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Encyclopedia > Nottingham
City of Nottingham
Queen of the Midlands
Nottingham and the River Trent seen from the bank of West Bridgford.
Nottingham and the River Trent seen from the bank of West Bridgford.
Official logo of City of Nottingham
Arms of the Nottingham City Council
Coordinates: 52°57′N 1°08′W / 52.95, -1.133
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region East Midlands
Ceremonial county Nottinghamshire
Admin HQ Nottingham City Centre
Settled AD 600
City Status 1897
Government
 - Type Unitary authority, City
 - Governing body Nottingham City Council
 - Leadership Leader & Cabinet
Area
 - City 28.8 sq mi (74.61 km²)
Population (2006 est.)
 - City 286,400
 - Density 9,673.6/sq mi (3,735/km²)
 - Urban 666,358
 - Ethnicity
(2005 Estimate)[1]
82.1% White
7.4% S. Asian
4.7% Black British
3.2% Mixed Race
2.6% Chinese and other
Time zone Greenwich Mean Time (UTC+0)
Twin Cities
 -  Flag of BelgiumGhent Belgium (since 1985)
 -  Flag of ZimbabweHarare Zimbabwe (since 1981)
 -  Flag of GermanyKarlsruhe Germany (since 1969)
 -  Flag of SloveniaLjubljana Slovenia (since 1963)
 -  Flag of BelarusMinsk Belarus (since 1966)
 -  Flag of the People's Republic of ChinaNingbo China (since 2004)
Grid Ref. SK570400
ONS code 00FY
ISO 3166-2 GB-NGM
NUTS 3 UKF14
Website: www.nottinghamcity.gov.uk/

Nottingham (/ˈnɒtɪŋəm/ ) is a large city in the ceremonial county of Nottinghamshire, England. It is the regional capital of the East Midlands region of England. Nottingham is the name of several places in the world: Nottingham, England, United Kingdom Nottingham, Maryland, United States of America Nottingham, New Hampshire, United States of America Nottingham, Pennsylvania, United States of America and a succession of Royal Navy destroyers: HMS Nottingham This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses see Trent River. ... , West Bridgford is a leafy suburb of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Arms of Nottingham City Council. ... This article discusses states as sovereign political entities. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East Midlands is one of the regions of England and consists of most of the eastern half of the traditional region of the Midlands. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... View of City Centre skyline from Victoria Embankment Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem, reputedly the oldest pub in England Street in Nottingham City Centres Lace Market Nottingham City Centre is the central area of Nottingham, and the Greater Nottingham conurbation as a whole. ... AD redirects here. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... Nottingham City Council is the city council for the unitary authority of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... GMT redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... // This is a list of twin towns or sister cities — that is, pairs of towns or cities in different countries which have town twinning arrangements. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... This article is about the Belgian city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... Motto: Pamberi Nekushandria Vanhu (Forward with Service to the People) Map of Zimbabwe showing the location of Harare. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Karlsruhe (population 285,812 in 2006) is a city in the south west of Germany, in the Bundesland Baden-Württemberg, located near the French-German border. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Location in Slovenia Coordinates: , Country Founded AD 15 (as Colonia Iulia Aemona) Government  - Mayor and governor Zoran Janković (Lista Zorana Jankovića) Area  - Total 275. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Ningbo (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ning-po; literally Tranquil Waves) is a seaport sub-provincial city with a population of 1,219,900 in northeastern Zhejiang province, Peoples Republic of China. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Image File history File links EnglandNottingham. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to administrative counties of England. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The East Midlands is one of the regions of England and consists of most of the eastern half of the traditional region of the Midlands. ...


In 2006 Nottingham had a city population of 286,400. However, Nottingham City's border is tightly drawn and so this figure excludes many places which most people consider to be Nottingham, such as Carlton, Gedling and West Bridgford. The Greater Nottingham conurbation, which does include these areas along with the large expanse of suburbs and towns on the outskirts such as Ilkeston, Long Eaton and Eastwood, has a population of 666,358. It is the 7th largest urban area in the United Kingdom, Liverpool and Sheffield being 6th and 8th largest respectively.[2] Nottingham is also a member of the English Core Cities Group. For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Location within the British Isles Carlton is a suburb to the east of the city of Nottingham. ... Gedling is a village is Nottinghamshire, England, that is now a suburb of Greater Nottingham. ... , West Bridgford is a leafy suburb of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Greater Nottingham is the surrounding conurbation of the city of Nottingham. ... A conurbation is an urban area comprising a number of cities, towns and villages which, through population growth and expansion, have physically merged to form one continuous built up area. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Ilkeston is a town in Derbyshire, in the East Midlands region of England, on the River Erewash. ... This article is about a town in England. ... Eastwood is the name of several places: Eastwood, East Renfrewshire a former district of Strathclyde in Scotland Eastwood, New South Wales a suburb of Sydney, Australia Eastwood, Essex a suburb in England Eastwood, Nottinghamshire a town in England Eastwood, Syracuse a neighborhood in Syracuse, New York See also: Clint Eastwood... Look up urban in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... The English Core Cities Group is an association of eight large regional cities in England: Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Nottingham and Sheffield. ...


At the heart of Nottingham City Centre is the Old Market Square or 'Slab Square'. This 22,000 sq/m open space is the largest square in England and was recently refurbished to include a large water feature, which consists of numerous fountains and gushing rapids. The entire square was also re-surfaced with granite slabs and new trees planted. The reaction to the redevelopment was mixed [1]. Nottingham Council House which overlooks the square can be seen for miles around thanks to its 200 ft (61 m) high dome which rises above the city and is lit up at night.[3] Inside the Council House is the Exchange Arcade, an upmarket shopping centre which houses many high class shops. Shopping being one of the main attractions of the City. Radiating out from the central square are the other areas of the city. The Hockley quarter, characterised by a higher proportion of independent retailers and alternative cinema, is situated to the east of the city. Hockley is adjacent to the Lace Market area which is home to many large grand Victorian era buildings owing to Nottingham's importance in the Victorian Lace Industry. The City's history being another main attraction. The Lace Market now has numerous bars and restaurants. To the south of the square shopping streets lead their way into the soon to be totally rebuilt Broadmarsh shopping centre. Beyond the shopping centre lies the canal which is a pleasant area full of cafes and restaurants. To the west is Nottingham Castle and Maid Marion Way which is home to The Tales of Robin Hood along with the majority of the high rise office buildings in the city. Northwards from the square is the Victoria Shopping Centre, numerous restaurants and a cinema complex. The Theatre Royal, Nottingham on Theatre Square and Nottingham Playhouse at the Albert Hall can also be found here. View of City Centre skyline from Victoria Embankment Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem, reputedly the oldest pub in England Street in Nottingham City Centres Lace Market Nottingham City Centre is the central area of Nottingham, and the Greater Nottingham conurbation as a whole. ... Old Market Square is an open town square in Nottingham, England, the largest such surviving in England, and forms the heart of the city of Nottingham. ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... Council House from Old Market Square, Nottingham. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see mall. ... For the hamlet in Ontario, Canada, see Hockley Village,Ontario A view of the Hockley area of Nottingham Hockley Village (or more commonly, just Hockley) is an area near the centre of Nottingham, UK, adjacent to the Lace Market. ... The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... For other uses, see Lace (disambiguation). ... The Broadmarsh Shopping Centre is the southern end shopping centre in Nottingham, England, owned by the Australian company The Westfield Group. ... Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England. ... Logo of The Tales of Robin Hood, Nottingham The Tales of Robin Hood is an indoor visitor attraction and medieval banqueting centre which is located on Maid Marian Way in Nottingham, in the vicinity of Nottingham Castle. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Contents

History

See also: History of Nottingham

Nottingham is relatively unusual among major manufacturing cities in Britain in having a mediæval and pre-industrial past of equal importance to its more recent one. The first evidence of settlement dates from pre-Roman times,[citation needed] and it is possible that the Romans also lived in the area.[citation needed] Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Roman Era is a period in Western history, when ancient Rome was the center of power of the world around the Mediterranean Sea, where Latin was the lingua franca. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


In Anglo-Saxon times, around 600 AD, the site formed part of the Kingdom of Mercia, when it was known in the Brythonic language as "Tig Guocobauc" meaning "a place of cave dwellings", until falling under the rule of a Saxon chieftain named Snot,[4] whereby it was dubbed "Snotingaham" literally, "the homestead of Snot's people" (Inga = the people of; Ham = homestead). Snot brought together his people in an area where the historic Lace Market in the City can now be found. For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ... Nottingham has more manmade caves than anywhere else in the country and this whole cave network has Scheduled Ancient Monument protection equal to that of Stonehenge which makes Nottingham Caves a site of vast importance to the heritage of the United Kingdom. ... Look up Saxon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ...


Nottingham was captured in 867 by Danish Vikings and later became one of the Five Burghs - or fortified towns - of The Danelaw. For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... The Five Burghs or more usually The Five Boroughs or The Five Boroughs of the Danelaw were the five main towns of Danish Mercia. ... Gold: Danelaw The Danelaw, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles also known as the Danelagh, (Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a name given to a part of Great Britain, now northern and eastern England, in which the laws of the Danes[1] held predominance over those of the Anglo...


In the 11th century, Nottingham Castle was constructed on a sandstone outcrop by the River Leen. The Anglo-Saxon settlement developed into the English Borough of Nottingham and housed a Town Hall and Law Courts. A settlement also developed around the castle on the hill opposite and was the French borough supporting the Normans in the castle. Eventually, the space between was built on as the town grew and the Old Market Square became the focus of Nottingham several centuries later. Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England. ... This article is about the geological formation. ... The River Leen rises in the Robin Hood Hills just outside Kirkby in Ashfield. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... Old Market Square is an open town square in Nottingham, England, the largest such surviving in England, and forms the heart of the city of Nottingham. ...

Demographic evolution of Nottingham
Year Population
4th century <37
10th century <1000
11th century 1,500
14th century 3,000
early 17th century 4,000
late 17th century 5,000
1801 29,000
1811 34,000
1821 40,000
1831 51,000
1841 53,000
1851 58,000
1861 76,000
1871 87,000
1881 159,000
1901 240,000
1911 260,000
1921 269,000
1931 265,000
1951 306,000
1961 312,000
1971 301,000
1981 278,000
1991 273,000
2001 275,000
2006 286,400
source: localhistories.org

In the 15th century, Nottingham had established itself as the centre of a thriving export trade in religious sculpture made from alabaster. The town became a county corporate in 1449, giving it effective self-government, in the words of the charter, "for eternity". The Castle and Shire Hall were expressly excluded and technically remained as detached Parishes of Nottinghamshire. A modern uplighter lamp made completely from Italian alabaster (white and brown types). ... A county corporate or corporate county was a form of local government in England and Wales. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ...

