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Encyclopedia > Notre Dame de Paris
Notre Dame de Paris: Western Façade
Notre Dame de Paris: Western Façade
Notre Dame de Paris: Flying Buttress

Notre Dame de Paris, known simply as Notre Dame in English (pronounced /nɔtʀə dam/ in French, /nɒtrə dɑːm/ in the UK and /nɔtər deɪm/ in the US), is a Gothic cathedral on the eastern half of the Île de la Cité in Paris, France, with its main entrance to the west. It is still used as a Roman Catholic cathedral and is the seat of the Archbishop of Paris. Notre Dame de Paris is widely considered one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture. It was restored and saved from destruction by Viollet-le-Duc, one of France's most famous architects. The name Notre Dame means "Our Lady" in French. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 1024 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 1024 pixel, file size: 1. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Notre Dame de Paris on ÃŽle de la Cité from upstream (the east) The ÃŽle de la Cité, one of two islands in the Seine (the other being ÃŽle Saint-Louis), in the centre of Paris and the location where the medieval city was refounded. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The archbishop of Paris is one of twenty-three archbishops in France. ... Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc (Paris, January 27, 1814 - Lausanne 1879) was a French architect, famous for his restorations of medieval buildings. ...


Notre Dame de Paris was one of the first Gothic cathedrals, and its construction spanned the Gothic period. Its sculptures and stained glass show the heavy influence of naturalism, giving them a more secular look that was lacking from earlier Romanesque architecture. Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... Naturalism in art refers to the depiction of realistic objects in a natural setting. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ...


Notre Dame de Paris was among the first buildings in the world to use the flying buttress. The building was not originally designed to include the flying buttresses around the choir and nave. After the construction began and the thinner walls (popularized in the Gothic style) grew ever higher, stress fractures began to occur as the walls pushed outward. So, naturally, the cathedral's architects built supports around the outside walls and later additions continued as such. Flying buttresses at Bath Abbey, Bath, England. ... The choir stalls in the quire of Bristol Cathedral, Bristol, England A quire is the area of a church where the choir sits, also known as the choir. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ...


The cathedral suffered desecration during the radical phase of the French Revolution in the 1790s, when much of its religious imagery was damaged or destroyed. During the 19th century, an extensive restoration project was completed, returning the cathedral to its previous state. Desecration is the ninth book in the Left Behind series. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...

Contents

Construction

Façade, showing the Portal of the Virgin, Portal of the Last Judgement and Portal of St-Anne.
Façade, showing the Portal of the Virgin, Portal of the Last Judgement and Portal of St-Anne.

In 1160, because the church in Paris had become the "parish church of the kings of Europe", Bishop Maurice de Sully deemed the current Parisian cathedral unworthy of its lofty role, and had it demolished shortly after he assumed the title of Bishop of Paris. According to legend, de Sully had a vision of a glorious new cathedral for Paris, and sketched it in the dirt outside of the original church. To begin the construction, the bishop had several houses demolished and had a new road built in order to transport materials for the new church. Maurice de Sully (died September 11, 1196) was Bishop of Paris from 1160 until his death. ... The archbishop of Paris is one of twenty-three archbishops in France. ...

The cathedral illuminated at night.
The cathedral illuminated at night.

Construction began in 1163, during the reign of Louis VII, and opinion differs as to whether Maurice de Sully or Pope Alexander III laid the foundation stone of the cathedral. However, both were at the ceremony in question. Bishop de Sully went on to devote most of his life and wealth to the cathedral's construction. Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Pope Alexander III (c. ...


Construction of the west front, with its distinctive two towers, began circa 1200, before the nave had been completed, contrary to normal construction practice. Over the construction period, numerous architects worked on the site, as is evidenced by the differing styles at different heights of the west front and towers. Between 1210 and 1220, the fourth architect oversaw the construction of the level with the rose window and the great halls beneath the towers. The towers were completed around 1245, and the cathedral was completed around 1345. Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ...


Dimensions

  • 41 m in width
  • 43 m in height until the base of the turns
  • 63 m at the top of the turns

Timeline of construction

  • 1160 Maurice de Sully (named Bishop of Paris), orders the original cathedral to be demolished.
  • 1163 Cornerstone laid for Notre Dame de Paris — construction begins.
  • 1182 Apse and choir completed.
  • 1196 Nave completed. Bishop de Sully dies.
  • 1200 Work begins on western façade.
  • 1225 Western façade completed.
  • 1250 Western towers and north rose window completed.
  • 1250 – 1345 Remaining elements completed.

