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Encyclopedia > Nowruz
Nowrūz
Nowrūz
Celebration of the coming of Spring and the Iranian new year
Also called Also spelled Norouz, Norooz, Nawruz, Newroz, Nauruz, Nawroz, Noruz, Novruz, Nauroz, Navroz, Naw-Rúz, Nevruz, Sultan Nevruz, Наврӯз, Navruz, Navrez or Nowrouz
Observed by Iran, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Northern Iraq, Albania, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, as well as among Iranian and Turkic people everywhere.
Type International
Significance New year holiday
Date March 20th, 21st or 22nd.
Celebrations The Haftsin setting, Chahârshanbe Sûrî, Sizdah Bedar, etc.
Persepolis all nations stair case. Notice the people from across Persia bringing Nowruz gifts for the king
Persepolis all nations stair case. Notice the people from across Persia bringing Nowruz gifts for the king
Persepolis relief of a bull being attacked by a lion is an emblem of seasonal sacrifice, and the spring equinox, (Nowruz) in Ancient Iranian mythology.

Nowrūz (Persian: نوروز, various local pronunciations and spellings) is the traditional Iranian new year holiday celebrated in Iran, Northern Iraq, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Albania, Georgia, the countries of Central Asia such as Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Kazakhstan, as well as among various other Iranian and Turkic people in Iraq, Syria, Pakistan, India, Northwestern China, the Caucasus, the Crimea, and the Balkans. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1712, 3039 KB) Beschreibung: bühender Kirschenbaum (prunus sp)im Frühling Quelle: FreePiP (Free Pictures Project) Fotograf: Benjamin Gimmel, BenHur See also Image:Frühlingslandschft Aaretal Schweiz. ... Motto: None Anthem: Ey Reqîb (English: Hey Guardian) Capital Arbil Largest city Erbil Official languages Kurdish, Arabic, (Assyrian (Syriac)) and (Iraqi Turkmen) [1] Government Parliamentary Democracy  - President Masoud Barzani  - Prime Minister Nechervan Idris Barzani  - Deputy Prime Minister Omer Fattah Hussain Formation of Autonomous Region    - Autonomy Accord Agreement is Signed... The Turkic people are any of various peoples whose members speak languages in the Turkic family of languages. ... Chaharshanbe Suri (in Persian: چهارشنبه‌سوری) is the national Persian Festival of Fire. ... The Traditional Haft Sîn Sizdah-bedar (Persian سیزده بدر) is the Persian Festival of springs. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (852x458, 56 KB) Summary Used with permission of the photographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (852x458, 56 KB) Summary Used with permission of the photographer. ... Persepolis aerial view. ... Image File history File links Persia. ... Image File history File links Persia. ... Persepolis aerial view. ... By Persian mythology is meant the myths and sacred narratives of the culturally and linguistically related group of ancient peoples who inhabited the Iranian Plateau and its borderlands, as well as areas of Central Asia from the Black Sea to Khotan (modern Ho-tien, China). ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Motto: None Anthem: Ey Reqîb (English: Hey Guardian) Capital Arbil Largest city Erbil Official languages Kurdish, Arabic, (Assyrian (Syriac)) and (Iraqi Turkmen) [1] Government Parliamentary Democracy  - President Masoud Barzani  - Prime Minister Nechervan Idris Barzani  - Deputy Prime Minister Omer Fattah Hussain Formation of Autonomous Region    - Autonomy Accord Agreement is Signed... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... This article is about the various peoples speaking one of the Turkic languages. ... For the county in Shanxi province, see Xinjiang County. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... Motto: Процветание в единстве - Prosperity in unity Anthem: Нивы и горы твои волшебны, Родина - Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Location of Crimea (red) on the map of Ukraine. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Nowruz marks the first day of spring and the beginning of the Iranian year as well as the beginning of the Bahá'í year.[1] It is celebrated on the day of the astronomical vernal equinox (start of spring in northern hemisphere), which usually occurs on the March 21st or the previous/following day depending on where it is observed. The Iranian calendar (Persian: ‎) also known as Persian calendar or the Jalāli Calendar is a solar calendar currently used in Iran and Afghanistan. ... The Baháí calendar, also called the Badí‘ calendar, used by the Baháí Faith, is a solar calendar with regular years of 365 days, and leap years of 366 days. ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The vernal equinox (or spring equinox) marks the beginning of astronomical spring. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


As well as being a Zoroastrian holiday, it is also a holy day for adherents of Sufism as well as Bahá'í Faith.[1] In Iran it is also referred to as an Eid festival, although it is not an Islamic feast. Shia Nizari Ismaili muslims, who trace their origins to Iran, celebrate the festival under the name Navroz. In their religious protocol, Navroz is officially recognized as an Eid, as with Eid ul-Fitr and Eid ul-Adha, although it involves a distinct set of religious ceremonies. Zoroastrianism was adapted from an earlier, polytheistic faith by Zarathushtra (Zoroaster) in Persia very roughly around 1000 BC (although, in the absence of written records, some scholars estimates are as late as 600 BC). ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam and encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... Seat of the Universal House of Justice, governing body of the Baháís, in Haifa, Israel The Baháí Faith is the religion founded by Baháulláh in 19th century Persia. ... The word Eid can mean several things: There are two Islamic festivals of Eid: One is called Eid ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر) that marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, The other is Eid ul-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى) or Eid-e Qurban (Persian: عید قربان) which is celebrated to commemorate Prophet Ibrahim... The Ismaili ( اسماعيلي, Persian Esmaaili) branch of Islam is the second-largest Shia community, after the Twelvers who are dominant in Iran. ... Eid ul-Fitr or Id-Ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر ‘Īd al-Fiá¹­r), often abbreviated as simply Eid, is an Islamic holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the month of fasting. ... Eid ul-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى ‘Īd al-’Aḍḥā) occurs on the tenth day of the Islamic month of Dhul Hijja. ...

Contents

Etymology

The word comes from Old Persian: nava = new + rəzaŋh = day/daylight, meaning "new day/daylight", and still has the same meaning in New Persian (now/naw = new + rūz = day; meaning "new day") [1] See Aryan Language or Old Persian For more information visit: *[Ancient Iranian Languages & Literature The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies (CAIS) ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ...


