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Encyclopedia > November 2004


November 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December
See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science For other uses, see November (disambiguation). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8 Richard Girnt... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... ← - 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... 2004 in sports : June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: Other events in June 2004 See also: Current events, 2004 in sports, current science and technology events. ... Science and technology news. ...


Events

OctNovemberDec
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30

Deaths in November

30 Pierre Berton
29 John Drew Barrymore
26 Bill Alley
24 Arthur Hailey
23 Rafael Eitan
18 Bobby Frank Cherry
16 John Morgan
13 Russell Jones
12 Mike Smith
11 Yasser Arafat
9 Iris Chang
9 Emlyn Hughes
7 Howard Keel
7 Gibson Kente
6 Fred Dibnah
2 Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan
2 Theo van Gogh
Sunday is the first or second day of the week, between Saturday and Monday, and the second day of the weekend in some cultures. ... Monday is considerd either the first or the second day of the week, between Sunday and Tuesday. ... Tuesday is considered either the second or the third day of the week, between Monday and Wednesday. ... The god Woden, after whom Wednesday was named. ... Thursday, by international standard, is the fourth day of the week, falling between Wednesday and Friday. ... Friday is the fifth day of the week, falling between Thursday and Saturday. ... Saturday is the seventh (sixth in some countries) day of the week, between Friday and Sunday. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 31 days remaining, as the final day of November. ... Pierre Berton Pierre Francis Berton, CC , O.Ont , BA , D.Litt (July 12, 1920 – November 30, 2004) was a noted Canadian author of non-fiction, especially Canadiana and Canadian history, and was a well-known television personality and journalist. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Drew Barrymore (June 4, 1932 – November 29, 2004) was an actor, one of a family of actors that included his father, John Barrymore, and his fathers siblings, Lionel and Ethel. ... November 26 is the 330th day (331st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... William (Bill) Edward Alley (born 3 February 1919 in Sydney, Australia; died 26 November 2004 in Taunton, Somerset, England) was a cricketer who played 400 first class matches for New South Wales, Somerset and a Commonwealth XI. Whilst in Australia, Alley was also a middleweight boxer, and was undefeated in... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Arthur Hailey (April 5, 1920 - November 24, 2004) was a British/Canadian/American/Bahamian novelist. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... Rafael Eitan (January 11, 1929 – November 23, 2004) was an Israeli general, former chief of staff of the Israeli Defence Forces and later a politician and a Knesset member. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... Bobby Frank Cherry (June 20, 1930 in Mineral Springs, Alabama - November 18, 2004 at Kilby Correctional Facility, Montgomery) was convicted in 2002 for the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... John Morgan (September 21, 1930 — November 15, 2004) was a British-born Canadian comedian. ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... Russell Jones appears as Dirt McGirt Ol Dirty Bastard (also known as ODB, Dirty, Dirt McGirt, Dirt Dog, Big Baby Jesus, Osirus, Joe Bannanas, and Unique Ason), born Russell Tyrone Jones (November 15, 1968–November 13, 2004), was an African American rapper with one of the most highly distinctive styles... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... Mike Smith (4 January 1942-12 November 2004) (born in Enfield, England) was a cricketer, who played most of his cricket as an opening batsman for Middlesex County Cricket Club. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... Iris Chang Iris Shun-Ru Chang (Traditional Chinese: 張純如, Simplified Chinese: 张纯如; Pinyin: Zhāng Chúnrú; March 28, 1968 – November 9, 2004) was a freelance Chinese American historian and journalist. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... Emlyn Hughes, OBE (August 28, 1947, Barrow-in-Furness - November 9, 2004, Sheffield) was an English footballer who captained the Liverpool F.C. side of the 1970s, having joined them from Blackpool in 1967. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... Howard Keel on the tv show dallas Howard Keel, born Harry Clifford Keel (April 13, 1919–November 7, 2004) was an American actor who starred in many of the classic film musicals of the 1950s. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... Gibson Kente (1932 - November 7, 2004) was a South African playwright based in Soweto. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... Fred with his MBE Fred Dibnah MBE (29 April 1938 – 6 November 2004), born in Bolton, Lancashire, was an English steeplejack who became a television personality, a cult figure and, latterly, a national institution. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... Sheikh Zayed Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan (Arabic:الشيخ زايد بن سلطان أل نهيان)‎, (1918 — 2 November 2004), the principal architect of the seven United Arab Emirates, was the ruler of Abu Dhabi and president of the UAE for over 30 years (1971-2004). ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... Theo van Gogh Theo van Gogh (July 23, 1957 – November 2, 2004) was a controversial Dutch film director, television producer, publicist and actor. ...

Ongoing events

AIDS pandemic
Iran's nuclear program
Nigerian oil crisis
Same-sex marriage debates
U.S. election controversy
U.S. presidential transition
Ukrainian election controversy
Orange Revolution
The following is a list of figures who died in 2004. ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV-positive people and those living with AIDS. AIDS is an acronym for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and is defined as a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the depletion of the immune system caused... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... (Redirected from 2004 oil crisis in Nigeria) Map of Nigeria In 2004, Nigeria was rocked by a crisis in the oil industry which, coupled with the continuing problems in Iraq and contracted petrol supplies offered by Saudi Arabia and other OPEC countries, has serious implications for the entire world community. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George W. Bushs second term as President of the United States began at noon on January 20, 2005 and is due to expire with the swearing-in of the 44th President of the United States at noon, Washington, D.C. time, on January 20, 2009. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Orange-clad supporters of Viktor Yushchenko gather in Independence Square in Kiev. ...

Ongoing armed conflicts

Arab-Israeli conflict
Conflict in Chechnya
Second Congo War
Conflict in Iraq
Conflict in Fallujah
Darfur conflict in Sudan
Civil war in Côte d'Ivoire
Second Sudanese Civil War It has been suggested that History of Arab-Israeli Conflict be merged into this article or section. ... Capital Grozny Area - total - % water 78th - 15,500 km² - negligible Population - Total - Density 49th - est. ... The Second Congo War was a conflict that took place largely in the territory of Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... U.S. soldiers from the 1st Cavalry Division prepare to enter and clear a building during fighting in Fallujah. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... Armed insurgents French troops try to separate the belligerents. ... The Second Sudanese Civil War started in 1983, although it is most accurately a continuation of the First Sudanese Civil War of 1955 to 1972. ...


Ongoing wars This is a list of lists of wars, sorted by country, date, region, and type of conflict. ...

Election results in November

28: Romania presidential
28: Romania legislative
22: Alberta legislative
21: Ukraine presidential (runoff)
2: USA presidential
2: USA congressional
2: USA gubernatorial (11 states)
2: Guam general
2: Puerto Rico general
November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A presidential election was held in Romania on November 28, 2004. ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Romanian legislative election of 2004 was held on November 28, 2004. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Strong and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Area 661,848 km² (6th) • Land 642,317 km² • Water 19,531 km² (2. ... Alberta riding map showing the winning parties and their vote percentage in each won riding. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... Presidential election results map. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... The U.S. Congress is the United States legislative body and consists of two branches, the House with 435 Representatives apportioned by population and Senate with two Senators from each state. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... U.S. gubernatorial elections of 2004 were held on November 2, 2004. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... The Guam general election of 2004 was held on 2 November. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... (Redirected from 2004 Puerto Rico General Elections) The Puerto Rico General Elections of 2004 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ...

Ongoing trials

Chile: Augusto Pinochet
ICTY: Slobodan Milošević
Iraq: Iraqi Special Tribunal
Saddam Hussein, among others
USA: Michael Jackson
USA: Zacarias Moussaoui
India: Jayendra Saraswathi General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte (born November 25, 1915) was dictator of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... The International Criminal Tribunal for Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991, more commonly referred to as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, acronym ICTY, is a body of the United Nations (UN) established... Slobodan Milošević, on trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, The Hague Slobodan Milošević ▶(?) (Serbian: Слободан Милошевић, pronounced ; born 20 August 1941) is a former President of Serbia and of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia as well as leader of the Socialist Party of Serbia. ... The Iraq Special Tribunal is a body established under Iraqi national law to try Iraqi nationals or residents accused of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes or other serious crimes committed between 1968 and 2003. ... Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic: صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي), born April 28, 1937 , was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (born August 29, 1958 [1] in Gary, Indiana), is an American singer-songwriter, record producer, dancer, choreographer, actor, and philanthropist, who is known by his peers and fans as the King of Pop. He began his career at the age of 11 as lead singer of the... Moussaoui mugshot Zacarias Moussaoui (born May 30, 1968) is a French terrorist of Moroccan descent involved in the conspiracy that resulted in the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Swamigal (born July 18, 1935 as Subramanyam Mahadeva Iyer) is the 69th Shankaracharya (guru and head (Peetadhipathi) of the Kanchi Kamakoti Peetham), a Hindu religious order. ...

Related pages

About this page
Year in...
Wikipedia Announcements The following is a list of articles devoted to events from 2004 in narrow subject areas: 2003: List of 2003 in articles 2005: List of 2005 in articles // Culture 2004 in architecture 2004 in film 2004 in games 2004 in literature 2004 in music 2004 in television 2004 in video...

November 30, 2004

November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 31 days remaining, as the final day of November. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... This article is about the green parties around the world. ... For the 18th & 19th century U.S. Congressman from Massachusetts, see David Cobb (Massachusetts). ... Delaware County is a fast growing suburban county located in the state of Ohio, within the Columbus, OH metropolitan area. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ... ... The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... A tariff (sometimes known as a customs duty) is a tax on imported or exported goods. ... Ken Jennings on Jeopardy! Kenneth Wayne Jennings III (born May 23, 1974) holds the record for the longest winning streak on the syndicated game show Jeopardy!, as well as other records. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ... A game show is a radio or television program, involving members of the public or celebrities, sometimes as part of a team, playing a game, perhaps involving answering quiz questions, for points or prizes. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Advance Ottawa/Ottawa en avant City of Ottawa, Ontario, Canadas Location. ... ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting Americas people from harm and its property from damage. ... Tom Ridge Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 26, 1946) is a former Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001), Assistant to the President for Homeland Security (2001–2003), and the first United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2003–2005). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is a committee of Swiss nationals and probably will be so as long as the ICRC exists. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Camp Delta. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was an infamous torture device. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Look up Flood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... It has been suggested that Mudslide be merged into this article or section. ... Quezon is a province of the Philippines located in the CALABARZON region in Luzon. ... Traian Băsescu (born November 4, 1951) is a Romanian politician. ... Justice and Truth (in Romanian Dreptate şi adevăr, or D.A. for short) is a political alliance comprising two centre-right political parties in Romania: the liberal National Liberal Party (PNL) and the reformist Democratic Party (PD). ... The Romanian legislative election of 2004 was held on November 28, 2004. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... The Social Democratic Party of Romania (Partidul Social Democrat or PSD) is the governing party of Romania. ... Jorge Fernando Branco de Sampaio (   listen?) is the current Portuguese President of the Republic, elected for a second term in January 14, 2001. ... Pedro Miguel de Santana Lopes (born June 29, 1956) is a Portuguese politician, and was Prime Minister of Portugal in (2004 and 2005). ... ... The Home Secretary (official full title Secretary of State for the Home Department) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... David Blunkett The Right Honourable David Blunkett (born June 6, 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and has been Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside since 1987. ... An entry visa valid in all Schengen treaty countries Visas for Laos, Thailand, and Sri Lanka A visa (short for the Latin carta visa, lit. ... Marriage is a relationship between individuals which has formed the foundation of the family for most societies. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

November 29, 2004

November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Main languages See Languages of ASEAN Secretary General Ong Keng Yong of Singapore Area  - Total 4,480,000 km2 Population  - Total (2004)  - Density 550,000,000 122. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... The Supreme Court of Ukraine (in Ukrainian, Верховний Суд України) is the highest judicial body in the system of courts of general jurisdiction in Ukraine. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... The President of Ukraine (in Ukrainian, Президент України, Prezydent Ukrayiny) is the head of state and acts in its name. ... Leonid Kuchma Leonid Danylovych Kuchma (Леонід Кучма) (born August 9, 1938) was the second President of Ukraine from July 19, 1994 to January 23, 2005. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... The Iraqi National Guard is a military force in Iraq controlled by the interim government. ... RamădÄ« (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is the worlds largest group of humanitarian non-governmental organizations, often known simply as the Red Cross, after its original symbol. ... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ... The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is the worlds largest group of humanitarian non-governmental organizations, often known simply as the Red Cross, after its original symbol. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Ayman al-Zawahiri Ayman al-Zawahiri (Arabic: ) (born June 19, 1951) is a prominent member of the al-Qaeda group and formerly the head of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad, a terrorist organization. ... ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... Paralysis is the complete loss of muscle function for one or more muscle groups. ... The spinal cord is a part of the vertebrate nervous system that is enclosed in and protected by the vertebral column (it passes through the spinal canal). ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The Kellogg Company NYSE: K (often referred to as simply Kellogg® or Kelloggs®) is an American-based multinational producer of breakfast foods, cookies and crackers, with corporate headquarters in Battle Creek, Michigan, USA. Kelloggs® was founded as the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company on February 19, 1906... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Carlos M. Gutierrez (originally Gutiérrez) (born November 4, 1953) is the 35th U.S. Secretary of Commerce, succeeding Donald Evans. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Nationality is, in English usage, the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A prison is a place in which people are confined and deprived of a range of liberties. ... The Kurds (in Kurdish: Kurd) are an Iranian people (a classification that is more linguistic than ethnic in the case of some Kurds) inhabiting a mountainous area of Southwest Asia that includes parts of Iraq, Turkey, and Iran as well as smaller sections of Syria, Armenia and Lebanon. ... Aung San Suu Kyi Daw Aung San Suu Kyi (Burmese: ), born June 19, 1945 in Yangon (Rangoon), is a nonviolent pro-democracy activist in Myanmar (Burma). ... Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... The National League for Democracy is a Burmese political party. ... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her residence. ... A record label is a brand created by companies that specialize in manufacturing, distributing and promoting audio and video recordings, on various formats including compact discs, LPs, DVD-Audio, SACDs, and cassettes. ... Sharman Networks is a company headquartered in Australia and incorporated in Vanuatu. ... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... File sharing is the practice of making files available to other users for download over the Internet and smaller networks. ... Kazaa Media Desktop (once capitalized as KaZaA, but now usually left as Kazaa) is a controversial peer-to-peer file sharing application using the FastTrack protocol. ... Copyright symbol. ... The Social Democratic Party of Romania (Partidul Social Democrat or PSD) is the governing party of Romania. ... The Romanian legislative election of 2004 was held on November 28, 2004. ... A presidential election was held in Romania on November 28, 2004. ... Adrian Năstase (born June 22, 1950) is a Romanian politician and President of the Chamber of Deputies since December 21, 2004. ... Ricardo Froilán Lagos Escobar (born March 2, 1938) is a Socialist politician and the president of Chile since 2000. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte (born November 25, 1915) was dictator of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was an infamous torture device. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a sudden and sometimes catastrophic movement of a part of the Earths surface. ... Hokkaido   listen? (北海道 Hokkaidō, literal meaning: North Sea Route, Ainu: Mosir), formerly known as Ezo, is the second largest island of Japan. ... Whales are the largest species of exclusively aquatic mammals, members of the order Cetacea, which also includes dolphins and porpoises. ... Genera See article below. ... Municipality of King Island, Tasmania King Island is one of the islands that makes up the state of Tasmania, Australia. ... Motto: Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Nickname: The Apple Isle Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Governor Premier Const. ... Scotus redirects here. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia and Palmyra Atoll (an uninhabited incorporated unorganized territory), form the United States of America. ... // Legislative branch Article I of the Constitution grants all legislative powers of the federal government to the Congress, which is divided into two chambers, a Senate and a House of Representatives. ... Cannabis sativa extract. ... Separation of powers is a model of democracy that involves the separation of political power between 3 branches of the state: The Executive, the Legislature, and the Judiciary. ... Officially launched on April 5, 2004, The Greatest Canadian was a project by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, to find who is the greatest ever Canadian. ... The color red and particularly the red flag are traditional symbols of Socialism. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ... The Honourable Thomas Clement Douglas, PC , CC , SOM , MA , LL.D (October 20, 1904 – February 24, 1986) was a Scottish-born Canadian Baptist minister until becoming a democratic socialist politician. ...