During the Paris Commune in 1871, the cathedral was nearly burned by the Communards — some accounts suggest that indeed a huge mound of chairs was set on fire in its interior. Whatever happened, Notre Dame survived the Commune essentially unscathed. It was a horrible day but they were relieved that everybody was safe. Maurice de Sully (died September 11, 1196) was Bishop of Paris from 1160 until his death. ... Look up cornerstone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about an architectural feature; for the astronomical term see apsis. ... The choir stalls in the quire of Bristol Cathedral, Bristol, England The choir stalls at Buxheim Priory, by Ignaz Waibl See also: Choir (disambiguation) The choir (sometimes referred to as the quire) is the area of a church or cathedral, usually in the western part of the chancel between the... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... Le Père Duchesne looking at the statue of Napoleon I on top of the Vendome column: Eh ben ! bougre de canaille, on va donc te foutre en bas comme ta crapule de neveu !… (Well now! buggering rascal, we will knock you the fuck off just like your crook of... Communards killed in 1871. ...


The organ

The cathedral by night
The cathedral by night

Though several organs were installed in the cathedral over time, the earliest ones were inadequate to the building. The first noteworthy organ was finished in the early 1700s by the noted builder Clicquot. Some of Clicquot's original pipework in the pedal division continues to sound from the organ today, almost 270 years after being installed. The organ was almost completely rebuilt and expanded in the nineteenth century by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll. The position of titular organist at Notre-Dame is considered as one of the most prestigious organist posts in France, along with the titulaire post of Saint Sulpice in Paris, Cavaillé-Coll's largest instrument. The organ has 7800 pipes with 900 classified as historical. The organ has 109 stops, five 56-key manuals and a 32-key pedalboard. In December 1992 work was completed on the organ that fully computerized the organ under 3 LANs (Local Area Networks). Among the best-known organists at Notre Dame was Louis Vierne, who held this position from 1900 to 1937. Under his tenure, the Cavaillé-Coll organ was modified in its tonal character, notably in 1902 and 1932. Pierre Cochereau initiated further alterations (many of which were already planned by Louis Vierne), including the electrification of the action between 1959 and 1963 (the original Cavaillé-Coll console, which can still be seen at the organ loft as a tribute to Louis Vierne, was replaced by a new console in Anglo-American style) and the addition of further stops between 1965 and 1972, notably in the pedal division, the recomposition of the mixture stops, and finally the adding of three horizontal reed stops "en chamade". After Cochereau's sudden death in 1984, four new titular organists were appointed at Notre Dame in 1985: Jean-Pierre Leguay, Olivier Latry, Yves Devernay (who died in 1990), and Philippe Lefévre. This was reminiscent of the eighteenth century practice of the cathedral having four titular organists, each one playing for three months of the year. Beginning in 1989, another restoration to the instrument was undertaken, which was completed in 1992. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2319x1749, 1330 KB) If you use this image outside of the Wikimedia projects, Id be happy to hear from you. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2319x1749, 1330 KB) If you use this image outside of the Wikimedia projects, Id be happy to hear from you. ... The baroque organ in Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by forcing pressurized air (referred to as wind) through a series of pipes. ... Aristide Cavaillé-Coll His grave in Montparnasse Cemetery, Paris Aristide Cavaillé-Coll (February 4, 1811–October 13, 1899) was a French organ builder. ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ... The interior of the Church Saint-Sulpice () is a famous Parisian church on the east side of the Place Saint-Sulpice, in the Luxembourg Quarter of the VIe arrondissement. ... A manual is a keyboard designed to be played with the hands on a pipe organ, harpsichord, clavichord, electronic organ, or synthesizer. ... The 30-note pedalboard of a Rieger organ with expression pedal and coupler switches. ... LAN redirects here. ... Organists are those who play the organ, whether pipe or electronic. ... Louis Victor Jules Vierne, (October 8, 1870–June 2, 1937) was a French organist and composer. ... Pierre Eugène Charles Cochereau (July 9, 1924–March 5, 1984), was a French organist, improviser, composer, and pedagogue. ... En Chamade (French: to sound a parley) refers to powerfully voiced reed stops in a pipe organ that are mounted horizontally rather than vertically in the front of the organ case, projecting out into the church. ...