The term Nowruz first appeared in Persian records in the second century AD, but it was also an important day during the time of the Achaemenids (c. 648-330 BC), where kings from different nations under the Persian empire used to bring gifts to the emperor (Shahanshah) of Persia on Nowruz.[2] The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... The Persepolis Ruins The Achaemenid dynasty (Old Persian:Hakamanishiya, Persian: هخامنشیان) - was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 690s BC 680s BC 670s BC 660s BC 650s BC - 640s BC - 630s BC 620s BC 610s BC 600s BC 590s BC Events and Trends Assyrian king Ashurbanipal founds library, which includes our earliest complete copy of the Epic... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC - 330s BC - 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 335 BC 334 BC 333 BC 332 BC 331 BC - 330 BC - 329 BC 328 BC 327... Darius the Great, the first to bear the title Shahanshah. ...


Nowruz and the Spring Equinox

Illumination of the Earth by the Sun on the day of equinox, (ignoring twilight).
Illumination of the Earth by the Sun on the day of equinox, (ignoring twilight).
Main article: Equinox

Noruz is the first day of spring and on this day the spring equinox takes place in the northern hemisphere. The sun is directly overhead at the equator. Also at that moment both the north pole and south pole of the Earth are just on the terminator, and sunlight is divided equally between the hemispheres. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1560x1024, 392 KB) Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox (vernal and autumnal). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1560x1024, 392 KB) Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox (vernal and autumnal). ... Illumination of the Earth by the Sun on the day of equinox, (ignoring twilight). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... World map showing the equator in red In tourist areas, the equator is often marked on the sides of roads The equator marked as it crosses Ilhéu das Rolas, in São Tomé and Príncipe. ... World map with terminator (April) A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. ...


History and Tradition

Tradition dates Noruz as far back as 15,000 years ago -- before the end of the last ice age. The mythical Persian King Jamshid (Yima or Yama of the Indo-Iranian lore) symbolizes the transition of the Indo-Iranians from animal hunting to animal husbandry and a more settled life in human history. Seasons played a vital part then. Everything depended on the four seasons. After a severe winter, the beginning of spring was a great occasion with mother nature rising up in a green robe of colorful flowers and the cattle delivering their young. It was the dawn of abundance. Jamshid is said to be the person who introduced Noruz celebrations. Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Jamshid (in Persian: ‎) is a common Persian male first name. ... Indo-Iranian can refer to: The Indo-Iranian languages The prehistoric Indo-Iranian people, see Aryan This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Shepherd with his sheep in FăgăraÅŸ Mountains, Romania. ...


Prophet Zoroaster (Zarathushtra) was the architect of the pre-Islamic Iranian cosmology who instituted many feasts, festivals and rituals to pay homage to the seven creations, the holy immortals and Ahura Mazda. The seven most important ones are known as Gahambars, the feasts of obligation. The last and the most elaborate was Noruz, celebrating Ahura Mazda and the Holy Fire at the spring equinox. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Ahura Mazda is the Avestan language name for an exalted divinity of ancient proto-Indo-Iranian religion that was subsequently declared by Zarathustra (Zoroaster) to be the one uncreated creator of all (God). ... Zoroastrianism has numerous festivals and holy days, all of which are bound to the Zoroastrian calendar. ... In astronomy, the vernal equinox (spring equinox, March equinox, or northward equinox) is the equinox at the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading northward. ...


Some 12 centuries later, in 487 BC, Darius the Great of the Achaemenian dynasty celebrated the Noruz at his newly built palaces of Persepolis. A recent research shows that it was a very special occasion. On that day, the first rays of the rising sun fell on the observatory in the great hall of audience at 06:30 a.m., an event which repeats itself once every 1400-1 years. It also happened to coincide with the Babylonian and Jewish new years. It was, therefore, a highly auspicious occasion for the ancient peoples. It has been suggested that the famous Persepolis complex, or at least the palace of Apadana and the "Hundred Columns Hall", were built for the specific purpose of celebrating Nowruz. However, no mention of Nowruz exists in Achaemenid inscriptions (see picture). Seal of Darius I, showing the king hunting on his chariot, and the symbol of Ahuramazda Darius the Great (Pers. ... The Achaemenid Empire (Old Persian: Hakhāmanishiya, هخامنشیان also frequently, the Achaemenid Persian Empire.) (559 BC–330 BC) was the first of the Persian Empires to rule over significant portions of Greater Iran. ... Persepolis aerial view. ... See Apadāna for the Pali texts. ...


Later it became the national holiday of Arsacid/Parthian dynastic Empires who ruled Iran (248 BC-224 AD). There are specific references to the celebration of Nowruz during the reign of Vologases I (51-78 AD), but these include no details. The Arsacid Dynasty ruled Persia. ... Parthia[1] (Middle Persian: اشکانیان Ashkâniân) was a civilization situated in the northeast of modern Iran, but at its height covering all of Iran proper, as well as regions of the modern countries of Armenia, Iraq, Georgia, eastern Turkey, eastern Syria, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Kuwait, the Persian Gulf... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC - 240s BC - 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC Years: 253 BC 252 BC 251 BC 250 BC 249 BC - 248 BC - 247 BC 246 BC... Events Shah Artashir I wins Persian independence from Parthia and establishes the Sassanid dynasty. ... Vologases I of Parthia ruled the Parthian Empire from about 51 to 78. ... This article is about the year 51. ... For other uses, see number 78. ...


Extensive records on the celebration of Nowruz appear following the accession of Ardashir I of Persia, the founder of the Sassanid dynasty (224-651 AD). Under the Sassanid emperors, Nowruz was celebrated as the most important day of the year. Most royal traditions of Nowruz such as royal audiences with the public, cash gifts, and the pardoning of prisoners, were established during the Sassanian era and they persisted unchanged until modern times. Silver coin of Ardashir I with a fire altar on its verso (British Museum London). ... The Sassanid Empire in the time of Shapur I; the conquest of Cappadocia was temporary Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) Dominant Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of... Events Shah Artashir I wins Persian independence from Parthia and establishes the Sassanid dynasty. ... Events End of Yazdegard IIIs attempts to drive out the Saracens. ...


