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Encyclopedia > Norwich University
Norwich University

Motto: I Will Try
Established: 1819
Type: Private Military College
President: Dr. Richard W. Schneider, RADM USCGR (Ret.)
Faculty: 112
Undergraduates: 2,000+
Postgraduates: 1,000
Location: Northfield, Vermont, USA
Campus: Rural,
1200 acres (486 hectares)
Colors: Maroon & Gold            
Mascot: Cadets
Athletics: NCAA Division III
Great Northeast Athletic Conference
18 sports teams
Website: www.Norwich.edu

Norwich University (NU) is a private university located in Northfield, Vermont. It is home to both a Corps of Cadets (NUCC) and a smaller traditional student population. The University was founded in 1819 at Norwich, Vermont, as the American Literary, Scientific and Military Academy. It is the oldest private military college in the United States and recognized by the United States Department of Defense as the "Birthplace of ROTC" (Reserve Officers' Training Corps). Image File history File links Norwich University Logo of 2005 redesign File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A military academy (American English), or service academy (British English) is an educational institution which prepares candidates for service in the military (officer corps of the Army), naval service or air force or provides education in a service environment, the exact definition depending on the country. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Dr. Richard W. Schneider, RADM. USCGR (Ret. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Northfield is a town in Washington County, Vermont, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The word Maroon can have the following meanings: Maroon is a color mixture composed of brown and purple. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The Great Northeast Athletic Conference (or GNAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Member institutions are located in the northeastern United States in the States of Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Northfield, Vermont Northfield is a town located in Washington County, Vermont. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ... Norwich, Vermont Norwich is located in the state of Vermont, United States of America, along the Connecticut River opposite Hanover, New Hampshire. ... In the United States, a Senior Military College is one of six colleges that offer military Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) programs and are recognized under 10 USC 2111a. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... A Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program is a college-based, officer commissioning program, predominantely in the United States. ...

Contents

History

Partridge and his academy

The University was founded in 1819 at Norwich by military educator and former superintendent of West Point, Captain Alden B. Partridge. Captain Partridge believed in the "American System of Education," a traditional liberal arts curriculum with instruction in civil engineering and military science. After leaving West Point because of congressional disapproval of his system, he returned to his native state of Vermont to create the American Literary, Scientific and Military Academy. Captain Partridge, in founding his Academy, rebelled against the reforms of Sylvanus Thayer to prevent the rise of what he saw as the greatest threat to the security of the young republic: a professional officer class. He believed that a well-trained militia was an urgent necessity and developed the American system around that idea. His academy became the inspiration for a number of military colleges throughout the nation, including both the Virginia Military Institute and The Citadel, and later the land grant colleges created through the Morrill Act of 1862.[1] Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ... USMA redirects here. ... For other uses, see Captain (disambiguation). ... Capt. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Military science concerns itself with the study of the diverse technical, psychological, and practical phenomena that encompass the events that make up warfare, especially armed combat. ... Sylvanus Thayer, painting by Robert Weir Brigadier General Sylvanus Thayer (June 9, 1785 - September 7, 1872) also known as the Father of West Point was an early superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point and an early advocate of engineering education in the United States. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States. ... The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are pieces of US legislation which allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges, which would be funded by the grant of federally-controlled land to each of the states which had stayed with the United States during the American Civil War. ...


Partridge's educational beliefs were considered radical at the time, and this lead to his conflicting views with the federal government while he was the superintendent of West Point. Upon creation of his own school, he immediately incorporated classes of agriculture and modern languages in addition to the sciences, liberal arts, and various military subjects. Field exercises, for which Partridge borrowed cannon and muskets from the federal and state governments, supplemented classroom instruction and added an element of realism to the college’s program of well-rounded military education.


Partridge founded six other military institutions during his quest to reform the fledgling United States military. They were the Virginia Literary, Scientific and Military Academy at Portsmouth, Virginia (1839-1846), Pennsylvania Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy at Bristol, Pennsylvania (1842-1845), Pennsylvania Military Institute at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (1845-1848), Wilmington Literary, Scientific and Military Academy at Wilmington, Delaware (1846-1848), the Scientific and Military Collegiate Institute at Reading, Pennsylvania (1850-1854), Gymnasium and Military Institute at Pembroke, New Hampshire (1850-1853) and the National Scientific and Military Academy at Brandywine Springs, Delaware (1853). [1] Map Political Statistics Founded 1752 County Independent city Mayor Dr. James W. Holley III Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 120. ... Bristol is a borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 23 miles (37 km) northeast of Philadelphia opposite Burlington, N.J. on the Delaware River. ... This article is about the capital city of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. ... : Chemical Capital of the World , Corporate Capital of the World , Credit Card Capital of the World : A Place to Be Somebody United States Delaware New Castle 17. ... Berks County’s location in Pennsylvania Reading’s location in Berks County Country United States State County Berks Founded 1748 Government  - Mayor Thomas McMahon (D) Area  - City 10. ... Pembroke is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ...


