FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Northwestern University
Northwestern University

Motto: Quaecumque sunt vera (Latin: Whatsoever things are true) -Philippians 4:8 KJV
Established: 1851
Type: Private
Endowment: US $7 billion[1]
President: Henry S. Bienen
Faculty: 2,563
Undergraduates: 7,826
Postgraduates: 6,282
Location: Flag of the United States Evanston, IL, U.S.
Campus: Suburban and Urban
Annual Fees: $46,005 (2007–2008)
Colors: Purple and White[2]            
Mascot: Willie the Wildcat
Athletics: NCAA Division I, Big Ten
Wildcats
Affiliations: Association of American Universities, COFHE
Website: northwestern

Northwestern University (NU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago. The university is organized into eleven schools and colleges granting undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees. The Kellogg School of Management, Medill School of Journalism, Feinberg School of Medicine, McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, School of Communication, School of Education and Social Policy, School of Music, and School of Law are often ranked highly in their respective fields.[3] Student enrollments include approximately 7,800 undergraduate and 6,300 graduate students.[4] Northwestern competes in the NCAA's Division I and is a founding member of the Big Ten Conference. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Philippians redirects here. ... King James Version redirects here. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Henry Bienen is the current president of Northwestern University. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... This article is about the color. ... This article is about the color. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Willie the Wildcat is the mascot for the Northwestern University Wildcats. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... The Northwestern Wildcats are the athletic teams that represent Northwestern University, a founding member of the Big Ten Conference, and the only private university member. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... COFHE is an acronym for The Consortium on Financing Higher Education. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... This article is about the concept. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... The Near North Side is the part of Chicago, Illinois just north of the downtown central business district (the Loop). ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Kellogg School of Management (The Kellogg School or Kellogg) is the business school of Northwestern University located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... Northwestern Universitys Medill School of Journalism (often just called Medill) is one of the premier journalism, integrated marketing, and media schools in the United States. ... The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is located in Chicago, Illinois, at 330 East Chicago Avenue. ... Established in 1909, the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science (MEAS) is one of six undergraduate schools at Northwestern University. ... Established in 1878, the Northwestern University School of Communication is an undergraduate and graduate institution devoted to the academic study of communication arts and sciences, located on Northwestern Universitys campus in Evanston, Illinois, about 12 miles north of downtown Chicago. ... Established in 1926, the School of Education and Social Policy is an undergraduate and graduate institution devoted to the academic study of education, located on Northwestern Universitys campus in Evanston, Illinois, about 12 miles north of downtown Chicago. ... Established in 1895, the Northwestern University School of Music is an undergraduate and graduate institution devoted to musical performing arts and academia, located on Northwestern Universitys campus in Evanston, Illinois, about 12 miles north of downtown Chicago. ... The Northwestern University School of Law is a private American law school in Chicago, Illinois. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

The Arch at Northwestern's Evanston campus
The Arch at Northwestern's Evanston campus

Founded in 1851 by Methodists from Chicago (including John Evans, after whom Evanston is named), Northwestern opened in Evanston in 1855 with two faculty members and ten students. The school’s nine founders, all of who were Methodists (three of them ministers), knelt in prayer and worship before launching their first organizational meeting.[5] The University's name, Northwestern, came from its founders' desire to serve citizens of the states that occupied the area of the former Northwest Territory: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota. The original Evanston campus in 1855 consisted of only one building, a temporary structure called "Old College." University Hall, the first permanent building, was constructed in 1869. Northwestern built a campus in Chicago for the schools of law, medicine, and business in the 1920s. The history of Northwestern University spans over 150 years from before its foundation in 1850 to the present. ... Download high resolution version (992x623, 972 KB) The Arch at the main entrance to Northwestern Universitys Evanston, Illinois campus Taken 10/2004 by User:Rdsmith4. ... Download high resolution version (992x623, 972 KB) The Arch at the main entrance to Northwestern Universitys Evanston, Illinois campus Taken 10/2004 by User:Rdsmith4. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... John Evans (9 March 1814–3 July 1897) was a US politician, physician, railroad promoter, and namesake of Evanston, Illinois. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... An Elder in Methodism -- sometimes called a Presbyter -- is someone who has been ordained by a Bishop to the ministry of Word, Sacrament, Order, and Service. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Monument honoring the right to worship, Washington, D.C. In Christianity, worship has been considered by most Christians to be the central act of Christian identity throughout history. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Old College in 1899, before being moved to make way for Fisk Hall. ... University Hall in the present day. ... The 1920s they were sexy referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ...