Nowruz, along with Sadeh (that is celebrated in mid-winter), survived in society following the introduction of Islam in 650 AD. Other celebrations such Gahanbar and Mehragan were eventually side-lined or were only followed by the Zoroastrians, who carried them as far as Turkey. Nowruz, however, was most honored even by the early founders of Islam. There are records of the Four Great Caliphs presiding over Nowruz celebrations, and it was adopted as the main royal holiday during the Abbasid period. Sadeh is an ancient Iranian tradition celebrated 50 days before nowrouz. ... Events Arab conquest of Persia, establishment of Islam as state religion Hindu empire in Sumatra Croats and Serbs occupy Bosnia Khazars conquer Great Bulgarian Empire in southern Russia building of St. ... Gahanbar are the festivals of the ancient Avesta calendar celebrated by the Parsees at six seasons of the year which correspond with the six periods of creation: Maidhyozaremaya (mid spring) Maidhyoshema (midsummer) Paitishahya (season of corn) A yathrema (season of flocks) Maidhyarya (winter solstice) Hamaspathmacdha (festival of sacrifices). ... Sometimes Spelled Mehregan or Mehrigan is an ancient Persian festival dating back almost 3000 years ago. ... Zoroastrianism was adapted from an earlier, polytheistic faith by Zarathushtra (Zoroaster) in Persia very roughly around 1000 BC (although, in the absence of written records, some scholars estimates are as late as 600 BC). ... Abbasid Caliphate (Abbasid Khalifat) and contemporary states and empires in 820. ...


Following the demise of the Caliphate and the subsequent re-emergence of Persian dynasties such as the Samanids and Buyids, Nowruz was elevated to an even more important event. The Buyids revived the ancient traditions of Sassanian times and restored many smaller celebrations that had been eliminated by the Caliphate. Even the Turkish and Mongol invaders did not attempt to abolish Nowruz in favor of any other celebration. Thus, Nowruz remained as the main celebration in the Persian lands by both the officials and the people. The Samanid dynasty (819-999) was a Persian dynasty in Central Asia, named after its founder Saman Khuda. ... The Buwayhids or Buyyids or Āl-i Buyeh, were a Shiite tribal confederation from Daylam, a region on the southern shore of the Caspian Sea. ... A caliphate (from the Arabic خلافة or khilāfah), is the Islamic form of government representing the political unity and leadership of the Muslim world. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ...


Omar Khayyam in his Nowruznama has written a vivid description of the celebration in ancient Persian. Tomb of Omar Khayam, Neishapur, Iran. ...

From the era of Keykhosrow till the days of Yazdegard, last of the pre-Islamic kings of Persia, the royal custom was thus: on the first day of the New Year, Nau Ruz, the King's first visitor was the High Priest of the Zoroastrians, who brought with him as gifts a golden goblet full of wine, a ring, some gold coins, a fistful of green sprigs of wheat, a sword, a bow and a handsome slave. In the language of Persia he would then glorify God and praise the monarch.. This was the address of the High Priest to the king : "O Majesty, on this feast of the Equinox, first day of the first month of the year, seeing that thou hast freely chosen God and the Faith of the Ancient ones; may Surush, the Angel-messenger, grant thee wisdom and insight and sagacity in thy affairs. Live long in praise, be happy and fortunate upon thy golden throne, drink immortality from the Cup of Jamshid; and keep in solemn trust the customs of our ancestors, their noble aspirations, fair gestes and the exercise of justice and righteousness. May thy soul flourish; may thy youth be as the new-grown grain; may thy horse be puissant, victorious; thy sword bright and deadly against foes; thy hawk swift against its prey; thy every act straight as the arrow's shaft. Go forth from thy rich throne, conquer new lands. Honor the craftsman and the sage in equal degree; disdain the acquisition of wealth. May thy house prosper and thy life be long!"

Local variations

Nowruz has been celebrated for at least 3000 years and is deeply rooted in the rituals and traditions of the Zoroastrian religion. Today, the festival of Nowruz is celebrated in many countries that were territories of, or influenced by, the Persian Empire: Persia (Iran), Iraq, Afghanistan, parts of the Middle East, as well as in the former Soviet republics of Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan,Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan. It is also celebrated by the Zoroastrian Parsis , Iranis in India and the inhabitants of northern areas of Pakistan, mainly in Chitral as well as by the Iranian immigrants from Shiraz in Zanzibar.[3] In Turkey, it is called Nevruz in Turkish, Sultan Nevruz in Albanian and Newroz in Kurdish. Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... a person from Pars (the middle-Persian word for Fars), a region now within the geographical boundaries of Iran, and is roughly the original homeland of the Persian people. ... Chitral Valley and Tirich Mir, 7,708 m (25,289 ft) Chitral, or Chatrāl (Urdu: چترال),in native language kalasha its pronounced chetrar(chetr meaning field) is the name of a town , valley, river, district, and former princely state in the former Malakand Division of the Northwest Frontier Province of... |official_name = Shirāz |other_name = |native_name = شیراز |nickname = |settlement_type = |motto = |image_skyline = |imagesize = |image_caption = |image_flag = |flag_size = |image_seal = |seal_size = |image_shield = |shield_size = |city_logo = |citylogo_size = |image_map = Shiraz. ... Map of Zanzibars main island Zanzibar is part of Tanzania Coordinates: , Country Tanzania Islands Unguja and Pemba Capital Zanzibar City Settled AD 1000 Government  - Type semi-autonomous part of Tanzania  - President Amani Abeid Karume Area  - Both Islands  637 sq mi (1,651 km²) Population (2004)  - Both Islands 1,070... The Kurdish language is a language spoken in the region called Kurdistan, including Kurdish populations in parts of Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey. ...


In Iran, the greeting that accompanies the festival is Aydetoon Mobārak (mubarak: felicitations) in Persian. In Turkey, the greeting is either Bayramınız Mubarek/kutlu olsun (in Turkish (the same greeting applies for other festivals as well)) or Cejna we pîroz be/Newroz pîroz be (in Kurdish). Eid is the name of two Islamic festivals: Eid ul-Fitr, marking the end of the month-long fast of Ramadan, held on the first day of Shawwal. ...


Nowruz in modern Iran

In Iran, preparations for Nowruz begin in Esfand (or Espand), the last month of winter in the Persian solar calendar. This article is in need of attention. ...


