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Encyclopedia > Not the Nine O'Clock News
Not the Nine O'Clock News

DVD cover
Genre Sketch comedy
Starring Rowan Atkinson
Pamela Stephenson
Mel Smith
Griff Rhys Jones
Chris Langham
Country of origin UK
No. of episodes 27
Production
Running time 25 min
Broadcast
Original channel BBC2
Original run 16 October 1979
8 March 1982
Chronology
Followed by Alas Smith and Jones
Blackadder
External links
IMDb profile

Not the Nine O'Clock News is a comedy television programme that was shown on the BBC, broadcast from 1979 to 1982. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (502x649, 51 KB) Summary VHS cover - visual reference Licensing This image is of a videotape cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the videotape or the studio which produced the videotape in question. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is a English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Pamela Stephenson on Not The Nine OClock News Pamela Stephenson (also known as Pamela Stephenson Connolly), (born December 4, 1949 in Takapuna, Auckland) is a New Zealand-Australian actress, psychologist, and former comedian, now resident in Beverly Hills, California. ... Mel Smith Mel Smith is an English actor, film director, writer, producer born in London on December 3, 1952) He attended New College, Oxford. ... Griff Rhys Jones (born 16 November 1953) is a British comedian, writer and actor. ... Chris Langham (born 14 April 1949) is a British writer and comedian. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Alas Smith and Jones was a British comedy sketch television series featuring Mel Smith and Griff Rhys Jones. ... Blackadder is the generic name that encompasses four series of an acclaimed BBC One historical sitcom, along with several one-off installments. ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ...


It featured a new generation of young comedians, principally Rowan Atkinson, Pamela Stephenson, Mel Smith and Griff Rhys Jones, and helped to bring alternative comedy to the mainstream. Rather than being written by a single team of writers, it gave virtually anyone involved in UK comedy scriptwriting a chance to demonstrate their talents, creaming the best of the contributions. Its format was similar to that of a forerunner, Monty Python's Flying Circus, including sketches that lasted from a few seconds to several minutes. Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is a English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Pamela Stephenson on Not The Nine OClock News Pamela Stephenson (also known as Pamela Stephenson Connolly), (born December 4, 1949 in Takapuna, Auckland) is a New Zealand-Australian actress, psychologist, and former comedian, now resident in Beverly Hills, California. ... Mel Smith Mel Smith is an English actor, film director, writer, producer born in London on December 3, 1952) He attended New College, Oxford. ... Griff Rhys Jones (born 16 November 1953) is a British comedian, writer and actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article discusses the series itself. ...

Contents

History

Not the Nine O'Clock News was produced by John Lloyd, a mainstay in much of British comedy as well as the BBC Light Entertainment department. Lloyd pitched the idea of a sketch show to the heads of BBC Comedy and Light Entertainment, and was given a six-show series, on condition that he collaborate with Sean Hardie, who had worked previously in current affairs at the BBC. A Television producer oversees the making of television penis programs. ... John Lloyd (born 1951 in Dover, England; birth name: John Hardress Wilfred Lloyd), British comedy writer and producer. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation,which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Light entertainment is a term used to describe a broad range of usually televisual performances. ... Current affairs is a genre of broadcast journalism where the emphasis is on detailed analysis and discussion of news stories that have recently occurred or are ongoing at the time of broadcast. ...