Alterations, vandalism, and restorations

In 1548, rioting Huguenots damaged features of the cathedral, considering them idolatrous. During the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV, the cathedral underwent major alterations as part of an ongoing attempt to modernize cathedrals throughout Europe. Tombs and stained glass windows were destroyed. The north and south rose windows were spared this fate, however. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Idolatry is a major sin in the Abrahamic religions regarding image. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ...


In 1793, during the French Revolution, the cathedral was rededicated to the Cult of Reason, and then to the Cult of the Supreme Being. During this time, many of the treasures of the cathedral were either destroyed or plundered. The statues of biblical kings of Judea (erroneously thought to be kings of France) were beheaded. Many of the heads were found during a 1977 excavation nearby and are on display at the Musée de Cluny. For a time, Lady Liberty replaced the Virgin Mary on several altars. The cathedral's great bells managed to avoid being melted down. The cathedral also came to be used as a warehouse for the storage of food. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... This article was a word for word copy of an entry in the Rotten Library here ... The Cult of the Supreme Being was a religion based on deism created by Maximilien Robespierre, intended to become the state religion after the French Revolution. ... The Musée de Cluny as viewed from the nearby park The Lady and the Unicorn tapestry Thermes de Cluny: caldarium The Musée de Cluny, officially known as Musée National du Moyen Âge, is a museum in Paris, France. ... Liberty (also known as Lady Liberty or the Goddess of Liberty) personifies liberty and freedom, particularly popular in the United States. ...

Sculpture from the restoration program
Sculpture from the restoration program

A restoration program was initiated in 1845, overseen by architects Jean-Baptiste-Antoine Lassus and Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. The restoration lasted 25 years and included the construction of a flèche (a type of spire) as well as the addition of the chimeras on the Galerie des Chimères. Viollet le Duc always signed his work with a bat, the wing structure of which most resembles the gothic vault (see Roquetaillade castle). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 582 pixelsFull resolution (1706 × 1241 pixel, file size: 386 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 582 pixelsFull resolution (1706 × 1241 pixel, file size: 386 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... View of Notre Dame showing its flèche A flèche (from the French for arrow) is used in French architecture to refer to a spire and in English to refer to a lead-covered timber spire. ... A modern spire on the Lancaster University Chaplaincy Centre A spire is a tapering conical or pyramidal structure on the top of a building, particularly a church tower. ... Gargoyles redirects here. ... Roquetaillade castle Built in 1306 by Pope Clement Vth, with the permission of King Edward II, Roquetaillade is still lived in by the same family for over 700 years. ...


In 1871, a civil uprising leading to the establishment of the short-lived Paris Commune nearly set fire to the cathedral, and some records suggest that a mound of chairs within the cathedral was set alight. Le Père Duchesne looking at the statue of Napoleon I on top of the Vendome column: Eh ben ! bougre de canaille, on va donc te foutre en bas comme ta crapule de neveu !… (Well now! buggering rascal, we will knock you the fuck off just like your crook of...


In 1939, it was feared that German bombers could destroy the windows; as a result, on September 11, 1939, they were removed. They were restored at the end of the war. is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1991, a major program of maintenance and restoration was initiated, which was intended to last 10 years but is still in progress as of 2008, the cleaning and restoration of old sculptures being an exceedingly delicate matter.


The bells

There are five bells at Notre Dame. The great bourdon bell, Emmanuel, is located in the South Tower, weighs just over 13 tons, and is tolled to mark the hours of the day and for various occasions and services. There are four additional bells on wheels in the North Tower, which are swing chimed. These bells are rung for various services and festivals. The bells were once rung manually but are currently rung by electric motors. The bells also have external hammers for tune playing from a small clavier.


Significant events at Notre Dame

The cathedral from the dining room of La Tour d'Argent.
The cathedral from the dining room of La Tour d'Argent.