Fire and hardship: Norwich in the 19th century

In 1825 the academy moved to Middletown, Connecticut to provide better naval training to the school's growing corps of cadets. However, in 1829, the state of Connecticut declined to grant Captain Partridge a charter and he moved the school back to Norwich. It wasn't until 1834 that Vermont granted a charter and recognized the institution as "Norwich University." The University, beginning in 1826, offered the first program of courses in civil engineering in the US. During the 1856 academic year, the first chapter of the Theta Chi Fraternity was founded by cadets Frederick Norton Freeman and Arthur Chase. With the beginning of the Civil War in 1861, Norwich cadets served as instructors of the state militias throughout the Northeast and the entire class of 1862 enlisted upon its graduation. Norwich turned out hundreds of officers and soldiers who served with the Federal armies in the Civil War, including four winners of the Medal of Honor. One graduate led a corps, seven more headed divisions, 21 commanded brigades, 38 led regiments, and various alumni served in 131 different regimental organizations. In addition, these men were eyewitnesses to some of the war's most dramatic events, including the bloodiest day of the conflict at Antietam, the attack up Marye's Heights at Fredericksburg, and the repulse of Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. Seven hundred and fifty Norwich men served in the Civil War, of whom sixty fought for the Confederacy. [2]. Because of the university's participation in the struggle, the number of students dwindled to 7 in the class of 1864 alone. After a catastrophic fire in 1866 which devastated the entire campus, the town of Northfield welcomed the struggling school. The Civil War, the fire, and the uncertainty regarding the continuation of the University seriously lowered the attendance, and the school opened in the fall of 1866 with only nineteen students. The 1870s and 1880s saw many financially turbulent times for the institution and the renaming of the school to Lewis College in 1880. In 1881 the student body was reduced to only a dozen men. Later, by 1884, the Vermont Legislature had the name of the school changed back to Norwich. In 1898 the University was designated as the Military College of the State of Vermont. Nickname: Forest City Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Midstate Region Incorporated (town) 1651 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1923 Government type Mayor-council Mayor Sebastian N. Giuliano Area    - City 42. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... Frederick Norton Freeman, A 57 Frederick Norton Freeman, Alpha/Norwich 1857, was born on March 2, 1839 in Claremont, New Hampshire. ... Arthur Chase, A 56 Arthur Chase, Alpha/Norwich 1856, is the co-founder of Theta Chi Fraternity. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Map of the US northeast. ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ... For other uses, see Medal of Honor (disambiguation). ... Battle of Antietam Conflict American Civil War Date September 16–18, 1862 Place Near Sharpsburg, Maryland Result (Union strategic victory) The Battle of Antietam (known as the Battle of Sharpsburg in the South), fought on Wednesday, September 17, 1862 near Sharpsburg, Maryland, was the first major battle of the American... Map of Picketts Charge, July 3, 1863. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Northfield is a town in Washington County, Vermont, United States. ...


War and expansion: Norwich in the 20th century

As part of the Vermont National Guard, the school's Corps of Cadets was mobilized as a squadron of cavalry in the First Vermont Regiment to assist in General John J. Pershing's Mexican Expedition. This greatly disrupted the academic year and in 1916 the War Department designated Norwich as the first site for a Senior ROTC cavalry unit; also in 1916, the first African-American, Harold "Doc" Martin (NU 1920), matriculated. Classes graduated early for both the First and Second World Wars and many Norwich-made officers saw service in all theaters of both conflicts. Professional education offered at Norwich also changed and adapted with the advance of technology. Military flight training began in 1939 and from 1946 to 1947, horse cavalry was completely phased out in favor of armored cavalry. Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... John Joseph Black Jack Pershing, GCB (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. ... The Pancho Villa Expedition was an abortive punitive expedition conducted by the United States against the military forces of Mexican Revolutionary General Pancho Villa in retaliation for Villas invasion of the United States and attack on the village of Columbus, New Mexico. ... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Graduates returning from European and Pacific fields of battle found a university very different from the one they had left behind. From the late 1940s to the 1960s, Norwich was greatly expanded and added a number of new opportunities. In 1947, the Army Department created a new program uniquely suited to Vermont's harsh climate: a mountain and cold weather warfare unit. Air Force and Navy ROTC programs were established in 1972 and 1984 respectively. During the 1974 school year, the University admitted women into the Corps of Cadets. Although unpopular at the time, Norwich University began a social trend that would move the country closer in gender equality. The 1972 merger and 1993 integration with Vermont College added two groups to "the Hill," civilian students and women. (Norwich later sold its Vermont College campus and non-traditional degree programs to the Union Institute and University in 2001.[2]) Seal The Department of the Army is one of the three military departments in the United States Department of Defense. ... USAF redirects here. ... USN redirects here. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... Union Institute & University provides non-traditional education at the bachelors, masters, and doctoral level. ... Union Institute and University provides non-traditional education at the bachelors, masters, and doctoral level. ...


The Bicentennial and beyond: Norwich in the 21st century

The ending of one century and birth of a new finds Norwich with a robust Corps of Cadets and a thriving traditional student body. Norwich maintains its position as a center of learning for civil service with online graduate programs, the 5 year Master of Architecture program and since 2001 an National Security Agency-sponsored Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance. NSA redirects here. ...


NU 2019

As the University moves closer to the bicentennial of the school's founding, the NU2019 plan was launched in 2005. Under the guidance of the Alumni Association, the Board of Trustees and the Office of the President, the University has budgeted millions of dollars to radically change and improve the campus.


Proposed additions are to include:

  • Traditional Student housing quad separate from the Corps housing on the Upper Parade Ground
  • Harmon Hall dining facility rebuilt into a Campus Service Center
  • A refurbishment of Webb and Ainsworth Halls and a new Humanities & Social Science quad
  • Improved transportation network and general campus beautification
  • Increasing enrollment by five-hundred undergraduate students

Campus

Norwich University in winter as observed from the "Ski Hill".
Norwich University in winter as observed from the "Ski Hill".

Academic buildings

Ainsworth Hall


In 1910 Ainsworth Hall was constructed for the United States Weather Bureau as their central Vermont station. Later returned to the University in 1948, it served as the Administrative Headquarters of the campus. By 1955, growth of the University forced the relocation of the Administration back up the hill to Dewey Hall. When also in 1955 construction began on Webb Hall to the immediate west of the building, the infirmary moved into the now empty structure. Due to expansion of the University in the 1960s and 1970s the building was converted into the home of the Division of Social Sciences. The building is named for Mrs. Laura Ainsworth, widow of Captain James E. Ainsworth (NU 1853), who in 1915 worked to bring an infirmary to campus. The National Weather Service (NWS) is one of the six scientific agencies that make up the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States government. ...


Chaplin Hall


Chaplin Hall, originally Carnegie Hall, was built in 1907 and is the home of the Division of Architecture & Art. Paid for by Andrew Carnegie, the building served as the University's library until 1993 with the construction of Kreitzberg Library. When the library was renovated in 1952, from the contributions of trustee Henry P. Chaplin it was rededicated as the Henry Prescott Chaplin Memorial Library. Until 1941 and the addition of Partridge Hall to the growing campus, Chaplin Hall also provided the classrooms and offices for the Department of Electrical Engineering. A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ...


Communications Building


This building, on the site of the first building in Center Northfield, contains the offices and classrooms of the Communications Department. The offices for the Guidon and the studios for both the University's radio station WNUB-FM are also located in this building. The building was purchased by the University in 1973 and restored in 1988.


