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Encyclopedia > Nuclear strategy

Nuclear strategy involves the development of doctrines and strategies for the production and use of nuclear weapons. Nuclear strategy, as a sub-branch of military strategy, attempts to match nuclear weapons as means to political ends. Among the issues considered within nuclear strategy are: under what conditions does it serve a nation's interest to develop nuclear weapons, what types of nuclear weapons should be developed, and when and how should such weapons be used? Many strategists argue that nuclear strategy differs from other forms of military strategy because the immense and terrifying power of the weapons makes their use in seeking victory in a traditional military sense impossible. Paradoxically, then, an important focus of nuclear strategy has been determining how to prevent (i.e. deter) their use. Military doctrine is a level of military planning between national strategy and unit-level tactics, techniques, and procedures. ... A strategy is a long term plan of action designed to achieve a particular goal, as differentiated from tactics or immediate actions with resources at hand. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the hypocenter. ... Military strategy in the Waterloo campaign Military strategy is a collective name for planning the conduct of warfare. ...


See also

Weapons of
mass destruction
By Type
Biological weapons
Chemical weapons
Nuclear weapons
Radiological weapons
By Country
Brazil Canada
China (PRC) France
Germany India
Iran Iraq
Israel Japan
Netherlands North Korea
Pakistan Poland
Russia South Africa
Taiwan (ROC) United Kingdom
United States  
Nuclear weaponry
Nuclear countries
Nuclear proliferation
Nuclear strategy
Nuclear terrorism
Nuclear warfare
Nuclear weapon history
Nuclear weapon design
Nuclear explosion
Nuclear testing
See also
Dirty bomb
Radiological warfare
edit

Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) generally include nuclear, biological, chemical and, increasingly, radiological weapons. ... Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) generally include nuclear, biological, chemical and, increasingly, radiological weapons. ... Biological warfare, also known as germ warfare, is the use of any organism (bacteria, virus or other disease-causing organism) or toxin found in nature, as a weapon of war. ... Dressing the wounded during a gas attack by Austin O. Spare, 1918. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the hypocenter. ... A radiological weapon (or radiological dispersion device, RDD) is any weapon that is designed to spread radioactive contamination, either to kill, or to deny the use of an area (a modern version of salting the earth) and consists of a device (such as a nuclear or conventional explosive) which spreads... The Peoples Republic of China is said to have an arsenal of 400 nuclear weapons stockpiled as of 1999. ... The Republic of China on Taiwan denies having chemical or nuclear weapons. ... There are currently five states considered to be nuclear weapons states, an internationally recognized status conferred by the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Nuclear terrorism can be used to describe any of the following terrorist assaults: Use of nuclear weapons against a civilian target Use of a radiological weapon or dirty bomb against a civilian target An attack against a nuclear power plant Some believe that no such act has ever taken place. ... Nuclear war, or atomic war, is war in which nuclear weapons are used. ... A nuclear fireball lights up the night in a United States nuclear test. ... The first nuclear weapons, though large, cumbersome and inefficient, provided the basic design building blocks of all future weapons. ... A 23 kiloton tower shot called BADGER, fired on April 18, 1953 at the Nevada Test Site, as part of the Operation Upshot-Knothole nuclear test. ... A nuclear test explosion is an experiment involving the detonation of a nuclear weapon. ... The term dirty bomb is most often used to refer to a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD), a radiological weapon which combines radioactive material with conventional explosives. ... Radiological warfare is any form of warfare involving deliberate radiation poisoning, without relying on nuclear fission or nuclear fusion. ... Strategic bombing is a military strategem used in a total war style campaign that attempts to destroy the economic ability of a nation-state to wage war. ... In nuclear strategy, first strike capability is a countrys ability to defeat another nuclear power by destroying its arsenal to the point where the attacking country can survive the weakened retaliation. ... In nuclear strategy, second strike capability is a countrys assured ability to respond to a nuclear attack with powerful nuclear retalliation against the attacker. ... No first use refers to a pledge not to use nuclear weapons unless first attacked by an adversary. ... Minimal deterrence involves the ability to respond to a nuclear attack with a minimal nuclear counterstrike. ... In the theory of nuclear warfare, a decapitation strike is an attack that aims to remove the command and control mechanisms of the opponent, in the hope that it will severely degrade or destroy its capacity for nuclear retaliation. ... Nuclear blackmail is a term used in nuclear strategy to refer to the threat of use of nuclear weapons to force an adversary to perform some action. ... Mutual assured destruction (MAD) is the doctrine of military strategy in which a full scale use of nuclear weapons by one of two opposing sides would result in the destruction of both the attacker and the defender. ... Nuclear utilization target selection (NUTS) was a strategy developed during the Cold War as a means for one world nuclear power to achieve victory against another world nuclear power. ... Single Integrated Operational Plan (or SIOP) is a blueprint that tells how American nuclear weapons would be used in the event of war. ... The Force de frappe (literally Striking Force; meant for dissuasion, i. ... Game theory is a branch of applied mathematics that studies strategic situations where players choose different actions in an attempt to maximize their returns. ... Assured Destruction is a concept sometimes used in game theory and similar discussions to describe a condition where certain behaviors or choices are deterred because they will lead to the imposition by others of overwhelming punitive consequences. ... Bernard Brodie (1910-1978) was an American military strategist well-known for establishing the basics of nuclear strategy. ... Herman Kahn Herman Kahn (February 15, 1922-July 7, 1983) was a military strategist and systems theorist employed at RAND Corporation, USA. // Background Born in Bayonne, New Jersey, Kahn grew up in the Bronx, then in Los Angeles following his parents divorce. ... For the hit 1987 single by Depeche Mode, see the album Music for the Masses Film poster for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 satirical film directed by Stanley Kubrick. ... Films are produced by recording actual people and objects with cameras, or by creating them using animation techniques and/or special effects. ...