The cathedral is renowned for its Lent sermons founded by the famous Dominican Jean-Baptiste Henri Lacordaire in the 1840s. In recent years however an increasing number have been given by leading public figures and state-employed academics. Many of their audience however are foreigners and as such obliged to a devoir de réserve. Heraclius of Caesarea (died 1191) was archbishop of Caesarea and Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem. ... The Third Crusade (1189–1192), also known as the Kings Crusade, was an attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin. ... For other uses, see Crown of Thorns (disambiguation). ... Louis IX (25 April 1215 – 25 August 1270), commonly Saint Louis, was King of France from 1226 to his death. ... La Sainte-Chapelle (French for The Holy Chapel) is a Gothic chapel on the Ile de la Cité in the heart of Paris, France. ... Philippe IV, recumbent statue on his tomb, Royal Necropolis, Saint Denis Basilica Philip IV (French: Philippe IV; 1268–November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... In France under the Ancien Regime, the States-General or Estates-General (French: états généraux), was a legislative assembly (see The States) of the different classes (or estates) of French subjects. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1431 was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... no changes . ... The house where Isabelle Romée raised Joan of Arc. ... For other uses, see Joan of Arc (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Heresy (disambiguation). ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... Coat of Arms of the Dauphins of France. ... Francis II (French: François II) (January 19, 1544 – December 5, 1560) was a King of France (1559 – 1560). ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... By Frans Pourbus the younger. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... For other persons named Marguerite de Valois, see Marguerite de Valois (disambiguation). ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Bonaparte as general, by Antoine-Jean Gros. ... Pope Pius VII, OSB (August 14, 1740—August 20, 1823), born Barnaba Niccolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti, was Bishop of Rome and Pope of the Catholic Church from March 14, 1800 to August 20, 1823. ... Joséphine de Beauharnais (nee Marie Josèphe Rose Tascher de la Pagerie June 23, 1763 – May 29, 1814) was the first wife of Napoléon Bonaparte and thus the first Empress of the French. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Joan of Arc (disambiguation). ... This article is about the process of declaring saints. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louis Victor Jules Vierne, (October 8, 1870–June 2, 1937) was a French organist and composer. ... Charles-Marie Jean Albert Widor (February 21, 1844 – March 12, 1937) was a French organist, composer and teacher. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Te Deum is an early Christian hymn of praise. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... Combatants Free French Forces French Resistance Germany Commanders Philippe Leclerc Raymond Dronne Henri Rol-Tanguy Jacques Chaban-Delmas Dietrich von Choltitz # Strength 2nd Armoured Division, French resistance 20,000 Casualties 1,500 dead French resistance 71 dead, 225 wounded Free French Forces[1] 3,200 dead, 12,800 POW The... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Requiem (from the Latin requiés, rest) or Requiem Mass (informally, the funeral Mass), also known formally (in Latin) as the Missa pro defunctis or Missa defunctorum, is a liturgical service of the Roman Catholic Church as well as the Anglican/ Episcopalian High Church and certain Lutheran Churches in... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Charles de Gaulle (disambiguation). ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The Visitation in the Book of Hours of the Duc of Berry For the David and the Giants album, see Magnificat (album) The Magnificat (also known as the Song of Mary) is a canticle frequently sung (or said) liturgically in Christian church services. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... Parvise or Parvis may refer to: A room over the porch of a church—quite often found in Norman churches in England. ... The Requiem (from the Latin requiés, rest) or Requiem Mass (informally, the funeral Mass), also known formally (in Latin) as the Missa pro defunctis or Missa defunctorum, is a liturgical service of the Roman Catholic Church as well as the Anglican/ Episcopalian High Church and certain Lutheran Churches in... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... François Maurice Adrien Marie Mitterrand (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996;   pronunciation?) was a French politician and President of France from May 1981, re-elected in 1988, until 1995. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Requiem (from the Latin requiés, rest) or Requiem Mass (informally, the funeral Mass), also known formally (in Latin) as the Missa pro defunctis or Missa defunctorum, is a liturgical service of the Roman Catholic Church as well as the Anglican/ Episcopalian High Church and certain Lutheran Churches in... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... Jean-Marie Lustiger (French pronunciation: ; September 17, 1926 – August 5, 2007)[1] [2] was a French prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... Emeritus (IPA pronunciation: or ) is an adjective that is used in the title of a retired professor, bishop or other professional. ... La Tour dArgent (The Silver Tower) is a restaurant in Paris, France over 400 years old. ... For other uses, see Lent (disambiguation). ... Portrait of Henri Jean-Baptiste Henri Lacordaire, father Henri-Dominique Lacordaire, born 12 May 1802 at Recey-sur-Ource (Côte-dOr), died 21 November 1861 à Sorèze (Tarn), was a French ecclesiastic, preacher, journalist and poltical activist. ...