The programme's original cast list was Rowan Atkinson, Christopher Godwin, John Gorman, Chris Langham, Willoughby Goddard and Jonathan Hyde, and the show was planned to premiere on 2 April 1979. The first episode was supposed to have been one of the first cross-over episodes in television history.[1] Originally scheduled to air after Fawlty Towers, John Cleese was to have introduced the first episode in a sketch referring to the technicians' strike then in progress, explaining (in character as Basil Fawlty) that there was no show ready that week, so a "tatty revue" would be broadcast instead. Fortunately for many critcs, who consider the episode to be rather unfunny, the 1979 general election intervened, and the show was pulled as being too political.[2] (The sketch with Cleese was eventually broadcast later that year, when by a stroke of luck the final episode of Fawlty Towers went out during broadcast run of the first series of Not the Nine O'Clock News, though the original significance of the sketch was lost.) Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is a English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... John Gorman (born 4 January 1936, in Birkenhead), is an English vocalist and musician. ... Chris Langham (born 14 April 1949) is a British writer and comedian. ... Willoughby Goddard (born 4 July 1926 in Bicester, Oxfordshire) is a British actor whose trademark rotund figure has been well known on television and in film for over 40 years. ... Jonathan Hyde (born May 21, 1947) is an Australian-born English stage actor. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Fawlty Towers was a British sitcom made by the BBC and first broadcast on BBC2 in 1975. ... John Marwood Cleese (born 27 October 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award winning English comedian and actor best known for being one of the founding members of the renowned comedy group Monty Python. ... Basil Fawlty, played by John Cleese Basil Fawlty is the major character in the British sitcom Fawlty Towers, played by John Cleese. ... Margaret Thatcher James Callaghan David Steel BBC Election 1979 Titles The United Kingdom general election of 1979 was held on May 3, 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ...

The established cast of Not the Nine O'Clock News (from left) Jones, Atkinson, and Smith, with Stephenson at the front.

Lloyd and Hardie regrouped, and decided to partly recast the show, retaining Langham and Atkinson. They wanted to bring in a woman. Victoria Wood turned down the opportunity, but Lloyd met Pamela Stephenson at a party and shortly afterwards she agreed to join. Atkinson, Langham and Stephenson were joined by Mel Smith.[3] The first series was sufficiently popular to merit a second. However, Langham was replaced by Griff Rhys Jones, who had already appeared in minor roles. [4] The second series was an instant success, winning the Silver Rose at the Montreux Festival and a BAFTA award for Best Light Entertainment Programme in 1982.[5] Cast of Not the nine oclock news [1] This work is copyrighted. ... Cast of Not the nine oclock news [1] This work is copyrighted. ... Victoria Wood OBE is a BAFTA award winning English comedian, actor, singer and writer born 19 May 1953 in Prestwich Village, Greater Manchester . ... The Rose dOr (or Golden Rose) is a highly prestigious television award, given annually since 1961 at the Festival Rose dOr in spring each year. ... Montreux Festival is a Blues album by Albert King, Chico Hamilton and Little Milton, recorded live in July 1, 1973 at the Montreux Jazz Festival. ...


The show ran for a total of twenty-eight episodes, of thirty minutes each:

The main writers included David Renwick, Colin Bostock-Smith, Andy Hamilton, Peter Brewis, Richard Curtis, and Clive Anderson.[6] However, the producers operated an "open door" policy, and accepted scripts for sketches from virtually any source, which allowed them to select the best from a wide range of writers and enabled the show to be topical by recording just days before broadcast. Howard Goodall (subsequently composer of the Red Dwarf, Blackadder and The Vicar of Dibley theme tunes among others) was also involved musically. Bill Wilson directed the first three series, Geoff Posner the fourth. October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... David Renwick (born September 4, 1951 in Luton, Bedfordshire, UK) is a British television writer, best known for creation of the sitcom One Foot in the Grave and the mystery series Jonathan Creek Before beginning his full-time comedy writing career, he worked as a journalist on his home town... Andrew Neil Hamilton (born 1954) is a British comedian, game show panelist, director and comedy scriptwriter for television and radio. ... Richard Curtis in London, 1999 Richard Curtis CBE, (born 8 November 1956), is a New Zealand-born British screenwriter, best known for the TV programmes Blackadder and The Vicar of Dibley as well as movies such as Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually. ... Clive Anderson (born 10 December 1952) is a British former practising barrister (specialising in criminal law) turned comedy writer and television presenter. ... Howard Goodall Howard Goodall (born 1958 in Bromley, South London) is a British composer of musicals, choral music and music for television. ... This article describes the British science fiction comedy television series. ... Blackadder is the generic name that encompasses four series of an acclaimed BBC One historical sitcom, along with several one-off installments. ... The Vicar of Dibley is a British sitcom created by Richard Curtis and written for its lead actress, Dawn French, by Curtis and Paul Mayhew-Archer, with contributions from Kit Hesketh-Harvey. ... There have been several people of significance named Bill Wilson. ...