Further Reading

Baylis, John, and John Garnett. Makers of Nuclear Strategy. London: Pinter, 1991. ISBN 1855670259.


Brodie, Bernard. The Absolute Weapon. Freeport, N.Y.: Books for Libraries Press, 1946.


Brodie, Bernard. Strategy in the Missile Age. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1959.


Freedman, Lawrence. The Evolution of Nuclear Strategy. 2nd ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1989. ISBN 0333972392 .


Kahn, Herman. On Thermonuclear War. 2nd ed. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1961.


Kaplan, Fred M. The Wizards of Armageddon. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1983. ISBN 0671424440.


Kissinger, Henry A. Nuclear Weapons and Foreign Policy. New York: Harper, 1957.


Rosenberg, David. "The Origins of Overkill: Nuclear Weapons and American Strategy, 1945-1960." International Security 7, 4 (Spring, 1983): 3-71.


Schelling, Thomas C. The Strategy of Conflict. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1960.


Schelling, Thomas C. Arms and Influence. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1966.


Smoke, Richard. National Security and the Nuclear Dilemma. 3rd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993. ISBN 0070593523.


Wohlstetter, Albert. "The Delicate Balance of Terror." Foreign Affairs 37, 211 (1958): 211-233.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Nuclear testing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1186 words)
Nuclear weapons tests are generally classified as being either "atmospheric" (in or above the atmosphere), "underground," or "underwater." Of these, underground testing contained in deep shafts poses the least health risk in terms of fallout.
From the first nuclear test in 1945 until the latest tests by Pakistan in 1998, there was never a period of more than 22 months with no nuclear testing.
Planned as a method to dispel doubts about whether the USA's nuclear missiles would actually function in practice, it had less effect than was hoped, as the stockpile warhead was substantially modified prior to testing, and the missile tested was a relatively low-flying SLBM and not a high-flying ICBM.
Nuclear strategy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (187 words)
Nuclear strategy involves the development of doctrines and strategies for the production and use of nuclear weapons.
Nuclear strategy, as a sub-branch of military strategy, attempts to match nuclear weapons as means to political ends.
Nuclear strategy differs from many other forms of military strategy because the immense and terrifying power of the weapons makes their use (to many if not all strategists) in seeking victory in a traditional military sense impossible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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