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Encyclopedia > Nuclear utilization target selection

Nuclear utilization target selection (NUTS) was a strategy developed during the Cold War as a means for one world nuclear power to achieve victory against another world nuclear power. To be victorious, the attacker had to destroy the target country's nuclear arsenal in a massive first strike. The ability to do so would then have given the attacker superiority in the nuclear arms race and relieve them from the threat of mutual assured destruction (MAD). For the generic term for high-tension and / or indirect struggle between states, falling short of actual open hostilities, see cold war (war). ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945 lifted nuclear fallout some 18 km (60,000 feet) above the epicenter. ... In nuclear strategy, first strike capability is a countrys ability to defeat another nuclear power by destroying its arsenal to the point where the attacking country can survive the weakened retaliation. ... The nuclear arms race was a competition for supremacy in nuclear weapons between the United States and Soviet Union during the Cold War. ... Mutual assured destruction (MAD) is the doctrine of military strategy in which a full scale use of nuclear weapons by one of two opposing sides would result in the destruction of both the attacker and the defender. ...


The strategy was first mentioned in the 1970s when the technology involving inter-continental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) allowed a nuclear payload to be delivered with exceptional accuracy to any location on the planet. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ...


However, because nuclear missiles were able to be launched from submarines (SLBMs) or mobile installations (the Soviet SS-20s), the idea of targeting fixed installations that the NUTS theory entails would not have been successful. Additionally, early warning systems would make it especially difficult to guarantee that an attacker would actually be able to achieve first strike capability. HMS Vanguard, a Vanguard-class nuclear ballistic missile (SSBN) submarine HMCS Windsor, a Victoria-class diesel-electric hunter-killer (SSK) submarine HMAS Rankin, a Collins-class diesel-electric guided missile (SSG) submarine USS Virginia, a Virginia-class nuclear attack (SSN) submarine A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate... French M45 SLBM and M51 SLBM Submarine-launched ballistic missiles or SLBMs are ballistic missiles delivering nuclear weapons that are launched from submarines. ... The RT-21M Pioneer was a medium-range ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead deployed by the Soviet Union from 1976 to 1988. ... In nuclear strategy, first strike capability is a countrys ability to defeat another nuclear power by destroying its arsenal to the point where the attacking country can survive the weakened retaliation. ...


The acronym itself is probably constructed as a joke on the insanity of nuclear war and the opposing strategy "MAD", called a backronym. A backronym or bacronym is a type of acronym that is formed to match the letters of a word already in use. ...


See also

Nuclear strategy involves the development of doctrines and strategies for the production and use of nuclear weapons. ... Single Integrated Operational Plan (or SIOP) is a blueprint that tells how American nuclear weapons would be used in the event of war. ...

External links

  • Reagan and nuclear war

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nuclear utilization target selection - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (232 words)
Nuclear utilization target selection (NUTS) was a strategy developed during the Cold War as a means for one world nuclear power to achieve victory against another world nuclear power.
To be victorious, the attacker had to destroy the target country's nuclear arsenal in a massive first strike.
However, because nuclear missiles were able to be launched from submarines (SLBMs) or mobile installations (the Soviet SS-20s), the idea of targeting fixed installations that the NUTS theory entails would not have been successful.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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