Not the Nine O'Clock News became a stage show in Oxford and London in 1982, but the main performers decided to end the project while it was a success and left for pastures new: Stephenson began a Hollywood film career, Atkinson recorded the first series of Blackadder in 1983, and Smith and Jones became a double act in Alas Smith and Jones. A successful American adaptation, Not Necessarily the News ran for six years, from 1983–89 on the Home Box Office cable television channel.[7] Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... ... Blackadder is the generic name that encompasses four series of an acclaimed BBC One historical sitcom, along with several one-off installments. ... Alas Smith and Jones was a British comedy sketch television series featuring Mel Smith and Griff Rhys Jones. ... Not Necessarily the News was a satirical sketch comedy series that ran on HBO from 1983 to 1990. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is an American premium cable television network. ... Coaxial cable is often used to transmit cable television into the house. ...


Name and format

The show's name derived from its broadcast schedule — it was originally transmitted on BBC2 at the same time as the Nine O'Clock News on BBC1, with the opportunity for some amusing continuity announcements. BBC Two (or BBC2 as it was formerly styled) was the second UK television station to be aired by the BBC. History The channel was scheduled to begin at 7:20pm on April 20, 1964 and show an evening of light entertainment, starting with the comedy show The Alberts and... The Nine OClock News is a BBC news programme which began in 1970 and ended in 2000. ... BBC One (or BBC1 as it was formerly styled) is the oldest United Kingdom, and indeed, the world. ...


Starring a new generation of young comedians, it helped bring alternative comedy to the mainstream. It presented a series of individual sketches that were often topical or generally satirical. Unlike other sketch shows up until then, which were based on simple stereotypes or idyllic views of Britain, the show was modern and aggressive — its comedy based on the likes of punk rockers, bodily functions, and kebabs, rather than men in tweed jackets and country pubs. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The series made full use of the revolution in video editing and recording taking place at the time, and its fast pace was enhanced by the device of jump-cutting archive news footage, usually of politicians, royalty or celebrities. For example, to make it appear that Margaret Thatcher was crashing a car. (She later complained about this.) The programmes were usually shot on film for exteriors and video for studio performances, and innovative video effects, provided by the then all-new Quantel Paintbox video effects unit, were often a key element of the musical numbers in the show. Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... The Quantel Paintbox is a dedicated computer system for performing real time manipulation of video, and creating graphics. ...


The quickfire sketch format became a template for various successors, including The Fast Show. The Fast Show is a BBC comedy sketch show programme that ran for four series from 1994 to 2000. ...


Memorable sketches

Not The Nine O'Clock News: Episode 1 - Rowan Atkinson
Not The Nine O'Clock News: Episode 1 - Gerald the Intelligent Gorilla
  • Perhaps the most famous sketch was "Gerald the Intelligent Gorilla": an interview with a professor (Smith) and his highly-trained primate (Atkinson).

Professor: "When I caught Gerald, he was completely wild." Gerald: "Wild? I was absolutely livid." It led to the adoption of two new uses for words in the English language, namely "whoop" and "flange" as collective nouns for gorillas[8] and baboons[9] respectively. Image File history File links This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Image File history File links This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is a English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Image File history File links This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Image File history File links This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ...