November 28, 2004

November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... Wyoming coal mine Coal mining is the extraction of coal from the Earth for use during combustion. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a north-central province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as... The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine This article is about mineral extraction. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Hebei (Chinese: 河北; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hopeh) is a northern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ NînÄ›wâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ... RamădÄ« (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... (Redirected from 2004 Ukrainian presidential election) The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Donetska Oblast ( Ukrainian: Донецька область, Donets’ka oblast’) is an oblast (province) of eastern Ukraine. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A tanker is usually a vehicle carrying large amounts of liquid fuel. ... Nodding donkey pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 Petroleum (from Latin petrus – rock and oleum – oil), mineral oil, or crude oil, sometimes colloquially called black gold, is a thick, dark brown or greenish flammable liquid, which exists in the upper strata of some areas of the Earths... The Delaware River at New Hope, Pennsylvania The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... Citgo Petroleum Corporation or Citgo is a United States oil refiner and marketer of gasoline, lubricants, petrochemicals and other petroleum products. ... View of the Tosco (ex Valero, originally Shell) Martinez oil refinery An oil refinery is an industrial process plant where crude oil is processed and refined into useful petroleum products. ... Coast Guard shield The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is the coast guard of the United States. ...

November 27, 2004

November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Liu Jingsheng (born c. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin, in full: Ioannes Paulus Papa II), born Karol Józef WojtyÅ‚a (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death, making his the second-longest pontificate (or the third... ... Patriarch Bartholomew I (born Demetrios Archontonis on February 29, 1940) has been the Patriarch of Constantinople, and thus first among equals in the Eastern Orthodox Communion, since November 2, 1991. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Bishops of Byzantium (until 330) St. ... An icon of Saint Gregory Nazianzen the theologian holding a Gospel Book Saint Gregory Nazianzen (AD 329 - January 25, 389), also known as Saint Gregory the Theologian, was a 4th century Christian bishop of Constantinople. ... Saint John Chrysostom John Chrysostom (347 - 407) was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the 4th and 5th centuries in Syria and Constantinople. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,823,807 almost 4,000,000 1... Map of Constantinople. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... The word ecumenism (also oecumenism, Å“cumenism) (IPA: ) is derived from the Greek oikoumene, which means the inhabited world. The term is usually used with regard to movements toward religious unity. ... The East-West Schism, known also as the Great Schism (though this latter term sometimes refers to the later Western Schism), was the event that divided Chalcedonian Christianity into Western Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy. ... A Duma (Д́ума in Russian) is any of various representative assemblies in modern Russia and Russian history. ... The Republic of North Ossetia in Russia The Beslan school hostage crisis (also referred to by the media as the Beslan school siege) began when armed multinational terrorists took hundreds of schoolchildren and adults hostage on September 1, 2004 at School Number One in the Russian town of Beslan in... Jorge Alberto Uribe Echavarría (b. ... The FARC-EPs flag The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP) is Colombias oldest, largest, most capable and best equipped militant guerrilla group, established in 1964-1966 as the military wing of the Colombian... ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... USSS redirects here. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Verkhovna Rada. ... The President of Ukraine (in Ukrainian, Президент України, Prezydent Ukrayiny) is the head of state and acts in its name. ... Leonid Kuchma Leonid Danylovych Kuchma (Леонід Кучма) (born August 9, 1938) was the second President of Ukraine from July 19, 1994 to January 23, 2005. ... Dr. Bernard Bot November 21, 1937 is the current Minister of Foreign affairs of The Netherlands. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... General Joginder Jaswant Singh is the chief of army staff of India. ... The Indian Army (भारतीय सेना Hindi: Bhartiya Sena) is the land force of the Military of India and has the prime responsibility of conducting land-based warfare. ... A Sikh man wearing a turban A Sikh is a follower of Sikhism, a religious faith originating in the Punjab. ...

November 26, 2004

November 26 is the 330th day (331st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... State nickname: Badger State Official languages None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Governor Jim Doyle (D) Senators Herb Kohl (D) Russ Feingold (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 23rd 169,790 km² 17 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 18th 5,453,896 38. ... Vaccination is a term coined by Edward Jenner for the process of administering live, albeit weakened, microbes to patients, with the intent of conferring immunity against a targeted form of a related disease agent. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... cocktail In general, a cocktail is a mix of several substances, usually liquids. ... A common alternate meaning of virus is computer virus. ... General Pervez Musharraf (Urdu: ); born August 11, 1943 (near Delhi, India) is the President of Pakistan. ... A satellite composite image of Europe // Etymology Picture of Europa, carried away by bull-shaped Zeus. ... Shown in green is the Kashmiri region under Pakistani control. ... It has been suggested that History of Arab-Israeli Conflict be merged into this article or section. ... Terrorism is the unconventional use of violence for political gain. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Luhansk Oblast (Луганська область, Luhanska oblast in Ukrainian) is an oblast (province) of eastern Ukraine. ... Donetsk heavy industry Donetsk (Ukrainian: , Donetsk; Russian: ) is a city in eastern Ukraine on the Kalmius river. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... A monument to St. ... Moscow (Russian: Москва́, Moskva, IPA: â–¶(?)) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Пу́тин, â–¶(?), Pútin; born 7 October 1952) is a Russian politician and the current President of the Russian Federation. ... Leonid Kuchma Leonid Danylovych Kuchma (Леонід Кучма) (born August 9, 1938) was the second President of Ukraine from July 19, 1994 to January 23, 2005. ... Javier Solana Francisco Javier Solana Madariaga (born July 14, 1942 in Madrid, Spain) is the High Representative of the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and the Secretary-General of both the Council of the European Union (EU) and the Western European Union (WEU). ... Office President of Poland Term of office from December 23, 1995 until December 23, 2005 Profession Journalist Political party SLD Spouse Jolanta KwaÅ›niewska Date of birth November 15, 1954 Place of birth BiaÅ‚ogard, Poland Date of death {{{death_date}}} Place of death {{{death_in}}} Aleksander KwaÅ›niewski (pronounced: â–¶(?)) (born November... President Valdas Adamkus Valdas V. Adamkus (born Voldemaras Adamkavecius on November 3, 1926) is the current President of the Republic of Lithuania. ... Boris Gryzlov Boris Gryzlov or Boris Grizlov (Russian: Борис Грызлов) (b. ... Alberto Abadie is a professor at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... The John F. Kennedy School of Government is a school within Harvard University that offers graduate degrees in public policy and public administration, as well as conducting research in various subjects relating to politics and government. ... Freedom is the right, or the capacity, of self-determination, as an expression of the individual will. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... Terrorism is the unconventional use of violence for political gain. ... This article applies to political ideologies. ... Large Ash Plume From Manam Volcano, November 2004 Manam is an inhabited island located in the Bismarck Sea across the Stephan Strait from the east coast of mainland Papua New Guinea. ... In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ... The Ontario Court of Appeal is headquarted in downtown Toronto, in historic Osgoode Hall. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... The Canada Pension Plan (or CPP) is a contributory, earnings-related social insurance program. ... WHO emblem The World Health Organization (WHO) is an agency of the United Nations, acting as a coordinating authority on international public health, headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. ... Negatively stained flu virions. ... A pandemic, or global epidemic, is an outbreak of an infectious disease that affects people over an extensive geographical area (from Greek pan all + demos people). ... The Spanish Flu Pandemic, also known as La Grippe, was an unusually severe and deadly strain of avian influenza, a viral infectious disease, that killed some 25 million to 50 million people worldwide in 1918 and 1919. ... Influenza A virus, the virus that causes Avian flu. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... The Green Zone is a 10 km² (4 mile²) area in central Baghdad that is the main base for coalition officials in Iraq. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Iraqi Islamic Party (Hizb al-Islami al-Airaqi), a Sunni political party in Iraq. ... An insurgency is an organized rebellion that engages in deliberate actions to cause the downfall of a governmental authority, through destruction and armed actions. ... Map of the Sunni Triangle The Sunni Triangle refers to a roughly triangular area of Iraq to the northwest of Baghdad. ... The Iraqi National Guard is a military force in Iraq controlled by the interim government. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Dr. Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, with an intent to destroy Israel. ... List of Presidents of Indonesia Categories: Indonesia | Lists of office-holders ... Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (born September 9, 1949), Indonesian retired military general and stateman, is the sixth President of Indonesia, and the first to be elected directly by voters. ... Aceh (pronounced Ah-chay) is a special territory (daerah istimewa, or special area) of Indonesia, located on the northern tip of the island of Sumatra. ... Political separatism is a movement to obtain sovereignty and split a territory or group of people (usually a people with a distinctive national consciousness) from one another (or one nation from another; a colony from the metropolis). ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as involvement in action to bring about change, be it social, political, environmental, or other change. ... MST logo The Brazilian Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra MST), commonly known in English as the Landless Workers Movement, is the largest social movement in Latin America with more than a 1. ... Bras lia is the capital city of Brazil and is located in the center of the country in a federal district created in the state of Goi s. ... Land reform (also agrarian reform although that can have a broader meaning) is the government-initiated or government-backed redistribution of — i. ... See also List of Presidents of Brazil The President of the Federal Republic of Brazil is the head of state and head of government of Brazil. ... Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (born October 6, 1945) is the President of Brazil. ... Osama bin Laden in a photo from the 1990s Usāmah bin Muhammad bin `Awad bin Lādin (born March 10, 1957; Arabic: ), commonly known as Osama bin Laden, or Usama bin Laden, (Arabic: ), a follower of the Wahhabi school of thought and the founder of the militant organization al... Tribal refers to a culture or society based on tribes or clans. ... Henan (Chinese: 河南; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-nan), is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the central part of the country. ...

November 25, 2004

November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shown in green is the Kashmiri region under Pakistani control. ... Autonomy is the condition of something that does not depend on anything else. ... A Declaration of War is a formal declaration issued by a national government indicating that a state of war exists between that nation, and one or more others. ... Border has several different, but related meanings: // Generic borders A border can consist of a margin around the edge of something, such as a lawn, garden, photograph, or sheet of paper. ... In military terms, a demilitarized zone (DMZ) is an area, usually the frontier or boundary between two or more groups, where military activity is not permitted, usually by treaty or other agreement. ... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... The IAEA flag The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... A laboratory centrifuge tabletop centrifuge A centrifuge is a piece of equipment that puts a substance in rotation around a fixed axis in order for the centrifugal force to separate a fluid from a fluid or from a solid substance. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Iran geography stubs | Cities in Iran ... The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... A summit is: A point higher than all the ground immediately surrounding it; see topographical summit. ... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: Den Haag, or officially s-Gravenhage) is the administrative capital of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country, in the province South Holland of which it is also the capital. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... The Camorra is a Mafia-like criminal organization, or secret society, in the region of Campania and the city of Naples in Italy. ... Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. ...

November 24, 2004

November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the audit, evaluation, and investigative agency of the United States Congress. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Official languages None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 8. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... A laboratory centrifuge tabletop centrifuge A centrifuge is a piece of equipment that puts a substance in rotation around a fixed axis in order for the centrifugal force to separate a fluid from a fluid or from a solid substance. ... The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or commonly mad cow disease) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... The bomb left a crater in the road three metres deep The Jakarta embassy bombing took place on September 9, 2004 in Jakarta, Indonesia. ... Motto: Jaya Raya (Indonesian): Prosper and Great Founded 22 June 1527 Governor Sutiyoso Area 661. ...