Miscellaneous trivia

Notre Dame digital art work
Notre Dame digital art work
The stone marking point zéro
The stone marking point zéro
  • France's "Point zéro", the reference point for distances along the highways starting in Paris, is situated in the square in front of the cathedral. Tradition holds that tourists who stand on Point zéro will one day return to Paris.
View of Notre Dame from Petit Pont
View of Notre Dame from Petit Pont

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1174 KB) I made this drawing of Notre Dame and then modified it with Digital Art programs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1174 KB) I made this drawing of Notre Dame and then modified it with Digital Art programs. ... The first page of the bill, as brought before the Chambre des Députés in 1905 On 9 December 1905, a law was passed in France separating the church and the state. ... Image File history File links Notre_dame-kilometer-zero. ... Image File history File links Notre_dame-kilometer-zero. ... Kilometre Zero of French national highways, located in Paris on the square facing the main entrance of Notre Dame cathedral, and considered the official center of the city of Paris. ...

Notre Dame de Paris in the media

  • During the early 19th century, the cathedral was in a state of disrepair, and city planners began to contemplate tearing it down. French novelist Victor Hugo, an admirer of the cathedral, wrote his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame (titled in French Notre Dame de Paris) in part to raise awareness of the cathedral's heritage, which sparked renewed interest in the cathedral's fate. A campaign to collect funds to save the cathedral followed, culminating in the 1845 restorations.
  • The cathedral was featured in the film Before Sunset.
  • In the video game Onimusha 3: Demon Siege, feudal era Japanese samurai Samanosuke Akechi visited Notre Dame and gained his second Oni-Weapon in this saga: Kuugatou (Nodachi), after being flung into the future. However, the cathedral was infested with demons and apparently underground is a complex filled with an arcane presence and design.
  • The videogame Timesplitters 2 contained a level set entirely within Notre Dame, although it does not appear to scale or to have any elaborate architectural similarity.
  • The cathedral can be built as a monument in Sim City 3000.
  • The cathedral can be built as a world wonder in Civilization IV.
  • The cathedral appears in the film Amélie.
  • The cathedral is featured in the television miniseries Band of Brothers, in the episode Crossroads.
  • The cathedral is shown in the film Van Helsing.
  • The cathedral is shown in the 1963 film "Charade"
  • The cathedral is shown in the Disney animated film The Hunchback of Notre Dame, based on Victor Hugo's book. The main character of this movie is Quasimodo, who is voiced by Tom Hulce.
  • The cathedral appears in the animated film Ratatouille.
  • The cathedral also appears in the animated movie by Nickelodeon (tv channel), Rugrats in Paris: The Movie.
  • It is seen in Midnight Club II
Notre Dame de Paris is a prominent landmark on the Île de la Cité
Notre Dame de Paris is a prominent landmark on the Île de la Cité

Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... The Hunchback of Notre Dame (original French title, Notre-Dame de Paris) is an 1831 French novel written by Victor Hugo. ... Before Sunset (2004), is the sequel to Before Sunrise (1995). ... Namcos Pac-Man is one of the most popular video games ever made. ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ... Samanosuke Akechi Hidemitsu Samanosuke Akechi (alias, Nankobo Tenkai, Red Onimusha) is the main protagonist for Onimusha: Warlords and Onimusha 3: Demon Siege, and a supporting character for Onimusha: Dawn of Dreams. ... A nodachi ) is a large two-handed Japanese sword. ... Esotericism refers to knowledge suitable only for the advanced, privileged, or initiated, as opposed to exoteric knowledge, which is public. ... TimeSplitters 2 is a first-person shooter video game that is available for the PlayStation 2, Xbox, and Nintendo GameCube game consoles. ... A SimCity 4 high-rise SimCity is a real-time strategy/simulation computer game (or software toy). It is game developer Maxis flagship product. ... Sid Meiers Civilization IV (Civilization IV or Civ4) is a turn-based strategy computer game released in 2005 and developed by lead designer Soren Johnson under the direction of Sid Meier and Meiers studio Firaxis Games. ... For other uses, see Amélie (disambiguation). ... Band of Brothers is an acclaimed 10-part television World War II miniseries based on the book of the same title written by historian and biographer Stephen Ambrose. ... Crossroads is the 5th episode of Band of Brothers. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... Charade is a 1963 film written by Peter Stone and Marc Behm, directed by Stanley Donen, and starring Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn. ... The Hunchback of Notre Dame (also known as The Bells of Notre Dame in some countries) is a 1996 animated feature produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released to theaters on June 21, 1996 by Walt Disney Pictures. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... For other uses, see Ratatouille (disambiguation). ... This article is about the TV channel. ... For the racing series, see Midnight Club Midnight Club II is the first sequel to Midnight Club: Street Racing, published for the Xbox, PC, and PlayStation 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3500x1477, 1489 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Notre Dame de Paris Île de la Cité Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates/Île de la Cit... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3500x1477, 1489 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Notre Dame de Paris Île de la Cité Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates/Île de la Cit...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Paris is among the cities hosting the most skyscrapers in Europe: as of 2006 there are twelve skyscrapers with roof height above 150 meters (492 feet) and two more under construction (compared to 9 such skyscrapers in London, 9 in Frankfurt, 6 in Moscow, and 6 in Istanbul). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Flying buttresses at Bath Abbey, Bath, England. ... Gabriel delivering the Annunciation to Mary. ... Maîtrise Notre Dame de Paris is a noted pre-college music school situated in Paris, France. ...

