life, advised by the nymph Egeria who met him by her spring in a sacred grove and taught him to be a wise legislator.
In other Roman institutions established by Numa, Plutarch thought he detected a Laconian influence, attributing the connection to the Sabine culture of Numa, for "Numa was descended of the Sabines, who declare themselves to be a colony of the Lacedaemonians." In the Roman Republic, the Pontifex Maximus was the head of the Roman religion.
Numa and Lycurgus - Pelopidas and Marcellus - Philopoemen and Flamininus - Phocion and Cato the Younger - Pompey and Agesilaus
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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