The phrase on Northwestern's seal is Quaecumque sunt vera -- in Latin, "Whatsoever things are true" from Philippians 4:8. Also on Northwestern's seal, a Greek phrase inscribed on the pages of an open book: ho logos pleres charitos kai aletheias, which translates as "The Word... full of grace and truth." This phrase comes from the Gospel of John 1:14: "And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, and we behold His glory, and the glory was of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth." Both the Latin and Greek phrases express the values of the University's founders, and recall Northwestern's Methodist heritage. For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The Epistle to Philippians is a book included in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ...


Northwestern's founding charter granted the school a permanent exemption from paying property taxes. For this reason, Northwestern has often endured a difficult relationship with Evanston's government. Tensions have arisen regarding building codes, law enforcement, and politics. Recently, factions of Evanston's government have attempted to divide Northwestern's campus into several different wards, so as to reduce students' voting potency.


In 1873, the Evanston College for Ladies merged with Northwestern, and Frances Willard, who later gained fame as a suffragist, became the school's first dean of women. Northwestern first became co-educational in 1869 at the insistence of Dean Erastus Haven, and the first female student graduated in 1874. [6] 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Evanston College for Ladies was a female-only Methodist-affiliated institution closely linked with Northwestern University. ... Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839-February 17, 1898) was an American educator, temperance reformer, and womens suffragist. ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... Erastus Otis Haven (1 November 1820 – 2 August 1881) was an American bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, elected in 1880. ...

University Hall, the second building constructed on the campus, and the oldest building still standing.
University Hall, the second building constructed on the campus, and the oldest building still standing.

Purple became Northwestern's official school color in 1892[7], replacing black and gold. A university committee thought that too many other universities used those colors. Contrary to popular belief, both white and purple are official colors. The University's Alma Mater mentions white in conjunction with purple ("Hail to purple, hail to white"), and both are listed in the university guidelines.[2] This article is about the color. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the color. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ...


During the 1930s, Northwestern nearly merged with its academic rival, the University of Chicago.[8] In 1933, Northwestern President Walter Scott and Chicago President Robert Hutchins concluded that in order to secure the future of both universities, it was in the best interest of both to merge as the Universities of Chicago, with Northwestern's Evanston campus serving undergraduates, Northwestern's Chicago campus serving professionals, and Chicago's Hyde Park campus serving postgraduates. What Scott and Hutchins initially envisioned as the preeminent university in the world was eventually extinguished by Northwestern's boards of trustees, a result that Hutchins called "one of the lost opportunities of American education." [8] The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Chicago community area. ...


Northwestern hosted the first-ever NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship game in 1939. It took place in Patten Gymnasium, which was demolished and relocated farther north in order to make room for the Technological Institute. This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Patten Gymnasium was a 5,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Evanston, Illinois. ... The Technological Institute is a landmark building at Northwestern University. ...


In 1948, prominent anthropologist Melville J. Herskovits founded the Program of African Studies at Northwestern, the first center of its kind at an American academic institution. Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Melville Jean Herskovits (September 10, 1895 - February 25, 1963) was a U.S. anthropologist born in Bellefontaine, Ohio who firmly established African and African American studies in American academia. ... An Africanist is a specialist in African affairs, cultures, or languages. ...