Dewey Hall


Named for Admiral of the Navy George Dewey (NU 1852-1854), and completed in 1902, Dewey Hall is one of the oldest buildings in the Northfield campus. It was originally two stories high with the lower floor occupied by offices of the University's administration, the library and museum. Office space for trustees and faculty, a chapel with a seating of five hundred and the United States Weather Bureau were located on the second floor. With the departure of the Weather Bureau in 1909 and the completion of the then new Carnegie Library in 1907 the Hall was primarily used by the Military Department. In October 1925 a fire gutted the building which led to its reconstruction as a three story structure. Dewey Hall currently houses the Division of Business & Management and a computer lab. In the United States Navy, Admiral of the Navy is traditionally considered the equivalent of a six-star Admiral. ... George Dewey (December 26, 1837 – January 16, 1917) was an admiral of the United States Navy, best known for his victory (without the loss of a single life of his own forces due to combat; one man died of a heart attack) at the Battle of Manila Bay during the...


Hollis House


Hollis House is today the location of a number of classrooms and offices of the Division of Humanities. Built in 1852, the building was until 1909 the house of a number of prominent residents of Northfield. When sold that year to the University it became part of the US Weather Bureau's station collocated on campus. The building was later named for David B. "Dixie" Hollis (NU 1922) who upon his death in 1993 donated what was until that point the largest single in the University's history, a total of seven million dollars. The National Weather Service (NWS) is one of the six scientific agencies that make up the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States government. ...


Engineering, Math and Science Complex The Engineering, Math and Science Complex houses the David Crawford School of Engineering as well as the departments of Geology, Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Mathematics. The complex is composed of five buildings: Juckett, Partridge and Tompkins Halls; the Science Building and the Cabot Annex. The complex was completed in 1997 and replaced a previous set of 1940s and 1950s-era facilities. The Engineering, Math and Science Complex also contains the University's Computer Services office and the majority of the campus' independent computer labs. This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: Βιολογία - βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ...


Kreitzberg Library


Kreitzberg Library is named in recognition of Barbara and Chairman of the Board of Trustees Fred Kreitzberg (NU 1957). The Library has a catalogue of more than 240,000 books, about 800 archived periodicals, and a collection of Federal government publications. The Norwich University Archives and Special Collections houses rare books and unique source materials relating to military history, the history of Vermont, and the history of the University. The 58,000 square foot library was designed by Perry, Dean, Rogers & Partners and was completed in 1993 at a cost of $8.1 million.


Webb Hall


Webb Hall was completed in 1960 and originally housed the English, Modern Languages, Social Sciences, Business Administration and the Psychology and Education departments. Currently, the Division of Humanities, Nursing Department and Education program are located in this building. Twenty one classrooms, three seminar rooms and a computer lab are available. Dole Auditorium, which can seat over four hundred people, is also located in Webb Hall. The building is named after J. Watson Webb, a Norwich trustee and world class polo player. Dole Auditorium honors Charles Dole (NU 1869), who served in his career at the University as an instructor in Mathematics and Latin, a professor of history and rhetoric, the commandant of cadets and acting president of the University from 1895 to 1896.


Residence halls and cadet barracks

  • Hawkins Hall — Named for General Hawkins, a colonel in the Civil War and later New York State Congressman. Built in 1940 and renovated in 1994
  • Dodge Hall — Named for Grenville M. Dodge (NU 1851), only all-traditional residence hall on the Upper Parade Ground. Originally named Cabot Hall, it was built in 1937 and renovated in 1998
  • Patterson Hall — Named for a 1909 graduate in Civil Engineering and a trustee. Built in 1958, it is the only residence hall that houses both traditional and Corps of Cadets students.
  • Goodyear Hall — Named for Major General A. Conger Goodyear, a trustee and founder of the Museum of Modern Art. Built in 1955 and renovated in 1999
  • Wilson Hall — Named for a Judge and Governor of Vermont, Stanley Calef Wilson.
  • Alumni Hall — First housing-only hall at the Northfield campus, named for the significant alumnus contributions that allowed for its construction. Built in 1905 and renovated in 2005
  • Ransom Hall — Named after Colonel Truman B. Ransom, the second president of the University who was killed leading the assault on Chapultepec during the Mexican-American War. Built in 1957
  • Gerard Hall — Named after industrialist and philanthropist Jacques A. Gerard who became a trustee in 1959. Built in 1962
  • Crawford Hall — Named after David C. Crawford (NU 1952) and whom the School of Engineering is also named, it is the only residence hall not on the Upper Parade Ground and is reserved for traditional students. Built in 1988

Grenville M. Dodge wearing a major generals uniform Grenville Mullen Dodge (April 12, 1831 – January 3, 1916) was a Union army officer on the frontier and during the Civil War, a U.S. Congressman, businessman, and railroad executive who helped construct the Transcontinental Railroad. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the museum in New York City. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... Stanley Calef Wilson (September 10, 1879 – October 5, 1967), was an American politician from Vermont. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Nicolás Bravo #, Mariano Monterde School Commandant, Juan N. Perez commander Remants Leon Brigade) Strength 13,000 876 cadets, 4000 regulars Casualties 130 killed 703 wounded 29 missing 862 total 1,800 killed and wounded 823 captured 2,623 Total Gen. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000...

Athletic buildings

Andrews Hall


Andrews Hall, built in 1980, houses the Departments of the Health, Physical Education and Athletics. In addition, it has basketball and racquetball courts and the equipment and training rooms for the university's varsity and intramural teams. The Athletic Hall of Fame is also located in Andrews Hall. The facility honors trustee Paul R. Andrews (NU 1930).


Kreitzberg Arena


Kreitzberg Arena, also named in for the Kreitzberg family, is the home of Norwich Hockey. Construction on this multi-purpose arena was completed in the spring of 1998. The 59,000 square ft. arena has a 200 x 90 ice surface and seating for 1400, with a maximum capacity of 5,000 for special events. The arena also hosts the ECAC Hockey East Regional Finals. The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ...


Plumley Armory


The Armory, built in 1928, is named to honor a distinguished 1896 graduate of the University, Charles A. Plumley. Plumley served as the President of the University from 1930 to 1934 when he was elected to Congress as Vermont's sole representative from 1934 to 1951. The main floor of the building provides seating space for 4,000 in an area as large as three basketball courts. There is an elevated running track as well as locker rooms, training rooms, and Navy ROTC offices in the basement. Connected to the Armory is Goodyear Pool. Built in 1962, the Pool is a 25 x 14 yard 5 lane facility that is open to all University members. These are tables of congressional delegations from Vermont to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ...