Khane Tekani

Main article: Khane Tekani

Persians, Afghans and other groups start preparing for the Nowruz with a major spring-cleaning of their houses, the purchase of new clothes to wear for the new year and the purchase of flowers (in particular the hyacinth and the tulip are popular and conspicuous). Khane tekani (lit. ... The name Hyacinth can refer to: the Hyacinth from Greek mythology. ... Species See text Tulip (Tulipa) is a genus of about 100 species of flowering plants in the family Liliaceae. ...


In association with the "rebirth of nature", extensive spring-cleaning is a national tradition observed by almost every household in Persia. This is also extended to personal attire, and it is customary to buy at least one set of new clothes. On the New Year's day, families dress in their new clothes and start the twelve-day celebrations by visiting the elders of their family, then the rest of their family and finally their friends. On the thirteenth day families leave their homes and picnic outdoors.


During the Nowruz holidays people are expected to visit one another (mostly limited to families, friends and neighbours) in the form of short house visits, which are usually reciprocated. Typically, on the first day of Nowruz, family members gather around the table, with the Haft Seen on the table or set next to it, and await the exact moment of the arrival of the spring. At that time gifts are exchanged. Later in the day, the first house visits are paid to the most senior family members. Typically, the youth will visit the elders first, and the elders return their visit later. The visits naturally have to be relatively short, otherwise one will not be able to visit everybody on their list. A typical visit is around 30 minutes, where you often run into other visiting relatives and friends who happen to be paying a visit to the same house at that time. Because of the house visits, you make sure you have a sufficient supply of pastry, cookies, fresh and dried fruits and special nuts on hand, as you typically serve your visitors with these items with tea or sherbet. Many Iranians will throw large Nowruz parties in a central location as a way of dealing with the long distances between groups of friends and family.


Some Nowruz celebrants believe that whatever a person does on Nowruz will affect the rest of the year. So, if a person is warm and kind to their relatives, friends and neighbours on Nowruz, then the new year will be a good one. On the other hand, if there are fights and disagreements, the year will be a bad one.


One tradition that may not be very widespread (that is, it may belong to only a few families) is to place something sweet, such as honey or candy, in a safe place outside overnight. On the first morning of the new year, the first person up brings the sweet stuff into the house as another means of attaining a good new year.


Chahārshanbe Sūrī

A man celebrating Chaharshanbe Sûrî
Main article: Chaharshanbe Suri
Chehel Sotoun's Wall painting, that dates back to the Safavid era, depicts a Chaharshanbe Suri celebration.
Chehel Sotoun's Wall painting, that dates back to the Safavid era, depicts a Chaharshanbe Suri celebration.

The night before the last Wednesday of the year is celebrated by the Iranian people as Chahârshanbe Sûrî Persian: چهارشنبه سوری), the Iranian festival of fire. This festival is the celebration of the light (the good) winning over the darkness (the bad); the symbolism behind the rituals are all rooted back to Zoroastrianism. Image File history File linksMetadata Chaharshanbe_soori. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Chaharshanbe_soori. ... Chaharshanbe Suri (in Persian: چهارشنبه‌سوری) is the national Persian Festival of Fire. ... Image File history File links Chehel-sotoon_chahar_shanbe_suri. ... Image File history File links Chehel-sotoon_chahar_shanbe_suri. ... Chehel Sotoun is a pleasure pavilion in Isfahan, Iran, built by Shah Abbas I to be used for the shahs entertainment and receptions. ... The Safavids were a long-lasting Turkic-speaking Iranian dynasty that ruled from 1501 to 1736 and first established Shiite Islam as Persias official religion. ... Chaharshanbe Suri (in Persian: چهارشنبه‌سوری) is the national Persian Festival of Fire. ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ...


The tradition includes people going into the streets and alleys to make fires, and jump over them while singing the traditional song Zardî-ye man az to, sorkhî-ye to az man (literally: "My yellowness for you, your redness for me; ", but figuratively: My paleness (pain, sickness) for you, your strength (health) for me.


Serving different kinds of pastry and nuts known as Ajīl-e Moshkel-Goshā (lit. The problem-solving nuts) is the Chahārshanbe Sūrī way of giving thanks for the previous year's health and happiness, while exchanging any remaining paleness and evil for the warmth and vibrancy of the fire.


According to tradition, the living are visited by the spirit of their ancestors on the last days of the year, and many children wrap themselves in shrouds, symbolically re-enacting the visits. They also run through the streets banging on pots and pans with spoons and knocking on doors to ask for treats. The ritual is called qashogh-zany (spoon beating) and symbolizes the beating out of the last unlucky Wednesday of the year.


There are also several other traditions on this night, including the rituals of Kūze Shekastan, the breaking of earthen jars which symbolically hold ones bad fortune; the ritual of Fal-Gûsh, or inferring one's future from the conversations of those passing by; and the ritual of Gereh-goshā’ī, making a knot in the corner of a handkerchief or garment and asking the first passerby to unravel it in order to remove ones misfortune.


The Haft Sīn

Main article: Haft sin table
The Traditional Haft Sîn

Haft Sîn (هفت سین) or the seven 'S's is a major tradition of Nowruz. The haft sin table includes seven items specific starting with the letter S or Sīn (س) in Persian alphabet). The items symbolically correspond to seven creations and holy immortals protecting them. Originally called Haft Chin (هفت چین)[citation needed], the Haft Sin has evolved over time, but has kept its symbolism. Traditionally, families attempt to set as beautiful a Haft Sīn table as they can, as it is not only of traditional and spiritual value, but also noticed by visitors during Nowruzi visitations and is a reflection of their good taste. The Traditional Haft Sîn Haft Sîn (هفت سین) or the seven Ss is a major tradition of Norouz. ... Image File history File links Haft_Seen. ... Image File history File links Haft_Seen. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Perso-Arabic script. ...