In May 1978, the first Unabomber attack occurred at Northwestern University. The following year, the second Unabomber attack also occurred at Northwestern. Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Unabomber is a nickname applied to three people: Theodore Kaczynski, an American terrorist. ...


On January 11, 2003, in a speech at Northwestern School of Law's Lincoln Hall, Governor of Illinois George Ryan announced that he would commute the sentences of more than 150 death row inmates. Ryan said, "it is fitting that we are gathered here today at Northwestern University with the students, teachers, lawyers and investigators who first shed light on the sorrowful conditions of Illinois’ death penalty system."[9] In the late 1990s, Northwestern student journalists uncovered information that exonerated Illinois death row inmate Anthony Porter two days before his scheduled execution. is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... George Ryan George Homer Ryan (born February 24, 1934 in Maquoketa, Iowa) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1999 until 2003. ... For information about the Record company see Death Row Records For information about the computer game see Deathrow (game) Death Row is a term that refers to the section of a prison that houses individuals awaiting execution. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Anthony Porter (born 1955) was a prisoner on death row whose conviction was overturned in a landmark case for Illinois law and opponents of the death penalty across the world. ...


Campuses

See also: List of Northwestern University buildings

This list of Northwestern University buildings encompasses the two campuses in Evanston and Chicago, Illinois. ...

Evanston

Dearborn Observatory
Dearborn Observatory
Ford Design Center
Ford Design Center
Lunt Hall
Lunt Hall
The neo-Brutalist architecture of the University Library
The neo-Brutalist architecture of the University Library

Northwestern's Evanston campus, home to the undergraduate program and the business school, runs north-south along a stretch of Sheridan Road. The north side of campus is home to the campus' fraternity quads, the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion and other athletic facilities, and the Technological Institute and science-related buildings. The south side of campus is home to the University's humanities buildings, music buildings, art buildings, and sorority quads. This division in building location, along with the fact that the south end of campus is closer to the downtown center of Evanston, creates a cultural difference between the students typically found on either end of the campus. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (3000 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1,018 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Northwestern University... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (3000 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1,018 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Northwestern University... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (1717 × 1120 pixel, file size: 796 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (1717 × 1120 pixel, file size: 796 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at Lafayette College. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... The Technological Institute is a landmark building at Northwestern University. ... The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at Lafayette College. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ...


The university has five libraries on the Evanston campus and three on the Chicago campus. The libraries in total have over 9 million materials.[citation needed]


Notable buildings and places on campus include the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Catalysis Center, Pick-Staiger Concert Hall, Dearborn Observatory, McCormick Tribune Center for use by students in the Medill School of Journalism, The Arthur and Gladys Pancoe-Evanston Northwestern Healthcare Life Sciences Pavilion, Ryan Hall, Ford Motor Company Engineering Design Center. The Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art is an art museum located on the campus of the Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. ... The Dearborn Observatory in 2007. ...


In the 1960s, the Evanston campus expanded its boundaries by constructing a lakefill in Lake Michigan. The 84 acres are now home to the Northwestern University Library, Norris University Center, Pick-Staiger Concert Hall, among other facilities. The Northwestern University Lakefill is an area of land that was reclaimed from underwater. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... It has been suggested that Transportation Library, Northwestern University be merged into this article or section. ...