November 23, 2004

November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A CBS News Special Report ident card CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ... Dan Rather, from a telecast in October 2004. ... The CBS Evening News is the flagship nightly television news program of the American television network CBS. // Early history It originally competed against the Camel News Caravan on NBC, and was anchored by Douglas Edwards. ... The ticking TAG Heuer stopwatch from 60 Minutes. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... A monument to St. ... Freedom House is a partly government-funded American advocacy group in the Wilsonian tradition, which advocates the global spread of democracy, and sees it as the historical task of the United States to further this goal. ... Lviv is a city in western Ukraine, the capital city of the Lviv Oblast (province) and one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. ... Ternopil (Тернопіль, Ternopil’ in Ukrainian, Tarnopol in Polish, Ternopol in Russian) is a city in western Ukraine, located on the banks of the Seret river. ... Vinnytsia, or Vinnytsya (Ukrainian: , Polish: ) is a city in central Ukraine, located on the banks of the Pivdennyi Buh River, approximately 270 km west of Ukraines capital, Kiev. ... Ivano-Frankivsk (Ukrainian: Івано-Франківськ/Ivano-Frankivsk; Станиславів/Stanyslaviv before 1962; Polish: StanisÅ‚awów 14th century - 1939; Russian: Ivano-Frankovsk; German: Stanislau (before World War I); Yiddish: סטאַניסלוו/Stanislev) is a city in Ukraine, center of Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast in the west of the country. ... A monument to St. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Flag of the League of Arab States The Arab League or League of Arab States (Arabic: جامعة الدول العربية), is an organization of Arab states - compare Arab world. ... The flag of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) The Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC; Arabic: منظمة المؤتمر الإسلامي) (French: Organisation de la Conference Islamique) is an inter-governmental organization with a Permanent Delegation to the United Nations. ... G8 countries. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... A large number of international organizations and other bodies have a secretary general or secretary-general as their chief administrative officers or in other administrative capacities. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... View of the Red Sea and Tiran Island from the Sheraton Sharm hotel Sharm el-Sheikh (شرم الشيخ, also transliterated as Sharm ash Shaykh), often known simply as Sharm, is a city situated on the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula, in Janub Sina, Egypt, on the coastal strip between the Red... A cleric is: A member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals; or A member of a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and similar fantasy role-playing games. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... The Association of Muslim Clerics, or sometimes called Association Of Muslim Clerics, was formed by well-known moderate Sunni religious leaders, including Sheikh Abdel-Salam al-Kubaisi and Sheikh Abdel-Sattar Abdel-Jabbar, after the collapse of Saddam Husseins regime in Iraq by U.S. in 2003. ... Baquba (بعقوبه; also transliterated as Baqubah and Baqouba) is the capital of Iraqs Diyala province. ...

November 22, 2004

November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... The Prime Minister of Ukraine is appointed by the President and ratified by the Verkhovna Rada (parliament). ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ... ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Richard Green Dick Lugar (born April 4, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Indiana. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union. ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, listen â–¶(?)) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician and is the 11th President of the European Commission. ... External links Webpage of Jacques Barrot as European Commission member (in French) Categories: Stub ... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... Volunteers cleaning up the aftermath of the Prestige oil spill An oil spill is the leaking of oil (generally, petroleum) into the natural environment, usually the ocean. ... Map of Newfoundland Newfoundland (French: Terre-Neuve; Irish: Talamh an Éisc; Latin: Terra Nova) is a large island off the northeast coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation is located in Savannah, Georgia, USA, and has been a unit of General Dynamics since 2001. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... Downtown Houston Nickname: Bayou City; Space City Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: www. ... kkdkd ... The University of Southern California (also known as USC, SC, and Southern California), Californias oldest private research university, is located in the urban center of Los Angeles, California. ... Malnutrition is a general term for the medical condition in a person caused by an unbalanced diet—either too little or too much food, or a diet missing one or more important nutrients. ... In probability theory and statistics, correlation, also called correlation coefficient, is a numeric measure of the strength of linear relationship between two random variables. ... IQ redirects here; for other uses of that term, see IQ (disambiguation). ... Anti-social behaviour is that lacking in judgement and consideration for others, ranging from careless negligence to deliberately damaging activity, vandalism and graffiti for example. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... Sexual abuse is a relative cultural term used to describe sexual relations and behavior between two or more parties which are considered criminally and/or morally offensive. ... Peacekeeping is a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year (279th in Leap years). ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Strong and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Area 661,848 km² (6th) • Land 642,317 km² • Water 19,531 km² (2. ... The Alberta Progressive Conservative Association is a provincial right-of-centre party in the Canadian province of Alberta. ... The Honourable Ralph Phillip Klein (born November 1, 1942), leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives, is current premier of the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Alberta riding map showing the winning parties and their vote percentage in each won riding. ...

November 21, 2004

November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Paris Club is an informal group of financial officials from 19 of the worlds richest countries, which provides financial services such as debt restructuring, debt relief, and debt cancellation to indebted countries and their creditors. ... Hifikepunye Lucas Pohamba (born August 18, 1935) is a Namibian politician from the South-West Africa Peoples Organisation (SWAPO) ruling party who won the presidential election of November 15/16, 2004 with 76% of the vote, in what has been described as a landslide. [1] He was backed by... The South West African Peoples Organization is a political party in Namibia. ... This page contains a list of presidents of Namibia. ... President Sam Nujoma Samuel Daniel Shafiishuna Nujoma (born May 12, 1929) is the first President of Namibia. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... ... The Seal of the United States Department of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Colin Luther Powell, (pronounced koh-lihn or call in, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 23, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The YAMAM ( יממ ) is the elite civilian counter-terrorism unit of Israel. ... Israeli Police logo The Israeli police (משטרת ישראל) is a civilian force in the State of Israel. ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ... Mukataa (also spelled Muqataa) is a compound of buildings which contain governmental offices and local administrative headquarters. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... Map of the Gaza Strip, showing the settlements of Gush Katif Gush Katif (also Gush Katiff, Hebrew: גוש קטיף) was a block of Israeli settlements in the southern Gaza Strip. ... Runoff voting is a voting system used in single-seat elections. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... A bias is a prejudice in a general or specific sense, usually in the sense for having a predilection to one particular point of view or ideology. ... The Iraqi Interim Government was created by the United States and its coalition allies as a caretaker government to govern Iraq until elections are conducted on January 30th, 2005. ... Legislative elections were held in Iraq on January 30, 2005. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Grand Canyon is a colorful, steep-sided gorge, carved by the Colorado River, in northern Arizona, USA. The canyon appears on many versions of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World list, although none of these lists are by any means authoritative. ... Look up Flood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... Sediment is any particulate matter that can be transported by fluid flow and which eventually is deposited as a layer of solid particles on the bed or bottom of a body of water or other liquid. ...

November 20, 2004

November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... María Isabel López Rodríguez (4 July 1995, ) is the winner of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2004 Discography Studio Album Category: ... The Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2004 was the second Eurovision Song Contest for young singers aged 8 to 15. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... A satellite is any object that orbits another object (which is known as its primary). ... The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission consists of an unmanned spacecraft called Swift, which was launched into orbit on November 20, 2004, at 17:16:00 UTC (12:16 PM, EST) on top of a Delta 2 rocket. ... Optical afterglow of gamma ray burst GRB-990123 (the bright dot within the white square and in the enlarged cutout) on 23 January 1999. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national public service broadcaster of the United Kingdom (see British television). ... Pudsey is the teddy bear logo of Children in Need, created by designer Joanna Ball and named after Balls home town, Pudsey, in West Yorkshire. ... The 2005 Telethon on Seven Perth. ... The pound sterling is the official currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... 2003 (MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Teresa Borcz Khalifa (1954-) is a Polish foreign aid worker. ... A hostage is a person (sometimes another entity) which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act, or refrain from acting, in a particular way. ... Warsaw (Polish Warszawa, (?), in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto StoÅ‚eczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ... Conseil Représentatif des Institutions juives de France (English: Representative Council of French Jewish Institutions) is an umbrella organization of French Jewish organizations. ... // The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי transliterated: Yehudi) is used in many ways, but generally refers to a follower of Judaism, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity; and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Hezbollah flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God, for other designations or alternative spellings, see name part of this article) is a Shia Islamist group in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... China Eastern Airlines Corporation Limited (中国东方航空股份有限公司) is an airline based in Shanghai, China. ... Bombardier Inc. ... Death is the cessation of physical life in a living organism or the state of the organism after that event. ... The Indian Army (भारतीय सेना Hindi: Bhartiya Sena) is the land force of the Military of India and has the prime responsibility of conducting land-based warfare. ... Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, also known as RDX, cyclonite,hexogen, and T4, is an nitroamine and explosive material widely used by the military. ... Shown in green is the Kashmiri region under Pakistani control. ... Anantnag is a district in the state of Jammu and Kashmir in north India. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Jammu and Kashmir is the northern-most state of the Republic of India, with Srinagar as its summer capital and Jammu as its winter capital. ... Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Swamigal (born July 18, 1935 as Subramanyam Mahadeva Iyer) is the 69th Shankaracharya (guru and head (Peetadhipathi) of the Kanchi Kamakoti Peetham), a Hindu religious order. ...

November 19, 2004

November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Current MRC logo The Medical Research Council (MRC) is a UK organisation dedicated to promot[ing] the balanced development of medical and related biological research in the UK. Organisation The MRC is one of seven Research Councils and is answerable to, although politically independent from, the Office of Science and... Co-trimoxazole (abbreviated SXT) is a bacteriostatic antibiotic combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, in the ratio of 1 to 5, used in the treatment of a variety of bacterial infections. ... HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a retrovirus that infects cells of the human immune system. ... A male Caucasian toddler child A child (plural: children) is a young human. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... A treaty is a binding agreement under international law concluded by subjects of international law, namely states and international organizations. ... Human cloning is the creation of a genetically identical copy of an existing, or previously existing human or growing cloned tissue from that individual. ... Russell Jones appears as Dirt McGirt Ol Dirty Bastard, born Russell Tyrone Jones (November 15, 1968 – November 13, 2004), was an African American rapper and member of the Wu-Tang Clan. ... Underwater funeral in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A funeral is a ceremony marking a persons death. ... A map highlighting Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. ... The city is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture, and is one of the worlds major global cities (along with London, Tokyo and Paris) with a virtually unrivaled collection of museums, galleries, performance venues, media outlets, international corporations, and stock exchanges. ... ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) is a group of Pacific Rim countries who meet with the purpose of improving economic and political ties. ... Satellite image of Santiago Santiago (full form Santiago de Chile) is the capital of Chile. ... World map with nuclear weapons development status represented by color. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... North Korea claims to possess nuclear weapons, and is widely believed to have a substantial arsenal of chemical weapons, deliverable by artillery against South Korea. ... The War on Terrorism (TWOT) or War on Terror (in US foreign policy circles, the global war on terrorism or GWOT ) is a campaign by the United States and some of its allies aiming to rid the world of terrorist groups and to end state sponsorship of terrorism. ... USD redirects here. ... The 2003 Invasion of Iraq began on March 20 comprising United States and United Kingdom forces (98%), and several other nations. ... the changes in societies and the world economy that result from dramatically increased international trade and cultural exchange. ... A riot control agent is a type of lachrymatory agent (or lacrimatory agent). ... A water cannon is a device that shoots a high-pressure stream of water. ... The Second Sudanese Civil War started in 1983, although it is most accurately a continuation of the First Sudanese Civil War of 1955 to 1972. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... Nairobi skyline Nairobi is the capital city of Kenya. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Foreign relations between Japan and China. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Geert Wilders in the Tweede Kamer Geert Wilders (born in Venlo on the 6th of September, 1963) is a Dutch conservative politician who is best known for his views favoring the restriction of immigration, particularly from non-western countries, and his opposition to Turkish EU membership. ... Theo van Gogh Theo van Gogh (July 23, 1957 – November 2, 2004) was a controversial Dutch film director, television producer, publicist and actor. ... Islām is described as a dÄ«n, meaning way of life and/or guidance. Six articles of belief There are six basic beliefs shared by all Muslims: 1. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... State nickname: Granite State, Mother of Rivers, White Mountain State, Switzerland of America [1] Official languages English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Governor John Lynch (D) Senators Judd Gregg (R) John Sununu (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 46th 24,239 km² 3. ... Electronic voting machine used in all Brazilian elections and plebiscites. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... Lieutenant-General Moshe Yaalon is a General of the Israeli Defence Force. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Yukos Oil Company (ОАО НК ЮКОС) is a petroleum company in Russia which, until recently, was controlled by Russian billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky and a number of prominent Russian businessmen. ... ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Government debt (public debt, national debt) is money owed by government, at any level (central government, federal government, national government, municipal government, local government, regional government). ... USD redirects here. ... Auburn Hills is a city located in Oakland County, Michigan. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Indiana Pacers are a National Basketball Association team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association team based in the Detroit, Michigan metropolitan area. ... Ronald William Artest, Jr. ... The Palace of Auburn Hills logo. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... Ben Wallace of the Detroit Pistons and his teammates are kept apart from Ron Artest of the Indiana Pacers by Pacers head coach Rick Carlisle and official Tommy Nunez. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Acinetobacter is a genus of Proteobacteria. ... World Vision, founded in the United States in 1950, is an international Christian relief and development organization whose goal is working for the well being of all people, especially children. ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... // Mosque; Aswan, Egypt. ... Imam (Arabic: إمام) is an Arabic word meaning Leader. The ruler of a country might be called the Imam, for example. ...