The Haft Sin items are:

  • sabzeh - wheat, barley or lentil sprouts growing in a dish - symbolizing rebirth
  • samanu - a sweet pudding made from wheat germ - symbolizing affluence
  • senjed - the dried fruit of the oleaster tree - symbolizing love
  • sīr - garlic - symbolizing medicine
  • sīb - apples - symbolizing beauty and health
  • somaq - sumac berries - symbolizing (the color of) sunrise
  • serkeh - vinegar - symbolizing age and patience

Other items on the table may include: Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. compactum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 For the indie rock group see: Wheat (band). ... Binomial name L. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is an annual cereal grain, which serves as a major animal feed crop, with smaller amounts used for malting and in health food. ... Lens culinaris. ... Cooking samanak in Isfara, Tajikistan Samanu (Persian: ‎ ), Samanak (Persian: ‎ ), or Sumalak (Tajik alphabet: сумалак) is a special type of sweet dish made from Wheat germ, which is prepared for Nowruz. ... Wheat germ is the heart of the wheat kernel - a concentrated source of several essential nutrients including Vitamin E, folate (folic acid), phosphorus, thiamin, zinc and magnesium. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... Binomial name Borkh. ... Species About 250 species; see text Rhus is a genus approximately 250 species of woody shrubs and small trees in the family Anacardiaceae. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ...

  • Sonbol - Hyacinth (flower)
  • Sekkeh - Coins - representative of wealth
  • traditional Iranian pastries such as baghlava, toot, naan-nokhodchi
  • dried nuts, berries and raisins (Aajeel)
  • lit candles (enlightenment and happiness)
  • a mirror (symbolizing cleanness)
  • decorated eggs, sometimes one for each member of the family (fertility)
  • a bowl of water with goldfish (life within life, and the sign of Pisces which the sun is leaving)
  • a bowl of water with an orange in it (the earth floating in space)
  • rose water for its magical cleansing powers
  • the national colours, for a patriotic touch
  • a holy book (e.g., the Qur'an, Avesta, Bible, Torah, or Kitáb-i-Aqdas,) and/or a poetry book (almost always either the Shahnama or the Divan of Hafez)

Genera Hyacinthus litwinowii Hyacinthus orientalis Hyacinthus transcaspicus A Hyacinth is any plant of genus Hyacinthus, which are bulbous herbs formerly placed in the lily family Liliaceae but now regarded as the type genus of the separate family Hyacinthaceae. ... This article is about monetary coins. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A mirror, reflecting a vase. ... Ukrainian Easter eggs Egg decorating is the easter special. ... Trinomial name Carassius auratus auratus (Linnaeus, 1758) For the baked snack crackers, please see Goldfish (snack). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The orange, a fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Current flag of the Islamic republic of Iran, introduced in 1980. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... See Avesta Municipality for the Swedish town Yasna 28. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... “Tora” redirects here. ... The Kitáb-i-Aqdas is the central book of the Baháí Faith, written by Baháulláh, the founder of the religion. ... Shahnameh Shahnameh Scenes from the Shahnameh carved into reliefs at Tus, where Ferdowsi is buried. ... Hafez, detail of an illumination in a Persian manuscript of the Divan of Hafez, 18th century. ...

Hājji Fîrūz

The traditional herald of the Nowruz season is called Hājjī Fīrūz (or Khwāja Pīrūz). He symbolizes the rebirth of the Sumerian god of sacrifice, Domuzi, who was killed at the end of each year and reborn at the beginning of the New Year. Sumer (or Shumer, Sumeria, Shinar, native ki-en-gir) formed the southern part of Mesopotamia from the time of settlement by the Sumerians until the time of Babylonia. ...


He usually uses face paint to make his skin black and wears a red costume. Then he sings and dances through the streets with tambourines and trumpets spreading good cheer and heralds the coming of the New Year. Mehrdad Bahar, iranologist, suggests in his book that this borrowing of the Domuzi/Tammuz tradition from the ancient non-Iranian civilizations in Mesopotamia happened with the arrival of the Iranian tribes to the western parts of the Iranian Plateau at the beginning of the 1st millennium BC. This borrowing may according to Bahar be true for the whole Nowruz tradition itself as Indo-Iranian tribes before that did not have this tradition while the civilizations of Mesopotamia did. This later spread to all areas where Iranian culture was present but was lost by the non-Iranian cultures of Mesopotamia. Mehrdad Bahar (Born 1930 Tehran, died Nov 13th 1994 Tehran) was a prominent Iranologist, linguist, mythologist and Persian historian. ...


New Year Dishes

  • Sabzi Polo Mahi: The New Year's day traditional meal is called Sabzi Polo Mahi, which is rice with green herbs served with fish. The traditional seasoning for Sabzi Polo are parsley, coriander, chives, dill and fenugreek.
  • Reshteh Polo: rice cooked with noodles which is said to symbolically help one succeed in life.
  • Dolme Barg : A traditional dish of Azeri people, cooked just before the new year. It includes some vegetables, meat and cotyledon which have been cooked and embedded in vine leaf and cooked again. It is considered useful in reaching to wishes.
  • Kookoo sabzi : Herbs and vegetable souffle, traditionally served for dinner at New Year. A light and fluffy omelet style made from parsley, dill, coriander, spinach, spring onion ends, and chives, mixed with eggs and walnut.

Sabzi polo is an Iranian (Persian) dish of rice and vegetables, and is usually served with fish. ...

Sizdah Bedar

Main article: Sizdah Bedar

The thirteenth day of the new year festival is Sizdah Bedar (literally meaning "thirteen to the door", figuratively meaning "hit the outdoors on the thirteenth"). This is a day of festivity in the open, often accompanied by music and dancing, usually at family picnics. The Traditional Haft Sîn Sizdah-bedar (Persian سیزده بدر) is the Persian Festival of springs. ... The Traditional Haft Sîn Sizdah-bedar (Persian سیزده بدر) is the Persian Festival of springs. ...


Sizdah bedar celebrations stem from the ancient Persians' belief that the twelve constellations in the Zodiac controlled the months of the year, and each ruled the earth for a thousand years at the end of which the sky and earth collapsed in chaos. Hence Nowruz lasts twelve days and the thirteenth day represents the time of chaos when families put order aside and avoid the bad luck associated with the number thirteen by going outdoors and having picnics and parties. The term zodiac denotes an annual cycle of twelve stations along the ecliptic, the apparent path of the sun across the heavens through constellations that divide the ecliptic into twelve equal zones of celestial longitude. ...


