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Encyclopedia > Nuada

In Irish mythology, Nuada or Nuadu (later Nuadha), known by the epithet Airgetlám ("Silver Hand/Arm"), was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. He is cognate with the Gaulish and British god Nodens. His Welsh equivalent is Nudd or Lludd Llaw Eraint. The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity, but much of it was preserved, shorn of its religious meanings, in medieval Irish literature, which represents the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology. ... Áes dána redirects here. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... Nodens, or Nodons, was a Celtic deity worshipped in Britain. ... Welsh mythology, the remnants of the mythology of the pre-Christian Britons, has come down to us in much altered form in medieval Welsh manuscripts such as the Red Book of Hergest, the White Book of Rhydderch, the Book of Aneirin and the Book of Taliesin. ... Lludd Llaw Eraint, Lludd of the Silver Hand, son of Beli Mawr, is a legendary hero from Welsh mythology. ...


One of the Four Treasures of the Tuatha Dé Danann was his sword, Fragarach, which cut his enemies in half[1] (in other stories Fragarach is the sword of Manannan mac Lir). Nuada was king of the Tuatha Dé before they came to Ireland, but in the first Battle of Magh Tuiredh, in which they conquered Ireland from the Fir Bolg, Nuada had his hand or arm cut off by the Fir Bolg warrior Sreng (the Irish word lámh can mean either "hand" or "arm", so the extent of his loss is unclear). Since he was no longer physically perfect he could not continue as king, and so the half-Fomorian Bres became the first Tuatha Dé Danann High King of Ireland. The Tuatha Dé Danann came to Ireland from four cities on four islands in the North; Murias, Falias, Gorias and Finias, bringing with them The Four Treasures, also known as The Hallows of Ireland. ... In Irish mythology, Fragarach, known as The Answerer or The Retaliator was the sword of Manannan mac Lir and Lugh Lamfada. ... In Irish mythology, Manannan mac Lir was a sea and weather god. ... In Irish mythology, Magh Tuiredh (Mag Tuired, Magh Tuireadh, anglicised as Moytura) is the name of the locations of two battles said to have been waged by the Tuatha Dé Danann. ... In Irish mythology the Fir Bolg (Fir Bholg, Firbolg, men of Builg or men of bags, or possibly men with spears, bolg meaning spear - and let us not forget the modern Irish word bolg belly (originally bag)) were one of the races that inhabited the island of Ireland prior to... In Irish mythology Sreng was a champion of the Fir Bolg or Men of Bolg. ... In Irish mythology, the Fomorians (Irish Fomóire, Fomórach) or Fomors were a semi-divine race who inhabited Ireland in ancient times. ... In Irish mythology, Bres, aka Eochaid Bres, Eochu Bres (Eochaid/Eochu the Beautiful), was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Bres turned out to be a tyrant, enslaving the Tuatha Dé, forcing them to pay tribute to the Fomorians and neglecting his duties of hospitality. So Nuada had his arm replaced by a working one of silver by the physician Dian Cecht and the artificer Creidhne, and he was restored to the kingship, gaining his epithet Airgetlám ("silver hand/arm"). Later, Dian Cecht's son, Miach, replaced the silver arm with one of flesh and blood; Dian Cecht killed him out of professional envy. Nuada could not throw off the Fomorian yoke until the multi-talented Lug joined his court. He put Lug in command of the army, and he led them to victory against the Fomorians in the Second Battle of Magh Tuireadh, but Nuada was killed in the battle by Balor, the Fomorian leader.[2] General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Atomic mass 107. ... In Irish mythology, Dian Cecht was a god of healing. ... In Irish mythology, Creidhne (or Credne) was a son of Brigid and Tuireann and the artificer of the Tuatha Dé Danann, working in bronze, brass and gold. ... In Irish mythology, Miach was a son of Dian Cecht of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ... Lugh (earlier Lug, modern Irish Lú, pronounced //) is an Irish deity represented in mythological texts as a hero and High King of the distant past. ... Cath Maige Tuireadh (the (second) Battle of Magh Tuiredh) is a tale of the Irish Mythological Cycle in which the Tuatha Dé Danann defeat their enemies, the Fomorians. ... In Irish mythology, Balor (Balar, Bolar) of the Evil Eye was a king of the Fomorians, a race of giants. ...