The Chicago Transit Authority's elevated train running through Evanston is called the Purple Line, taking its name from Northwestern's school color. The Foster and Davis stations are within walking distance of the southern end of the campus, while the Noyes station is close to the northern end of the campus. The Central station is close to Ryan Field, Northwestern's football stadium. Northwestern's professional schools and hospital in downtown Chicago are about four blocks east of the Chicago station on the CTA Red Line. For other uses, see Chicago Transit Authority (disambiguation). ... The L[1], variously, if perhaps incorrectly, styled L, El, EL, or L, is the rapid transit system that serves Chicago, Illinois in the United States. ... The Purple Line of the Chicago Transit Authority is a 3. ... Foster is a station on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system, on the Purple Line in Evanston, Illinois. ... Platforms 2 side platforms Other information Opened May 16, 1908 Rebuilt 1994 Accessible Traffic Passengers (2006) 1,188,783 0% Davis is a station on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system, on the Purple Line in Evanston, Illinois. ... Noyes is an station on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system, on the Purple Line in Evanston, Illinois. ... Connections CTA bus Platforms 1 island platform Tracks 2 tracks Other information Opened May 16, 1908 Rebuilt 1931 Traffic Passengers (2006) 268,068 4% Central is a station on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system, on the Purple Line at 1022 Central Street in Evanston, Illinois (directional coordinates 2600... For other uses, see Ryan Field. ... Chicago (800N/1E-1W) is a station on the State Street Subway, served by the Red Line. ... The Red Line (Howard-Dan Ryan Service) is a heavy rail line in Chicago, run by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) as part of the Chicago L system. ...


The Chicago Transit Authority and Pace Suburban Bus Service have several bus routes that run through both campuses. The Evanston Davis Street Metra station serves the Northwestern campus in downtown Evanston as well, and the Evanston Central Street Metra station is near Ryan Field. For other uses, see Chicago Transit Authority (disambiguation). ... Pace is the suburban bus division of the Regional Transportation Authority in the Chicago area. ... Evanston Davis Street is a commuter railroad station in downtown Evanston, Illinois, USA. It is served solely by Metras Union Pacific/North Line with trains going south to Ogilvie Transportation Center in Chicago and as far north as Kenosha, Wisconsin. ... A Metra Train in Ogilvie Transportation Center Metra (officially known as the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is a regional rail system that serves the city of Chicago, Illinois, United States and surrounding cities, many of them Chicago suburbs. ... Connections CTA Buses Platforms 2 Other information Accessible Fare zone C Evanston Central Street is the northernmost of the three commuter railroad stations in Evanston, Illinois, USA. It is an elevated station at Green Bay Road and Central Street, surrounded by a neighborhood of stores, restaurants and multi-story apartment... A Metra Train in Ogilvie Transportation Center Metra (officially known as the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is a regional rail system that serves the city of Chicago, Illinois, United States and surrounding cities, many of them Chicago suburbs. ...


Chicago

Northwestern's Chicago campus is located in the city's Streeterville neighborhood, with close proximity to landmarks such as the John Hancock Center and Michigan Avenue. Its Ward Building was the first academic skyscraper in the country. The Chicago campus is home to the medical school and hospital, the law school, the part-time business school, and the School of Continuing Studies, which offers evening and weekend courses for working adults. Streeterville is a neighborhood in Chicago north of the Chicago River. ... Several buildings bear this name, all built by John Hancock Insurance and named after John Hancock. ... The Michigan Avenue Bridge across the Chicago River. ... The Northwestern University School of Continuing Studies (SCS) is a private school with campuses in Evanston and Chicago, Illinois. ...


Academics

Profile

The Montgomery Ward Building at the Feinberg School of Medicine--America's first academic skyscraper.
The Montgomery Ward Building at the Feinberg School of Medicine--America's first academic skyscraper. [10]

In the 2005-06 academic year, there were 7,826 undergraduates and 5,640 graduate students enrolled fulltime. [2] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x824, 452 KB) Summary The Ward Building at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x824, 452 KB) Summary The Ward Building at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. ...


In the class of 2009, 6.4% are black, 17.4% are Asian, 6.5% are Hispanic, 1.8% are multiracial and 67.9% are White. The class is 52.1% female and 47.9% male. The mean high school rank was the 94th percentile and the combined SAT score 1402 (out of 1600), marking the highest SAT average of any class in Northwestern history. This made Northwestern the most selective Big Ten university, as well as one of the most selective universities in the American Midwest. Of those enrolled in the class of 2009, 126 graduated as valedictorian of their high school class.[citation needed] This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... Actress Halle Berry was born to a white mother and a black father The terms multiracial and mixed-race describe people whose parents are not the same race. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ...