  • Rhys-Jones impersonated Senator Edward Kennedy, then hopeful of the Democratic Presidential nomination being, interviewed on a TV programme. When asked if he had learnt anything from his Chappaquiddick experience, he comments "I think that there's a lesson in there for everyone." When asked what that is, he thoughtfully and slowly replies, "Never... never... drive your floosie over a rickety bridge when you're pissed out of your mind."
  • A darts parody featuring the "sportsmen" being scored according to units of alcohol instead of their darts.
  • A social worker edges out along a ledge to a potential suicide (Atkinson). Despite being reassured of help, the man threatening to jump says that he cannot live with the shame any more, and after a lot of probing, he explains that he voted Tory at the last election. After insisting "I wanted Maggie In last time", the Social Worker pushes him off the ledge himself. Sketch is followed by the caption, "A Party Political Broadcast on behalf of the Ruthless Wing of the Labour Party".
  • Rowan Atkinson addressing the Conservative Party conference, interspersed with footage of applauding government ministers (notably Michael Heseltine, Willie Whitelaw and Jim Prior). Railing against non-white immigration, he remarks that they cannot help it if they are from India, adding, "..And I like curry. But now that we've got the recipe, is there any reason for them to stay?"
  • The "General Synod's Life of Christ": a parody of the controversy surrounding the film Monty Python's Life of Brian
  • "Constable Savage": a barbed attack on alleged police treatment of ethnic minorities [10]
  • Rowan Atkinson as a vicar, embarrassingly trying and failing to express an enlightened position on homosexuals within the Church — "Are you a gay Christian?"
  • "Come Home to a Real Fire (Buy a Cottage in Wales)": a reference to a spate of arson attacks by Welsh nationalists against English people's second homes, and a parody of the contemporary coal marketing campaign. The Welsh were frequent targets, as was the UK Liberal Party.
  • In this vein, "Failed in Wales", a parody of a television advertising campaign called "Made in Wales" (using the tune of "Bread of Heaven") which encouraged businesses from England to relocate to Wales. Two follow-up sketches covered "Made from Whales" and "Laid in Wales".
  • A parody of the American Express commercials, in which Pamela Stephenson unbuttons her blouse to the line "That'll do nicely sir, and would you like to rub my tits too?"
  • Pamela Stephenson's send-ups of Janet Street-Porter, exaggerated almost to the point of incomprehensibility. (She had performed similar impersonations of Street-Porter earlier in the 1980s with Kenny Everett.)
  • Film of Roy Jenkins, the then-leader of the UK Social Democratic Party, standing behind a lectern, with the added sound-effect of someone urinating into a bucket.
  • A spoof of the BBC2 closedown screen in which the clock falls to the right to reveal a yawning Atkinson, in his pyjamas, running a moistened finger around a champagne glass to produce the closing-down tone.
  • A spoof of religious affairs programmes chaired by Stephenson in which Atkinson complains to an Anglican priest, "Where was God when I cut my finger?" to which Stephenson replies, "I think the point is God can't be expected to be in two places at once," at which the priest snaps, "He can, he can, he's omnipresent for Christ's sake!"
  • Two men in the stands at a women's football (soccer) game, commenting on the poor quality of the game. The conversation ends with the men deciding to stop going to such matches as the game finally draws to a close. The players all exchange shirts, revealing that they are wearing nothing underneath. The whole crowd cheer the exhibition.
  • Atkinson, walking down a street, spots the camera filming him, smiles, waves, and, not looking where he is going, walks into a tree. The same format was used in other sketches ending with different accidents.
  • Atkinson as a vicar introducing a broadcast of Songs of Praise from his church, lambasting the suspiciously numerous and devout congregation: "...And didn't the hat shop do well this week!", before introducing the first hymn, "Good Christian men rejoice, the 'Beeb' are back in town".
  • Trade union representatives issuing demands to corporate bosses in order to avoid a strike — these included the chance to sleep with the boss's wife. They were also offered use of the boss's swivel chair and an automatic bottle opener. (This sketch featured future Oscar winning actor Jim Broadbent as the shop steward).
  • A meeting of trade unionists in which the chairman announces a refreshment break by asking "tea or coffee?". The resulting show of hands is counted in terms of the unions' block votes.
  • Two men in a spacecraft see a Salvation Army member outside, knocking on the window, with a collection box and copies of The War Cry magazine.
  • The space-shuttle Columbia takeoff, with the sound effect of an old car trying to start up, revving its engine, and crashing the gears as it pulls away.
  • A US Presidential press conference where the aide (Atkinson) repeatedly steps in to prevent any coherent sentence being uttered by the president, for fear that he may appear intellectually challenged. He eventually (and reluctantly) prompts the president's every word, replacing meaningful policy with the likes of "cup cakes" and "crumbly candy bars". (This was broadcast shortly after Ronald Reagan was elected.)
  • A National Health Service "auction" in which (in an era of health expenditure cuts) a hospital bed is awarded to the most deserving case, i.e. to the patient who can "bid" the most life-threatening illness.
  • Griff Rhys Jones as John McEnroe at the breakfast table with his parents, throwing a tantrum because his mother has accused him of slurping his orange juice.
  • Langham performing as "Stunt Pope".
  • Langham in a spoof of a DIY programme injuring himself more and more seriously in fruitless attempts to open a Band-Aid.
  • Stephenson as a French surgeon giving a lecture on the practical details of an operation. The English translation (provided by Atkinson) leaves a lot to be desired.
  • Atkinson playing a print union shop steward with a Geordie accent. He was protesting at the dismissal of an employee on the grounds that he was dead. The corpse had apparently been secured to a heating radiator on safety grounds: to prevent anyone "slippin' in the ooze that was emanatin' from 'is member."
  • Two politicians on a debate show slinging accusations and insults at each other with ever increasing fury — until one has a fatal heart attack. This prompts the other to launch into a eulogy praising his deceased opponent as "a great parliamentarian of our time, and a close, personal friend."
  • A parody of The Two Ronnies, entitled "The Two Ninnies", in which Ronnie Corbett's (Griff Rhys Jones) greeting of "It's lovely to be with you again, isn't it, Ronnie?" is met with a reply of "No, it's a bleedin' pain in the arse, quite frankly" from Ronnie Barker (Mel Smith).
  • A parody of a televised debate on football hooligans in which Pam Stephenson plays a social worker and Mel Smith a right-wing politician. Smith suggests that the solution is to "cut off their goolies" and Stephenson, surprisingly, agrees.
  • A sketch where two young thugs vandalise a parked automobile, followed by Pam Stephenson explaining how much the brief sketch had cost the BBC, including the purchase of a custom-made automobile (in keeping with the Beeb's policy of not advertising a particular make or manufacturer), designer street clothing for the thugs, consultation fees for real thugs...
  • Diners in an elegant restaurant witness the kitchen taken over in noisy gun battles by Latin American revolutionaries, followed by Maoist guerillas and then the Red Army. At the end, after a crescendo of battle noises, Rowan Atkinson emerges from the kitchen in dinner jacket, dusts himself off, and invites the diners to enjoy the rest of their meal courtesy of the SAS.
  • A version of the poem Abou Ben Adhem read by the cast, with Atkinson rendering the last line of every stanza as incomprehensible gibberish.
  • A parody of a television discussion show about the coarsening of discourse, in which Atkinson and Rhys Jones slip increasingly bizarre sexual references into their lines (as Atkinson explains, "Exactly! That's my whole big thing point! People are swearing, and uttering obscenities, take me, take me, without even knowing it." Jones responds to this statement by saying: "Oh, huge melons!"). Stephenson, as the presenter, eventually winds up the discussion with "That's enough lipstick around the nipple for now."

Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Chappaquiddick Island is a small island off the eastern end of the larger island of Marthas Vineyard. ... A standard dart board. ... In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British Conservative politician and businessman. ... William Stephen Ian Whitelaw, 1st Viscount Whitelaw, KT, CH, MC, PC, DL (June 28, 1918 - July 1, 1999), commonly known as Willie Whitelaw, was a British Conservative politician. ... James Michael Leathes Prior, Baron Prior, PC, is a British politician, and was Conservative MP for Lowestoft and Waveney. ... Pilau rice, cucumber rhaita and Chicken Tikka Jalfrezi. ... The General Synod is the title of the governing body of some church organizations. ... Christ is the English of the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ... Monty Pythons Life of Brian is a 1979 comedy written and performed by the Monty Python comedy team. ... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... This article is about the sub-division of the United Kingdom. ... Meibion Glyndŵr (Welsh: Sons of Glyndŵr) was a Welsh nationalist movement violently opposed to the loss of Welsh culture and language. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... 19th century Cottages in the small hamlet of Crafton, Buckinghamshire A cottage is a small house of any period. ... This article is about the sub-division of the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Party was one of the two major British political parties from the early 19th century until the 1920s, and a third party of varying strength and importance up to 1988, when it merged with the Social Democratic Party to form a new party which would become known as... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Cwm Rhondda. ... American Express (NYSE: AXP), sometimes known as AmEx or Amex, is a diversified global financial services company, headquartered in New York City. ... Janet Street-Porter née Bull[1] (born 27 December 1946) is a BAFTA award-winning British editor, journalist, media personality, television presenter and producer. ... Kenny Everett Kenny Everett (born Maurice Cole in Crosby, Merseyside, 25 December 1944, died 4 April 1995), was a popular English radio DJ and television entertainer. ... Roy Harris Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead, OM, PC (November 11, 1920 – January 5, 2003) was a British politician and a prominent Labour Member of Parliament in the 1960s and 1970s, and founding member of the Social Democratic Party (SDP). ... The Social Democratic Party (SDP) was a political party of the United Kingdom that existed nationwide between 1981 and 1988. ... In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Songs of Praise is a BBC television programme based around traditional Christian hymns. ... A trade union or labor union is a continuous association of wage-earners for the purpose of maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment. ... The following is a partial list of chair types, with internal or external cross references about most of the chairs. ... James Broadbent (born May 24, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning English theatre, film and television actor. ... Bloc voting (or block voting) (also called Plurality-at-large) refers to a class of voting systems which can be used to elect several representatives from a single constituency. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organization. ... The presidential seal is a well-known symbol of the presidency. ... George W. Bush A Bushism is any of a number of peculiar words, phrases, pronunciations, malapropisms, semantic or linguistic errors that have occurred in the public speaking of United States President George W. Bush[1][2] and, before that, of his father George H. W. Bush. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... , the information in this article describes the current English public health service. ... John Patrick McEnroe, Jr. ... A tantrum is an emotional outburst wherein higher brain functions are unable to stop the emotional expression of the lower (emotional and physical) brain functions. ... Orange juice is sometimes artificially colored to match the color of orange rinds. ... A stunt performer is someone who performs dangerous stunts. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope of Rome... See also: DIY Network, a cable TV network. ... Band Aid can refer to: BAND-AID, a brand of adhesive bandage Band Aid, a musical ensemble raising money for famine relief. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Two Ronnies was a British sketch show that aired on BBC One from 1971 to 1987. ... Ronnie Corbett in Extras Ronald Balfour Corbett, OBE (born 4 December 1930 in Edinburgh, commonly credited as Ronnie Corbett) is a British comedian and actor, best known as one of The Two Ronnies. ... Ronnie Barker Ronald William George Barker OBE (September 25, 1929 – October 3, 2005), popularly known as Ronnie Barker and (as a writer) Gerald Wiley , was an English comic actor and writer. ... Human male anatomy The testicles, known medically as testes (singular testis), are the male generative glands in animals. ... The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... Abou Ben Adhem was an Arab Muslim saint and Sufi mystic. ...

