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Encyclopedia > Nuclear material

Nuclear material consists of materials used in nuclear systems, such as nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. Most commonly this refers to special nuclear material (SNM) as defined in the United States Atomic Energy Act. Special nuclear materials are plutonium, uranium-233 and enriched uranium-235. These materials can potentially be used for nuclear weapons. Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter. ... Special nuclear material is a term used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of the United States to classify fissile materials. ... Almost a year after World War II ended, Congress established the United States Atomic Energy Commission to foster and control the peace time development of atomic science and technology. ... General Name, Symbol, Number plutonium, Pu, 94 Chemical series actinides Group, Period, Block n/a, 7, f Appearance silvery white Atomic mass (244) g/mol Electron configuration [Rn] 5f6 7s2 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 24, 8, 2 Physical properties Phase solid Density (near r. ... Uranium-233 is a fissile artificial isotope of uranium, which is proposed as a nuclear fuel. ... Uranium-235 is an isotope of uranium that differs from the elements other common isotope, uranium-238, by its ability to cause a rapidly expanding fission chain reaction. ...


See also

v  d  e
Nuclear technology
Nuclear engineering Nuclear physics | Nuclear fission | Nuclear fusion | Radiation | Ionizing radiation | Atomic nucleus | Nuclear reactor | Nuclear safety
Nuclear material Nuclear fuel | Fertile material | Thorium | Uranium | Enriched uranium | Depleted uranium | Plutonium
Nuclear power Nuclear power plant | Radioactive waste | Fusion power | Future energy development | Inertial fusion power plant | Pressurized water reactor | Boiling water reactor | Generation IV reactor | Fast breeder reactor | Fast neutron reactor | Magnox reactor | Advanced gas-cooled reactor | Gas cooled fast reactor | Molten salt reactor | Liquid metal cooled reactor | Lead cooled fast reactor | Sodium-cooled fast reactor | Supercritical water reactor | Very high temperature reactor | Pebble bed reactor | Integral Fast Reactor | Nuclear propulsion | Nuclear thermal rocket | Radioisotope thermoelectric generator
Nuclear medicine PET | Radiation therapy | Tomotherapy | Proton therapy | Brachytherapy
Nuclear weapons History of nuclear weapons | Nuclear warfare | Nuclear arms race | Nuclear weapon design | Effects of nuclear explosions | Nuclear testing | Nuclear delivery | Nuclear proliferation | List of states with nuclear weapons | List of nuclear tests

  Results from FactBites:
 
Daily NK - North Korean Nuclear Test 101 – Introduction to NK’s Nuclear Weapon in Technical Perse (2384 words)
Nuclear bomb is consisted of Uranium bomb and Plutonium bomb depending on the type of element.
It is highly probable that North Korea’s nuclear material is the Plutonium that is reprocessed from spent fuel rods in nuclear reactor.
Nuclear bomb is developed with a huge amount of time and money, and it is not developed to be kept carefully in garage.
Nuclear medicine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1453 words)
Nuclear medicine is a branch of medicine and medical imaging that uses unsealed radioactive substances in diagnosis and therapy.
Nuclear medicine diagnostic tests are usually provided by a dedicated department within a hospital and may include facilities for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals.
Since each nuclear medicine radionuclide has a unique gamma-ray emission energy spectrum, and since the energy of a gamma-ray is detected in a gamma-camera by the brightness of the scintillation associated with an event, gamma-cameras employ energy 'windows' to gate or limit the imaging process to gamma-ray events of particular energies.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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