Sabine Field


Dedicated in 1921, Sabine Field is home to the university football and track teams. This article covers college football played in the United States. ...

Main article: Sabine Field

Shapiro Field House


Shapiro Field House, built in 1987 and named for trustee Jacob Shapiro (NU 1936), houses a multipurpose arena that has a 200-meter indoor running track, four tennis courts, and a climbing wall. It is also used for morning PT (Physical Training), athletic practices, Commencement, concerts and other university functions. Jacob Gurrah Shapiro (May 5?, 1899-June 9?, 1947) was a Jewish-American mobster and, with Louis Lepke Buchalter, controlled industrial labor racketeering in New York for more then two decades. ...


Other buildings

The Harmon Memorial The Harmon Memorial is a tribute to Major General Ernest Harmon, who attended Norwich University from 1912 to 1913 and was later president from 1950 to 1968. Recorded on the memorial, by year of death, are the names of alumni, faculty, staff, and friends of Norwich University that have made a "significant contribution" to the University. Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ...


Harmon Hall & Wise Campus Center


Harmon Hall opened in 1955 and later enlarged in 1958. Since then, it has served as the focal point for student life and activities. The campus mess hall, bookstore, post office, and The Mill (a snack bar open to upperclassmen and civilian freshmen) are located on the lower two floors. The Foreign Student Office, Student Activities, Yearbook Office, Music Program offices, a game room, and a lounge were located on the top floor. This floor originally housed the departments of English, History, and Modern Languages until they were moved to Webb Hall in 1960. Harmon Hall renovated in 2007. The addition onto Harmon Hall is named the Wise Campus Center and houses new dining and food preparation facilities as well as a new book store, post office, Partridge's Pub and an outdoor skating rink.


Jackman Hall


Norwich University moved to Northfield from Norwich, Vermont in 1866 when the South Barracks at the older location were destroyed by fire. Old Jackman Hall was the first building to be constructed at the new central Vermont site. The building was erected in 1868, and named Jackman Hall in 1907 to honor Brigadier General Alonzo Jackman (NU 1836) a distinguished faculty member, creator of the trans-Atlantic telegraph cable system and commander of the Vermont Brigade during the Civil War. From its construction till 1905 the building served as housing for cadets. In the mid-1950s Jackman Hall was extensively remodeled and modernized, however, it became apparent that the almost century-old barracks were too costly to maintain. It was decided that rather than pay for near continual upkeep to build a new hall on the same site. As many newer barracks had been built since its original construction it was decided that the new Jackman Hall would serve as the primary administration building. Currently the Army and Air Force ROTC departments are housed in Jackman, as well.


White Chapel


Constructed by a gift from Eugene L. White (NU 1914), a trustee, the chapel was completed in 1941. Originally designed as a multi-purpose building, then White Hall has served as a mess hall with a dining room, lunch room, kitchen, a college store and a recreational room. White Hall was converted to the University's first single-purpose chapel after Harmon Hall was opened in 1955. There are two bronze plaques on the walls that honor the Norwich war dead. Weekly services include Catholic Mass on Saturday and Sunday, Non-denominational service on Sunday, and Islamic Prayer on Friday. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... In Christianity, the term non-denominational refers to those churches which have not formally aligned themselves with an established denomination, or remain otherwise officially autonomous. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...


Sullivan Museum and History Center


One of the newest buildings on the campus, the Sullivan Museum was opened January 22, 2007. The building is named after General Gordon R. Sullivan (ret.), Norwich class of 1959 and former U.S. Army Chief of Staff. The Sullivan Museum houses state of the art conservation, storage, and display facilities for the wide variety of Norwich University artifacts and memorabilia. Items currently displayed cover a wide spectrum of Norwich history, including uniforms worn by Alden Partridge and Alonzo Jackman to pieces from more recent history.


Athletics

Norwich University Cadets.
Norwich University Cadets.

The Norwich University Cadets compete at the NCAA Division III level and are affiliated in one of four conferences, mainly the Great Northeast Athletic Conference. There are 11 varsity sports and one club sport for men at Norwich University. The Cadets participate in Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Football, Soccer, Lacrosse, and more. In recent years, Norwich men's teams have been regularly found in the national rankings, won conference titles, and won two national championships in ice hockey. The Great Northeast Athletic Conference (or GNAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Member institutions are located in the northeastern United States in the States of Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. ...


This is an exciting time for women's athletics at Norwich University. Two sports, lacrosse and volleyball, have recently been approved to receive varsity status and will compete as such in coming years. All current women's varsity teams compete at the NCAA Division III level and are members of the Great Northeast Athletic Conference. Some of the sports the women compete in are Basketball, Ice Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Softball, Swimming & Diving, and more.


The Norwich Men's Basketball team returned to the NCAA Tournament in 2006 after winning the GNAC post-season title. Head Coach Paul Booth garnered GNAC Coach of the Year honors for a second straight season, while point guard Geoff Hensley was named to the All-GNAC 1st Team and forward Rene Cheatham made the All-GNAC 2nd Team.


Norwich University's Krietzberg Arena also plays host to Elite Hockey Camp in the summer (as does Dartmouth College). Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ...


Students and organization

The University has approx. 2,000 undergraduate students, 112 full-time faculty (approx. 80% hold a doctorate), and a fluctuating number of adjunct professors. The student/faculty ratio is 14:1 and the male/female ratio is 2:1. The freshman retention rate is 80%. The student body comprises students from over 40 different states and 20 countries. In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ...


Norwich University has two very different on-campus resident programs: the Corps of Cadets and the traditional student body.


Corps

The Corps side is structured as a regiment commanded by a Cadet Colonel (C/COL) with four battalions each commanded by a Cadet Lieutenant Colonel (C/LTC). Normally, each battalion consists of three companies commanded by a Cadet Captain (C/CPT) which are made of two platoons (1st platoon is the upperclassmen and 2nd platoon the freshmen, or "Rooks"). British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... A company is a military unit, typically consisting of 100-200 soldiers. ...