Musical sketches

The show usually ended with a musical parody or pastiche (later adapted by the Australian sketch comedy The Late Show, using celebrities and prominent politicians to perform cover versions of songs by artists of similar names. Spitting Image also ended with musical numbers in its later years), normally either from the writing team of Curtis & Goodall, or penned by the show's musical director, Philip Pope. Titles included "I Like Truckin'" (infamous for its squashed hedgehog), "Nice Video (Shame About the Song)", "Sooper Dooper" (an ABBA send-up), "Mod Monarch" (featuring a Jam-esque mod band singing about the street credentials of the Prince of Wales) "Gob on You" (unusually, written by Chris Judge Smith), the "Ayatollah Song" (featuring Pamela Stephenson singing "Ayatollah, Khomeini closer...") and, for the final episode, "The Memory Kinda Lingers" (a pun on cunnilingus). One of the most brilliant in its execution was "Restricted Practices", supposedly arranged by Moss Evans. This was a simple musical medley with one huge difference, it was played by 12 different people on the same grand piano, two of whom had to lie on the top of it, with each man playing just a couple of notes each. The Best Bits of The Late Show: Champagne Edition (DVD) The Late Show was a popular Australian comedy show, which ran for two seasons on ABC TV from 18 July 1992 to 30 October 1993. ... Spitting Image was a satirical puppet show that ran on the United Kingdoms ITV television network from 1984 to 1996. ... Philip Pope is a British composer and actor. ... Genera Atelerix Erinaceus Hemiechinus Mesechinus Paraechinus A hedgehog is any of the small spiny mammals of the subfamily Erinaceinae and the order Erinaceomorpha. ... ABBA was a Swedish pop music group active from 1972 until 1982. ... Christopher John Judge Smith (born 1948 in England), is a songwriter, composer and performer, and a founder member of progressive rock band Van der Graaf Generator. ... Ayatollah Khomeini founded the first modern Islamic republic Ayatollah Seyyed Ruhollah Khomeini (آیت‌الله روح‌الله خمینی in Persian) (May 17, 1900 – June 3, 1989) was an Iranian Shia cleric and the political... Watercolour painting depicting cunnilingus by Achille Devéria Cunnilingus is the act of performing oral sex, using the mouth and tongue to stimulate the female genitals. ...