November 18, 2004

  • 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy: According to a report called The Effect of Electronic Voting Machines on Change in Support for Bush in the 2004 Florida Elections[7] George W. Bush received between 130,000 and 260,000 faulty votes in Florida. (IDG) (IT Week) (Scoop) (Vunet)

November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years), with 43 remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Kim Jong-il (born February 16, 1941) is Chairman of the National Defense Commission of the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (North Korea), Supreme Commander of the (North) Korean Peoples Army, and General Secretary of the Korean Workers Party (a Communist party which has controlled the country since... Joseph Stalin, the subject of a massive Communist Party campaign to rename locations in his honor (see List of places named after Stalin). ... A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Alfonso Gagliano The Dishonourable Alfonso Gagliano, PC (born January 25, 1942) is a Canadian accountant and Liberal Party politician. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... The Bonanno family is one of Five Families said to be in control of organized crime (Mafia activities) in New York City. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece. ... New York Daily News Building, Raymond Hood, architect, rendering by Hugh Ferriss The New York Daily News is one of the largest newspapers in the United States with a circulation well over 700,000. ... The Leader of the Opposition in Canada is the Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... The Honourable Stephen Joseph Harper, PC, MP, MA (born April 20, 1959, in Toronto, Ontario) is leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, and Leader of the Official Opposition. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC, MP, BA, LLB (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the Prime Minister of Canada. ... Sicilian disambiguates here; see also Sicilian language or Sicilian Defence. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... Halo 2 is the sequel to the blockbuster and critically-acclaimed Halo: Combat Evolved, and features a newly built game engine and the Havok physics engine, new weapons and vehicles, new multiplayer maps, and a storyline that continues the story begun in Halo: Combat Evolved. ... The Microsoft Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console first released on November 15, 2001 in North America, then released on February 22, 2002 in Japan, and on March 14, 2002 in Europe. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Microsoft Game Studios (MGS), formerly the Microsoft Game Division, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Microsoft Corp. ... Video game publishers are companies that publish video games that they have either developed internally or have had developed by a video game developer. ... British House of Commons Canadian House of Commons In some bicameral parliaments of a Westminster System, the House of Commons has historically been the name of the elected lower house. ... The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament. ... ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Editing of this page is temporarily restricted to registered users (other than new accounts) in order to deal with vandalism. ... The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum is on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. ... The William J. Clinton Presidential Center is the presidential library of Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States. ... There is also a Littlerock, California. ... State nickname: The Natural State Other U.S. States Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Governor Mike Huckabee (R) Senators Blanche Lincoln (D) Mark Pryor (D) Official language(s) English Area 137,732 km² (29th)  - Land 134,856 km²  - Water 2,876 km² (2. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), the head of the Government of Canada, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC, MP, BA, LLB (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the Prime Minister of Canada. ... Mississauga—Erindale is a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Ontario. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Mark Critch (left), Carolyn Parrish (right) and a Bush doll, in a skit that led to her dismissal from the Liberal caucus. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is a political party in Canada. ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... The Canadian Press is a Canadian news agency established in 1917 as a vehicle to distribute Associated Press material to Canadian news media, mainly because it was very difficult to spread news across such a huge country, covering many time zones. ... The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC, in French Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes) was established in 1968 by the Canadian Parliament to replace the Board of Broadcast Governors. ... News channels are television specialty channels that present news content. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... Digital television (DTV) uses digital modulation and compression to broadcast video, audio and data signals to television sets. ... A license or licence is a document or agreement giving permission to do something. ... Conservative bias is the mirror image of liberal bias, a belief that the media is biased in favor of conservative views. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, listen â–¶(?)) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician and is the 11th President of the European Commission. ... In military organizations, an officer is a member of the service who holds a position of responsibility. ... On October 5, 2004, Iman Darweesh Al Hams, a 13-year-old schoolgirl in Rafah, Gaza Strip of Palestine was shot repeatedly at close range by an Israel Defense Force (IDF) commander during Operation Days of Penitence, an Israeli military offensive into Gaza population centers conducted between September 29 and... IDF or idf may refer to: the International Diabetes Federation the Israel Defense Forces the AIDC Ching-kuo Indigenous Defence Fighter of Taiwan. ... The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... Look up Cow on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Cow may refer to: Cattle regardless of sex (in vernacular usage). ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or commonly mad cow disease) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... Bales of hay on a farm near Ames, Iowa Ames is a city located in Story County, Iowa. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Food chains and food webs or food networks describe the feeding relationships between species in a biotic community. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Smuggling tunnels are secret tunnels, usually hidden underground, used for smuggling of goods, illegal weapons and people. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... A bulldozer is a powerful crawler (caterpillar tracked tractor) equipped with a blade. ... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 The Sinai Peninsula (in Arabic, Shibh Jazirat Sina) is a triangle-shaped peninsula lying between the Mediterranean Sea (to the north) and Red Sea (to the south). ... The city of Gaza is the principal city in the Gaza Strip. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... The term Palestinian terrorism is commonly used to describe acts of political violence committed by Palestinian individuals or groups against Israelis, Jews, and nationals of other countries. ... â–¶(?) Hebrew: אריאל שרון (born February 27, 1928) is the eleventh and current Prime Minister of Israel, serving from March 2001. ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... The New Zealand foreshore and seabed controversy is a debate in the politics of New Zealand. ... Te Puni, Māori Chief Māori is the name of the indigenous people of New Zealand, and their language. ... The Great American Smokeout is an annual event in the United States to encourage Americans (of whom 45. ... The American Cancer Society is a charitable organization dedicated to eliminating cancer. ...

November 17, 2004

17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Baiji is a city of about 60,000 inhabitants in northern Iraq some 130 miles north of Baghdad, on the main road to Mosul. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ NînÄ›wâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ... RamădÄ« (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... Buenos Aires (Good Airs in Spanish, originally meaning Fair Winds) is the capital of Argentina and its largest city and port, as well as one of the largest cities in Latin America. ... new Kmart logo Kmart Corporation was a US based corporation until it merged with Sears Holdings in November 2004. ... Sears Holdings Corporation NASDAQ: SHLD is the third largest retailer in the United States, behind Wal-Mart and The Home Depot. ... Sears Holdings is a proposed new retail holding company, created from the merger of Sears, Roebuck and Company of Hoffman Estates, Illinois and Kmart Holdings Corporation of Troy, Michigan. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing same-sex couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married opposite-sex peoples (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by opposite-sex couples who... The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which the Sovereign of the United Kingdom, or the Sovereigns representative in Commonwealth Realms, completes the process of the enactment of legislation by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... The National Council of Resistance of Iran is the parliament-in-exile of the Iranian Resistance. ... Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan (born 1935, Bhopal, India) is a Pakistani engineer widely regarded as the father of Pakistans nuclear weapons programme. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945 lifted nuclear fallout some 18 km (60,000 feet) above the epicenter. ... Yasser Arafat in 1999 Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO... Le Monde is a French daily evening newspaper with a circulation in 2002 of 389,200. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... Cirrhosis is a chronic disease of the liver in which liver tissue is replaced by connective tissue, resulting in the loss of liver function. ... Yasser Arafat in 1999 Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO... ... The National Institutes of Health is an institution of the United States government which focuses on medical research. ... The National Children’s Study will examine the effects of environmental influences on the health and development of more than 100,000 children across the United States, following them from before birth until age 21. ... Dino Rossi (born October 15, 1959 in Seattle, Washington, USA) is a former Washington State Senator and the Republican nominee for Governor of Washington in the 2004 election. ... Governor Christine Gregoire Christine Chris OGrady Gregoire (born March 24, 1947) is the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Washington. ... State nickname: The Evergreen State Official languages None Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Governor Christine Gregoire (D) Senators Patty Murray (D) Maria Cantwell (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 18th 184,824 km² 6. ... The 2004 Washington gubernatorial election was the election for governor of the U.S. state of Washington in the year 2004. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

November 16, 2004

Mi6.co.uk November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A pre-9/11 view of The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... The Secretary of the Air Force is the civilian head of the United States Department of the Air Force, a component organization of the Department of Defense. ... James Roche Dr. James G. Roche was the 20th Secretary of the Air Force, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 20, 2005. ... The Pasteur Institute (French: Institut Pasteur) is a French non-profit private foundation dedicated to the study of biology, microorganisms, diseases and vaccines. ... Schematic of antibody binding to an antigen An antibody is a protein used by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign objects like bacteria and viruses. ... The human immunodeficiency virus, commonly called HIV, is a retrovirus that primarily infects vital components of the human immune system such as CD4+ T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. ... Wiktionary has a definition of: In vitro In vitro (Latin: within glass) means within a test tube, or, more generally, outside a living organism or cell. ... As there is no known cure for AIDS, the search for a vaccine against the etiological agent, HIV, has become part of the struggle against the disease. ... Shown in green is the Kashmiri region under Pakistani control. ... The Prime Minister of India is, in practice, the most powerful person in the government of India. ... Manmohan Singh (Punjabi: , Hindi: ) is the fourteenth, and current, Prime Minister of India. ... Islām is described as a dīn, meaning way of life and/or guidance. Six articles of belief There are six basic beliefs shared by all Muslims: 1. ... Since both nations achieved independence in August 1947, there have been three major wars and one minor war between India and Pakistan. ... Separatism involves setting oneself or others apart. ... The scene of one of the Madrid bombings. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... // Mosque; Aswan, Egypt. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ Nîněwâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ... ... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ... Margaret Hassan Margaret Hassan (also known as Madam Margaret) (April 18, 1945– November 2004) was an aid worker who worked in Iraq for many years and was kidnapped and killed there at the age of 59, apparently by members of the Iraqi insurgency, in late 2004. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ... Condoleezza Rice, Ph. ... Colin Luther Powell, (pronounced koh-lihn or call in, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 23, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Look up Democratic Republic of the Congo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary News allAfrica - Congo-Kinshasa news headline links Le Congo Sans Frontieres news headline links (in French) Le Soft government-supporting newspaper (in French) Yahoo! News Full Coverage - DR Congo news headline links [8] DRC news for the humanitarian... Papa Wemba, real name Jules Shungu Wembadio Pene Kikumba, is a Congolese singer and one of Africas biggest music stars. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... A white paper can be an authoritative report on a major issue, as by a team of experts; a government report outlining policy; or a short treatise whose purpose is to educate industry customers. ... Smoking bans are government prohibitions or voluntary bans decided by establishment management on tobacco smoking in public or quasi-public indoor areas such as offices, restaurants, hotels, or even outdoor public areas such as parks and sports stadiums. ... Various smoking equipment including different pipes, and cigars. ... QR, formerly known as Queensland Rail and Queensland Railways, is the corporation responsible for the operation and maintenance of the railway system in the State of Queensland, Australia. ... This article is about the Australian city. ... Cairns is a regional city and Local Government Area located in far north Queensland, Australia. ... Bundaberg is a city in, and Local Government Area of, Queensland, Australia. ... The Bowflex Ultimate XTLU model The Bowflex is an exercise strength training device marketed and sold by the Nautilus fitness company. ... Marines doing push-ups. ... A product recall is a request to return to the maker a batch or an entire production run of a product, usually due to the discovery of safety issues. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... NASA technicians working on the X-43A at the tip of a Pegasus rocket attached to a Boeing B-52B prior to launch (March 27, 2004) The X-43 is an unmanned experimental hypersonic aircraft design with multiple planned scale variations meant to test different aspects of highly supersonic flight. ... Official sites James Bond Official Homepage Official Danjaq 007 website Ian Fleming Publications official website Miss Moneypennys Rolodex Mr. ...


November 15, 2004

November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chinas seat in the United Nations has been occupied by the Peoples Republic of China since November 23, 1971. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... Taiwan independence (Chinese: 台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Taiwanese Romanization: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands currently administered... The European Space Agency (ESA), established in 1975,is an inter-governmental organisation dedicated to exploration of space with currently 17 member states. ... An ion engine test An ion thruster is a type of spacecraft propulsion that uses beams of ions for propulsion. ... SMART-1. ... The Right Honourable Conrad Moffat Black, Baron Black of Crossharbour, PC, OC (born August 25, 1944, in Montreal, Quebec), is a British biographer, financier and newspaper magnate. ... The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... Serge Rialuth Vohor (born 1955) is a politician from Vanuatu. ... Vanuatu maintains relations with more than 65 countries, including Russia, Cuba, and Vietnam. ... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Premier Frank Hsieh Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The Seal of the United States Department of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Colin Luther Powell, (pronounced koh-lihn or call in, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 23, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... Presidential election results map. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... Ann Margaret Veneman (born June 29, 1949) was the 27th United States Secretary of Agriculture, and was a director of Calgene, the first company to market genetically-engineered food. ... The United States Secretary of Energy is the head of the United States Department of Energy, concerned as the name suggests, with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Spencer Abraham Edward Spencer Abraham (born June 12, 1952 in East Lansing, Michigan) is an American politician. ... The United States Secretary of Education is the head of the Department of Education. ... Rod Paige Dr. Roderick Raynor Paige (born June 17, 1933), served as the 7th United States Secretary of Education from 2001 to 2005. ... Various smoking equipment including different pipes, and cigars. ... The 2012 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXX Olympiad, will be held in London, United Kingdom from 27 July to 12 August 2012. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Moscow (Russian: Москва́, Moskva, IPA: â–¶(?)) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva. ... The city is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture, and is one of the worlds major global cities (along with London, Tokyo and Paris) with a virtually unrivaled collection of museums, galleries, performance venues, media outlets, international corporations, and stock exchanges. ... The International Olympic Committee is an organisation based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin in 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece, and organise this sports event every four years. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Seal of the United States Department of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Nabil Shaath (also spelled Shaath), a senior Palestinian official, has held the following titles: Palestinian chief negotiator Palestinian cabinet minister Palestinian International Co-operation Minister Planning Minister for the Palestinian National Authority Categories: People stubs | Palestinian people ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... Athanasius Kirchers map of a possible Atlantis location. ... Satellite image The Mediterranean Sea is a part of the Atlantic Ocean almost completely enclosed by land, on the north by Europe, on the south by Africa, and on the east by Asia. ...