1st Battalion 2nd Battalion 3rd Battalion Provisional Battalion
Alpha Delta Golf Regimental Band Company
Bravo Echo Hotel Drill Team
Charlie Foxtrot India Cavalry Troop
Kilo Norwich Independent Battery
Headquarters & Headquarters Company

Traditional

The Resident Life Department oversees the civilian side. Floors in the Residence Halls are under the supervision of a Resident Advisor (RA). The Residence Halls are in turn supervised by Resident Coordinators (RC) who report to the Area Coordinator (AC) and the Director of Resident Life (DoRL). Norwich is unique in that students hold positions that at many other colleges and universities are reserved for professional staff. A resident assistant, commonly shortened to RA, is a trained student leader, within a college or university, who is given the responsibility of supervising students living in a residence hall. ...


Graduate

The Norwich University School of Graduate Studies oversees the university's graduate programs. By majority, the graduate programs are conducted on a distance learning based platform. The university offerers accredited and highly recognized programs in a range of fields. [3] Distance Learning is learning carried out apart from the usual classroom setting; in an asynchronous setting. ...


Notable alumni

Military

  • Major General Horatio G. Wright (NU 1834-1836) - Commander of the VI Corps and Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War. Chief of Engineers for the US Army. Chief Engineer for the completion of the Washington Monument.
  • Brigadier General Simon Manly Preston - Commanded the 52nd Miss. Regiment during the American Civil War. Appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant as the United States Internal Revenue Collector for Mississippi. Later served as the chief engineer for the Nachez, Jackson & Columbia Railroad.
  • Major General Leonard F. Wing Jr. - Commander of the 43rd Infantry Division (United States) "Winged Victory" in the Pacific Theater during World War II.
  • Major General Ernest N. Harmon — Armored division, corps and later German Constabulary commander. Became the 22nd President of the University in 1950. Ernest Harmon Air Force Base is named in his honor.
  • Major General Briard Poland Johnson (NU 1927) - Commander of the 67th Armored Regiment during World War II. Commander of the US Military Assistance Group to Thailand, 1959-62. Chief of Staff for the Continental Army Command, Fort Monroe, Virginia, 1963. [3]
  • Captain James M. Burt (NU 1939) — Medal of Honor and Purple Heart recipient for his actions during the Battle of Aachen during World War II, alumnus of Theta Chi.
  • Brigadier General Charles E. Canedy (NU 1953) — Inducted into the Army Aviation Hall of Fame in 1995, he organized one of the first air cavalry troops in the US Army. While serving at The Pentagon he was responsible for the adoption of the UH-1 and the AH-1 Cobra.
  • General Boonsrang Niumpradit (NU 1966) — Chief of Joint Staff for the Supreme Command Headquarters, Royal Thai Army. [4]
  • Lieutenant General Tanongsuk Tuvinum (NU 1970) - Superintendent of the National Defence College of Thailand.
  • Brigadier General Jeffrey P. Lyon (NU 1972) — Chief of Staff for the Vermont Air National Guard. [5]

Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ... James Harmon Ward (25 September 1806 - 27 June 1861) was the first officer of the United States Navy killed during the American Civil War. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Captain (disambiguation). ... George Musalas (Colvos) Colvocoresses, naval officer and commander of the Saratoga during the American Civil War[1] adopted son of Alden Partridge. ... USS Saratoga, a sloop-of-war, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for the Battle of Saratoga of the American Revolutionary War. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Horatio G. Wright Horatio Gouverneur Wright ( March 6, 1820 – July 2, 1899) was an engineer and officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Edward Bancroft Williston (July 15, 1837 - April 24, 1920) was an American Brigadier General in the United States Army, veteran of the American Civil War and recipient of the Medal of Honor. ... For other uses, see Medal of Honor (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Trevilian Station (also called Trevilians) was fought June 11–12, 1864, in Union General Ulysses Grants Overland Campaign against Confederate Gen. ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... George Dewey (December 26, 1837 – January 16, 1917) was an admiral of the United States Navy, best known for his victory (without the loss of a single life of his own forces due to combat; one man died of a heart attack) at the Battle of Manila Bay during the... The Asiatic Squadron, also known as the Asiatic Station, was the fleet of United States Navy warships and supporting elements stationed in the Pacific Ocean in the 19th century. ... There have been a number of naval battles that occurred in Manila Bay. ... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... Brigadier General Edmund Rice Edmund Rice (December 2, 1842 – July 20, 1906) was a soldier in the United States Army and a Medal of Honor recipient who achieved the rank of Brigadier General. ... Map of Picketts Charge, July 3, 1863. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... Thomas Orville Seaver (December 23, 1833 - July 11, 1912) rose to the rank of Colonel in the U.S. Army and received the Medal of Honor for his heroism during the Civil War. ... The 3rd Regiment, Vermont Volunteer Infantry (or 3rd VVI) was a three years infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... For other uses, see Medal of Honor (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Battle of the Wilderness in the American Civil War. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... George Albert Converse (13 May 1844 – 29 March 1909) was an officer of the United States Navy, who was noted for his contributions to naval engineering. ... A torpedo boat is a relatively small and fast naval ship designed to launch torpedoes at larger surface ships. ... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... Several ships of United States Navy were named USS Converse, named for George Albert Converse: The first Converse (DD-291) was a Clemson-class destroyer, commissioned in 1920 and decommissioned in 1930. ... (Redirected from 1st Lieutenant) First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... James Ezekiel Porter (1846-1876) was one of General Custers officers killed at the Battle of Little Bighorn, also known as Custers Last Stand. ... 7th Cavalry Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia The 7th United States Cavalry Regiment is a United States Army cavalry regiment, whose lineage traces back to the mid-19th century. ... Combatants Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, Arapaho United States Commanders Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse George A. Custer â€ , Marcus Reno, Frederick Benteen, James Calhoun â€  Strength 949 lodges (probably 950-1,200 warriors) 31 officers, 566 troopers, 15 armed civilians, ~35-40 scouts Casualties At least 54 killed, ~168 wounded (according to Sitting Bull... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Hiram Iddings Bearss (13 April 1875 – August 28, 1938) was an officer of the United States Marine Corps who was awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Philippine-American War and the Distinguished Service Cross for his valor in World War I. Bearss was born 13 April 1875... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... For other uses, see Medal of Honor (disambiguation). ... Belligerents United States Philippine Constabulary Philippine Scouts First Philippine Republic several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar several unofficial leaders post-1902 Strength 126,000 soldiers[1] First Philippine Republic: 80,000 soldiers Casualties and losses ~5,000-7,000[1][2] ~12,000... The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration of the United States Army, awarded for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... 1877 Chatterlaut French Cavalry Sword brought back from World War I by Edward H. Brooks Edward Hale Brooks (April 25, 1893 – October 10, 1978) was a decorated officer in the United States Army and a veteran of World War I, World War II and the Korean Conflict. ... This article is about the armoured fighting vehicle. ... The 43d Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War II. // Activated: 21 March 1925 as a National Guard Division in Connecticut, Maine, Rhode Island, and Vermont. ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... Ernest Harmon AFB is a former United States Air Force base located in Stephenville, Newfoundland and Labrador. ... General Isaac D. White commanded the U.S. Army, Pacific (USARPAC) from July 1957 to March 1961. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... This article is about a military unit. ... // Also known as USARPAC, the U.S. Army Pacific Command is the army component unit of the U.S. Pacific Command, except the units in Korea. ... James M. Burt was a United States Army armor officer who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his valor in the battle for the German city of Aachen during World War II. A depiction of Captain Burt commanding his tank in WWII. Burt was born in Massachusetts and graduated... For other uses, see Medal of Honor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Purple Heart (disambiguation). ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... General James Harold Jimmy Doolittle, Sc. ... Combatants  United States  Japan Commanders James H. Doolittle Hideki Tojo Strength 16 B-25 Mitchells Unknown number of troops and homeland defense Casualties 3 dead, 8 POWs (4 died in captivity); 5 interned in USSR all 16 B-25s About 50 dead, 400 injured Lt. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an influential and independent, nonpartisan foreign policy membership organization founded in 1921 and based at 58 East 68th Street (corner Park Avenue) in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C. Through its membership, meetings, and studies, it has been... USS Washington (BB-56), the second of two North Carolina-class battleships, was the third ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the 42nd state. ... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders William H. Rupertus, USMC Kunio Nakagawa Strength 2 divisions (1st Marine Division and the USA 81st Infantry Division) Approximately 11,000 men Casualties 2,336 killed and 8,450 wounded 10,695 killed, 202 captured The Battle of Peleliu, like the bloody World... Combatants  United States  United Kingdom  Canada  Australia  New Zealand Empire of Japan Commanders Simon B. Buckner â€  Joseph W. Stilwell Ray Spruance Mitsuru Ushijima â€  Isamu Cho â€  Strength 548,000 soldiers, 1,300 ships,  ? aircraft 100,000 regulars and militia,  ? ships,  ? aircraft Casualties 12,513 dead or missing, 38,916 wounded, 33... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Air cavalry are infantry units that use air units like the helicopter for mobility and firepower. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... The Bell UH-1 Iroquois, commonly known as the Huey, was a multipurpose military helicopter, famous for its use in the Vietnam war. ... The Bell AH-1 Cobra is an attack helicopter. ... General Gordon R. Sullivan General Gordon R. Sullivan (born September 25, 1937 in Boston, Massachusetts) was a U.S. Army general. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the highest ranking officer in the United States Army and is member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff [1]. Prior to 1903, the military head of the... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... The Royal Thai Army is the army of Thailand. ... The Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Agency (AF ISR) (F.K.A. the Air Intelligence Agency (AIA)) is an agency of the United States Air Force, with headquarters at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, and was activated 1 October 1993. ... The US Strategic Command Joint Information Operations Warfare Command, or JIOWC, is responsible for the integration of Information Operations (IO) into military plans and operations across the spectrum of conflict. ... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... The Singapore Armed Forces Military Police Command providing security coverage at the Padang in Singapore during the National Day Parade in 2000. ... Based in Ft. ... Look up airborne in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq arguably without the explicit backing of the...

Political

  • William Little Lee (NU 1842) — Lawyer and privy counselor to Kamehameha III of Hawaii, later served as the Kingdom's chief justice from 1848 to his death in 1857.
  • William Pitt Kellogg (NU 1848) — Was appointed Chief Justice of the Nebraska Territory in 1861 by President Lincoln but soon after resigned to fight in the Civil War. Elected to the Senate from Louisiana in 1868, he became the governor of that state in 1873 and left office with the end of Reconstruction 1877. Returning to the Senate in 1877, he remained there until 1883 when he sought a term (1883-1885) in the House instead. Was one of the few carpetbagger politicians to remain in power in the South post-Reconstruction.

Thomas Green Clemson (1809–1889) was an American politician and statesman, serving as an ambassador and the United States Superintendent of Agriculture. ... In 1832, shortly after the creation of the Kingdom of Belgium, the United States established diplomatic relations. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. ... Gideon Welles (July 1, 1802–February 11, 1878) was the United States Secretary of the Navy from 1861 to 1869, including the entire duration of the American Civil War: his dedication to naval blockades was one of the key reasons for the Norths victory over the South. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Edward Stanly Edward Stanly (January 10, 1810-July 12, 1872) was a North Carolina politician. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Look up orator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... GOP redirects here. ... Categories: Stub | 1810 births | 1872 deaths | Governors of North Carolina | United States Senators ... The Governor of North Carolina is the top executive of the government of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... United States Senate House of Representatives Congress District 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 1st* (1789-1791) John Baptista Ashe John Steele Hugh Williamson Timothy Bloodworth John Sevier 2nd* (1791-1793) William Barry Grove Nathaniel Macon 3rd* (1793-1795) William J. Dawson Matthew... The Attorney General of the Confederate States of America was a member of Confederacy cabinet. ... Governor Horatio Seymour Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Major Alvan Earle Bovay (1818-January 13, 1903) was the founder of the Republican Party of the United States. ... GOP redirects here. ... Ripon College is also the name of a college in Yorkshire, England. ... A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, typically in a monarchy. ... Kamehameha III, King of Hawaii (born Kauikeaouli) (August 11, 1813?–December 15, 1854) was the king of the Kingdom of Hawaii from 1824 to 1854. ... William Pitt Kellogg (December 8, 1830 August 10, 1918) was an American politician. ... Nebraska Territory was a historic, organized territory of the United States from May 30, 1854 until March 1, 1867 when Nebraska became the 37th U.S. state. ... List of Governors of Louisiana First French Era Sieur Sauvole de la Villantry 1699-1701 Jean Baptiste de la Moyne, Sieur de Bienville 1701-1713 Antonine de la Mothe Cadillac 1713-1716 Jean Baptiste de la Moyne 1716-1717 De lEpinay 1717-1718 Jean Baptiste de la Moyne 1718... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... In United States history, carpetbaggers were Northerners who moved to the South during Reconstruction between 1865 and 1877. ... The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... In the United States, the state supreme court (known by various names in various states) is the highest state court in the state court system. ... Burleigh F. Spalding Burleigh Folsom Spalding (December 3, 1853 - March 17, 1934) was a United States Representative from North Dakota. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... The North Dakota Supreme Court is the highest court of law in the state of North Dakota. ... For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... Ernest Willard Gibson (also known as Ernest W. Gibson) (1872-1940) was a United States Representative and Senator from Vermont. ... Representatives Hall, where the Vermont House of Representatives convenes in the Vermont State House. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Ernest William Gibson, Jr. ... Vermont was admitted to the Union on March 4, 1791. ... The Pacific Ocean theater was one of four major theaters of the Pacific War, between 1941 and 1945. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... The United States Bureau of Reclamation (Formerly the United States Reclamation Service) is a division of the U.S. Department of the Interior which oversees water development projects in the western United States. ... Colin Kenny (born December 10, 1943) is a Canadian Senator. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... “Trudeau” redirects here. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Jason R. Holsman (born March 25, 1976) is a high school social studies teacher and politician from the U.S. state of Missouri. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. ...