Commercial releases

Video and DVD

Two highly-edited videos of the show, entitled Nice Video, Shame about the Hedgehog and The Gorilla Kinda Lingers were released in the mid-1990s. Video (Latin for I see, first person singular present, indicative of videre, to see) is the technology of electronically capturing, recording, processing, storing, transmitting, and reconstructing a sequence of still images representing scenes in motion. ...


More recently, in August 2003 these videos were released on DVD under the title of The Best of Not the Nine O'Clock News — Volume One and The Best of Not the Nine O'Clock News — Volume Two a year later. DVD (Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ...


The complete series episodes have never been released.


Audio

Three albums were released at the time the series was screening, entitled Not the Nine O'Clock News, Hedgehog Sandwich and The Memory Kinda Lingers respectively. These albums were very successful, with the first two both reaching the top ten of the UK albums chart, a rare feat for a spoken-word LP. It has been suggested that Childrens gramophone records be merged into this article or section. ...


The original version of The Memory Kinda Lingers was a double-LP. The second disc is titled Not in Front of the Audience and is a live recording of the cast's stage show. Hedgehog Sandwich and the first disc of The Memory Kinda Lingers were later combined on a BBC double-length cassette. The British Broadcasting Corporation,which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Typical 60-minute Compact Cassette. ...


The group rerecorded "Oh Bosanquet" (a tribute to the then recently retired newsreader Reginald Bosanquet) and "Gob on You" for single release. The latter had the same — less hard-hitting — lyrics as featured in Not in Front of the Audience. Reginald Bosanquet was a newsreader on Independent Television News in the United Kingdom for several years. ...


"The Ayatollah Song" b/w "Gob on You" (as featured in the TV show) and "I Like Trucking" b/w "Supa Dupa" were also released as singles.


Books and miscellaneous

Three books were released to tie in with the series; Not! the Nine O'Clock News, a collection of classic material rewritten and restructured as a parody of the short-lived "Now!" magazine, Not the Royal Wedding (the royal wedding in question being the marriage of Charles and Diana), and Not the General Election, a tie in with the 1983 General Election. The first was reprinted in 1995 as Not For Sale. Not The Royal Wedding was promoted by a little-known radio spinoff, Not The Nuptials, transmitted on BBC Radio 1. The same station had also previously produced a behind-the-scenes documentary on Not The Nine O'Clock News as part of their magazine series Studio B15. In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George[2]; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances;[2] née Spencer; 1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997) was the first wife of Charles, Prince of Wales. ... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...


Two 'page-a-day' tear-off calendars, edited by John Lloyd and containing several contributions from Douglas Adams were released in the early 1980s (Not 1982 and Not 1983) along with a spoof edition of the Times newspaper, Not The 1984 Times, which covered events of the time as if they were taking place in the world of George Orwell's novel, 1984. John Lloyd (born 1951 in Dover, England; birth name: John Hardress Wilfred Lloyd), British comedy writer and producer. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ...


References

  1. ^ BBC Guide to Comedy, by Mark Lewisohn, URL accessed March 17, 2007
  2. ^ BBC Guide to Comedy, by Mark Lewisohn, URL accessed March 17, 2007
  3. ^ BBC Guide to Comedy, by Mark Lewisohn, URL accessed March 17, 2007
  4. ^ BFI Screenonline, URL accessed March 17, 2007
  5. ^ Awards at IMDb.com, URL accessed March 17, 2007
  6. ^ Cast list at IMDb.com, URL accessed March 17, 2007
  7. ^ BBC Guide to Comedy, by Mark Lewisohn, URL accessed March 17, 2007
  8. ^ AskOxford.com: Collective nouns — G
  9. ^ AskOxford.com: Collective nouns — B
  10. ^ "Constable Savage" (transcript)

Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ... Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ... Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ... Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ...

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