For the undergraduate class of 2010, there were 18,385 total applicants, with 5,434 students being admitted (about 29%) and 2,062 enrolling as freshmen (about 38%).[3]


Of the 20,649 students that applied for admission to the Class of 2011 (an all-time record), 4,852 were accepted for an acceptance rate of 24.7%, a 5% decrease from the previous year (29% for the Class of 2010). Of those accepted, 1,975 chose to enroll. [11]The Class of 2011 has a mean SAT score of 1423, the highest average in NU history, and 86 percent ranked in the top ten percent of their high school class.[12]


In 2008, Northwestern University set yet another admissions record for the number of applicants to the class of 2012. The admissions office reported over 25,000 applicants, which is a 12% increase from the previous year. In the past three years, the number of applicants to Northwestern has grown by an astounding 54%.[13] 1,531 students applied for Early Decision; 561 were accepted, which lowered the acceptance rate for ED students to 37%. Overall, the percentage increase in applicants from the previous year is 14%.[14] [15]


Faculty and administration

Northwestern has had fifteen presidents during its history, not including interim presidents. The current president is Henry Bienen. This list of Northwestern University faculty includes current, former, emeritus, and deceased faculty, administrators, and researchers at Northwestern University. ... Henry Bienen is the current president of Northwestern University. ...


Former notable faculty include artist Ed Paschke and Nobel Prize-winning chemist John Pople. Ed Paschke (1939 - 2004) was an American painter. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Sir John Anthony Pople, FRS, (October 31, 1925 – March 15, 2004) was a theoretical chemist. ...


Current notable faculty include sexual psychologist J. Michael Bailey; Holocaust denier Arthur Butz [16] ; Kyoto Prize-winning philosopher Jurgen Habermas; military sociologist and "don't ask, don't tell" author Charles Moskos; Templeton Prize-winner Charles Taylor; Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Garry Wills; and MacArthur Fellowship recipients Stuart Dybek, Aleksandar Hemon, Jennifer Richeson, Amy Rosenzweig, and Mary Zimmerman. John Michael Bailey (born 2 July 1957 in Lubbock, Texas) is an American psychology professor, best known for his controversial work on homosexuality, bisexuality and transsexualism. ... Richard Harwoods Did Six Million Really Die? Holocaust denial is the claim that the mainstream historical version of the Holocaust is either highly exaggerated or completely falsified. ... Arthur R. Butz (born 1933 in New York City) is an American Holocaust denier and an associate professor of electrical engineering at Northwestern University, where has been tenured since 1974. ... The Kyoto Prize (京都賞) has been awarded annually since 1984 by the Inamori Foundation, founded by Kazuo Inamori (fortune from ceramics). ... Jürgen Habermas Jürgen Habermas (born June 18, 1929 in Düsseldorf, Germany) is a philosopher and social theorist in the tradition of critical theory. ... This article is about the U.S. military policy. ... Professor Charles Moskos Charles C. Moskos II, influential military sociologist in the United States Military and a professor at Northwestern University. ... The Templeton Prize for Progress Toward Research or Discoveries about Spiritual Realities was until 2001 awarded for Progress in Religion. ... Charles Margrave Taylor, CC, BA, MA, Ph. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Garry Wills (born May 22, 1934 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an author and historian, and a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... Stuart Dybek (b. ... Aleksandar Hemon is a Bosnian fiction writer living in the United States. ... Jennifer Richeson is an African-American psychologist who studies racial identity and interracial interactions. ... Mary Zimmerman is a member of the Lookingglass Theatre Company and is an Artistic Associate of the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Rankings

U.S. University Rankings In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...