November 14, 2004

November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 47 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... A political party is a political organization that subscribes to a certain ideology and seeks to attain political power within a government. ... Note that Flemish Block turned themselves into Flemish Interest (Vlaams Belang) since their condamnation in 2004 The Flemish Block (Dutch: Vlaams Blok) was a Flemish far-right nationalist political party which rejects the state of Belgium, calling for political independence for the Flemish half of the country. ... Vlaams Belang (English: Flemish Interest) is a right-wing Belgian political party. ... It has been suggested that Basque diaspora be merged into this article or section. ... Batasuna (Unity) is a Basque political party based mainly in Spain but with a French presence, which is presumed to be associated with the Basque terrorist group ETA. It is part of the Basque National Liberation Movement which includes social organizations, trade unions, youth (Jarrai and Gazteriak, now merged in... A rolling thundercloud over Enschede, Netherlands Heavy storm brought by Typhoon Sanvu in Hong Kong. ... In British usage, a shipwreck is the remains of a ship after it has sunk or been beached as a result of a crisis at sea. ... Map of Algeria showing Algiers province Algiers (French Alger, (Arabic: ولاية الجزائر) El-Jazair, The Islands) is the capital and largest city of Algeria in North Africa. ... A sailor is a member of the crew of a ship or boat. ... Yoweri Kaguta Museveni became President of Uganda on January 29, 1986. ... The conflict forces many civilians to live in internally displaced person (IDP) camps. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national public service broadcaster of the United Kingdom (see British television). ... The skull and crossbones symbol traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ... Union Carbide of South Charleston, West Virginia is a chemical manufacturer, now a subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company. ... Time cover about Bhopal disaster. ... Iyad Allawi Dr Iyad Allawi (اياد علاوي) (born 1945) is an Iraqi politician, and was the interim Prime Minister of Iraq prior to Iraqs 2005 legislative elections. ... Boris Johnson on the cover of his 2002 book Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson (born 19 June 1964 in New York City), better known as Boris Johnson (and occasionally as Bo-Jo within the UK tabloid press) is a British Conservative politician and journalist, with a distinctive scatty and eccentric... Michael Howard The Right Honourable Michael Howard, QC, MP (born July 7, 1941) is a British politician and caretaker Leader of the Opposition and the Conservative Party, having formally resigned the post on 7 October 2005. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Dr. Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... The article is about the Middle Eastern city. ... Shoichi Nakagawa (中川昭一 Nakagawa Shōichi) (b. ... The Senkaku Islands (Japanese: 尖閣諸島; Senkaku-Shotō) are islands currently under Japanese control but claimed by the Peoples Republic of China and the Republic of China (Taiwan), by which they are known as Diaoyutai Islands or Diaoyu Islands—both literally mean Fishing Islands. ... See Election (movie) for the film directed by Alexander Payne. ... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Rawhi Fattuh (روحي فتوح, also transliterated as Rauhi Fattouh) (born 1949) is the current Speaker of the Palestinian Legislative Council and was the interim President of the Palestinian Authority, following the death of Yasser Arafat on November 11, 2004 until January 15, 2005. ...

November 13, 2004

November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is the worlds largest group of humanitarian non-governmental organizations, often known simply as the Red Cross, after its original symbol. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ NînÄ›wâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... -1... Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941), widely known as Dick Cheney, is an American politician and businessman affiliated with the U.S. Republican Party. ... The George Washington University (GWU) is a private university in Washington, D.C., founded in 1821 as The Columbian College. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... The United States Secretary of Education is the head of the Department of Education. ... Dr. Roderick Raynor Paige (born June 17, 1933), served as the 7th United States Secretary of Education from 2001 to 2005. ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ... Margaret Spellings Margaret Spellings (born Margaret Dudar on November 21, 1957) is the current Secretary of Education under the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush and was previously a Domestic Policy Adviser to Bush. ... One of the only known photographs of Omar (date unknown) Mullah Mohammed Omar (ملا محمد عمر; born 1959) is the reclusive leader of the Taliban of Afghanistan and Afghanistans former de facto Head of State who has been in hiding since the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in 2002. ... Flag flown by the Taliban. ... Afghan Islamic Press (AIP) is a private and independent news agency headquartered in Pakistan. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... The Islamic holiday of Eid ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر) marks the end of Ramadan. ... // Mosque; Aswan, Egypt. ... Helden is a municipality and a town in the southeastern Netherlands in the province Limburg. ...

November 12, 2004

November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Several people are named John McLaughlin: John McLaughlin (musician), an English jazz fusion guitar player. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Porter Goss Porter Johnston Goss (born November 26, 1938) is an American politician and the current Director of the Central Intelligence Agency . ... This article needs cleanup. ... Laci Peterson Laci Peterson, born Laci Denise Rocha (May 4, 1975 – December, 2002), was last seen alive on December 23, 2002 and became the subject of one of the most discussed missing person cases in recent U.S. history. ... In legal parlance, a trial is an event in which parties to a dispute present information (in the form of evidence) in a formal setting, usually a court, before a judge, jury, or other designated finder of fact, in order to achieve a resolution to their dispute. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Proposals for a Palestinian state vary depending on ones views of Palestinian statehood, as well as various definitions of Palestine and Palestinian (see also State of Palestine). ... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed region in Italy. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Italy. ... â–¶(?) (born September 29, 1936) is the current Prime Minister of Italy. ... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... The IAEA flag The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... Yasser Arafat in 1999 Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... Although technically in Giza, The Great Pyramids have become a symbol of Cairo internationally Cairo (Arabic: القاهرة; transliterated: al-Qāhirah) is the capital city of Egypt (and previously the United Arab Republic) and has a metropolitan area population of approximately 15. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are a large ethnic group widespread in the Middle East and North Africa, originating in the Arabian Peninsula of southwest Asia. ... Khaled Mashal, also known as Khaled Mashaal (b. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Ramallah (Arabic: â–¶(?) is a Palestinian city in the West Bank of approximately 57,000 residents. ... Ramallah (Arabic: â–¶(?) is a Palestinian city in the West Bank of approximately 57,000 residents. ... Chaos derives from the Greek Χαος and typically refers to unpredictability. ... Mukataa (also spelled Muqataa) is a compound of buildings which contain governmental offices and local administrative headquarters. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004... Lying in state is a term used to describe the tradition in which a coffin is placed on view to allow the public at large to pay their respects to the deceased. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...

November 11, 2004

November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Iris Chang Iris Shun-Ru Chang (Traditional Chinese: 張純如, Simplified Chinese: 张纯如; Pinyin: Zhāng Chúnrú; March 28, 1968 – November 9, 2004) was a freelance Chinese American historian and journalist. ... The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II (ISBN 0-465-06835-9) is a 1997 book by the late Iris Chang which presents a history of the 1937-1938 Nanjing Massacre. ... Downtown Los Gatos, looking down Santa Cruz Avenue towards Los Gatos-Saratoga Road. ... State nickname: The Golden State Official languages English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Senators Dianne Feinstein (D) Barbara Boxer (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 4. ... Yasser Arafat in 1999 Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO... Saeb Erakat (Sa’ib Muhammad Salih ‘Urayqat; born 1955) was the chief of the PLO Steering and Monitoring Committee, from which he negotiated with Israel regarding the Oslo Accords from 1995 until his resignation in protest from the Palestinian government, in May 2003. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... Rawhi Fattuh (روحي فتوح, also transliterated as Rauhi Fattouh) (born 1953) was the interim President of the Palestinian Authority, following the death of Yasser Arafat on November 11, 2004 until January 15, 2005. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Dr. Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic: منظمة التحرير الفلسطينية â–¶(?) or Munazzamat al-Tahrir al-Falastiniyyah) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinians dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state in the region historically known as Palestine. ... Farouk al-Kaddoumi (alternative spelling, Faruq al-Qaddumi), a. ... The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Ahmed Ali Mohammed Qurei (or Qureia), also known as Abu Alaa, was the Speaker of the Palestinian Legislative Council and is currently Prime Minister and holds the security portfolio of the Palestinian Authority. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... â–¶(?), (born November 29, 1932 in Paris) is a French politician who is currently President of the French Republic. ... Zine El Abidine Ben Ali (زين العابدين بن علي; born September 3, 1936) has been president of Tunisia since 1987, only the second since its independence from France in 1956. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin, in full: Ioannes Paulus Papa II), born Karol Józef WojtyÅ‚a (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death, making his the second-longest pontificate (or the third... General Pervez Musharraf (Urdu: ); born August 11, 1943 (near Delhi, India) is the President of Pakistan. ... Patrick Bartholemew Ahern (Irish name: Pádraig Parthalán Ó hEachthairn) (born September 12, 1951), commonly called Bertie Ahern, is an Irish politician. ... Yang Amat Berhormat Dato Seri Abdullah bin Haji Ahmad Badawi (born November 26, 1939) is the current prime minister of Malaysia, succeeding Tun Mahathir bin Mohamad. ... Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud (Arabic: عبد الله بن عبد العزيز آل سعود, born 1924) became the King of Saudi Arabia on August 1, 2005. ... Muhammad Hosni Said Mubarak (Arabic : محمد حسنى سيد مبارك ) (born May 4, 1928) commonly known as Hosni Mubarak (Arabic: حسنى مبارك ) has been the fourth President of the Arab republic of Egypt for twenty-four years, since 14 October 1981. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Lady Justice - allegory of Justice as woman with sword and with book - statue at court building. ... Yosef Tommy Lapid ( יוסף טומי לפיד ) is an Israeli politician and a minister. ... The Treaty establishing a constitution for Europe is a proposed constitutional treaty for the European Union. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... The Al_Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al_Fatah faction. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Last Gaza settlement cleared, West Bank towns prepare to resist The Israeli settlement of Netzarim was created as a kibbutz in 1984 (the kibbutz split a few years later in order to become a village). ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Hebron (Arabic â–¶(?) al-ḪalÄ«l; Hebrew â–¶(?), Standard Hebrew Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew Ḥeḇrôn: derived from the word friend) is a town in the southern West Bank of around 130,000 Palestinians and 500 Israeli settlers. ... Mordechai Vanunu in the garden of St. ... Operation Phillis was the British service-assisted evacuation operation for British citizens in Côte dIvoire in 2004. ... Solar Panel made by BP Solar The solar panels (photovoltaic arrays) on this small yacht at sea can charge the 12 V batteries at up to 9 Amps in full, direct sunlight. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1856 to 2004 Mean temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is an increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans. ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border The Arctic is the area around the Earths North Pole. ... Habitat (from the Latin for it inhabits) is the place where a particular species lives and grows. ... Binomial name Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1774 The Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus), also known as white bear or northern bear, is a large bear native to the Arctic. ... Long-distance land bird migration Many species of land birds migrate very long distances, the most common pattern being for birds to breed in the temperate or arctic northern hemisphere and winter in warmer regions, often in the tropics or the southern hemisphere. ... Alice Munro (born Alice Ann Laidlaw on July 10, 1931) is a Canadian short story writer, widely considered one of the greatest short story writers in modern literature. ... The Giller Prize is an annual award that goes to the author of the best Canadian novel or short story fiction collection published in English. ...

November 10, 2004

November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The President of the Republic of China (中華民國總統) is the head of state of the Republic of China, the government which administered part or all of Mainland China from 1917 to 1949 and has administered Taiwan and several outlying islands from 1945 until the present. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The Republic of China on Taiwan denies having chemical or nuclear weapons. ... Taiwan Strait Area The Taiwan Strait or Formosa Strait is a 180km-wide Strait between mainland China and the island of Taiwan. ... Supreme Court of Pakistan, Islamabad The Supreme Court is the apex court in Pakistans judicial hierarchy, the final arbiter of legal and constitutional disputes. ... Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan (born 1935, Bhopal, India) is a Pakistani engineer widely regarded as the father of Pakistans nuclear weapons programme. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... A riot control agent is a type of lachrymatory agent (or lacrimatory agent). ... Refugee camp for Rwandans located in what is now the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo following the Rwandan Genocide A refugee camp is a camp built up by governments or NGOs (such as the ICRC) to receive refugees. ... The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States. ... Alberto R. Gonzales (born August 4, 1955 in San Antonio, Texas, USA) is the current United States. ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... List of Prime Ministers of Iraq The Prime Minister of Iraq is Iraqs head of government. ... Iyad Allawi Dr Iyad Allawi (اياد علاوي) (born 1945) is an Iraqi politician, and was the interim Prime Minister of Iraq prior to Iraqs 2005 legislative elections. ... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ... A hostage is a person (sometimes another entity) which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act, or refrain from acting, in a particular way. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ NînÄ›wâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ... The First Minister (First Meinister in Scots; Prìomh Mhinistear in Scots Gaelic) is the leader of Scotlands national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the reconvened Scottish Parliament. ... Jack McConnell The Right Honourable Jack Wilson McConnell MSP (born June 30, 1960 in Irvine, North Ayrshire) is a Scottish politician, leader of the Labour Party in Scotland and the current First Minister of Scotland. ... The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba in Gaelic, Scots Pairlament in Scots) is the national unicameral legislature of Scotland. ... Smoking bans are government prohibitions or voluntary bans decided by establishment management on tobacco smoking in public or quasi-public indoor areas such as offices, restaurants, hotels, or even outdoor public areas such as parks and sports stadiums. ... Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in Scotland Abbeys and priories in Scotland... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) (Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The euro (symbol: €; banking code: EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... USD redirects here. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Balance of trade figures are the sum of the money gained by a given economy by selling exports, minus the cost of buying imports. ... A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ... The Association of International Educators or AIE was founded in 1948 as the National Association of Foreign Student Advisers (NAFSA). ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... Émile Louis (born 1934) is a retired French bus driver and prime suspect in the disappearance of seven young women in the département of Yonne, Burgundy, France, in the late 1970s. ... Yonne is a French département named after the Yonne River. ... The Courts of Assize, or Assizes, is the name of criminal courts in several countries. ... Yasser Arafat in 1999 Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO... A Mufti (Arabic: مفتى ) is an Islamic scholar who is an interpreter or expounder of Islamic law (Sharia), capable of issuing fataawa (plural of fatwa). // Role of a Mufti in governments In theocracies like Saudi Arabia and Iran, and in some countries where the constitution is based on sharia law, such... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Ramallah (Arabic: â–¶(?) is a Palestinian city in the West Bank of approximately 57,000 residents. ... Although technically in Giza, The Great Pyramids have become a symbol of Cairo internationally Cairo (Arabic: القاهرة; transliterated: al-Qāhirah) is the capital city of Egypt (and previously the United Arab Republic) and has a metropolitan area population of approximately 15. ... Grenade may refer to: The well-known hand grenade commonly used by soldiers. ... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: Den Haag, or officially s-Gravenhage) is the administrative capital of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country, in the province South Holland of which it is also the capital. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... A school is most commonly a place designated for learning. ... Uden is a municipality and a town in the province of Noord-Brabant, Netherlands. ... Islām is described as a dÄ«n, meaning way of life and/or guidance. Six articles of belief There are six basic beliefs shared by all Muslims: 1. ... The Republic of Côte dIvoire (IPA /kot divwa/ or /kot divwar/; commonly called Ivory Coast in English; see below about the name) is a country in West Africa. ... In logistics and military terminology: An airlift is the act of transporting people or cargo from point to point using aircraft. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. Election controversies and irregularities) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... Presidential election results map. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... During the 2004 U.S. presidential election, there were numerous problems with the election process in Florida, including but not limited to missing/uncounted votes, machine malfunction, machine shortage, turnout reaching above 100 percent, and abnormal statistical discrepancies such as 77 percent Democratic precincts voting 77 percent Republican, and the...