The old central area focussed around Market Square
The old central area focussed around Market Square

During the Industrial Revolution, much of Nottingham's prosperity was founded on the textile industry; in particular, Nottingham was an internationally important centre of lace manufacture. However, the rapid and poorly planned growth left Nottingham with the reputation of having the worst slums in the British Empire outside India. Residents of these slums rioted in 1831, in protest against the Duke of Newcastle's opposition to the Reform Act 1832, setting fire his residence, Nottingham Castle. A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... With the establishment of overseas colonies, the British Empire at the end of the 17th century/beginning of the 18th century had a vast source of raw materials and a vast market for goods. ... For other uses, see Lace (disambiguation). ... Slums in Delhi, India. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... Duke of Newcastle is a title which has been created several times in the peerages of England and Great Britain. ... The Representation of the People Act 1832, commonly known as the Reform Act 1832, was an Act of Parliament that introduced wide-ranging changes to the electoral system of the United Kingdom. ... Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England. ...


In common with the UK textile industry as a whole, Nottingham's textile sector fell into headlong decline in the decades following the World War II, as British manufacturers proved unable to compete on price or volume with output of factories in the Far East and South Asia. Very little textile manufacture now takes place in Nottingham, but the City's heyday in this sector endowed it with some fine industrial buildings in the Lace Market district. Many of these have been restored and put to new uses. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the Asian regions. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ...


Nottingham was one of the boroughs reformed by the Municipal Corporations Act 1835, and at that time consisted of the parishes of Nottingham St Mary, Nottingham St Nicholas and Nottingham St Peter. It was expanded in 1877 by adding the parishes of Basford, Brewhouse Yard, Bulwell, Radford, Sneinton, Standard Hill and parts of the parishes of West Bridgford, Carlton, Wilford (North Wilford). In 1889 Nottingham became a county borough under the Local Government Act 1888. City status was awarded as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations of Queen Victoria, being signified in a letter from the Prime Minister the Marquess of Salisbury to the Mayor, dated 18 June 1897. Nottingham was extended in 1933 by adding Bilborough and Wollaton, parts of the parishes of Bestwood Park and Colwick, and a recently developed part of the Beeston Urban District. A further boundary extension was granted in 1951 when Clifton and Wilford (south of the River Trent) were incorporated into the city.[5] The Municipal Reform Act 1835 required members of town councils (municipal corporations) to be elected by ratepayers and councils to publish their financial accounts. ... Basford is a suburb on the north side of Nottingham. ... Bulwell is an English market town which lies approximately 4. ... Radford is the name of several places: Radford, Virginia, USA Radford University, Virginia, USA Radford, Coventry, United Kingdom Radford, Nottingham, United Kingdom Radford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom Categories: Disambiguation ... Sneinton (pronounced Snenton) is a north-eastern suburb of Nottingham, England. ... , West Bridgford is a leafy suburb of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Location within the British Isles Carlton is a suburb to the east of the city of Nottingham. ... Wilford is a village close to the centre the city of Nottingham, UK, on the banks of the River Trent. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... The title Marquess of Salisbury is a British title of Peerage, created in 1789 for James Cecil, 7th Earl of Salisbury. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Wollaton (often mistakenly spelt Woolaton) is an area in the west of the City of Nottingham, England. ... Colwick is a suburb in the east of Greater Nottingham in England. ...


Architecture

King Street with Alfred Waterhouse's and Watson Fothergill's buildings

Nottingham has some truly magnificent architecture, buildings from a vast swathe of history stretching right back to the 1100s have been built in the City. Victorian Nottingham saw a building boom with many grand buildings being built owing to the City's 19th century importance. Architects such as Alfred Waterhouse, Thomas Chambers Hine and Watson Fothergill have all built spectacular buildings in Nottingham. The Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, has an ornate terracotta facade typical of high Victorian architecture. ... Watson Fothergill was an architect of the Gothic Revival and Old English vernacular styles between the years 1870 - 1912. ...


The western third of the city is home to most of the modern offices and businesses of the city, several tall office buildings line Maid Marian Way whilst there are some handsome buildings around Oxford and Regent Streets mainly occupied by professional firms. The Albert Hall was rebuilt in 1909 after the original Watson Fothergill masterpiece burnt down, sits next to the comparatively unimpressive Nottingham Cathedral by Pugin. Nottingham Castle and its grounds are located further south in the western third of the city. The central third descends from the University district in the north, past the Arkwright Building which is a beautiful example of gothic revival architecture and was previously Nottingham's public library - Nottingham Trent University now owns this building as well as many in the area. Theatre Royal on Theatre Square with its pillared facade was built in 1865 in just six months. Head further south down King and Queen Street which are home to many magnificent Victorian architecture buildings designed by the likes of Alfred Waterhouse who designed London's Natural History Museum and Nottingham's own Watson Fothergill who's buildings are distinctive and unique. The Cathedral Church of St. ... People named Pugin include: Augustus Charles Pugin (1768/9 to 1832): French born English artist and architectural draftsman Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812-1852): son of the above, architect and advocate of the gothic style Edward Welby Pugin (1834-1875): eldest son of the above and also an architect This... Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... Arkwright Building Nottingham Trent University (NTU) is a university in Nottingham, England. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... For other similarly-named museums see Museum of Natural History. ...

The Arkwright Building
The Arkwright Building
Architecture from different eras side by side
Architecture from different eras side by side

The central focal point of the City is Old Market Square which is the largest in the UK and is home to many beautiful buildings, most notably Nottingham Council House. This was built in the 1920s to display civic pride, ostentatiously using baroque columns and placing stone statues of two lions at the front to stand watch over the square; the Exchange Arcade inside the building contains an upmarket shopping centre with boutique shops, it is a small but beautiful covered area. Portland Stone, the same as used for St Paul's Cathedral, was used to construct the Council House and Exchange Arcade. Streets lead from all directions off the square but to the south, shopping streets lead their way in to the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre which is soon to be completely rebuilt. Plans include a massive three floor centre with glass covered 'streets' (similar to the Birmingham Bullring) a landmark new building on the southwest corner of the site and a new transport terminus for the tram lines and buses. Old Market Square is an open town square in Nottingham, England, the largest such surviving in England, and forms the heart of the city of Nottingham. ... Council House from Old Market Square, Nottingham. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... The Cenotaph, in Whitehall, London, England, is made from Portland stone Portland stone is limestone from the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... 2003 Bull Ring _ St Martins church and Selfridges The Bull Ring market has been an important feature of Birmingham since the Middle Ages. ...

Nottingham Council House and Queen Street
Nottingham Council House and Queen Street

The Canalside, further south of this is adjacent to the railway station and several new but sympathetically designed modern offices and is an inviting redevelopment of 19th century industrial buildings into a cluster of bars and restaurants. The eastern third of the city contains the Victoria Shopping Centre which was built in the 1970s on the site of the demolished Victoria Railway Station. All that remains of the beautiful old station building is the clocktower and the station hotel which is now the Hilton Hotel, Nottingham. The Victoria Centre flats stand above the shopping centre and run the whole length of it. At 250 fet high they are the tallest buildings in the city. The eastern third also contains perhaps the most interesting areas of the city, such as Hockley Village. (Photos) Hockley is where the vast majority of the individual shops are to be found. Hockley is also home to two cinemas which show alternative cinema. They are the Broadway cinema and The Screen Room cinema. The Screen Room is the smallest in the world with only 21 seats and was the cinema of choice for Quentin Tarantino's UK premier of Reservoir Dogs. The Lace Market area is another interesting area just south of Hockley. The Lace Market was once the heart of Britain's Lace industry during the 19th century British Empire and the area provides a snapshot of typical Victorian Britain, with its densely packed streets full of 4-7 story red brick warehouses, ornate iron railings and red phone boxes. For the hamlet in Ontario, Canada, see Hockley Village,Ontario A view of the Hockley area of Nottingham Hockley Village (or more commonly, just Hockley) is an area near the centre of Nottingham, UK, adjacent to the Lace Market. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an Academy Award- and Palme dOr-winning American film director, screenwriter and actor. ... For the video game based on the film, see Reservoir Dogs (video game). ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ...

Typical red brick lined street in the Lace Market
Typical red brick lined street in the Lace Market
St Mary's church in the Lace Market
St Mary's church in the Lace Market

These have all been restored and cleaned and the buildings are now used for different purposes, New College Nottingham now has many sites in the Lace Market including the impressive Adams Building built by Thomas Chambers Hine for Thomas Adams. Many of the buildings are also now used for upmarket city centre apartments. Several bars and restaurants also have premises in the Lace Market. The area was once a run down one with the warehouses abandoned but since cleaning and gentrification is now an attractive aspect to this part of the city. The church of St Mary the Virgin is also in this area and is widely considered to be the best example of an English cross-shaped church. On this medieval site was supposedly where Robin Hood was arrested after being betrayed by a monk and subsequently imprisoned by the Sherrif of Nottingham, before being rescued by Little John. It and the adjacent Shire Hall are two interesting buildings from the city's medieval past. The Georgian built Galleries of Justice are also in the Lace Market, they were used as courts and prisons from 1780 for 200 years although the aite has been home to a court since 1375. Thomas Adams was the name of the following men: Thomas Adams (playwright) (1580-1653), an English playwright Sir Thomas Adams, 1st Baronet (1586-1668), Lord Mayor of London Thomas Adams (publisher) (d. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Little John is a presumably fictional character in the legend of Robin Hood. ...

Galleries of Justice in the Lace Market
Galleries of Justice in the Lace Market

Wollaton Hall lies about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) to the west of the city centre. This building built in 1588 is a massive piece of specatacular Tudor period architecture, it is home to the city's Natural History Museum and is set in 500 acres (2.0 km²) of deer park taking a large chunk out of the urban area surrounding it. It is located just north of the University of Nottingham's University Park Campus. Wollaton Hall in the late 18th century. ... Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c. ... The Downs, University Park Millennium Garden, University Park Lincoln Hall, University Park University Park Campus is the main campus of the University of Nottingham, England. ...


Three pubs in Nottingham claim the title of "England's Oldest Pub". The contenders for the title are Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem near the castle which is partly built into the cave system, The Bell on the Old Market Square, and The Old Salutation on Maid Marian Way. All of which are some of the cities oldest buildings and make for fascinating viewing. Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem is supposedly named for its role as a meeting point for those going on the Crusades in the Middle Ages. Its claim of the being the oldest is due partly to the questionable date of 1189 painted on the side of the inn. A recent television documentary tested the three claimants and found that, while each has its own evidence, none can claim exclusivity. The Trip, while the oldest building and oldest location, was for most of its early life a brewery and not a public house. The Salutation sits on the oldest recognised public house site, but the current building is comparatively recent. The Bell, although not in such an antiquated location, does boast the oldest public house building. There is also conflicting information available: dendrochronology from roof timbers in the Salutation give a date for the building of c.1420 with similar dates for the Bell. Ultimately, the roots of the multiple claims can be traced to various subtleties of definition in terms such as public house and inn. An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... Front of Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem is one of the 20 public houses (including three in Nottingham) which claim to be the oldest drinking establishment in Great Britain. ... Old Market Square is an open town square in Nottingham, England, the largest such surviving in England, and forms the heart of the city of Nottingham. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The growth rings of an unknown tree species, at Bristol Zoo, England Pinus taeda Cross section showing annual rings, Cheraw, South Carolina Pine stump showing growth rings Dendrochronology or tree-ring dating is the method of scientific dating based on the analysis of tree-ring growth patterns. ... Pub redirects here. ... Inns are establishments where travellers can procure food, drink, and lodging. ...