Nuada is probably the same figure as Elcmar, and possibly Nechtan.[citation needed] Other characters of the same name include the later High Kings Nuadat Finnfail and Nuada Necht, and Nuada, the maternal grandfather of Fionn mac Cumhail. A rival to Conn of the Hundred Battles was Mug Nuadat ("Nuada's Slave"). The Delbhna, a people of early Ireland, had a branch called the Delbhna Nuadat who lived in County Roscommon. In Irish mythology, Elcmar (also Ecmar, Elcmhaire) was the husband of Boann. ... In Irish mythology, Nechtan was the father and/or husband of Boann. ... Nuadat Finnfail was a legendary High King of Ireland in the 11th century BC. Depending on the source consulted, he ruled for twenty, forty or sixty years. ... Nuada Necht (the pure) was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 2nd century BC. He was considered an ancestor of the Laigin. ... Fionn mac Cumhail (earlier Finn or Find mac Cumail or mac Umaill, pronounced roughly Finn mac Cool) was a legendary hunter-warrior of Irish mythology, also known in Scotland and the Isle of Man. ... Conn Cétchathach (Conn of the Hundred Battles) was a legendary High King of Ireland. ... In Irish traditional history Mug Nuadat (or Mogha Nuadhad) meaning slave of Nuada, whose given name was Éogan Mór (Eoghan the Great), was a king of Munster in the 2nd century A.D. He was a rival of the High King, Conn of the Hundred Battles and for a... The Delbhna were a race of Ireland. ... The Delbhna Nuadat were lords of a large section of what is now County Roscommon, situated between the Suca and Shannon rivers. ... Statistics Province: Connacht County Town: Roscommon Code: RN Area: 2,547 km² (983 mi²) Population (2006) 58,700 Website: www. ...

Contents

Etymology

This theonym appears to be derived from Proto-Celtic *Noudant-s, in turn derived from Proto-Indo-European *neu-d-,[3] meaning 'acquisitive'.[4] Following accepted sound laws elucidating systematic diachronic phonological sound change in Celtic proto-linguistics, the Romano-British form of this Proto-Celtic theonym is likely to have been *Nōdans or Nodens. The Proto-Celtic language, also called Common Celtic, is the putative ancestor of all the known Celtic languages. ... This article refers to the typographical symbol. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages. ... Sound change or phonetic change is a historical process of language change consisting in the replacement of one speech sound or, more generally, one phonetic feature by another in a given phonological environment. ... The adjective diachronic (from Greek elements dia through and chronos time) means historically, over time. It is generally opposed to synchronic. ... Phonology (Greek phone = voice/sound and logos = word/speech) is a subfield of grammar (see also linguistics). ... Sound change or phonetic change is a historical process of language change consisting in the replacement of one speech sound or, more generally, one phonetic feature by another in a given phonological environment. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, spoken by ancient and modern Celts alike. ... Historical linguistics (also diachronic linguistics or comparative linguistics) is primarily the study of the ways in which languages change over time, by means of examining languages which are recognizably related through similarities such as vocabulary, word formation, and syntax, as well as the surviving records of ancient languages. ... The term Romano-British describes the romanised culture of Britannia under the rule of the Roman Empire, when Roman and Christian culture had extensively entered into the life of the native Brythonic and Pictish peoples of Britain. ... Nodens, or Nodons, was a Celtic deity worshipped in Britain. ...


However, another plausible etymology[citation needed] is a Proto-Indo-European compound such as *Nou-da:nt-s meaning ‘nourishment-giving’ a possible byword for a deification of the notion of ‘wholesomeness’. This would tie in well with Nodens’ associations with water, as well as Nuada’s associations with youth,[citation needed] healing,[citation needed] sunlight,[citation needed] warriors and kingship. *Noudants may also be derived from Proto-Indo-European *sneudh- "fog" (cf. Avestan snaoda "clouds," Welsh nudd "fog," Gk. nython, in Hesychius "dark, dusky"), suggesting[citation needed] that Nodens was the deification of a weather pattern frequent in the British Isles. The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages. ...


Texts

Notes

  1. ^ Lebor Gabála Érenn.
  2. ^ Cath Maige Tuireadh - The (second) Battle of Magh Tuireadh.
  3. ^ Julius Pokorny's Indogermanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch:768
  4. ^ Proto-Celtic—English, English—Proto-Celtic lexicon, University of Wales. Cf. also Celtic data at University of Leiden.

References

  • Cross, Tom Peete and Clark Harris Slover, Ancient Irish Tales, Henry Holt & Company, Inc (1936); ISBN 1-56619-889-5
  • Ellis, Peter Berresford, Dictionary of Celtic Mythology(Oxford Paperback Reference), Oxford University Press, (1994); ISBN 0-19-508961-8
  • MacKillop, James. Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998; ISBN 0-19-280120-1.
  • Wood, Juliette, The Celts: Life, Myth, and Art, Thorsons Publishers (2002); ISBN 0-00-764059-5
Preceded by
Bres
High King of Ireland
AFM 1890-1870 BC
FFE 1470-1447 BC
Succeeded by
Lug

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nuada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (547 words)
In Irish mythology, Nuada, Nuadu (later Nuadha, Nuadhu, genitive Nuadat), known by the epithet Airgetlám ("Silver Hand/Arm"), was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann.
So Nuada had his arm replaced by a working one of silver by the physician Dian Cecht and the artificer Creidhne, and he was restored to the kingship, gaining his epithet Airgetlám ("silver hand/arm").
Nuada could not throw off the Fomorian yoke until the multi-talented Lug joined his court.
Nuada - definition of Nuada in Encyclopedia (306 words)
In Goidelic mythology, Nuada was one of the Tuatha de Danaan.
He was a god of the sea, children and childbirth, the sun, beauty, healing, sorcery and poetry and writing.
Nuada returned to the throne and was killed by Balor, the grandfather of Bres.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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