Business

  • Pierson Mapes (NU 1959) — President of NBC from 1982 to 1994

Harry Bates Thayer (1858 - 1936), U.S. was an electrical and telephone businessman. ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Brigadier General Robert Francis McDermott (July 31, 1920 – August 28, 2006) was the first permanent Dean of the Faculty at the United States Air Force Academy, and later served as Chairman and CEO of USAA. He is often referred to as the Father of Modern Military Education for his contributions... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA or Air Force),[1] located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers for the United States Air Force. ... This article is about the television network. ...

Engineering & architecture

  • Edward D. Adams (NU 1864) — Engineer and builder of the Niagara Falls Power facility

The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Champlain Canal is a canal in New York, USA. It is now part of the New York Barge Canal. ... Northern Pacific Railway Categories: Stub | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Idaho railroads | Minnesota railroads | Montana railroads | North Dakota railroads | Oregon railroads | Washington railroads | Wisconsin railroads ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Grenville M. Dodge wearing a major generals uniform Grenville Mullen Dodge (April 12, 1831 – January 3, 1916) was a Union army officer on the frontier and during the Civil War, a U.S. Congressman, businessman, and railroad executive who helped construct the Transcontinental Railroad. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Union Pacific redirects here. ... For the 1939 western movie, see Dodge City (1939 film). ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... Samuel Thomas Wellman, (February 5, 1847 – July 11, 1919) was an American steel industry pioneer, industrialist, and prolific inventor. ... ASME redirects here. ... William Rutherford Mead (1846-1928) was an American architect, a part of the famed McKim, Mead, and White firm. ... Charles Follen McKim, portrait by Frances Benjamin Johnston. ... Stanford White (1853-1906) Washington Square Arch New York American on June 25, 1906 Stanford White (November 9, 1853 – June 25, 1906) was an American architect and partner in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White, the frontrunner among Beaux-Arts firms. ... McKim, Mead, and White was a prominent architectural firm in the eastern United States at the turn of the twentieth century. ... The City Beautiful movement was a Progressive reform movement in North American architecture and urban planning that flourished in the 1890s and 1900s with the intent of using beautification and monumental grandeur in cities to counteract the perceived moral decay of poverty-stricken urban environments. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... McKim, Mead, and White was a prominent architectural firm in the eastern United States at the turn of the twentieth century. ... North façade The Rhode Island State House, located in downtown Providence, Rhode Island, is the seat of government of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... Morningside Heights is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City and is bound by the Upper West Side, Morningside Park, Harlem, and Riverside Park (some now consider it part of the Upper West Side). ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Pennsylvania Station (commonly known as Penn Station) is the major intercity rail station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. ... The West Wing (in foreground) The West Wing is the part of the White House Complex in which the Oval Office, the Cabinet Room, and the Situation Room are located. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...

Other notable alumni

  • Emily Caruso (NU 2000) — 2002, 2005, 2006, & 2007 National Air Rifle Champion. Member of 2004 Olympic Rifle Team. [14] [15]

Frederick Townsend Ward (1831-1862) was a sailor, mercenary and soldier of fortune famous for his military victories for Imperial China during the Taiping Rebellion. ... A Soldier of Fortune is another term for a mercenary. ... China is the worlds oldest continuous major civilization, with written records dating back about 3,500 years and with 5,000 years being commonly used by Chinese as the age of their civilization. ... Combatants Qing Empire United Kingdom France (United Kingdom and France join the war later) Taiping Heavenly Kingdom Commanders Xianfeng Emperor Tongzhi Emperor Empress Dowager Cixi Charles George Gordon Frederick Townsend Ward Hong Xiuquan Yang Xiuqing Xiao Chaogui Feng Yunshan Wei Changhui Shi Dakai Li Xiucheng Strength 2,000,000-5... Arthur Chase, A 56 Arthur Chase, Alpha/Norwich 1856, is the co-founder of Theta Chi Fraternity. ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... Dr. Erasmus Arlington Arlie Pond (Born January 19, 1873 in East Saugus, Massachusetts, Died September 19, 1930 in Cebu, Philippines) was a major league pitcher for the Baltimore Orioles from 1895-1898, as well as a doctor in the U.S. Army. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group, Tuskegee Airmen, the elite, all-African American 332nd Fighter Group at Ramitelli, Italy. ... Marjorie Welish is an American poet, artist, and art critic. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue and Orange Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National Football... Allen Doyle (born July 26 1948 in Woonsocket, Rhode Island) is an American golfer who is a leading player on the Champions Tour, the worlds leading tour for senior golfers. ... In golf the distinction between amateurs and professionals is rigorously maintained. ... The Champions Tour, a golf tour run by the PGA TOUR, hosts 30 events annually in the United States and Canada for golfers 50 and older. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst Massachusetts or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, Mass. ... “Neu” redirects here. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... Michael Dante Mori (born October 4, 1965) is a major in the United States Marine Corps. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002 Guantánamo Bay detainment camp serves as a joint military prison and interrogation center under the leadership of Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO), has occupied a portion of the United States Navys base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba since 2002. ... For the American chaplain, see David Hicks (chaplain). ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is an American organization consisting of two separate entities: the ACLU Foundation, a non-profit organization that focuses on litigation and communication efforts, and the American Civil Liberties Union which focuses on legislative lobbying and does not have non-profit status. ... Keith Aucoin (born November 6, 1978 in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, USA) is an American hockey player who plays for the Carolina Hurricanes. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ...