Education

The University of Nottingham and Highfields Park
The University of Nottingham and Highfields Park

Despite a lot of investment, the closing of numerous schools and the opening of new city academies, Nottingham remains near the bottom of the league tables at both primary school and secondary school levels. At primary level, Nottingham was ranked second-worst overall in the country, at 149th out of 150 local authorities rated.[6] photo by me File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... photo by me File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... Mossbourne Community Academy, the controversial successor to Hackney Downs School. ... A primary school in Český Těšín, Czech Republic. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ...


At secondary level, Nottingham came third from bottom nationally in terms of GCSE results attained.[7] GCSE is an acronym that can refer to: General Certificate of Secondary Education global common subexpression elimination - an optimisation technique used by some compilers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The authority has instituted a plan for wide-sweeping reform of education across the city, but in many cases have been met with opposition from parents who say the planned changes are not in the best interests of education. Stanstead School, in the Rise Park area, successfully managed to prevent its planned closure, with the Independent Schools' Adjudicator finally ruling against the authority in February 2006.[8]


The decision, the first of its kind in the country, adds more weight to the campaigns of the many other schools attempting to prevent closure or amalgamation.[9][10][11]


Nottingham is home to two universities: the University of Nottingham and Nottingham Trent University (formerly Trent Polytechnic). Together they are attended by over 40,000 full-time students. The University of Nottingham's teaching hospital, Nottingham University Hospital, is the largest hospital in the UK. In October 2007 Unipol Student Homes opened an accommodation bureau in Nottingham to assist students at the two universities who were seeking to find accommodation in the private sector. For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... Arkwright Building Nottingham Trent University (NTU) is a university in Nottingham, England. ... Arkwright Building Nottingham Trent University (NTU) is a university in Nottingham, England. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... A Teaching hospital is a hospital which provides medical training. ...


Other notable educational institutions include the further education college New College Nottingham, Confetti Institute of Creative Technologies, Nottingham High School, Bilborough College, Nottingham High School for Girls, Chilwell Comprehensive School, The Nottingham Bluecoat School and Technology College, South Nottingham College, The Midlands Academy of Dance and Drama and Djanogly City Academy and Greenwood Dale Technology College. Nottingham is home and headquarters of the National College for School Leadership. New College Nottingham - or more often ncn - is a coalition of further education establishments in the city of Nottingham. ... Nottingham High School is a UK leading independent fee-paying boys public school situated about a mile north of Nottingham city centre. ... Bilborough College is a 6th form college in Bilborough, Nottingham, United Kingdom. ... Nottingham High School for Girls is a selective day school, founded in 1875, situated just north of Nottingham city centre. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... The Nottingham Bluecoat School and Technology College (TNBS) is a Church of England secondary school in Aspley, Nottingham, United Kingdom whose history dates back to 1706. ... Djanogly City Academy is a secondary school in Nottingham, UK. Djanogly City Academy website Categories: | | ... National College for School Leadership The National College for School Leadership was established in 2000. ...


The Nottingham School of Fashion is a fashion school respected around the country. The designer Paul Smith trained there. Sir Paul Smith, RDI, (born in Beeston, Nottingham on July 5, 1946) is an English fashion designer. ...


Nottingham is also where the Midlands Academy of Dance & Drama (commonly known as M.A.D.D.) is based. M.A.D.D. is one the UK's top musical theatre, performing arts colleges. It's studio's are based in Carlton.


Industry

Nottingham is home to the headquarters of many well-known companies. One of the best known is Boots the Chemists, founded in the city by Jesse Boot 1st Lord Trent in 1849 and substantially expanded by his son John Boot (2nd Lord Trent). Boots is the dominant pharmacist chain in the United Kingdom, with outlets in most high streets throughout the country. ... The Boots Company was founded by John Boot. ... John Boot (1815-1860) was the founder of Boots the Chemists born in Radcliffe on Trent in Nottinghamshire, England. ...

Part of the HMRC complex in Nottingham.
Part of the HMRC complex in Nottingham.

Other large current employers include the credit reference agency Experian, the energy company E.ON UK, the tobacco company John Player & Sons, betting company Gala Group, engineering company Siemens, sportswear manufacturers Speedo, high street opticians Vision Express, games and publishing company Games Workshop (creator of the popular Warhammer series), and the American credit card company Capital One, whose European offices are situated by the side of Nottingham station. Nottingham is also the home of HM Revenue and Customs and the Driving Standards Agency. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 289 pixelsFull resolution (923 × 334 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 289 pixelsFull resolution (923 × 334 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Experian is a global information solutions company, with operations in over 30 countries around the world, including the USA, UK, most European countries, Argentina, Brazil, South Africa, China, Japan and Australia. ... E.ON UK is an energy company in the United Kingdom, it is a subsiduary of the German utility giant E.ON. It was formed after the takeover of Powergen Plc by E.ON. It is a vertically integrated utility company with interests in electrical generation, electricity distribution in the... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... John Player founded his tobacco company in the mid-19th century in Nottingham, England. ... Gala Coral Group Ltd is a British betting shop, bingo and casino operator. ... Siemens redirects here. ... The Speedo boomerang logo Speedo is a swimsuit manufacturer that began on Bondi Beach near Sydney, Australia. ... Vision Express is a leading High Street optician in the United Kingdom, selling glasses and contact lenses. ... For the unrelated defunct American company, see Game Designers Workshop. ... For the tabletop games, see Warhammer Fantasy and Warhammer 40,000. ... Capital One Bank in Wake Village, Texas Capital One Financial Corp. ... History Nottingham station is the principal railway station in the city of Nottingham and the Greater Nottingham area. ... Her Majestys Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is a new department of the British Government created by the merger of the Inland Revenue and Her Majestys Customs and Excise which came into formal effect on 18 April 2005. ... The Driving Standards Agency (DSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT) and is part of the Driver, Vehicle and Operator (DVO) group. ...


Although Boots itself is no longer a research-based pharmaceutical company, a combination of former Boots researchers and university spin-off companies have spawned a thriving pharmaceutical/science/biotechnology sector. BioCity, the UK's biggest bioscience innovation and incubation centre, sits in the heart of the city and houses around thirty science-based companies. Other notable companies in the sector include ClinPhone and Pharmaceutical Profiles. The city has recently been made one of the UK's six Science Cities.


Until recently bicycle manufacturing was a major industry, the city being the birthplace of Raleigh Cycles in 1886 and later joined by Sturmey-Archer, the creator of 3-speed hub gears. However, Raleigh's factory on Triumph Road, famous as the location for the filming of Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, was demolished in Summer 2003 to make way for the University of Nottingham's expansion of Jubilee Campus. For other uses, see Bicycle (disambiguation). ... Raleigh is a British bicycle manufacturer based in Nottingham in central England. ... Sturmey-Archer is a manufacturing company from Nottingham, England. ... Saturday Night and Sunday Morning is a 1960 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Alan Sillitoe. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... Djanogly Learning Resource Centre, Jubilee Campus Jubilee Campus is a campus of the University of Nottingham, England. ...


Nottingham is also joint headquarters of Paul Smith, the high fashion house. Sir Paul Smith, RDI, (born in Beeston, Nottingham on July 5, 1946) is an English fashion designer. ...


Creative Industries are a target growth sector for the city [2] with graphic design, interiors and textile design being a particular focus. already many small design companies are establishing a base in the city with Jupiter and the multi-award winning Purple Circle being two of the higher profile consultancies. Nottingham City Council has recently announced that other target sectors include Financial and Business Services, Science and Technology, Public Sector and Retail and Leisure as part of their economic development strategy for the city. [3]


Ceramics manufacturer Mason Cash was founded and continues to have operations in Nottingham. Mason Cash & Co is a ceramics manufacturing company based in Nottingham, England, and is a part of The Tabletop Group. ...


The schools and aerial photographers, H Tempest Ltd were Nottingham-based for many years, until relocating to St. Ives (Cornwall) around 1960. A skeleton office remained for many years in the original building next to Mundella School.


Many of the UKs railway ticket machines and platform departure boards run software written by Atos Origin in their offices in Nottingham. Other major industries in the city include engineering, textiles, knitwear and electronics. An increasing number of software developers are located in Nottingham: Reuters and Monumental Games are based in the city, with Free Radical Design located in nearby Sandiacre and Serif Europe based between Wilford and Ruddington, south west of the Trent and east of Clifton. Atos Origin, SA (Euronext: ATO) is an international IT corporation which operates in more than 50 countries worldwide, with about 47,000 employees. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... Founded by three key people from Climax Online, this new development studio is dedicated to massively multiplayer online (MMO) middleware and games. ... Free Radical Design is a video game developer, based in Nottingham, England. ... , Sandiacre is a town in the Erewash district of Derbyshire, in England. ... This image of the Island of Sodor was produced using Serif DrawPlus Serif Europe Ltd. ... Wilford is a village close to the centre the city of Nottingham, UK, on the banks of the River Trent. ... Clifton may refer to: In United Kingdom geography: Clifton, Bedfordshire, a village and parish Clifton, Bristol, inner suburb of the English port city of Bristol Clifton, City of York, suburb of the unitary authority of the City of York Clifton, Cumbria, small linear village and civil parish 3 miles outside...


Nottingham is progressively changing from an industrial city to one based largely in the service sector. Tourism—particularly from the United States and the Far East—is becoming an increasingly significant part of the local economy.


In 2004 Nottingham had a GDP per capita of £24,238 (US$48,287, €35,529), which was the highest of any English city after London, and the fourth highest of any city of the UK, after London, Edinburgh and Belfast.[12] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ...

Economic trends
Year Regional Gross
Value Added (£m)
Agriculture
(£m)
Industry
(£m)
Services
(£m)
1995 4,149 2 1,292 2,855
2000 5,048 1 912 4,135
2003 5,796 - 967 4,828
source: Office for National Statistics

Shopping

The Exchange Arcade inside the Council House
The Exchange Arcade inside the Council House

In 2007, Nottingham was positioned fourth in the retail shopping league of England (CACI Retail Footprint 2007), behind London, Birmingham and Manchester, but ahead of Leeds, Liverpool, Southampton, Bluewater and Newcastle. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British city. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... , Bluewater interior This article is about a shopping mall. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ...