At the end of the celebrations on this day, the sabzeh grown for the Haft Seen (which has symbolically collected all sickness and bad luck) is thrown into running water to exorcise the demons (divs) from the household. It is also customary for young single women to tie the leaves of the sabzeh before discarding it, so expressing a wish to be married before the next year's Sizdah Bedar. Another tradition associated with this day is Dorugh-e Sizdah, literally meaning "the lie of the thirteenth", which is the process of lying to someone and making them believe it (similar to April Fools Day). — Mark Twain April Fools Day or All Fools Day is a notable day, though not of its own right a holiday, celebrated in many countries on April 1. ...


Nowruz celebration by Kurds

Kurds celebrating Nouruz in Istanbul, 2006.
Kurds celebrating Nouruz in Istanbul, 2006.

The Kurds celebrate this Iranian feast between 18th till 21st March. The word Nowruz is pronounced as 'Newruz' by the Kurds. It is one of the few ‘peoples celebrations’ that has survived and predates all the major religious festivals. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 2624 KB) Summary Newroz celebration in Istanbul. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 2624 KB) Summary Newroz celebration in Istanbul. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Norouz. ...


With this festival Kurds gather into the fairgrounds mostly outside the cities to welcome spring. Women wear gaily colored dresses and spangled head scarves and young men wave flags of green, yellow and red, the colors of the Kurdish people. By lighting fire and dancing around it they hold this festival [2], also see: [3]. A festival is an event, usually staged by a local community, which centers on some unique aspect of that community. ...


The Kurdish greetings that accompany the festival are Newroz pîroz be! meaning Happy Newroz! or Bijî Newroz! meaning Long live Newroz! The Kurdish language is a language spoken in the region called Kurdistan, including Kurdish populations in parts of Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey. ...


The festival was illegal until 2000 in Turkey, where most of the Kurds live [4], and Turkish forces arrested Kurds celebrating Newroz [5]. In Newroz 1992 at least 70 people celebrating the festival were killed in clashes with Turkish security forces [6]. The official Turkey now celebrates Nevruz as a Turkish spring holiday. Newroz is however still considered as a potent symbol of Kurdish identity in Turkey. Newroz celebrations are usually organised by Kurdish cultural associations and pro-Kurdish political parties. Thus, the Democratic Society Party was a leading force in the organisation of the 2006 Newroz events throughout Turkey. In recent years the Newroz celebration gathers around 1 million participants in Diyarbakır, the biggest city of the Kurdish dominated Southeastern Turkey. As the Kurdish Newroz celebrations in Turkey often are theater for political messages, the events are frequently criticized for rather being political rallies than cultural celebrations. DTP Symbol Map illustrating independents performance at the 2007 general election by constituency. ... Diyarbakır (Ottoman Turkish: دیاربکر land of the Bekr as derived from Persian; Kurdish Amed; Syriac ; Greek Amida; Armenian Ô±Õ´Õ«Õ¤ Amid) is a major city in the Southeastern Anatolia region of Turkey. ...


Nowruz in Afghanistan

In Afghanistan, Nowroz festival is traditionally celebrated for 2 weeks. Preparations for Nowroz start several days beforehand, at least after Chaharshanbe Suri, the last Wednesday before the New Year. Among various traditions and customs, the most important important ones are: Chaharshanbe Suri (in Persian: چهارشنبه‌سوری) is the national Persian Festival of Fire. ...

  • Haft Mēwa: In Afghanistan, they prepare Haft Mēwa (Seven Fruits) instead of Haft Sin which is common in Iran. Haft Mewa is like a Fruit salad made from 7 different Dried fruits, served in their own syrup. The 7 dried fruits are: Raisin, Senjed (the dried fruit of the oleaster tree), Pistachio, Hazelnut, Prune (dry fruit of Apricot), Walnut and whether Almond or another species of Plum fruit.
  • Samanak: It is a special type of sweet dish made from Wheat germ. Women take a special party for it during the night, and cook it from late in the evening till the daylight, singing a special song: Samanak dar Josh o mā Kafcha zanem - Degarān dar Khwāb o mā Dafcha zanem
  • Mēla-e Gul-e Surkh: The Guli Surkh festival which literally means Red Flower Festival (referring to the red Tulip flowers) is an old festival celebrated only in Mazari Sharif during the first 40 days of the year when the Tulip flowers grow. People travel from different parts of the country to Mazar in order to attend the festival. It is celebrated along with the Jahenda Bālā ceremony which is a specific religious ceremony performed in the holy blue mosque of Mazar that is believed (mostly by Sunnite Afghans) to be the site of the tomb of Ali ibn Abi Talib, the fourth caliph of Islam. The ceremony is performed by raising a special banner in the blue mosque in the first day of year (i.e. Nowroz). The Guli Surkh party continues with other special activities among people in the Tulip fields and around the blue mosque for 40 days.
  • Buzkashi: Along with other customs and celebrations, normally a Buzkashi tournament is held. The Buzkashi matches take place in northern cities of Afghanistan and in Kabul.
  • Special cuisines: People cook special types of dishes for Nowroz, especially on the eve of Nowroz. Normally they cook Sabzi Chalaw, a dish made from rice and spinach, separately. Moreover, the bakeries prepare a special type of cookie, called Kulcha-e Nowrozī, which is only baked for Nowroz. Another dish which is prepared mostly for the Nowroz days is Māhī wa Jelabī (Fried Fish and Jelabi) and it is the most often meal in picnics. In Afghanistan, it is a common custom among the affianced families that the fiancé's family give presents to or prepare special dishes for the fiancée's family on special occasions such as in the two Eids, Barā'at and in Nowroz. Hence, the special dish for Nowroz is Māhī wa Jelabī.
  • Sightseeing to Cercis fields: The citizens of Kabul go to Istalif, Charikar or other green places around where the Cercis flowers grow. They go for picnic with their families during the first 2 weeks of New Year.
  • Jashni Dehqān: Jashni Dehqan means The Festival of Farmers. It is celebrated in the first day of year, in which the farmers walk in the cities as a sign of encouragement for the agricultural productions. In recent years, this activity is being performed only in Kabul and other major cities, in which the mayor and other high governmental personalities participate for watching and observing.