November 9, 2004

November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... Olivia Amador ... A no-fly zone is a territory over which aircraft (or unauthorized aircraft) are not permitted to fly. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... Janjaweed The Janjaweed (variously spelled Janjawid, Jingaweit, Jinjaweed, Janjawiid, Janjiwid, etc. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... Genocide is defined by the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (CPPCG) article 2 as any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group, as such: Killing members of the group; Causing... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Donald Evans Donald Louis Evans with Alejandro Toledo, President of Peru Donald Louis Evans (born July 27, 1946) was the 34th U.S. Secretary of Commerce. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... A pre-9/11 view of The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... An airstrike is a military strike by air forces on an enemy ground position, which depending on the selected tactics may or may not be followed up by artillery, armor, and/or infantry units. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Iraqi Islamic Party (Hizb al-Islami al-Airaqi), a Sunni political party in Iraq. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... The Association of Muslim Clerics, or sometimes called Association Of Muslim Clerics, was formed by well-known moderate Sunni religious leaders, including Sheikh Abdel-Salam al-Kubaisi and Sheikh Abdel-Sattar Abdel-Jabbar, after the collapse of Saddam Husseins regime in Iraq by U.S. in 2003. ... A boycott is a refusal to buy, sell, or otherwise trade with an individual or business who is generally believed by the participants in the boycott to be doing something morally wrong. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ NînÄ›wâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... Baquba (بعقوبه; also transliterated as Baqubah and Baqouba) is the capital of Iraqs Diyala province. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... The Iraqi National Guard is a military force in Iraq controlled by the interim government. ... Kirkuk city centre. ... The two Shiite mosques in Samarra A soldier descends a Minaret in Samarra, Iraq. ... Court of Appeals is the title of certain appellate courts in various jurisdictions. ... Ghent (once Gaunt in English, Gent in Dutch, Gand in French) is a municipality located in Flanders, one of the three regions of Belgium, and in the Flemish province of East Flanders, of which it is the capital. ... Note that Flemish Block turned themselves into Flemish Interest (Vlaams Belang) since their condamnation in 2004 The Flemish Block (Dutch: Vlaams Blok) was a Flemish far-right nationalist political party which rejects the state of Belgium, calling for political independence for the Flemish half of the country. ... A political party is a political organization that subscribes to a certain ideology and seeks to attain political power within a government. ... An African-American man drinks out of the colored only water fountain at a racially segregated streetcar terminal in the United States in 1939. ... To discriminate is to make a distinction. ... This article is about the Belgian region Flanders and the eponymous historical region of the Low Countries. ... Michael Scheuer is a 22-year CIA veteran. ... ... The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Osama bin Laden in a photo from the 1990s Usāmah bin Muhammad bin `Awad bin Lādin (born March 10, 1957; Arabic: ), commonly known as Osama bin Laden, or Usama bin Laden, (Arabic: ), a follower of the Wahhabi school of thought and the founder of the militant organization al... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated suicide attacks upon the United States of America carried out on Tuesday, September 11, 2001, in which hijackers almost simultaneously took control of four U.S. domestic commercial airliners. ... Military personnel guarding transportation facilities such as New York Penn Station as part of homeland security efforts. ... Yasser Arafat in 1999 Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO... Nabil Shaath (also spelled Shaath), a senior Palestinian official, has held the following titles: Palestinian chief negotiator Palestinian cabinet minister Palestinian International Co-operation Minister Planning Minister for the Palestinian National Authority Categories: People stubs | Palestinian people ... Saeb Erakat (Sa’ib Muhammad Salih ‘Urayqat; born 1955) was the chief of the PLO Steering and Monitoring Committee, from which he negotiated with Israel regarding the Oslo Accords from 1995 until his resignation in protest from the Palestinian government, in May 2003. ... A cerebral hemorrhage is a condition in the brain in which a blood vessel leaks. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Ahmed Ali Mohammed Qurei (or Qureia; أحمد علي محمد قريع), also known as Abu Alaa (أبو علاء) (born 1937) was the Speaker of the Palestinian Legislative Council and was the Prime Minister and held the security portfolio of the Palestinian Authority. ... Dr. Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the audit, evaluation, and investigative agency of the United States Congress. ... Presidential election results map. ... Flag of Ireland The Republic of Ireland does not recognize same-sex marriages or civil unions and neither is there currently any kind of provision for unmarried cohabiting couples, homosexual or indeed heterosexual. ... The High Court (Irish: An Ard-Chúirt) of the Republic of Ireland is a court which deals at first instance with the most serious and important civil and criminal cases, and also acts as a court of appeal for civil cases in the Circuit Court. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... The Mozilla Foundation is a non-profit organization that exists to support and provide leadership for the open source Mozilla project. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ... Web browser shortcuts on an Apple computer A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with HTML documents hosted by web servers or held in a file system. ... Mozilla Firefox is a free, cross-platform, graphical web browser developed by the Mozilla Corporation and hundreds of volunteers. ... Cocoa is the dried and partially fermented fatty seed of the cacao tree from which chocolate is made. ... Thabo Mvuyelwa Mbeki (born June 18, 1942) is the President of the Republic of South Africa. ...

November 8, 2004

  • In Broward County, officials find the software used in Broward can handle only 32,000 votes per precinct. After that, the system starts counting backward. The problem affected running tallies and not the final vote totals. All absentee ballots had been placed in a single precinct to be counted and only the votes for constitutional amendments reached the threshold and encountered the problem. (The Palm Beach Post)
  • In Palm Beach County, about 88,000 more votes are recorded than voters recorded as having turned out for the election. (The Washington Dispatch)
  • U.S. Federal District Judge James Robertson rules that the system of tribunals set up by the United States military to try and sentence prisoners being held at Guantanamo Bay is illegal. (Washington Post) (ACLU) (The Guardian)
  • Microsoft announces it will pay Novell USD $536 million to settle its ten-year-long antitrust suit and will pay legal costs incurred by the Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA). In return, CCIA will not pursue its arguments in favor of the European Union's antitrust suit. (Reuters)
  • The Pitcairn Island governing council selects the first female mayor in its 214 year history after the former mayor, Steve Christian, was convicted of rape. (BBC)
  • The United States dollar falls to a record low of $1.2985 against the euro. (BBC)
  • China confirms that two Hong Kong officials have been convicted and jailed for spying for the United Kingdom. (BBC)
  • Intelligence services intercept FARC guerrilla communications calling all units to focus on assassinating Colombian President Álvaro Uribe. (BBC)
  • Russian troops storm a Chechen rebel base and kill 22 militants. (Reuters)
  • Conflict in Iraq:
    • Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi publicly authorizes an offensive in Fallujah and Ramadi to "liberate the people" and "clean Falluja of terrorists". U.S. and Iraqi forces advance. A hospital doctor in Falluja reports 15 people killed and 20 wounded. (Reuters)(BBC)
    • In Baghdad, three Iraqis are killed when a suicide car bomb explodes near a U.S. convoy. A U.K. soldier is killed by a roadside bomb near Camp Dogwood. A U.S. soldier is killed when gunmen open fire on a military patrol. At least three people are killed and 40 others injured in explosions at two Christian churches. (Reuters)(BBC)
  • Illness of Yasser Arafat: Officials of the Palestinian Authority travel to France to see Yasser Arafat. Suha Arafat, wife of Yasser Arafat, says, "They are trying to bury Abu Ammar (Arafat) alive". Israeli security officials believe Arafat is brain-dead or comotose, and is on life support equipment and will be disconnected on Tuesday, the Muslim holiday of Lailat-ul-Qadr so that he will be declared dead on that day. (Reuters)
  • A 5.8 magnitude earthquake rocks northern Japan. It was centered close to the earth's surface in the Chuetsu area of Niigata prefecture. (CNN)
  • A Muslim school in Eindhoven in the Netherlands suffers a bomb attack. It is believed to be a revenge attack in retaliation for the murder of Theo van Gogh, following a weekend in which several mosques were attacked throughout the Netherlands. (BBC)
  • The current wave of violence in Côte d'Ivoire causes London markets to fear a lack of cocoa exports, sending cocoa to a five-year high. French forces, including tanks, deploy throughout the Ivorian capital, Abidjan, to restore order. (BBC)
  • An electronic voting machine in 1B in Franklin County, Ohio recorded 260 votes for John Kerry and 4258 votes for George W Bush though only 638 people voted there, one of several alleged problems. (IDG) (c|net) (Dissident Voice)
  • Supercomputers: The Top 500 Supercomputers list, which officially charts the records for the 500 fastest computers in the world, announces IBM's Blue Gene/L prototype as the world's fastest supercomputer. Using the Linpack benchmark, it achieved a record computational speed of 70.72 TFlops, taking the title away from Japan's Earth Simulator (35.86 TFlops) which held the title since June 2002. NASA's Columbia takes second place with 51.87 TFlops. (BBC)

November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of county in the state of Florida County Seat Fort Lauderdale, Florida Area  - Total  - Water 3,418 km² (1,320 mi²) 296 km² (114 mi²) 8. ... Palm Beach County is a county located in the state of Florida. ... James Robertson is an American judge whose December 20, 2005 resignation was highly politicized. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKEx: 4338) is the worlds largest software company, with 2005 global annual sales of 40 billion US dollars and nearly 60,000 employees in 85 countries and regions. ... Novell, Inc. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... It has been suggested that competition law be merged into this article or section. ... Steven Raymond Christian (born 1951) was the Mayor of the Pitcairn Islands, a British dependency in the Pacific Ocean, from 7 December 1999 to 30 October 2004. ... On 30 September 2004, seven men living on Pitcairn Island (including Steve Christian, the Mayor), went on trial facing 55 charges relating to sexual offences. ... USD redirects here. ... The euro (symbol: €; banking code: EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... Espionage is the practice of obtaining secrets (spying) from rivals or enemies for military, political, or economic advantage. ... The FARC-EPs flag The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP) is Colombias oldest, largest, most capable and best equipped militant guerrilla group, established in 1964-1966 as the military wing of the Colombian... Distinguish from the type of ape called a gorilla. ... Álvaro Uribe Vélez (born July 4, 1952) is the President of Colombia (since 2002). ... Chechen can mean: Chechen people, an ethnic group Chechen language Related to Chechnya This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Iyad Allawi Dr Iyad Allawi (اياد علاوي) (born 1945) is an Iraqi politician, and was the interim Prime Minister of Iraq prior to Iraqs 2005 legislative elections. ... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ... RamădÄ« (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... Terrorism is the unconventional use of violence for political gain. ... ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... ... Camp Dogwood is the name of the base camp for the British Black Watch regiment in Iraq, 2004. ... Yasser Arafat in 1999 Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... If you came to this page from an e-mail asking for help transferring a large sum of money, please see advance fee fraud. ... Life support, in the medical field, refers to a set of therapies for preserving a patients life when essential body systems are not functioning sufficiently to sustain life unaided. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... Laylat ul-Qadr (Night of Power) is the anniversary of the night on which, according to Islam, the Quran was first communicated to Muhammad (see surat Iqra. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a sudden and sometimes catastrophic movement of a part of the Earths surface. ... Niigata Prefecture (新潟県; Niigata-ken) is located on Honshu island, Japan. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... A school is most commonly a place designated for learning. ... Eindhoven is a municipality and a city located in the province of Noord-Brabant in the south of the Netherlands, originally at the confluence of the Dommel and Gender brooks. ... A large cache of munitions found in Afghanistan in 2004. ... Theo van Gogh Theo van Gogh (July 23, 1957 – November 2, 2004) was a controversial Dutch film director, television producer, publicist and actor. ... // Mosque; Aswan, Egypt. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7. ... Cocoa is the dried and partially fermented fatty seed of the cacao tree from which chocolate is made. ... Abidjan is the largest city and former capital of Côte dIvoire. ... Electronic voting machine used in all Brazilian elections and plebiscites. ... Franklin County is the name of several counties in the United States of America. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Official languages None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 8. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... A supercomputer is a device for turning compute-bound problems into I/O-bound problems. ... TOP500 (www. ... International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue) NYSE: IBM (incorporated June 15, 1911, in operation since 1888) is headquartered in Armonk, NY, USA. The company manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, and services. ... Blue Gene/L Blue Gene is a computer architecture project designed to produce several next-generation supercomputers, designed to reach operating speeds in the petaflops range, and currently reaching speeds over 360 teraflops. ... LINPACK is a software library for performing numerical linear algebra on digital computers. ... ... ESC cabinets The Earth Simulator (ES) was the fastest supercomputer in the world from 2002 to 2004, located at the Earth Simulator Center (ESC) in Kanazawa-ku (ward), Yokohama-shi, Japan. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ...