There are two main shopping centres in Nottingham: Victoria Centre and Westfield Broadmarsh. Work on redeveloping Westfield Broadmarsh at a cost of £400 million (creating 400 stores, 136,000m² of shopping space) is to start in 2008 although this could be offset by closures elsewhere in the city. Debenhams and Marks and Spencer are to be the anchors of the new centre, which will be open in 2011. Smaller shopping centres are the The Exchange Arcade, the Flying Horse Walk (once a famous hotel) and new developments in Trinity Square and The Pod. The new developments will increase the shopping sales area in the city centre by 28% to 4,300,000 square feet (399,000 m²). The Bridlesmith Gate area has numerous designer shops, and is the home of the original Paul Smith boutique. There are also various side streets and alleys that hide some interesting and often overlooked buildings and shops - streets such as Poultry Walk, West End Arcade and Hurts Yard. These are home to many specialist shops as is Derby Road, near the Cathedral and once the antiques area but now home to some the city's most interesting independent shops. For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see mall. ... Victoria Centre clock from upper mall The Victoria Centre is a large shopping mall in the city of Nottingham, UK. It has over 120 shops and is rated as one of the top 15 shopping malls in the UK. Its main host stores are John Lewis and House of Fraser... Debenhams plc (LSE: DEB) is a retailer with a chain of department stores based in the United Kingdom, and franchised stores in a number of other countries. ... Marks and Spencer plc (known also as M&S and sometimes colloquially as Marks and Sparks) is the largest retailer in the United Kingdom by sales. ... The Flying Horse Walk is an elegant shopping arcade located at the heart of Nottingham City Centre in Nottingham, England. ... Bridlesmith Gate is a street in Nottingham, it is often called Posh Mans alley due to its alley like appearance and the many expensive shops on the street. ... Paul Smith may refer to: In music: Paul Smith (music industry), British record label manager and art event producer Paul Smith (pianist) (born 1922), Los Angeles jazz pianist Paul Smith (singer), British Indie Rock In television: Paul Smith (Television) (born 1959), Executive for British childrens television Paul Smith (writer...


Nottingham has a number of department stores including the House of Fraser, John Lewis, and Debenhams. Hockley Village caters to alternative tastes with shops like Ice Nine and Void, famous across the city. The interior of a typical Macy*s department store. ... House of Fraser is a British department store group with 61 stores (July 2007) across the UK and Ireland. ... For the former (1856-1991) unrelated UK department store, see Lewiss. ... Debenhams plc (LSE: DEB) is a retailer with a chain of department stores based in the United Kingdom, and franchised stores in a number of other countries. ... For the hamlet in Ontario, Canada, see Hockley Village,Ontario A view of the Hockley area of Nottingham Hockley Village (or more commonly, just Hockley) is an area near the centre of Nottingham, UK, adjacent to the Lace Market. ...


Culture

Nottingham Playhouse and Cathedral reflected in Anish Kapoor's Sky Mirror
Nottingham Playhouse and Cathedral reflected in Anish Kapoor's Sky Mirror

Nottingham has two large-capacity theatres, the Nottingham Playhouse and the Theatre Royal (which together with the neighbouring Royal Concert Hall form the Royal Centre) and a smaller theatre space at the University of Nottingham's Lakeside Arts Centre. There are also several art galleries which often receive national attention, particularly the Nottingham Castle Museum, the Angel Row Gallery (attached to the main library), the University of Nottingham's Djanogly Gallery and Wollaton Park's Yard Gallery. The visual arts in Nottingham will be significantly enhanced in 2008 and 2009 by the opening of New Art Exchange and Centre for Contemporary Art Nottingham. In a new £13.9 million 3000 square metre building on the corner of High Pavement and Middle Hill designed by Caruso St John, CCAN will be one of the largest venues for exhibitions of contemporary art in the UK. Both of the city's universities also put on a wide range of theatre, music and art events open to the public throughout the year. 1000 Names, 1985 Anish Kapoor (originally Anish Neeraj Sen, born 1954) is a Turner Prize winning sculptor. ... Sky Mirror, Nottingham Sky Mirror, New York, as seen from Rockefeller Center Sky Mirror is a piece of public art commissioned by the Nottingham Playhouse from artist Anish Kapoor that stands outside the theatre in Wellington Circus, Nottingham. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... The Nottingham Playhouse is a theatre in Nottingham. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Looking north up Buchanan Street to the Royal Concert Hall The Glasgow Royal Concert Hall is a music auditorium in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England. ...

Nottingham Playhouse at the Albert Hall
Nottingham Playhouse at the Albert Hall

The city has several multiplex cinemas alongside two arthouse cinemas in Hockley. The independent cinemas are the Broadway Cinema, one of the major independent cinemas in the UK and Screen Room, which claims to be the world's smallest cinema (at just 21 seats). Broadway was redeveloped and expanded in 2006. Quentin Tarantino held the British premiere of Reservoir Dogs there in 1992. Art film is a film style that began as a European reaction to the classical Hollywood style of film making. ... For the hamlet in Ontario, Canada, see Hockley Village,Ontario A view of the Hockley area of Nottingham Hockley Village (or more commonly, just Hockley) is an area near the centre of Nottingham, UK, adjacent to the Lace Market. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an Academy Award- and Palme dOr-winning American film director, screenwriter and actor. ... For the video game based on the film, see Reservoir Dogs (video game). ...


There is a classical music scene, with long-established groups such as the city's Symphony Orchestra, Philharmonic Orchestra, Harmonic Society, Bach Choir, Early Music Group Musica Donum Dei and the Symphonic Wind Orchestra giving regular performances in the city.


The annual Goose Fair in October is always popular, being one of the largest fairs in the country. The Nottingham Goose Fair is an annual travelling fair held in Nottingham, UK, during the first week of October. ...


Nottingham won the Britain in Bloom competition, in the Large City category, in 1997, 2001, 2003 and 2007. It also won the Entente Florale Gold Award in 1998. Britain in Bloom is a horticultural competition in the United Kingdom. ... The Entente Florale is an international horticultural competition. ...


Nottingham is known for its large teenage alternative scene (rock, punk, emo etc.), the heartland of which is Old Market Square. Another focus for their activities is the Rock City concert venue. The Sumac Centre based in Forest Fields has for many years supported local upcoming musicians, artists and film makers, and a variety of campaign groups. This article is about the genre. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Look up emo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Old Market Square is an open town square in Nottingham, England, the largest such surviving in England, and forms the heart of the city of Nottingham. ... Simple Plan playing a gig at Rock City The crowd of the 2006 NME Awards Tour Rock City is a club in Nottingham, England that focuses on live rock music gigs. ... The Sumac Centre is an independent community and social centre in Nottingham, UK. It provides resources, meeting spaces and skills for groups and individuals campaigning for human rights, animal rights, the environment, peace and co-operation world-wide. ...


Nottingham has a strong grass roots "Do it yourself" music culture, and is very in touch with underground trends in modern music. Nottingham is renowned as one of the biggest cities supporting the Dubstep movement of dance music. It also has a strong DIY Punk and Indie/Folk scene based at venues such as The Old Angel Inn, The Rose of England and Lee Rosys Tea in Hockley. Dubstep is a genre of electronic dance music which has its roots in Londons early 2000s UK garage scene. ...


Tourism

Nottingham receives a considerable volume of tourism. Many visitors are attracted by Nottingham's nightlife and shops, by its history, and by the legend of Robin Hood, visiting Sherwood Forest, Nottingham Castle and The Tales of Robin Hood on Maid Marian Way. Popular history-based tourist attractions in central Nottingham include the Castle, City of Caves, Lace Market, The Galleries of Justice, and the City's ancient pubs. Tourist redirects here. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ... Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England. ... Logo of The Tales of Robin Hood, Nottingham The Tales of Robin Hood is an indoor visitor attraction and medieval banqueting centre which is located on Maid Marian Way in Nottingham, in the vicinity of Nottingham Castle. ... Logo of City of Caves, Nottingham City of Caves is an award-winning [1] visitor attraction in Nottingham which is accessed from the upper mall of the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre. ... The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ... Logo of The Galleries of Justice, Nottingham The Galleries of Justice is a museum and tourist attraction in the Lace Market area of Nottingham, England. ...


Parks and gardens include Wollaton Park (over 500 acres) near the University Highfields Park on the University of Nottingham campus, Colwick Park, which includes the racecourse, and the Nottingham Arboretum, Forest Recreation Ground and Victoria Park which are in or close to the city centre. Sherwood Forest, Rufford Country Park, Creswell Crags and Clumber Park are further away from the city itself. A new park is being developed in the city at the Eastside City development. Wollaton Hall in the late 18th century. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into The Arboretum, Nottingham. ... Forest Recreation Ground The Forest Recreation Ground is a recreation ground in Nottingham, England, about a mile north of the city centre. ... visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ... Rufford Abbey Rufford Abbey is an estate in Sherwood Forest in England. ... Map sources for Creswell Crags at grid reference SK536741 Creswell Crags is a limestone gorge on the Nottinghamshire-Derbyshire border, in the Midlands of England. ... Lime Tree Avenue The Gothic revival chapel at Clumber Park Clumber House from an old postcard. ...


Museums and galleries

  • Brewhouse Yard Museum, a museum of Nottingham Life
  • Centre for Contemporary Art Nottingham - under construction and due to open in 2008.
  • The Galleries of Justice - Museum of Law Trust based at the Shire Hall in the Lace Market
  • Green's Windmill and Science Centre
  • Nottingham Castle Museum and Art Gallery - home to the city’s Decorative Art and Fine Art collections, along with the Story of Nottingham galleries, and the Sherwood Foresters Regimental Museum
  • Nottingham Industrial Museum
  • Nottingham Museums of Costume and Textiles in Castlegate
  • Nottingham Natural History Museum - based at Wollaton Hall.
  • Nottingham Transport Heritage Centre in Ruddington is a museum of local transport. It has an eight mile (13 km) long railway where Heritage steam trains and Diesel locomotives are used on passenger runs, a classic Road Transport collection (mostly omnibuses) with many Nottingham assosiated vehicles to see, a miniature and model railway and many other things.

Logo of The Galleries of Justice, Nottingham The Galleries of Justice is a museum and tourist attraction in the Lace Market area of Nottingham, England. ... The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ... Greens Windmill Green’s Windmill is a restored and working 19th century tower windmill in Sneinton, Nottingham. ... Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England. ... Wollaton Hall in the late 18th century. ... Wollaton Hall in the late 18th century. ... The Nottingham Transport Heritage Centre is a museum of local transport history based at Ruddington in Nottinghamshire. ... Great Western Railway No. ... Parisian Omnibus, late nineteenth century Look up omnis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article needs cleanup. ...

Demographics

Nottingham embraces Multi-culturalism and is a modern British city with significant Black and Asian populations and is becoming increasingly more mixed as more immigrants arrive from Eastern Europe the Middle East and Africa. Multiculturalism or cultural pluralism is a policy, ideal, or reality that emphasizes the unique characteristics of different cultures in the world, especially as they relate to one another in immigrant receiving nations. ... This article is about the color. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Eastern Europe is a concept that lacks one precise definition. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Nottingham is also said to have a higher female-to-male ratio though this is disputed. The myth may be due to the large number of nurses at the Queen's Medical Centre. An alternative theory is that it dates back to heavy casualties suffered by a local pals battalion in the First World War.[citation needed] A welcome sign at the entrance This is about the hospital in the United Kingdom, for the hospital in Hawaiʻi, see Queens Medical Center The Queens Medical Centre (popularly known as QMC or Queens Med) situated in Nottingham (England) is the largest hospital in the UK... The Pals battalions of World War I were units of the British Army that consisted of men who had enlisted together at special local recruiting drives, with the promise that they would be able to serve alongside their friends, neighbours and work colleagues (Pals) rather than having to be mixed... WWI may be an acronym for: World War I World Wrestling Industry This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Nottingham also has on average over 50,000 full-time students studying across the two universities.[citation needed]


The influence of the ethnic groups can be seen with the widespread influence of Black and Jamaican culture on the different ethnicities in the city. Hyson Green is the most multi-religious and multi-racial part of the city with Radford Road being the hub of activity. Once home to the city's Black and Pakistani communities it is now becoming increasingly Middle Eastern in its makeup.[citation needed] This article is about the color. ... Jamaica is a country in the Caribbean Sea, located south of Cuba and to the west of Hispaniola, on which Haiti and the Dominican Republic are situated. ...