Fruit salad with kiwifruit, strawberries and oranges. ... Dried fruit is fruit that has been dried, either naturally or through use of a machine, such as a dehydrator. ... In cooking, a syrup (from Arabic شراب sharab, beverage, via Latin siropus) is a thick, viscous liquid, containing a large amount of dissolved sugars, but showing little tendency to deposit crystals. ... Raisins Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Binomial name L. The pistachio (Pistacia vera L., Anacardiaceae; sometimes placed in Pistaciaceae) is a small tree up to 10 m tall, native to mountainous regions of Iran, Turkmenistan and western Afghanistan. ... Binomial name Corylus avellana L. Male catkins on Common Hazel The Common Hazel (Corylus avellana) is a shrub native to Europe and Asia. ... Prune refers to any of more than 125 varieties of fruit, most grown for drying. ... Binomial name Prunus armeniaca L. For other uses, see Apricot (disambiguation). ... “Walnut Tree” redirects here. ... Binomial name (Mill. ... Species See text. ... Cooking samanak in Isfara, Tajikistan Samanu (Persian: ), Samanak (Persian: ), or Sumalak (Tajik alphabet: сумалак) is a special type of sweet dish made from wheat germ, which is prepared for Nowruz. ... The germ is the heart of the cereal kernel, the embryo of the seed, and a concentrated source of several essential nutrients including Vitamin E, folate (folic acid), phosphorus, thiamin, zinc and magnesium. ... Species See text Tulip (Tulipa) is a genus of about 100 species of flowering plants in the family Liliaceae. ... Mazari Sharif, also known as Mazar-i Sharif or Mazār-e SharÄ«f (Persian: ‎ ), is the fourth largest city of Afghanistan, with population of 300,600 people (2006 official estimate). ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘AlÄ« ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ... Species See text Tulip (Tulipa) is a genus of about 100 species of flowering plants in the family Liliaceae. ... Game of Buzkashi in Mazari Sharif, Afghanistan Buzkashi, Kok-boru or Oglak Tartis (Persian: بزکشی buzkashÄ«: goat grabbing) (Uzbek, Tatar, Turkmen: kökbörü, kök blue + börü wolf, Kazakh: көкпар, Kyrgyz: улак) is a traditional Central Asian team sport played on horseback. ... Game of Buzkashi in Mazari Sharif, Afghanistan Buzkashi, Kok-boru or Oglak Tartis (Persian: بزکشی buzkashÄ«: goat grabbing) (Uzbek, Tatar, Turkmen: kökbörü, kök blue + börü wolf, Kazakh: көкпар, Kyrgyz: улак) is a traditional Central Asian team sport played on horseback. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Binomial name Spinacia oleracea L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... A chocolate chip cookie In the United States and Canada, a cookie is a small, round, flat cake. ... Fiance and Fiancee redirect here. ... The word Eid can mean several things: There are two Islamic festivals of Eid: One is called Eid ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر) that marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, The other is Eid ul-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى) or Eid-e Qurban (Persian: عید قربان) which is celebrated to commemorate Prophet Ibrahim... Mid-Shaban is the 15th day of the month of Shaban in the Islamic calendar. ... Species See text. ... For other places with the same name, see Kabul (disambiguation). ... Istalif is a village about 18 miles northwest of Kabul, Afghanistan. ... Capital of Parvan one of the 34 provinces of Afghanistan. ... Species See text. ...

Bahá'í Faith

Main article: Bahá'í Naw-Rúz

The Bahá'í Faith, a religion with its origin in Iran, celebrates this day (spelling it "Naw-Rúz") as a religious holiday marking not only the new year according to the Bahá'í calendar, but the end of their Nineteen Day Fast. Persian Bahá'ís still observe many Iranian customs associated with it, but Bahá'ís all over the world celebrate it as a festive day, according to local custom. American Bahá'í communities, for example, may have a potluck dinner, along with prayers and readings from Bahá'í scripture. While Naw Rúz, according to scripture, begins on the vernal equinox, Bahá'ís outside Iran currently celebrate it on March 21, regardless of what day the equinox falls. Bahá'ís are required to suspend work and school in observance. Naw-Rúz in the Baháí Faith is one of nine holy days for adherents of the Baháí Faith worldwide and the first day of the Baháí calendar occuring on the vernal equinox, around March 21. ... Seat of the Universal House of Justice, governing body of the Baháís, in Haifa, Israel The Baháí Faith is the religion founded by Baháulláh in 19th century Persia. ... The Baháí calendar, also called the Badí‘ calendar, used by the Baháí Faith, is a solar calendar with regular years of 365 days, and leap years of 366 days. ... The Nineteen Day Fast (March 2 - March 20) is a nineteen-day period of the year, during which members of the Baháí Faith adhere to a sunrise to sunset fast. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Although the Persian calendar is very precise about the very moment that the astronomical new year begins, in Iran, the 24-hour period (as per "wall clock" time) in which the astronomical new year begins is treated as Naw Ruz.


Fasli

Adherents of the Fasli variant of the Zoroastrian calendar also celebrate Nowruz as the first day of the New Year. Other variants of the Zoroastrian calendar celebrate the Nowruz twice: once as Jamshedi Nowruz on March 21st as the start of spring, and a second Nowruz, in July/August (see Variations of the Zoroastrian calendar), as either new year's eve or new year's day. That the second Nowruz is celebrated by some as the last day of the year (contrary to what might be expected from a term that means "new day"), may be due to the fact that in ancient Persia the day began at sunset, while in later Persian belief the day began at sunrise. The Zoroastrian calendar is a religious calendar used by members of the Zoroastrian faith, and it is an approximation of the (tropical) solar calendar. ... The New Year is an event that happens when a culture celebrates the end of one year and the beginning of the next year. ... The Zoroastrian calendar is a religious calendar used by members of the Zoroastrian faith, and it is an approximation of the (tropical) solar calendar. ... Jamshid (in Persian: ‎) is a common Persian male first name. ... The Zoroastrian calendar is a religious calendar used by members of the Zoroastrian faith, and it is an approximation of the (tropical) solar calendar. ...


Nowruz around the world

Nowruz is celebrated in Greater Iran, Caucasus, central Asia and by Iranians worldwide. It is a public holiday in: Iran, Azerbaijan [7], Turkmenistan [8], Tajikistan [9], Uzbekistan [10], Pakistan [11], Kazakhstan [12], and Kyrgyzstan [13]. Greater Iran (in Persian: ایران بزرگ pron: Iran-e Bozorg, also ایران‌زمین pron: Iran-zameen) is a term for the Iranian plateau in addition to the entire region where Iranian languages are today spoken as a first language, or as a second language by a significant minority. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ...