References

  • Jacobs, Jay, ed. The Horizon Book of Great Cathedrals. New York, New York: American Heritage Publishing, 1968.
  • Janson, H.W. History of Art. 3rd Edition. New York, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1986.
  • Myers, Bernard S. Art and Civilization. New York, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1957.
  • Michelin Travel Publications. The Green Guide Paris. Hertfordshire, UK: Michelin Travel Publications, 2003.
  • Tonazzi, Pascal. Florilège de Notre-Dame de Paris (anthologie), Editions Arléa, Paris, 2007, ISBN 2869597959

Harry N. Abrams, Inc. ... The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. ...

External links

  • Notre Dame de Paris is at coordinates 48°51′11″N 2°20′59″E / 48.8530, 2.3498 (Notre Dame de Paris)Coordinates: 48°51′11″N 2°20′59″E / 48.8530, 2.3498 (Notre Dame de Paris)

Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Paris. ... This article is about the monument in Paris. ... The Sacré-CÅ“ur Basilica (French: Basilique du Sacré-CÅ“ur, Basilica of the Sacred Heart) is a Roman Catholic basilica and popular landmark in Paris, France, dedicated to the Sacred Heart. ... Centre Georges Pompidou (constructed 1971–1977 and known as the Pompidou Centre in English) is a complex in the Beaubourg area of the IVe arrondissement of Paris, near Les Halles and the Marais. ... The Champs-Élysées (pronounced  ) is the most prestigious and broadest avenue in Paris. ... The Palais de Justice, the Conciergerie and the Tour de lHorloge, after 1858 - by Adrien Dauzats The Conciergerie (French: La Conciergerie) is a former prison in Paris, located on the west of the ÃŽle de la Cité, near the Cathedral of Notre-Dame. ... The Eiffel Tower (French: , ) is an iron tower built on the Champ de Mars beside the Seine River in Paris. ... Grand Palais in 2004 The Grand Palais (Grand Palace) is a large glass exhibition hall that was built for the Paris Exhibition of 1900. ... People relaxing in front of the Luxembourg Palace The Jardin du Luxembourg (familiar nickname Luco) is a 224,500 m² public park and the largest in the city located in the 6th arrondissement of Paris, France. ... The church at the Invalides Les Invalides in Paris, France consists of a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the buildings original purpose. ... This article is about the museum. ... Vincent Van Gogh: Starry Night Over the Rhone, painted in September 1888 at Arles Pierre-Auguste Renoir: Bal au moulin de la Galette, Montmartre, 1876 Édouard Manet: The Luncheon on the Grass, 1862-3 Gustave Courbet: The Artists Studio (detail), 1855 Paul Cézanne: Apples and Oranges, circa 1899... The Palais Garnier, Paris The Palais Garnier, also known as the Opéra de Paris as well as the Opéra Garnier, is a 2,200 seat opera house in Paris, France. ... Looking down the hill at Père-Lachaise. ... Image File history File links Paris-metropolitan-area-symbol. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Notre Dame de Paris Historic Overview - Earthlore Exploations Gothic Dreams Feature (2713 words)
The majority of material used in Notre Dame was taken from nearby quarries.
Vista of Notre Dame from the Southwest -
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Paris: culture, students, travel information, tips, Paris (542 words)
Although Notre Dame is known for its sublime balance, there are all sorts of minor anomalies as the French love nothing better than to mess with things.
The Archeological Crypt of the Parvis of Notre-Dame was erected by the city of Paris in order to house the (Gallo-Roman to 19th century) vestiges discovered during the excavation undertaken in 1965 by the "Direction des Antiquites historiques de I'Ile de France" (M. Fleury, director) and the "Commission du Vieux Paris".
Paris was born on the "Ile de la Cite", at the intersection of a waterway and road.
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