Entertainment

New Buildings on the South Side of the Lace Market area.
New Buildings on the South Side of the Lace Market area.

The 2,500-capacity Nottingham Royal Concert Hall and 9,500-capacity Nottingham Arena attract the biggest names in popular music. For less mainstream acts and a generally more intimate atmosphere, Nottingham has a selection of great smaller venues including Junktion 7, The Old Angel, the award-winning dedicated rock music venue Rock City and Rock City's compact sister venues The Rescue Rooms, The Bodega Social Club and Stealth. These venues, with their packed listings and close proximity, make Nottingham one of the centres of live popular music in the UK. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 367 KB) Summary New Developments near Nottingham Arena Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 367 KB) Summary New Developments near Nottingham Arena Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ... The logo of the Royal Concert Hall, Nottingham The Royal Concert Hall is part of Nottinghams Royal Centre, which also incorporates the Victorian Theatre Royal. ... The National Ice Centre is located in Nottingham, in the middle of England. ... This article is about the genre. ... Simple Plan playing a gig at Rock City The crowd of the 2006 NME Awards Tour Rock City is a club in Nottingham, England that focuses on live rock music gigs. ...


"Nottingham Playhouse" is the major producing theatre in the city including some new and innovative works. The Nottingham Playhouse is a theatre in Nottingham. ...


In the 1980s, Nottingham was barely mentioned in the Good Food Guide; but now there are several restaurant entries and a range of cuisine reflecting the ethnic diversity of the city. The Nottingham Restaurant Awards play a leading role in promoting the industry. The Good Food Guide is a guidebook to the best restaurants in the UK. The Good Food Guide was first published in 1951 by Raymond Postgate, an enthusiastic gourmet, who was appalled by the standard of contemporary catering. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ...


The large number of students in the city bolsters the night time entertainment scene. There are several well established areas of the city centre for entertainment such as Lace Market, Hockley, The Waterfront and The Corner House. The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ... For the hamlet in Ontario, Canada, see Hockley Village,Ontario A view of the Hockley area of Nottingham Hockley Village (or more commonly, just Hockley) is an area near the centre of Nottingham, UK, adjacent to the Lace Market. ... The Waterfront is a open air shopping center located in Homestead, Pennsylvania near Pittsburgh. ... The CornerHouse is a leading leisure complex in Nottingham, England. ...


Sport

Holme Pierrepont National Watersports Centre
Holme Pierrepont National Watersports Centre

Nottingham is home to two football teams: Nottingham Forest (promoted to the Football League Championship at the end of the 2007-08 season) (who under their most famous manager, the late Brian Clough, won the European Cup twice in succession) and Notts County (who play in Football League Two). Notably, these two stadia are the closest in England, divided by the River Trent. The latter is the oldest professional Football League team in the UK, and indeed the world, having been founded in 1862 - a year before the establishment of the Football Association. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,304 × 1,728 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,304 × 1,728 pixels, file size: 1. ... The City Ground is a football stadium in West Bridgford, Nottinghamshire, England, on the banks of the River Trent. ... For other uses see Trent River. ... Download high resolution version (1043x695, 174 KB)View of the Holme Pierrepont National Watersports Centre. ... Download high resolution version (1043x695, 174 KB)View of the Holme Pierrepont National Watersports Centre. ... A view of the Sports Centre across the rowing lake The Holme Pierrepont National Watersports Centre is located in the village of Holme Pierrepont near Nottingham, England and on the River Trent. ... Soccer redirects here. ... This article is about the English football club. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... For the writer, see Bryan Clough. ... Champions League Logo The UEFA Champions League is an annual international inter-club football competition between Europes most successful clubs, regarded as the most prestigious club trophy in the sport. ... Notts County Football Club is a football club based in Nottingham, England, and are the oldest of all the clubs that are now professional[1]. The team currently plays in Football League Two, of the Coca-Cola league section of the English football league system. ... Football League Two (often referred to as League Two for short or Coca-Cola Football League 2 for sponsorship reasons) is the third-highest division of The Football League and fourth-highest division overall in the English football league system. ... For other uses see Trent River. ...


Trent Bridge cricket ground, located across the river in West Bridgford, Rushcliffe, is the home of Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club, who were winners of the 2005 County Championship and runners-up in the 2006 Twenty20 cup competition. Trent Bridge is a major venue for international Test matches, and also hosts other important cricketing events such as the Twenty20 cup finals and regular one-day international games. The ground, which has won architectural awards for the design of some of its newer stands, also houses a cricket academy, a hotel, and a gym, and also uniquely features not one, but two public houses built within the ground itself. For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ... This article is about the sport. ... , West Bridgford is a leafy suburb of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Rushcliffe is a local government district with borough status in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county of Nottinghamshire. ... Twenty20 is a form of cricket, originally introduced in the United Kingdom for professional inter-county competition by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), in 2003. ... For the womens version of the game, see Womens Test cricket. ...


All three famous sports venues are within sight of each other even though the River Trent separates Trent Bridge and Forest's stadium (known as the City Ground and near the cricket ground) from Notts County's ground, Meadow Lane. As a curiosity Meadow Lane is actually in the City of Nottingham and the City Ground is in the County of Nottingham, the river forming the boundary. Forest should not be confused with 'The Forest', which is an open green space where the Goose Fair (see above) is held; however, the team take their name from this open space, having been founded there in 1865. This makes Forest the third oldest team in the league. For other uses see Trent River. ... The City Ground is a football stadium in West Bridgford, Nottinghamshire, England, on the banks of the River Trent. ... The Meadow Lane Stadium is the home stadium of Notts County football club. ... This article is about the English city. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ...

The National Ice Centre and Trent FM Arena Nottingham

The National Ice Centre, a large ice skating rink; the city's links to ice skating can be traced back to arguably its most famous children of recent times, Olympic ice dancing champions Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean who collected a unanimous 6.0 score at the 1984 Winter Olympics at Sarajevo. The NIC is used as a training and competition venue for speed skating, sledge hockey and figure skating and receives an annual grant from bodies such as Sport England to maintain and fund these sports. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 603 KB) Summary The National Ice Centre Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nottingham Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 603 KB) Summary The National Ice Centre Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nottingham Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... The National Ice Centre is located in Nottingham, in the middle of England. ... Outdoor ice skating in Austria Ice skating is travelling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices moulded into special boots (or, more primitively, without boots, tied to regular footwear). ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Ice dancers Albena Denkova and Maxim Staviski. ... Jayne Torvill (born October 7, 1957, Nottingham, United Kingdom) is a British figure skater who won a gold medal in ice dancing at the 1984 Winter Olympics with her skating partner Christopher Dean and a bronze medal at the 1994 Winter Olympics. ... Christopher Colin Dean (born July 22, 1958 in Nottingham, Great Britain) is a British figure skater who won a gold medal in ice dancing at the 1984 Winter Olympics with his skating partner Jayne Torvill. ... The 1984 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1984 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Yugoslavia. ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... Speed skating, or long track speedskating, long track speed skating, is an Olympic sport where competitors are timed while crossing a set distance. ... Ice Hockey Sledge Sledge hockey is a sport that was designed to allow participants who have a physical disability to play the game of ice hockey. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... Sport England logo Sport England (formerly the English Sports Council) is the body responsible for distributing funds and providing strategic guidance for sporting activity in England. ...


The NIC is the home of the Nottingham Panthers ice hockey team, founded in 1946 and the current holders of the Challenge Cup. There is a thriving junior ice hockey programme which is also based at the centre. Since 2001, Nottingham has been the host city of the annual ice hockey Play-Off Championship Finals weekend, which attracts fans from many different parts of the country. Also calling the NIC home is the Nottingham North Stars recreational ice hockey team. Founded in 1989 North Stars are one of the oldest recreational clubs in the country. The Nottingham Panthers (for sponsorship reasons officially referred to as the GMB Nottingham Panthers) are an ice hockey club based in Nottingham, England. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Challenge Cup is a cup competition contested between members of the Elite Ice Hockey League in the United Kingdom. ...


The city's rugby union side, Nottingham R.F.C. are currently based at a new venue in West Bridgford near the City Ground, and play their league matches at Meadow Lane. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Nottingham Rugby Football Club are a rugby union club representing Nottingham currently playing in Beeston on the outskirts of the city. ... , West Bridgford is a leafy suburb of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ...


There is a large tennis centre, where the annual Nottingham Open is held in the weeks immediately prior to Wimbledon and has been used as warm-up practice by various tennis stars. Nottingham Tennis Centre is Nottinghams premier tennis venue and one of the largest of its kind in the country. ... Red Letter Days Open (previously known as Samsung Open, Nottingham Open and 10tele. ... Wimbledon logo The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as simply Wimbledon, is the oldest and arguably most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ...

Trent Bridge cricket ground.

The National Water Sports Centre is based at Holme Pierrepont, with a 2000 m regatta lake for rowing, canoeing and sailing, and a white water slalom canoe course fed from the river. A number of other sailing, rowing and canoeing clubs are also based along the River Trent, as is the boatbuilder Raymond Sims. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A view of the Sports Centre across the rowing lake The Holme Pierrepont National Watersports Centre is located in the village of Holme Pierrepont near Nottingham, England and on the River Trent. ... Holme Pierrepont is a hamlet located south of the city of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ... A regatta is a boat race or series of boat races. ... Look up rowing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Canoeing is the recreational or sporting activity of paddling a canoe or kayak. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ...


Every year since 1981 Nottingham has played host to the 'Robin Hood Marathon' taking in many of the city's historic and scenic sights. The race is run alongside a half marathon and a fun run among other events and is widely considered to be the second best marathon in the UK. The Nottingham Robin Hood Marathon, is a race in Nottingham, England held every year since 1981. ... In athletics, a half marathon is a race over half the distance of a marathon, i. ... For the event, see Fun run. ...


Motorcycle speedway racing was staged in Nottingham before the Second World War. The original venue known as Olympic Speedway was redeveloped by the building of the White City stadium which also featured speedway. A book by Philip Dalling, published by Tempus Publishing, chronicles speedway events in Nottingham. For a short spell in the 1980s the promotion based at Long Eaton raced under the Nottingham Speedway banner and the team was known as Nottingham Outlaws. Motorcycle speedway, normally referred to as Speedway, is a motorcycle sport that involves usually 4 and sometimes up to 6 riders competing over 4 laps of an oval circuit. ... This article is about a town in England. ...