In Albania Sultan Nevruz is celebrated as a manily mystical day by the Bektashi sect, there are special ceremonies in the Tekke led by the clergy and large meals are served there. It is considered the historical Albanian New Year by the Bektashis, who refer to old Illyrian evidence. The Bektashi order (Turkish: BektaÅŸi) is a syncretic religious order related to Shia Alevi faith, and is generally considered to be a Shia Sufi sect (Tarika). ... Tekke is a Turkish word which corresponds to the Arabic word Zawya or the Persian Dergah. ... The Bektashi order (Turkish: BektaÅŸi) is a syncretic religious order related to Shia Alevi faith, and is generally considered to be a Shia Sufi sect (Tarika). ...


Nowruz is also celebrated by Kurds in Iraq[14] and Turkey [15] as well as by Parsis in India and Pakistan. a person from Pars (the middle-Persian word for Fars), a region now within the geographical boundaries of Iran, and is roughly the original homeland of the Persian people. ...


Other notable celebrations take place by Iranians around the world, such as Los Angeles, Toronto, Cologne and in United Kingdom, mainly in London [16]. Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ...


But because Los Angeles is prone to devastating fires, there are very strict fire codes in the city. No fires are allowed even on one's own property. Usually, Iranians and Azerbaijanis living in Southern California go to the beaches to celebrate the event where it is permissible to build fires. [17]


In Afghanistan during the reign of the Pashtun dominated Taliban, Nowruz was banned until 2001 where it came back as popular as it was before the Taliban.


Trivia

  • Basque musician Fermin Muguruza recorded a song called Newroz in his album Brigadistak Sound System (1999).
  • On June 1, 2006, the word for Nowruz was used in the final session of the 2006 Scripps National Spelling Bee in the United States. 11-year-old contestant Allion Salvador of Fort Lauderdale Florida was eliminated from the top 13 contestants in the final rounds for offering the spelling "naoruse" rather than the spelling "nauruz" that was considered correct for the competition [18][19]. The official pronouncer prompted Salvador with a pronunciation in which the first syllable was pronounced like the English word "now" or "gnaw" rather than "no", and indicated that no alternative pronunciations were available. The origin of the word was described as Persian and the definition given was, approximately, the Persian New Year holiday. It is noteworthy that there appears to be little agreement over how to spell this word in English and that neither the spelling considered official by Scripps nor the offered pronunciation would appear to be considered correct by most people familiar with the word [20].

Fermin Muguruza (Irún, Guipúzcoa, Spain) is a Basque nationalist rock musician, singer, songwriter, producer and disc label manager. ... Brigadistak Sound System is a studio album from Basque artist Fermin Muguruza. ... The Scripps National Spelling Bee (formerly known as the Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee and commonly referred to simply as the National Spelling Bee) is a highly competitive annual spelling bee run on a not-for-profit basis by The E. W. Scripps Company, held in the ballroom at the... Fort Lauderdale, known as the Venice of America, is a city located in Broward County, Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Khane tekani (lit. ... The Traditional Haft Sîn Haft Sîn (هفت سین) or the seven Ss is a major tradition of Norouz. ... Cooking samanak in Isfara, Tajikistan Samanu (Persian: ‎ ), Samanak (Persian: ‎ ), or Sumalak (Tajik alphabet: сумалак) is a special type of sweet dish made from Wheat germ, which is prepared for Nowruz. ... Hâjji Fîrûz or Hajji Piruz, is the traditional herald of Nouroz. ... Chaharshanbe Suri (in Persian: چهارشنبه‌سوری) is the national Persian Festival of Fire. ... Sabzi polo is an Iranian (Persian) dish of rice and vegetables, and is usually served with fish. ... The Traditional Haft Sîn Sizdah-bedar (Persian سیزده بدر) is the Persian Festival of springs. ... Image File history File links Haft_Seen. ... Zoroastrianism has numerous festivals and holy days, all of which are bound to the Zoroastrian calendar. ... The following is a List of Festivals in Iran (Persia): // Persian National Festivals Mehregan Norouz Yalda Chahar Shanbeh Suri (Shab-e Cheleh) Zoroastrian Please improve this section according to the posted request for expansion. ... Sadeh is an ancient Iranian tradition celebrated 50 days before nowrouz. ... Mihragān (Persian:‎ ​, var: Mehregān, Mehragān) or Jashn-e-Mihragān is a Zoroastrian and Iranian festival celebrated in honor of Mithra (Persian: Mehr or Mihr), the divinity of covenant, and hence of interpersonal relationships such as friendship, affection and love. ... A variety of foodstuff that are consumed on Yalda Yaldā also known as Shab-e Cheleh is celebrated on the eve of the first day of the winter (December 21) in the Iranian calendar, which falls on the Winter Solstice. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

References

  1. ^ a b The Baha'i Calendar. Retrieved on 2007-03-19.
  2. ^ LINK
  3. ^ Rostami, Hoda. "yek jahan noruz (meaning :Worldwide nowruz)", 2007-03-17. 

--> Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ...

See also

Holidays Portal

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The following is a List of Festivals in Iran (Persia): // Persian National Festivals Mehregan Norouz Yalda Chahar Shanbeh Suri (Shab-e Cheleh) Zoroastrian Please improve this section according to the posted request for expansion. ... Holidays in Iran: Iran uses three official calendar systems. ... Illumination of the Earth by the Sun on the day of equinox, (ignoring twilight). ... Earth Day Flag. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Nowruz

  Results from FactBites:
 
History and background of Persia and Nowruz (781 words)
Today, this celebrative region of Nowruz is extended from the Aral Lake and Sind River on the east, Caspian Sea to the north, Black and Mediterranean Seas to the west, and the Persian Gulf to the south.
Nowruz has its roots deeply embedded in Zoroastrianism, the first monotheistic religion that considers it as the last day of seven-day creation epoch, thus the ritual of Haft Sin, or seven life related, mostly plant based symbolic heralds that begin with the letter "S" in Persian language.
During Nowruz holiday seasons, family and friends visit each other, pay respect to the elderly, donate to the impoverished and the sick, give and accept presents in the thirteen days period that ends with April fool's day when everyone spends the whole day in the orchards or on the prairies dancing, singing and playing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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