November 7, 2004

November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sébastien Briat (August 17, 1982 - November 7, 2004) was a French anti-nuclear activist who was fatally injured when he chained himself to a railway track near Avricourt (Lorraine) to block a train carrying radioactive waste to Germany. ... Castor may refer to one of the following. ... It has been suggested that History of Arab-Israeli Conflict be merged into this article or section. ... The Hezbollah flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God, for other designations or alternative spellings, see name part of this article) is a Shia Islamist group in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... Drone can refer to many things: // In music A drone is a continuous note or chord. ... Elbert L. Burt Rutan (born June 17, 1943) is an aircraft designer known for designing light, strong, unusual-looking, energy-efficient aircraft. ... Scaled Composites (often abbreviated as Scaled) was founded in 1982 in Mojave, California by famous aircraft designer Burt Rutan out of what used to be the Rutan Aircraft Factory. ... The X prize logo shows a stylised letter X representing a spacecraft trajectory and containing a starfield. ... The Iraqi Interim Government was created by the United States and its coalition allies as a caretaker government to govern Iraq until elections are conducted on January 30th, 2005. ... A state of emergency is a governmental declaration that may suspend certain normal functions of government, may work to alert citizens to alter their normal behaviors, or may order government agencies to implement emergency preparedness plans. ... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ... Yasser Arafat in 1999 Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... Consciousness is a quality of the mind generally regarded to comprise such key features as subjectivity, self-awareness, sentience, sapience, and the ability to perceive the relationship between oneself and ones environment. ... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American activist lawyer who opposes the power of large corporations and has worked for decades on environmental, consumer rights, and pro-democracy issues. ... Peter Miguel Camejo (born December 31, 1939) is a financier, businessman, political activist, environmentalist, author, and one of the founders of the socially responsible investment movement. ... State nickname: Granite State, Mother of Rivers, White Mountain State, Switzerland of America [1] Official languages English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Governor John Lynch (D) Senators Judd Gregg (R) John Sununu (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 46th 24,239 km² 3. ... Diebold, Incorporated NYSE: DBD is a security systems corporation which is engaged primarily in the sale, manufacture, installation and service of self-service transaction systems (such as ATMs), electronic and physical security products (including vaults and currency processing systems), and software and integrated systems for global financial and commercial markets. ...

November 6, 2004

November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The IAEA flag The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... The train derailed in the Ufton Nervet crash On 6 November 2004 at 18:12 GMT, the 17:35 First Great Western departure from London Paddington to Plymouth hit a stationary car with the driver inside at an automatic level crossing, located close to the rural Berkshire village of Ufton... Ufton Nervet is a small village and civil parish in the English county of Berkshire. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... No mobile phones are permitted in the Quiet Carriage First Great Western is a British train operating company owned by First Group and which operates services principally on the Great Western Main Line. ... The central (and longest) span of Paddington Station Paddington station or London Paddington is the name of a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London. ... Plymouth is a city in the South West of England, or alternatively the Westcountry, and is situated within the traditional county of Devon. ... The Indian Army (भारतीय सेना Hindi: Bhartiya Sena) is the land force of the Military of India and has the prime responsibility of conducting land-based warfare. ... Counter-insurgency is the combatting of insurgency, by the government (or allies) of the territory in which the insurgency takes place. ... General Juan Emilio Cheyre is the current Commander-in-Chief of the Chilean Army. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte (born November 25, 1915) was dictator of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... Anthem: Let us all unite and celebrate together Official languages The African languages, as well as Arabic, Swahili, English, French and Portuguese Some member states have other official languages. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... A no-fly zone is a territory over which aircraft (or unauthorized aircraft) are not permitted to fly. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... The two Shiite mosques in Samarra A soldier descends a Minaret in Samarra, Iraq. ... The Iraqi National Guard is a military force in Iraq controlled by the interim government. ... RamădÄ« (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ... Norwegian Blue Helmet during the Siege of Sarajevo, 1992 - 1993, photo by Mikhail Evstafiev. ... ... Bouak is the second largest city in C te dIvoire. ... // Organisation The titular head of the French armed forces is the President of the Republic, in his role as Chef des Armées — the President is thus Commander-in-Chief of French Forces. ... Yamoussoukro, a town of 100,000 inhabitants located 240 kilometers North of Abidjan, is the administrative capital of Côte dIvoire. ...

November 5, 2004

  • Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Two Palestinian children are killed by an explosion in the refugee camp of Khan Yonis in the Gaza Strip. Hospital officials say it was from a tank shell that hit a house. Israeli spokesmen said there had been no army fire in the area. They believe it was either caused when a Palestinian mortar misfired or by the detonation of a roadside bomb. (Reuters)
  • Conflict in Iraq:
    • United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan warns that an assult on Falluja may result in a Sunni Muslim boycott of January elections. British ambassador to Iraq Jones Parry states: "You can't have an area the size of Falluja operating as a base for terrorism." Iraqi Interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi describes Annan's letter as confused and unclear. (Reuters)
    • Two U.S. soldiers are killed and five wounded when fighting breaks out near a base on the outskirts of Falluja. After weeks of intensive airstrikes, U.S. and Iraqi troops seal off all roads to the city. They drop leaflets and play loudspeaker messages encouraging all civilians to leave, but say they would arrest any men under 45. Near Baghdad, two children are killed when a mortar shell lands near a police station. (Reuters)(BBC)
  • Dutch-Moroccan Muslim Mohammed Bouyeri, identified by the Dutch media as "Mohammed B.", is to be charged for murdering filmmaker Theo van Gogh and for being a member of a group with "terrorist intentions". (Reuters)
  • Illness of Yasser Arafat: Israel refuses to allow Yasser Arafat to be buried in Jerusalem. The ailing leader of the Palestinian Authority is still in a coma, which might be reversible; an aide rejects reports that Arafat is "brain dead". Palestinians claim they will only trust a successor who is "determined and steadfast on the fundamental Palestinian rights", some say who is less willing to compromise. (Reuters)
  • Voters in the north east of England decisively reject plans for a devolved assembly for the region. With a turnout of 47.8% 197,310 vote for and 696,519 vote against the plans. It is a serious setback for the British Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott, who had championed the plans. (BBC)
  • Same-sex marriage in Canada: A judge in Saskatchewan rules that same-sex couples must enjoy the right to equal marriage in that province. (CBC)
  • Episcopal Church: The Annual Convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh approves an amendment to its Constitution which allows it to differ with the opinion of the national church on issues which the diocese believes to be "contrary to the historic faith and order" of the church. (Diocese of Pittsburgh)

November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Refugee camp for Rwandans located in what is now the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo following the Rwandan Genocide A refugee camp is a camp built up by governments or NGOs (such as the ICRC) to receive refugees. ... Khan Yunis (Arabic: خان يونس) is a city/refugee camp in the southern part of the Gaza Strip. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... Terrorism is the unconventional use of violence for political gain. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... A military strike is a limited attack on a specified target. ... ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... Islām is described as a dÄ«n, meaning way of life and/or guidance. Six articles of belief There are six basic beliefs shared by all Muslims: 1. ... Mohammed Bouyeri Mohammed Bouyeri (b. ... Theo van Gogh Theo van Gogh (July 23, 1957 – November 2, 2004) was a controversial Dutch film director, television producer, publicist and actor. ... Terrorism is the unconventional use of violence for political gain. ... Yasser Arafat in 1999 Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... Jerusalem and the Old City. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Brain death is defined as a complete and irreversible cessation of brain activity. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... North East England is one of the regions of England. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... Regional Assembly is a title which has universally been adopted by the English bodies established as regional chambers under the Regional Development Agencies Act 1998. ... The office of Deputy Prime Minister is one that has only existed occasionally in the history of the United Kingdom. ... John Prescott The Right Honourable John Leslie Prescott (born May 31, 1938) is a British Labour Party politician who is presently Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and First Secretary of State. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (From many peoples, strength) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Area 651,036 km² (7th) • Land 591,670 km² • Water 59,366 km² (9. ... Flag of Saskatchewan Saskatchewan is one of the seven Canadian provinces and territories that recognize same-sex marriage, as of November 5, 2004. ... The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington DC is the national cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ...

November 4, 2004

November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Balakovo (Балако́во) is a town in Saratov Oblast, Russia. ... Core of a nuclear reactor A nuclear reactor is a device in which nuclear chain reactions are initiated, controlled, and sustained at a steady rate (as opposed to a nuclear explosion, where the chain reaction occurs in a split second). ... Saratov flag Saratov (Сара́тов) is a major city in southern European Russia. ... WWII era steam turbine used for ship propulsion. ... the Caduceus Pharmacy (from the Greek φάρμακον = drug) is the profession charged with assuring the safe use of medication. ... Media:Example. ... Look up Vodka in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Vodka is a strong, clear, typically colorless liquor, usually distilled from fermented grain. ... Water (from the Old English word wæter; c. ... Look up engineer on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Radiation has a variety of different meanings. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... Rivne (Рівненська область, Rivnens’ka oblast’ in Ukrainian; Rowno in Polish) is a region of Ukraine. ... Core of a nuclear reactor A nuclear reactor is a device in which nuclear chain reactions are initiated, controlled, and sustained at a steady rate (as opposed to a nuclear explosion, where the chain reaction occurs in a split second). ... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... Radiation has a variety of different meanings. ... Spamming is the abuse of any electronic communications medium to send unsolicited messages to someone in bulk. ... Jeremy Jaynes was considered the worlds eighth most prolific spammer. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, listen â–¶(?)) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician and is the 11th President of the European Commission. ... External links Profile: Franco Frattini, BBC Italian government: official Franco Frattini biography Categories: Stub | 1957 births | Italian politicians ... Andris Piebalgs Andris Piebalgs (born 17 September Latvian politician and diplomat, currently serving as European Commissioner for Energy. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Пу́тин, â–¶(?), Pútin; born 7 October 1952) is a Russian politician and the current President of the Russian Federation. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 at Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... Shmuel Zakai is an Israeli Brigadier-General who was forcibly discharged from the Israel Defense Force in November 2004 by order of Chief of Staff Moshe Yaalon. ... â–¶(?) Hebrew: אריאל שרון (born February 27, 1928) is the eleventh and current Prime Minister of Israel, serving from March 2001. ... Operation Days of Penitence was the name used by Israel to describe an Israel Defense Forces operation in the northern Gaza Strip, conducted between September 30, 2004 and October 15, 2004. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A non-governmental organization (NGO) is an organization that is not part of a government and was not founded by states. ... Médecins Sans Frontières (abbreviated MSF; sometimes known as Doctors Without Borders in English-speaking countries) is a nonprofit private organisation created in 1971 by a small group of French doctors led by Bernard Kouchner. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... ... Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in Scotland Abbeys and priories in Scotland... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... Camp Dogwood is the name of the base camp for the British Black Watch regiment in Iraq, 2004. ... Official languages Macedonian¤ Capital Skopje President Branko Crvenkovski Prime Minister Vlado Bučkovski Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water Ranked 146th  25,333 km²  1. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: People stubs | 1949 births ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Richard B. Cheney, 46th and current Vice President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards (born June 10, 1953) is a former United States Senator from North Carolina. ... Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ... Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993–2004); and a... Life support, in the medical field, refers to a set of therapies for preserving a patients life when essential body systems are not functioning sufficiently to sustain life unaided. ... Brain death is defined as a complete and irreversible cessation of brain activity. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The term High Court could refer to one of the following institutions: High Court of England and Wales High Court of Australia The Four Courts of Ireland The High Court of Justiciary in Scotland And the 18 High Courts of India The High Court of Andhra Pradesh The High Court... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Premier Frank Hsieh Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... Diabetes mellitus type 2 (formerly Diabetes mellitus type II and also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes, NIDDM or adult-onset diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is primarily characterized by insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, relative insulin deficiency and obesity. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) City of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canadas Location. ... The structure of insulin Red: carbon; green: oxygen; blue: nitrogen; pink: sulfur. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... This is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Flag of Newfoundland and Labrador Same-sex marriage in Newfoundland and Labrador: Newfoundland and Labrador has issued marriage licences to same-sex couples since December 21, 2004. ... The Olympic Games, or Olympics, is an international multi-sport event taking place every four years and comprising summer and winter games. ... Michael Phelps, prior to the 2004 Olympic Summer Games, on the August 9, 2004 issue of Time. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Official languages None Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Senators Paul Sarbanes (D) Barbara Mikulski (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 42nd 32,160 km² 21 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 19th 5,296,486 165/km² (5th) Admission into... Salisbury Cathedral from the Cathedral Yard High Street Market Great West Front of Salisbury Cathedral Salisbury (pronounced Solsbree or Sauls-bree) is a small cathedral city in Wiltshire, England. ... A sport utility vehicle (SUV) or off-roader is a vehicle that combines the load-hauling and passenger-carrying capacity of a large station wagon or minivan with features designed for off-road driving. ...