Transport

Road

Nottingham is close to the M1 motorway and major roads the A52 and the A46. To the west of Nottingham through to Derby, the A52 is known as Brian Clough Way. The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... The A52 is a major road in England. ... The A46 is a trunk road in England. ... The A52 is a major road in England. ... For the writer, see Bryan Clough. ...

Ferris Wheel in Old Market Square
Ferris Wheel in Old Market Square

Air

East Midlands Airport in Leicestershire, served by low-cost international airlines, makes the city easily accessible from other parts of the world providing daily services to many principal European destinations such as Paris, Frankfurt, Berlin, and Amsterdam, internal flights to Edinburgh and Belfast and limited services to trans-continental destinations such as Barbados, Mexico, Sanford and Florida. Nearby Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield also provides domestic European and Trans-Atlantic services. Birmingham International airport is about one hour's drive away and 2 hours 15 minutes on the train, providing flights to most principal European cities, New York, Boston, Toronto, Montreal, Dubai and the Indian sub-continent. East Midlands Airport[1] (IATA: EMA, ICAO: EGNX) is an airport in the East Midlands of England, near Castle Donington in Leicestershire. ... An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... Sanford is the name of several places in the United States of America: Sanford, Florida Sanford, Maine Sanford, Michigan Sanford, New York Sanford, North Carolina Sanford is also a company that manufactures the Sharpie marker. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield (IATA: DSA, ICAO: EGCN) is an international airport located at the former RAF Finningley airbase in Finningley, South Yorkshire, England. ... Birmingham International Airport (IATA: BHX, ICAO: EGBB) is a major airport located 5. ... This article is about the state. ... Boston redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Location of Dubai in the UAE Coordinates: , Country Emirate Dubai Incorporated (town) June 9, 1833 Incorporated (emirate) December 2, 1971 Founder Maktoum bin Bati bin Suhail (1833) Seat Dubai Subdivisions Towns and villages Jebel Ali Hatta Al Hunaiwah Al Aweer Al Hajarain Al Lusayli Al Marqab Al Shindagha Al Faq... The Indian subcontinent is the peninsular region of larger South Asia in which the nations of India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka as well as parts of Nepal, Bhutan, Myanmar and some disputed territory currently controlled by China are located. ...


Rail

Nottingham is served by rail services operated by East Midlands Mainline from Nottingham railway station to London, CrossCountry and local services by East Midlands Connect. For other uses, see Train (disambiguation). ... Norwich will be at the eastern tip of the franchise area. ... Nottingham station is the principal railway station in the city of Nottingham, England, and the Greater Nottingham area. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about CrossCountry trains. ... Norwich will be at the eastern tip of the franchise area. ...


The re-opening of the Robin Hood Line to passengers rather than just freight, between 1993 and 1998 linked Nottingham with its close neighbours of Hucknall, Mansfield, Kirkby-in-Ashfield and Sutton-in-Ashfield. Other lines connect the city to Beeston, Burton Joyce, Netherfield and Carlton. Nottingham has direct services to London, Leeds, Birmingham, Leicester, Lincoln, Manchester, Sheffield, Liverpool and Norwich as well as many other conurbations. The Robin Hood Line is a railway line running from Nottingham to Worksop, Nottinghamshire. ... Hucknall, formerly known as Hucknall Torkard, is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, in the district of Ashfield. ... , For other uses, see Mansfield (disambiguation). ... Kirkby-in-Ashfield is a market town and a notable victim of that serial killer of British communities, Margaret Thatcher, in Nottinghamshire, England, with a population of 25,265 (according to the 2001 National Census). ... Sutton-in-Ashfield open air market (Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays) Sutton-in-Ashfield is a town in the Ashfield district of Nottinghamshire, England, with a population of around 40,000. ... Beeston is a town in the county of Nottinghamshire, England some 3 miles (5 km) south west of the centre of Nottingham. ... Burton Joyce is a large village and civil parish in the Gedling district of Nottinghamshire. ... Netherfield, is a small town 3 miles east of Nottingham. ... Location within the British Isles Carlton is a suburb to the east of the city of Nottingham. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British city. ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... Lincoln (pronounced //) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ...


From 11 November 2007 Midland Mainline and Central Trains services in Nottingham were combined into a new franchise, East Midlands Trains, with the exception of the Nottingham to Cardiff services which are now operated by CrossCountry. is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the train operating company Midland Mainline Railway. ... Central Trains rolling stock at Liverpool Lime Street railway station Central Trains is a train operating company in the United Kingdom, running local and long-distance services in central England. ... Norwich will be at the eastern tip of the franchise area. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about CrossCountry trains. ...


Also, from the December 2008 timetable change, Nottingham will be served by an hourly express from Leeds, operated by Northern Rail. This service will serve Nottingham, Chesterfield, Dronfield, Sheffield, Meadowhall, Barnsley, Wakefield Kirkgate and Leeds. For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... Northern Rail, usually known as Northern (and sometimes incorrectly called Northern Trains), is a train operating company, that has operated local passenger services in the north of England since 2004. ... This article is about the English town. ... Dronfield is a town in northeast Derbyshire, England // Situated between Sheffield and Chesterfield on the River Drone, Dronfield lies on the B6057 (Chesterfield Road and Sheffield Road). ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... Meadowhall Interchange is a railway station, Sheffield Supertram stop, and bus station located in the north of Sheffield, South Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Barnsley (disambiguation). ... Pacer DMU at Wakefield Kirkgate platform one. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ...


Nottingham railway station is the last survivor of a once much larger rail network around Nottingham. At one time Nottingham was served by four other railway stations, Nottingham station is the principal railway station in the city of Nottingham, England, and the Greater Nottingham area. ...

  • Nottingham Victoria Station (closed 1967)
  • Nottingham Arkwight Street (Closed 1969)
  • Nottingham London Road High Level (closed 1969)
  • Nottingham London Road Low Level (closed 1948)
See also: Nottingham's Tunnels

Nottingham Victoria railway station was a Great Central Railway and Great Northern Railway railway station in Nottingham, England. ... // Four Railway Companies built lines in and around Nottingham, England. ...

Light rail

Nottingham Express Transit a light rail system opened in 2004, running from Hucknall in the north to the city's railway station. An additional spur to/from Phoenix Park serves as a Park and Ride Station close to the M1 motorway (Junction 26). See National Park and Ride Directory for details. Phase 2 development of the system will add two new lines to the southern suburbs of Wilford and Clifton and western suburbs of Beeston and Chilwell to create a three-line network. Nottingham Express Transit (or in short NET) is a light-rail tramway in the Nottingham area in England. ... Hucknall, formerly known as Hucknall Torkard, is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, in the district of Ashfield. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street Station in 1865. ... a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ... The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ...


Buses

Nottingham is bucking the national trend, as bus use in the city is growing and employment rates are rising.[13] This is a result of the city council, as well as the two principal operators, Nottingham City Transport (NCT) and Trent Barton, making multi-million-pound investments in some of the newest fleets in the country. NCT was also the first transport operator in the UK to use RFID technology for its EasyRider bus passes, introduced in 2000. The two operators are also frequent winners of the National Bus Operator of the Year award. Also new LocalBus services operated by Premiere Travel. Autobus redirects here. ... Nottingham City Transport is Nottingham, East Midlands in Englands major bus operator, running a comprehensive network of services in the Nottingham City area and a handful of services beyond the boundaries of the conurbanation to Southwell, Newark, Loughborough, and Nottingham East Midlands Airport. ... trent barton is the result of merging Derbyshires Trent Buses with Nottinghamshires Barton. ... An EPC RFID tag used for Wal-Mart Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. ... The EasyRider card is a contactless smartcard introduced in 2000 in Nottingham, for use on Nottingham City Transport Services. ...


Crime

Nottingham is served by Nottinghamshire Police and has a Crown Court and Magistrates' Court. Nottinghamshire Police is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the shire county of Nottinghamshire and the unitary authority of Nottingham in the East Midlands of England. ...


In 2000 - 2003 the press and other media claimed Nottingham was the 'gun-crime capital of the UK', although by 2007 the BBC reported that the number of shootings in the City had fallen from 51 (in 2003) to 13 (in 2006).[14] In January 2008, however, it was reported that gun crime in the city had risen for a second consecutive year with a 50% increase in gun crime during 2007.[15] The incidence of many crimes in Nottingham is several times higher than the English average.[16] A 2006 crime survey[citation needed] stated that Nottingham topped the crime rankings for police statistics on murders, burglaries, and vehicle crime, and "had almost five times the level of crime as the safest town in the rankings". The survey was condemned as inaccurate by Nottingham City Council and Nottinghamshire Police[17] due largely to the use of out of date (2001) population figures, and The University of Nottingham argued that the way in which statistics such as these are calculated is severely flawed, and if the population of the entire conurbation were taken into account instead of just the centre of the city then a more accurate picture would be revealed.[18] A revised survey based on 2004 population estimates, however, appears to back up the original rankings.[19] In 2007 a property focused TV programme named Nottingham as the 4th worst city to live in, stating the city has "loads of good aspects but crime lets it down".[20] Interestingly the same programme also ranked the neighbouring Nottinghamshire borough of Rushcliffe, which contains suburbs of Greater Nottingham, among the best 20 places to live in the UK.[21] Nottingham City Council is the city council for the unitary authority of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire. ... Nottinghamshire Police is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the shire county of Nottinghamshire and the unitary authority of Nottingham in the East Midlands of England. ... Rushcliffe is a local government district with borough status in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Greater Nottingham is the surrounding conurbation of the city of Nottingham. ...


While the crime figures in the city are high, initiatives introduced to tackle the levels of crime appear to be having an effect, with a 2006 Home Office survey showing that the overall level of crime in the city is down by 12% since 2003.[22] Initiatives include the Community and Neighbourhood Protection Service developed by Nottingham City Council, Nottinghamshire Police and Nottingham City Homes to take an uncompromising stance to anti-social behaviour.[23] It comprises Community Protection Officers (CPOs), Police Officers, Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs) and Anti-Social Behaviour Officers who work with internal and external agencies to reduce anti-social behaviour and the fear of crime. Nottingham City Council is the city council for the unitary authority of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire. ... Nottinghamshire Police is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the shire county of Nottinghamshire and the unitary authority of Nottingham in the East Midlands of England. ... Anti-social behaviour (which can be spelled with or without the hyphen) is often seen as public behaviour that lacks judgement and consideration for others and may cause them or their property damage. ...


Community Protection Officers (also known as City Wardens) highly visible in their bright yellow stab vests, are accredited by the Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire Police to issue Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) for littering and are employed to tackle other anti-social behaviour.


Religion

In Nottingham one can find places of worship for all the major world religions, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism and Taoism. The Nottingham Inter-faith Council works to make connections between faith groups and show the wider public the importance of spiritual aspects of life and the contribution faith groups make to the community. Download high resolution version (700x736, 71 KB)Nottingham Cathedral, taken by me 20/04/2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (700x736, 71 KB)Nottingham Cathedral, taken by me 20/04/2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Cathedral Church of St. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... Taoism (pronounced or ; also spelled Daoism) refers to a variety of related philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ...