References

  1. ^ Reynolds, Terry. "The Education of Engineers in America Before the Morrill Act of 1862." History of Education Quarterly, Vol 32, No 4, Winter 1992.
  2. ^ Nat Frothingham, "Vermont College and Union: One Plus One Equals Three," The Montpelier Bridge, May 2001. http://www.mtbytes.com/mpbridge/article.cfm?articleid=264
  3. ^ Norwich University School of Graduate Studies

External links

Military of the United States Portal

Template:United States Private Universities and Colleges Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ... See Vermont state entry. ... Bennington College is a liberal arts college located in Bennington, Vermont. ... Burlington College is a private liberal arts college located in Burlington, Vermont. ... Champlain College is a private college located in Burlington, Vermont. ... College of St. ... The shingle style clock house on the Greatwood Campus appears on the college seal. ... Green Mountain College is a private, environmental liberal arts college in Poultney, Vermont. ... Founded in 1985 by Charles Drake, Landmark College is the first college exclusively for students with learning disabilities in the United States. ... Marlboro College is a small alternative liberal-arts college in Marlboro, Vermont, USA. // Marlboro College was founded in 1946 by returning World War II veterans on Potash Hill in Marlboro, Vermont. ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... The New England Culinary Institute (NECI) is a culinary school located in Montpelier, Vermont founded on June 15, 1980 by Fran Voigt and John Dranow. ... Saint Michaels College is a private, residential, liberal arts Catholic college. ... Sterling College is a work college in Craftsbury Common, Vermont known as the smallest accredited four-year college in the country. ... International Building at School for International Training School for International Training, or SIT, is an accredited college in Brattleboro, Vermont. ... Everett Mansion, Southern Vermont College Southern Vermont College is a private liberal arts school located in Bennington, Vermont. ... UVM redirects here. ... Oakes Hall, Vermont Law School Vermont Law School is a private law school located in South Royalton, Vermont (a village of Royalton, Vermont). ... Woodbury College is an institute of higher learning in Montpelier, Vermont, USA. It was established in 1975. ... The Vermont State Colleges (VSC) is the U.S. state of Vermonts system of public colleges. ... Castleton State College is a public liberal arts college located at Castleton in the U.S. state of Vermont. ... Community College of Vermont is a community college headquarted in Montpelier, Vermont and with offices in twelve other Vermont towns. ... Johnson State College is a public college located in Johnson, Vermont. ... Lyndon State College is a public college located at Lyndonville in the U.S. state of Vermont. ... The Vermont Technical College The Vermont Technical College (VTC) is a public technological institute located in the village of Randolph Center, Vermont (in the town of Randolph, Vermont). ... The Empire 8 (or E8) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. // Full member institutions include: Norwich University Springfield College Washington & Jefferson College The Empire 8 can trace its beginnings back to 1964 with the founding of the Independent College Athletic Conference (ICAC). ... Alfred University (Alfred) is a small, comprehensive university in the Village of Alfred in western New York State, USA, an hour south of Rochester and two hours southeast of Buffalo. ... Elmira College is a coeducational private liberal arts college located in Elmira, in New York States Southern Tier region. ... Hartwick College is a non-denominational, private, four-year, third tier, liberal arts and sciences college located in Oneonta, New York, in the United States. ... Ithaca College is a private institution of higher education located on the South Hill of Ithaca, New York. ... For other colleges with the same name, see Nazareth College. ... RIT redirects here. ... St. ... Stevens Institute of Technology is a technological university located on a 55 acre (223,000 m²) campus in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA, founded in 1870 on the basis of an 1868 bequest from Edwin A. Stevens. ... Utica College Utica College (or UC) is located in Utica, New York. ... Springfield College is a college located in Springfield, Massachusetts. ... Washington & Jefferson College (W&J) is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college located in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area, in the city of Washington, Pennsylvania. ... A military academy (American English), or service academy (British English) is an educational institution which prepares candidates for service in the military (officer corps of the Army), naval service or air force or provides education in a service environment, the exact definition depending on the country. ... The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA or Air Force),[1] located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers for the United States Air Force. ... The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ... The United States Merchant Marine Academy is one of the five United States service academies. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ... USMA redirects here. ... The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), established by the United States Congress in 1972 and graduating its first class in 1980, is a center for military medical education and research. ... The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... North Georgia College & State University (NGCSU), also known as The Military College of Georgia, is one of six senior military colleges in the United States. ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech, is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, and veterinary medicine programs from its historical polytechnic core are still considered to... Established in 1879 in Milledgeville, Georgia Military College (abbreviated as GMC) now includes a liberal arts junior college, a high school, and a middle school. ... Marion Military Institute is the state military college of Alabama. ... New Mexico Military Institute is located in Roswell, New Mexico. ... The Valley Forge Military Academy is a boarding school for young men grades seven through twelve, and additionally offers a co-ed 2 year junior college program. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Norwich University - Military College, Traditional Degrees (172 words)
Whether they choose the military college path or the traditional college path, students are challenged with leadership experiences and receive a balanced, rigorous education that allows them to act as well as think, and to execute as well as conceive.
Norwich University offers 28 undergraduate and 11 master’s level programs, as well as numerous co-curricular activities designed to challenge and reward students.
Norwich graduates also join a close-knit community of alumni who have played an instrumental role in the formation of this country, from its earliest beginnings to its current position as a global leader.
Accreditation and Mission - Norwich University | Directory of Schools (732 words)
Norwich University is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc., through its Commission on Institutions of Higher Education.
Norwich's mission statement is one of the most unique statements found in higher education.
Alden Partridge, the founder of Norwich, founded the university on a radical curriculum and pedagogy for the time, that of developing students in an experiential learning environment, hence the "acting" and "executing" additions to the classical model of the day.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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