November 3, 2004

November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Khalifa bin Zayed, president of the UAE. His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan (Arabic: , born 1948) is the current president of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). ... Sheikh Zayed Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan (Arabic:الشيخ زايد بن سلطان أل نهيان)‎, (1918 — 2 November 2004), the principal architect of the seven United Arab Emirates, was the moderate ruler of Abu Dhabi and president of the UAE for over 30 years (1971-2004). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... In United States presidential politics, a swing state (also, battleground state) is a state in which no candidate has overwhelming support, meaning that any of the major candidates have a reasonable chance of winning the states electoral college votes. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Official languages None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 8. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States. ... Thomas Andrew Daschle (born December 9, 1947), known as Tom Daschle, was a U.S. Senator from South Dakota and the Senate Majority Leader. ... bastard ... The EFF uses the blue ribbon as symbolism for their Free Speech defense. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... Electronic voting machine used in all Brazilian elections and plebiscites. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... Presidential election results map. ... Same-sex marriage, often referred to as gay marriage, indicates a marriage between two persons of the same sex. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... State nickname: The Natural State Other U.S. States Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Governor Mike Huckabee (R) Senators Blanche Lincoln (D) Mark Pryor (D) Official language(s) English Area 137,732 km² (29th)  - Land 134,856 km²  - Water 2,876 km² (2. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... State nickname: The Wolverine State, The Great Lakes State Official languages English de-facto Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm (D) Senators Carl Levin (D) Debbie Stabenow (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 11th 96,889 mi² / 250,941 km² 41. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... State nickname: Treasure State Official languages English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Governor Brian Schweitzer (D) Senators Max Baucus (D) Conrad Burns (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 4th 381,156 km² 1 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 44th 902,195 2. ... State nickname: Peace Garden State, Roughrider State, Flickertail State Official languages English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Governor John Hoeven (R) Senators Kent Conrad (D) Byron Dorgan (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 19th 183 272 km² 2. ... Oklahoma is a state of the United States, lying mostly in the southern Great Plains, and its U.S. postal abbreviation is OK; others abbreviate the states name Okla. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Official languages None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 8. ... State nickname: Beaver State Official languages None Capital Salem Largest city Portland Governor Ted Kulongoski (D) Senators Ron Wyden (D) Gordon Smith (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 9th 255,026 km² 2. ... Utah is one of the Four Corners states, and is bordered by: Idaho (at 42°N) and Wyoming (at 41°N and 111°W) in the north, by Colorado (at 109°W) in the east, at a single point by New Mexico to the southeast (at the Four Corners Monument... A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing same-sex couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married opposite-sex peoples (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by opposite-sex couples who... Domestic partner or domestic partnership identifies the personal relationship between individuals who are living together and sharing a common domestic life together but are not joined in any type of legal partnership, marriage or civil union. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... ... Salman Pak (al-Salman) is a town approximately 15 miles south of Baghdad near a peninsula formed by a broad eastward bend of the Tigris River. ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... Jaish Ansar al-Sunna or Army of the Protectors of the Sunna (faith) (Arabic: جيش أنصار السنه ) , is an Islamist militant group in Iraq that fought the US-led occupation and US-backed interim government of Iyad Allawi, and continues to fight the new ruling government of Jalal Talabani. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ NînÄ›wâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ... Tikrit (تكريت, also transliterated as Takrit or Tekrit) is a town in Iraq, located 140 km northwest of Baghdad on the Tigris river (at 34. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... Nāşirīyah (also transliterated as Nassiriya or Nasiriya; in Arabic ناصرية, al-Nasiriyah or an-Nasiriyah) is a city in Iraq. ... Image:Myron Williams. ... In military terms, a demilitarized zone (DMZ) is an area, usually the frontier or boundary between two or more groups, where military activity is not permitted, usually by treaty or other agreement. ... Desertion is the act of abandoning or withdrawing support from an entity to which one has given. ... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Premier Frank Hsieh Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... This article is about the foreign relations of the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Puerto Rico General Elections of 2004 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... The State Commission of Elections of Puerto Rico —or Comisión Estatal de Elecciones de Puerto Rico (CEEPR or CEE-PUR) in Spanish— is the entity that guarantees the right to vote to the citizens of Puerto Rico. ... Order: 8th Democratically Elected Governor Term of Office: January 2, 2005– Predecessor: Sila Calderón Successor: Incumbent Date of Birth: Friday, February 13, 1962 Place of Birth: San Juan, Puerto Rico First Lady: Luisa Gándara Profession: Lawyer Political Party: Popular Democratic Party Resident Commissioner: Luis Fortuño (2005-) An... Since 1949, the Governor of Puerto Rico is elected by the people of Puerto Rico to a four year term. ... Luis Fortuño, Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico Luis G. Fortuño (born October 31, 1960) is a corporate lawyer and politician from Puerto Rico affiliated with the New Progressive Party and the United States Republican Party. ... The Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico is a nonvoting representative of the United States House of Representatives elected by Puerto Ricans every 4 years. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... The Senate of Puerto Rico is the upper house of the Legislative Assembly of Puerto Rico, smaller than the House of Representatives. ... The House of Representatives of Puerto Rico is the lower house of the Legislative Assembly of Puerto Rico, larger than the Senate. ... The New Progressive Party of Puerto Rico —or Partido Nuevo Progresista de Puerto Rico (PNP) in Spanish— is a political party that campaigns for Puerto Rico to become a state of the United States. ...

November 2, 2004

November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ NînÄ›wâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ... The Iraqi National Guard is a military force in Iraq controlled by the interim government. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Refugee camp for Rwandans located in what is now the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo following the Rwandan Genocide A refugee camp is a camp built up by governments or NGOs (such as the ICRC) to receive refugees. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... Spanking (or smacking, or less specific terms such as whipping, etc. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Space Shuttle Columbia seconds after engine ignition, 1981 (NASA). ... This article is about the month of May. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with a length of 30 days The month is named after the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and equivalent to the Greek goddess Hera. ... Crew of STS-107 on launch day (Close up of faces and names) STS-107 was a space shuttle mission by NASA using the Space Shuttle Columbia. ... 2003 (MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... First storm formed: Aug. ... National motto: none Official language Arabic Capital and largest city Abu Dhabi Area 75,150 km² (29,016 mi²) Population  - Total (2005)  - Density Ranked 136th 2,563,212 46/km² HDI (2003) 0. ... Sheikh Zayed Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan (Arabic:الشيخ زايد بن سلطان أل نهيان)‎, (1918 — 2 November 2004), the principal architect of the seven United Arab Emirates, was the ruler of Abu Dhabi and president of the UAE for over 30 years (1971-2004). ... His Highness Sheikh Maktoum Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum (born 1946) is the current Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and the emir of Dubai. ... Theo van Gogh Theo van Gogh (July 23, 1957 – November 2, 2004) was a controversial Dutch film director, television producer, publicist and actor. ... Amsterdam Location Country The Netherlands Province North Holland Population 739,298 (1 January 2005) Coordinates 4°54′E 52°22′N Website www. ... Submission (a direct translation of the word Islam) is a 10-minute film directed by Theo van Gogh and written by Ms. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The following is a timeline of events during the 2004 U.S. presidential election: // 2002 May 31 - Vermont Governor Howard B. Dean III forms a presidential exploratory committee. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The U.S. Congress is the United States legislative body and consists of two branches, the House with 435 Representatives apportioned by population and Senate with two Senators from each state. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia and Palmyra Atoll (an uninhabited incorporated unorganized territory), form the United States of America. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... The Puerto Rico General Elections of 2004 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... Order: 8th Democratically Elected Governor Term of Office: January 2, 2005– Predecessor: Sila Calderón Successor: Incumbent Date of Birth: Friday, February 13, 1962 Place of Birth: San Juan, Puerto Rico First Lady: Luisa Gándara Profession: Lawyer Political Party: Popular Democratic Party Resident Commissioner: Luis Fortuño (2005-) An... Order: 6th Democratically Elected Governor Term of Office: January 2, 1993– January 2, 2001 Predecessor: Rafael Hernández Colón Successor: Sila Calderón Date of Birth: Monday, April 5, 1944 Place of Birth: San Juan, Puerto Rico First Lady: Maga Nevares Profession: Pedriatician Political Party: New Progressive Party Resident... The Puerto Rican Independence Party (Partido Independentista Puertorriqueño (PIP) in Spanish) is a Puerto Rican political party that campaigns for the independence of Puerto Rico from the United States. ... The government of the Puerto Rico, established by the Constitution, is a commonwealth in republican form consisting of 78 municipalities. ... A ballot is a device used to record choices made by voters. ... Maria de Lourdes Santiago, vice-president of the Puerto Rican Independence Party and candidate for Senator of Puerto Rico in the 2004 General Elections. ... The Senate of Puerto Rico is the upper house of the Legislative Assembly of Puerto Rico, smaller than the House of Representatives. ...

November 1, 2004

November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... General information The Grímsvötn (Icelandic vatn, or lake) are lakes in Iceland. ... Eruption redirects here. ... Vatnajökull (pronounced vatnajöküdll) is the largest glacier in Iceland. ... A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 The Sinai Peninsula (in Arabic, Shibh Jazirat Sina) is a triangle-shaped peninsula lying between the Mediterranean Sea (to the north) and Red Sea (to the south). ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A governor is also a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... Hatem Kamil Abdul Fatah (died November 1, 2004) was the deputy governor of Iraqs Baghdad province. ... This is an incomplete list of persons that were assassinated for political and other reasons, and who have individual entries. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... Jaish Ansar al-Sunna or Army of the Protectors of the Sunna (faith), is an Iraq fighting US_led occupation and US_backed interim government of Iyad Allawi. ... Reuters Group plc is best known as a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... The traditional definition of a sniper is an infantry soldier especially skilled in field craft and marksmanship, who kills selected enemies from concealment with a rifle at long distances. ... RamădÄ« (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... ... Motto: जननी जन्मभूमिष्च स्वर्गादिप गरियिस (Sanskrit: Mother and Motherland are better than the kingdom of heaven) Anthem: Rastriya Gaan Capital Kathmandu Largest city Kathmandu Official languages Nepali Government King Prime Minister Constitutional Monarchy Gyanendra Office currently vacant Unification 1768-12-21 Area  â€¢ Total  â€¢ Water (%)   147,181 km² (94th) 2. ... Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... Location within Italy Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venessia in the local dialect), the city of canals, is the capital of the region of Veneto and of the province of Venice, 45°26′N 12°19′E, population 271,663 (census estimate 2004-01-01). ... Look up Flood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Scotus redirects here. ... William H. Rehnquist has served as the Chief Justice of the United States since 1986. ... Clinac 2100 C accelerator Radiation therapy (or radiotherapy) is the medical use of ionizing radiation as part of cancer treatment to control malignant cells (not to be confused with radiology, the use of radiation in medical imaging and diagnosis). ... Chemotherapy is the use of chemical substances to treat disease. ... Thyroid cancer is cancer of the thyroid gland. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... A suicide bombing is an attack using a bomb in which the individual(s) carrying the explosive materials composing the bomb intend(s) and expect(s) to die upon detonation (see suicide). ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) (Arabic الجبهة الشعبية لتحرير فلسطين - al-Jabhah al-Shaabiyah li-Tahrīr Filasṭīn) is a secular, Marxist-Leninist, nationalist Palestinian organization, founded after the Six-Day War in 1967. ... Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice. ... Henan (Chinese: 河南; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-nan), is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the central part of the country. ... The Hui (回) ethnic group is unrelated to the Hui (徽) dialects. ... Han Chinese (Simplified Chinese: 汉族; Traditional Chinese: 漢族; pinyin: ) is a term which refers to the majority ethnic group within China and the largest single human ethnic group in the world. ...

Events by month

2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2001: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2000: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in April • 26: Augusto Roa Bastos • 24: Ezer Weizman • 23: Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen • 23: John Mills • 16: Marla Ruzicka • 9: Andrea Dworkin • 6: Prince Rainier III • 5: Dale Messick • 5: Saul Bellow • 2: Pope John... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21: Subodh Mukherjee May 21: Stephen Elliott May 20... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby... Ongoing events • 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes • 2005 Maharashtra floods • 2005 Gujarat Flood • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in August August 31: Michael Sheard August 26: Lord Fitt August 24: Jack Slipper August 24: Maurice Cowling August 24: Dr. Tom Pashby August 23: Brock Peters August 22: Lord Lane August 21: Robert Moog August... Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Atlantic hurricane season • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak • Bali bombings investigation • California wildfires • UK Conservative Party leadership election • DeLay political financing scandal • Dengue outbreak in Singapore • Fuel prices / Peak oil • Harriet Miers nomination and hearings • Hurricane Wilma • Irans nuclear program • Kashmir earthquake • London bombings... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in October 28: Richard Smalley 26: Emil Kyulev 24: José Azcona del Hoyo 24: Rosa Parks 23: Stella Obasanjo 22: Liam Lawlor 22: Shirley Horn 20: Endon Mahmood 17: Ba Jin 10: Milton Obote 7: Charles... Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Al Jazeera bombing memo • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak • Black sites scandal • Conservative leadership race (UK) • Fuel prices • Irans nuclear program • Jilin chemical plant explosions • Kashmir earthquake • Malawi food crisis • Malaysian prisoner abuse scandal • New Delhi bombings investigation • Niger food crisis • North Indian cyclone... To suggest a relevant news story for the main page, refer to the criteria then add your suggestion at the candidates page. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8 Richard Girnt... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... ← - 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... 2003 (MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... December 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → Events December 31, 2003 In Taiwan, President Chen Shui-bian signs a law that allows referendums to be held. ... 2002 (MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a month starting on Monday with 31 days. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: February - Iraq disarmament crisis: British and U.S. forces carry out bombing raids attempting to disable Iraqs air defense network. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: April 1: An EP-3E United States Navy plane collides with a Chinese Peoples Liberation Army fighter jet. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: May 1 - Chandra Levy disapears while jogging. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: June 5-June 9 - Houston, Texas is devastated by flooding when Tropical Storm Allison dumps 36 inches of rain on the city. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: July 3 - Mordecai Richler July 23 - Eudora Welty July 31 - Poul Anderson Films: July 4 - Cats and Dogs July 6 - Kiss of the Dragon starring Jet Li July 18 - Jurassic Park III July 27 - Planet of... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: August 25 - Aaliyah Films: August 10 - Osmosis Jones played by Chris Rock, starring Bill Murray August 24 - Bubble Boy Categories: 2001 by month ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: September 4 - Google Inc. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: October 2 - Bankruptcy of Swissair. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of the Volunteer The United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations Events January January 1 - A black monolith measuring approximately nine feet tall appears in Seattles Magnuson Park, placed by an anonymous... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: December 2 - Enron files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection five days after Dynegy canceled a US$8. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: January 1- Millennium celebrations take place throughout the world. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in February, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in March, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in April, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in June, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in July, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in August, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in September, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in October, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in November, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in December, 2000. ...


News collections and sources

See: Wikipedia:News collections and sources.


See also

  • WikiNews Demo

  Results from FactBites:
 
November 2004 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5733 words)
Yasser Arafat, who is on a life-support machine, has been officially declared brain-dead while in intensive care at a hospital in Paris, according to medical sources inside the hospital.
The High Court in the Republic of China rejects a petition by the Kuomintang to nullify the March 2004 presidential election result that saw Chen Shui-bian re-elected president by a margin of 0.2% over Lien Chan.
The penalty phase of the trial is scheduled for November 22, 2004.
Seconductor Industry Status November 2004 (720 words)
Finally, the grey squares are 2004 revenue, with January through July showing progressively moderating growth over the year 2000 peak, August dipping under the year 2000 level and September now showing some recovery.
For 2004 our most recent forecast was for IC growth in the mid thirties with lower discrete growth pulling the overall market number down slightly.
Industry status as of October 2004 - Worldwide revenue growth continues to soften further clouding the outlook for the second half.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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