The Roman Catholic Cathedral of St. Barnabas on Derby Road was designed by the architect Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, it was consecrated in 1844 and is the cathedral church for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Nottingham established in 1850 which covers Nottinghamshire (except Bassetlaw District), Leicestershire, Derbyshire (except Chesterfield and parts of the High Peak), Rutland and Lincolnshire (pre-1974 boundaries). The Cathedral Church of St. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English architect and designer, 1812–1852. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... The Diocese of Nottingham is a Roman Catholic diocese which covers covers an area of 13,074 km², taking in the counties of Nottinghamshire (excluding the district of Bassetlaw), Leicestershire, Derbyshire (excluding the High Peak and Chesterfield districts) and North Lincolnshire. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Bassetlaw is the northernmost district of Nottinghamshire, England, with a population according to the 2001 UK census of 107,713. ... Leicestershire ( IPA: (RP), IPA: (locally)), abbreviation Leics. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... This article is about the English town. ... Oakham Castle Rutland is traditionally Englands smallest county and is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire, northeast by Lincolnshire, and southeast by Northamptonshire. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ...

St. Mary the Virgin also known as St. Mary's in the Lace Market
St. Mary the Virgin also known as St. Mary's in the Lace Market

Nottingham has three historic Anglican parish churches all of which date back to mediæval times. St. Mary the Virgin, in the Lace Market, a member of the Greater Churches Group is the oldest foundation (dating from the eighth or ninth centuries) but the building is at least the third on the site dating from 1377 to 1485. St. Mary's is considered the mother church of the city and civic services are held here, including the welcome to the new Lord Mayor of Nottingham each year. St.Peter's in the heart of the city is the oldest building in continuous use in Nottingham, with traces of building starting in 1180. St. Nicholas' was rebuilt after destruction in the Civil War. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 690 KB) St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 690 KB) St. ... The Church of St Mary the Virgin is the oldest religious foundation in the City of Nottingham, England, and is also the largest church after the Roman Catholic Cathedral. ... The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... A parish church is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish, the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Church of St Mary the Virgin is the oldest religious foundation in the City of Nottingham, England, and is also the largest church after the Roman Catholic Cathedral. ... The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ... The Greater Churches Group is a self help organisation within the Church of England. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Unitarian Chapel on High Pavement, now the Pitcher and Piano public house
Unitarian Chapel on High Pavement, now the Pitcher and Piano public house

Non-conformism was strong from the 17th century onwards[citation needed] and a variety of chapels and meeting rooms proliferated throughout the town. Sadly many of these grand buildings have been demolished, including Halifax Place Chapel, but some have been re-used, notably High Pavement Chapel which is now a public house. The offices of the Congregational Federation are in Nottingham. Image File history File links Armslttingham. ... Image File history File links Armslttingham. ... A nonconformist is an English or Welsh Protestant of any non-Anglican denomination, chiefly advocating religious liberty. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... The Congregational Federation is a Federation (or Association or Union) of independent Congregational churches in England, Scotland and Wales. ...


The Christian Centre is a Pentecostal church located in the centre of Nottingham. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ...


William Booth, the founder of the Salvation Army, was born in Nottingham in 1829. For other persons named William Booth, see William Booth (disambiguation). ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organisation. ...


Media

East Midlands BBC Broadcast Centre : London Road Island

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 607 KB) Summary BBC Island Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nottingham Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 607 KB) Summary BBC Island Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nottingham Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or...

Television

The BBC has its East Midlands headquarters in Nottingham on London Road. BBC East Midlands Today is broadcast from the city every weeknight at 6:30. Central Television the ITV region for the East Midlands until recently broadcast regional news from the city, but has now been moved to Birmingham. This decision was controversial and although a petition was set up to try to stop it, the TV studios were shut down in early 2005. Central News still keep a news bureau outside of the city at Chilwell, though. The former studios were purchased by the University of Nottingham to accommodate their administrative departments. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... BBC East Midlands is the BBC English Region covering Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, most of Derbyshire and parts of western and southern Lincolnshire. ... The BBC East Midlands Today ident BBC East Midlands Today is the BBCs regional television news programme for the east midlands region, which is comprises Derbyshire, Leicestershire, southern Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire and Rutland (note this is different to the political East Midlands region). ... Central TV logo, 1985_1998 Central Independent Television, or to give it its familiar name, Central Television or Central, is a British Independent Television company that took over from ATV on 1 January 1982. ... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British city. ... Chilwell is a suburb of Greater Nottingham, in the Broxtowe district of Nottinghamshire, west of Nottingham proper. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ...


Radio

The Nottingham area is served by four licenced commercial radio stations (though all broadcast to a wider area than the city), three community radio stations, one student station broadcasting on a Low powered AM Restricted Service Licence and a BBC local radio station.


Nottingham is the home of Trent FM, a commercial radio station in Nottinghamshire, which is licensed to broadcast to Nottingham and Mansfield. The old building that housed Trent FM until 2007 was a converted Victorian Hospital which connects to the underground network of caves. Many famous presenters have been employed at Trent FM (formerly Radio Trent), including Dale Winton, Kid Jensen, John Peters and Penny Smith. The station is also the home of the award-winning Jo and Twiggy. Trent FM is a commercial radio station which broadcasts from Nottingham in the United Kingdom. ... Dale Winton (born 22 May 1955 in London) is an English radio DJ and television presenter. ... David Kid Jensen (July 4, 1950 in Victoria, British Columbia) is a Canadian-born British radio DJ. // After beginning his career in his home country at the age of sixteen playing jazz and classical music, Kid Jensen joined Radio Luxembourg at the age of eighteen in 1968. ... John Peters (Born 19?? in Ashford, Kent) is a British disc jockey and long established personality in the East Midlands region. ... Penny Smith Lets see how quickly some sad Wikipedia editor sitting alone in their sad little bedroom, takes to remove this! Wankers! Penny Smith (born 3rd January 1965 in Rutland, England), is a television presenter best known for her work on the breakfast TV show GMTV. She has previously...


The other professional radio stations broadcast from the city are BBC Radio Nottingham (BBC Radio Five Live's Simon Mayo appeared on this station and was the rival to Trent's Dale Winton), Gold (formerlyClassic Gold GEM), and the East Midlands' regional stations Heart 106 (formerly Century FM) and 106.6 Smooth Radio (formerly Saga 106.6 fm). Heart 106 has its headquarters in the same business park as the BBC, while Trent FM's (and Classic Gold GEM's) building is on the other side of the Nottingham City Centre near Nottingham castle. BBC Radio Nottingham is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Nottinghamshire. ... BBC Radio Five Live is the BBCs radio service providing live BBC News, phone-ins, and sports commentaries. ... Simon Mayo (born 21st September 1958 in Southgate, London) is one of the most recognised and respected voices of radio in the UK, currently presenting a daily afternoon programme on BBC Radio Five Live. ... Classic Gold GEM Categories: United Kingdom broadcasting stubs | Radio stations in the United Kingdom ... Heart 106 is a regional radio station broadcasting to the East Midlands. ... Century FM is the name of a number of UK regional radio stations mostly owned by GCap Media. ... 106. ... City Centre is a Local Government ward in the City of Manchester. ... The article is about the German novel by Franz Kafka. ...


Student Radio is broadcast in the city permanently by URN (University Radio Nottingham). URN has won many awards for quality and which is broadcast on medium wave (AM) around the main campus (University Park) at 1350 kHz and from Sutton Bonnigton campus on 1602 kHz. It is also streamed over the Internet at www.urn1350.net. Logo for URN / Student Radio for Nottingham University Radio Nottingham (branded as URN / Student Radio for Nottingham) is the university radio station of the University of Nottingham, England, where it is part of the Students Union. ...


There are also three community radio stations serving the city; Faza FM on 97.1FM is aimed at Asian Women and their families and has been broadcasting since 2002; Dawn FM on 107.6FM used to share its broadcast hours with Faza, but in 2006 became a separate service in its own right - broadcasting news, current affairs and music of relevance to the Asian (specifically Islamic) community within the city; Kemet Radio on 97.5 broadcasts urban music while also serving the Afro-Caribbean community. Prior to its launch in 2007 such programming had only been available on pirate radio stations Unique 106.3 (later 107.3) and 107.9 Switch FM (later Freeze FM, networked with the London pirate of the same name), both of which appear to have ceased broadcasts as of late 2006. Faza FM is a community radio station in the United Kingdom. ... Dawn FM is a community radio station in the United Kingdom. ...


Newspapers

Nottingham has one daily newspaper, the Evening Post. There are also a number of weekly/monthly publications available which focus on individual areas around the city, for instance the Hucknall and Bulwell Dispatch. The Nottingham Evening Post is an English tabloid newspaper which serves Nottingham, Nottinghamshire and some parts of Derbyshire such as Long Eaton and Sandiacre. ...


There is also a local culture and listings magazine available free from many sites around the city called LeftLion. A listings magazine is a magazine which contains information about the upcoming weeks events such as TV Listings, Music, Clubs, Theatre and Film information, examples include Time Out magazine in the UK. These are normally published either with a Saturday or Sunday newspaper or are published weekly to give information... LeftLion is an underground listings magazine which covers Nottingham, with a specific focus on the local music scene. ...


Alternative media

Community news project Nottinghamshire Indymedia, which was set up in April 2005, works within a variety of groups to create community media and collaboration between communities throughout the county. At the centre of the project is an online news site, which is run on the principles of open publishing. Open publishing is a process of creating news or other content that is transparent to the readers. ...


Geography

Nottingham is located at 52°58′00″N, 01°10′00″W (52.9667,-1.1667).


The City of Nottingham boundaries are tightly drawn and exclude several suburbs and satellite towns that are usually considered part of Greater Nottingham, including Arnold, Carlton, West Bridgford, Beeston and Stapleford. Outlying towns and villages include Hucknall, Eastwood, Tollerton, Ruddington, Ilkeston and Long Eaton of which the last two are in Derbyshire. The geographical area of Greater Nottingham includes several local authorities: Gedling, Broxtowe, Rushcliffe, Ashfield, Erewash and Amber Valley. “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Greater Nottingham is the surrounding conurbation of the city of Nottingham. ... Arnold is a town near Nottingham, England. ... Location within the British Isles Carlton is a suburb to the east of the city of Nottingham. ... West Bridgford is a leafy suburb of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Beeston is a town in the county of Nottinghamshire, England some 3 miles (5 km) south west of the centre of Nottingham. ... Stapleford is a town in the county of Nottinghamshire, England some 6 miles (10km) west of the centre of Nottingham. ... Hucknall, formerly known as Hucknall Torkard, is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, in the district of Ashfield. ... Arms of the former Eastwood Urban District Council Eastwood is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, six miles west of Nottingham. ... Tollerton is a village situated in Rushcliffe just to the south of Nottingham, United Kingdom. ... Ruddington is an English village situated five miles south of Nottingham in the Borough of Rushcliffe. ... Ilkeston is a town in Derbyshire, in the East Midlands region of England, on the River Erewash. ... This article is about a town in England. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Gedling is a local government district with borough status in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Broxtowe is a local government district with borough status in Nottinghamshire, England, west of the city of Nottingham. ... Rushcliffe is a local government district with borough status in Nottinghamshire, England. ... This article is about the district in England, for the area in Sydney, Australia, see Ashfield, New South Wales. ... Erewash is a local government district and borough in Derbyshire, England, to the east of Derby. ... Amber Valley is a local government district and borough in Derbyshire, England. ...

Destinations from NOTTINGHAM
Sheffield Arnold, Hucknall, Mansfield
 
Gedling, Newark-on-Trent
University of Nottingham, Beeston, Stapleford, Ilkeston, Wollaton, Derby
N
W E
S
Carlton, Grantham
Long Eaton, Tamworth, Birmingham West Bridgford, Edwalton, Leicester
 
Melton Mowbray, Oakham
Districts within Nottinghamshire
Image:Nottinghamshire Ceremonial Numbered.png
1 Rushcliffe
2 Broxtowe
3 Ashfield
4 Gedling
5 Newark and Sherwood
6 Mansfield
7 Bassetlaw
8 Nottingham

For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... Arnold is a town near Nottingham, England. ... Hucknall, formerly known as Hucknall Torkard, is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, in the district of Ashfield. ... , For other uses, see Mansfield (disambiguation). ... Gedling is a local government district with borough status in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Newark (also Newark-on-Trent) is a town in Nottinghamshire, located on the River Trent. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... Beeston is a town in the county of Nottinghamshire, England some 3 miles (5 km) south west of the centre of Nottingham. ... Stapleford is a town in the county of Nottinghamshire, England some 6 miles (10km) west of the centre of Nottingham. ... Ilkeston is a town in Derbyshire, in the East Midlands region of England, on the River Erewash. ... Wollaton (often mistakenly spelt Woolaton) is an area in the west of the City of Nottingham, England. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Location within the British Isles Carlton is a suburb to the east of the city of Nottingham. ... Grantham is a medium sized market town in Lincolnshire, England with about 35,000 inhabitants (40,000 including Great Gonerby), situated on the River Witham. ... This article is about a town in England. ... For other places named Tamworth, see Tamworth (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British city. ... , West Bridgford is a leafy suburb of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Edwalton is a prestigious suburb to the south of Nottingham, attached and conjoined to [[West Bridgford and Gamston. ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... , Melton Mowbray (known locally as Melton) is a town within the Melton borough of Leicestershire, England. ... Arms of Rutland County Council Oakham is the county town of Rutland, England. ... This is a list of settlements in the ceremonial county of Nottinghamshire, England. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Image File history File links Districts in the Ceremonial County of Nottinghamshire. ... Rushcliffe is a local government district with borough status in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Broxtowe is a local government district with borough status in Nottinghamshire, England, west of the city of Nottingham. ... This article is about the district in England, for the area in Sydney, Australia, see Ashfield, New South Wales. ... Gedling is a local government district with borough status in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Newark and Sherwood is a local government district of eastern Nottinghamshire, England. ... Mansfield is a local government district in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Bassetlaw is the northernmost district of Nottinghamshire, England, with a population according to the 2001 UK census of 107,713. ...

Within the City of Nottingham

The Arboretum is a residential area of the City of Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, England. ... Aspley is a suburb of the city of Nottingham. ... Bakersfield is a small suburb of Nottingham situated east of the city. ... Bulwell is an English market town which lies approximately 4. ... Basford is a suburb on the north side of Nottingham. ... Carrington is a small suburb of Nottingham. ... The Clifton Estate was owned by the Clifton family (who resided at Clifton Hall). ... Colwick is a suburb in the east of Greater Nottingham in England. ... Dunkirk is a residential of Nottingham which is located to the south of the University of Nottingham and the Queens Medical Centre. ... Forest Fields is an innercity area of the City of Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, England. ... For the hamlet in Ontario, Canada, see Hockley Village,Ontario A view of the Hockley area of Nottingham Hockley Village (or more commonly, just Hockley) is an area near the centre of Nottingham, UK, adjacent to the Lace Market. ... Hyson Green is a small but lively area located to the north-west of Nottingham City. ... The Lace Market is an historic quarter-mile square area of Nottingham, UK. Once the heart of the world lace industry, with many impressive examples of 18th Century industrial architecture, it is a protected heritage area. ... Lenton is an area of the City of Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, England. ... Lenton Abbey is a place in Nottingham, in the Wollaton East and Lenton Abbey ward of Nottingham City Council. ... Locally Mapperley (top) is used to describe the collection of shops running along Woodborough Road in Nottinghamshire roughly 3 miles from the Nottingham City centre. ... Mapperley is a north-eastern suburb and commercial area of Nottingham, England. ... Locally Mapperley (top) is used to describe the collection of shops running along Woodborough Road in Nottinghamshire roughly 3 miles from the Nottingham City centre. ... View of City Centre skyline from Victoria Embankment Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem, reputedly the oldest pub in England Street in Nottingham City Centres Lace Market Nottingham City Centre is the central area of Nottingham, and the Greater Nottingham conurbation as a whole. ... The Park Estate is a residential estate in Nottingham, England that was built in what was once the deer park belonging to Nottingham Castle. ... Radford is an area of Nottingham. ... Sherwood is a residential area of Nottingham, England. ... Sneinton (pronounced Snenton) is a north-eastern suburb of Nottingham, England. ... Strelley is the name of a village and civil parish to the west of Nottingham. ... Top Valley is an area of Nottingham. ... Wilford is a village close to the centre the city of Nottingham, UK, on the banks of the River Trent. ... Wollaton (often mistakenly spelt Woolaton) is an area in the west of the City of Nottingham, England. ...

Around the City of Nottingham

Arnold is a town near Nottingham, England. ... Beeston is a town in the county of Nottinghamshire, England some 3 miles (5 km) south west of the centre of Nottingham. ... Bingham is a market town in the Rushcliffe borough of Nottinghamshire, England. ... Bulcote is a village and civil parish in the Newark and Sherwood district of Nottinghamshire, England. ... Burton Joyce is a large village and civil parish in the Gedling district of Nottinghamshire. ... Location within the British Isles Carlton is a suburb to the east of the city of Nottingham. ... Chilwell is a suburb of Greater Nottingham, in the Broxtowe district of Nottinghamshire, west of Nottingham proper. ... Arms of the former Eastwood Urban District Council Eastwood is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, six miles west of Nottingham. ... Edwalton is a prestigious suburb to the south of Nottingham, attached and conjoined to [[West Bridgford and Gamston. ... Gedling is a village is Nottinghamshire, England, that is now a suburb of Greater Nottingham. ... Holme Pierrepont is a hamlet located south of the city of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Hucknall, formerly known as Hucknall Torkard, is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, in the district of Ashfield. ... Ilkeston is a town in Derbyshire, in the East Midlands region of England, on the River Erewash. ... Kimberley is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, lying immediately northwest of Nottingham. ... Kirkby-in-Ashfield is a market town and a notable victim of that serial killer of British communities, Margaret Thatcher, in Nottinghamshire, England, with a population of 25,265 (according to the 2001 National Census). ... This article is about a town in England. ... This page is about the town of Mansfield in England. ... Netherfield, is a small town 3 miles east of Nottingham. ... Nuthall is a village located in Nottinghamshire, England, neighbouring Kimberley, Cinderhill and Basford. ... Redhill is a small community adjacent to the much larger town of Arnold in the county of Nottinghamshire. ... Ruddington is an English village situated five miles south of Nottingham in the Borough of Rushcliffe. ... , Sandiacre is a town in the Erewash district of Derbyshire, in England. ... Stapleford is a town in the county of Nottinghamshire, England some 6 miles (10km) west of the centre of Nottingham. ... Toton is a small town in Nottinghamshire, located southwest of Nottingham. ... Trowell is a village and civil parish in Nottinghamshire, England. ... West Bridgford is a leafy suburb of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Woodthorpe is a suburban area of Arnold, Nottinghamshire. ...

Twin cities

Nottingham is twinned with the following cities:[24] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

The county of Nottinghamshire is twinned with Poznań, Poland. Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... This article is about the Belgian city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... Motto: Pamberi Nekushandria Vanhu (Forward with Service to the People) Map of Zimbabwe showing the location of Harare. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Karlsruhe (population 285,812 in 2006) is a city in the south west of Germany, in the Bundesland Baden-Württemberg, located near the French-German border. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Location in Slovenia Coordinates: , Country Founded AD 15 (as Colonia Iulia Aemona) Government  - Mayor and governor Zoran Janković (Lista Zorana Jankovića) Area  - Total 275. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Ningbo (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ning-po; literally Tranquil Waves) is a seaport sub-provincial city with a population of 1,219,900 in northeastern Zhejiang province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina PoznaÅ„ Established 8th century City Rights 1253 Government  - Mayor Ryszard Grobelny Area  - City 261. ...


Notable people

Main article: List of people from Nottingham

List of Mayors and Lord Mayors

This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

The Sheriff of Nottingham

Main article: Sheriff of Nottingham

The Sheriff of Nottingham was historically the office responsible for enforcing law and order in Nottingham and bringing criminals to justice. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/dissemination/LeadTableView.do?a=3&b=276829&c=nottingham&d=13&e=13&g=395722&i=1001x1003x1004&m=0&r=1&s=1206563790122&enc=1&dsFamilyId=1812
  2. ^ Graham Pointer (2005). The UK's major urban areas. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  3. ^ Nottingham's Council House - The Dome.
  4. ^ A P Nicholson (9 May 2003). Meaning and Origin of the Words. Shire and County. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  5. ^ Relationships / unit history of NOTTINGHAM. A Vision of Britain Through Time. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  6. ^ How different areas performed. BBC News (5 December 2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  7. ^ How different areas performed. BBC News (19 January 2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  8. ^ Welcome to Stanstead Primary School Website. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  9. ^ Threatened school vows to fight. BBC News (10 February 2005). Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  10. ^ Save Special Needs Schools. Action Network (4 May 2004). Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  11. ^ Anushka Asthana (25 June 2006). Single-sex schools 'no benefit for girls'. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  12. ^ Sub-regional: Gross value added1 (GVA) at current basic prices. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  13. ^ Report on Comparable Medium Sized Cities. The Commission for Integrated Transport (March 2005). Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  14. ^ Slight rise in shootings in city. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  15. ^ City sees new rise in shootings. BBC (January 2008). Retrieved on 04 January 2008.
  16. ^ Crime figures for 2005/2006. UpMyStreet. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  17. ^ Rebuttal of reform's urban crimes ranking report. Nottingham City Council. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  18. ^ Nottingham Life - NOT Capital for Crime. The University of Nottingham (May 2006). Retrieved on 2008-01-12.
  19. ^ Blair Gibbs & Andrew Haldenby (July 2006). Urban crime rankings. Reform. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  20. ^ Worst 20 Places to Live in the UK from Location, Location, Location.
  21. ^ Best 20 Places to Live in the UK from Location, Location, Location.
  22. ^ Some facts about crime in Nottinghamshire. Nottingham City Council (July 2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  23. ^ Community and Neighbourhood Protection Service. Nottingham City Council. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  24. ^ International Partner Cities. Nottingham City Council. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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