USNWR National University[17] 14th
USNWR Business School[18] 5th
USNWR Law School[19] 12th
USNWR Medical School (research) [20] 21st
USNWR Medical School (primary care) [21] 44th
USNWR Engineering School[22] 21st
USNWR Education School[23] 7th
ARWU World[24] 29th
ARWU National[25] 22nd
ARWU Natural Science & Math[26] 30th
ARWU Engineering & CS[27] 20th
ARWU Life Sciences[28] 51st
ARWU Clinical Medicine[29] 39th
ARWU Social Sciences[30] 13th
THES World[31] 29th
CMUP[32] 23rd
Washington Monthly[33] 55th

Northwestern University is ranked 14th among national universities by U.S.News & World Report (tied with Brown University and Johns Hopkins University),[34] 29th among world universities and 22nd among universities in the Americas by Shanghai Jiao Tong University,[35] and 15th in North America by The Times Higher Education Supplement,[36] 42nd among national universities by Washington Monthly,[37] 35th among world universities and 23rd among American universities by Newsweek,[38] and in the 6th tier among national universities by The Center for Measuring University Performance.[39] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine from Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1933 as United States News, which in 1948 merged with World Report. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


USNWR ranks Northwestern's School of Law 12th,[40] Kellogg School of Management 5th,[41] Feinberg School of Medicine 21st in research and 44th in primary care,[42] the McCormick School of Engineering 21st,[43] and the School of Education and Social Policy 7th.[44] The Northwestern University School of Law is a private American law school in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Kellogg School of Management (The Kellogg School or Kellogg) is the business school of Northwestern University located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is located in Chicago, Illinois, at 330 East Chicago Avenue. ... Established in 1909, the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science (MEAS) is one of six undergraduate schools at Northwestern University. ...


The Medill School of Journalism ranks among America's top three journalism, media, and advertising schools [45][46] Business Week ranks Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management as the best business school for executive MBA's and 3rd best overall, with respect to full-time MBA programs.[47] Northwestern Universitys Medill School of Journalism (often just called Medill) is one of the premier journalism, integrated marketing, and media schools in the United States. ...


The Princeton Review ranks NU with the 12th best college newspaper, 3rd best college theater, and 5th worst town and gown relationship.[48] Men's Fitness magazine named Northwestern the fifth-fittest college in America in 2005.[49] The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... Town and gown is a term used to describe the two communities of a university town; town being the non-academic population and gown the university community, especially in traditional seats of learning such as Oxford and Cambridge. ... Men’s Fitness is a men’s magazine published by American Media, Inc. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Schools and colleges

Northwestern University comprises 11 schools and colleges:

Undergraduate and Graduate Programs Graduate and Professional
Evanston Campus Evanston Campus

Chicago Campus The Judd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences (WCAS) at Northwestern University was established in 1851 and is the largest of Northwesterns schools. ... Established in 1878, the Northwestern University School of Communication is an undergraduate and graduate institution devoted to the academic study of communication arts and sciences, located on Northwestern Universitys campus in Evanston, Illinois, about 12 miles north of downtown Chicago. ... Established in 1895, the Northwestern University School of Music is an undergraduate and graduate institution devoted to musical performing arts and academia, located on Northwestern Universitys campus in Evanston, Illinois, about 12 miles north of downtown Chicago. ... The Kellogg School of Management (The Kellogg School or Kellogg) is the business school of Northwestern University located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... Established in 1909, the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science (MEAS) is one of six undergraduate schools at Northwestern University. ... Northwestern Universitys Medill School of Journalism (often just called Medill) is one of the premier journalism, integrated marketing, and media schools in the United States. ... Established in 1926, the School of Education and Social Policy is an undergraduate and graduate institution devoted to the academic study of education, located on Northwestern Universitys campus in Evanston, Illinois, about 12 miles north of downtown Chicago. ... The Kellogg School of Management (The Kellogg School or Kellogg) is the business school of Northwestern University located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... The Graduate School (also known as TGS) is the liberal arts graduate school of Northwestern University, awarding advanced degrees in 70 disciplines. ...

Chicago Campus

The Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (1853) is also located on the Evanston campus, though it is only affiliated with the university. The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is located in Chicago, Illinois, at 330 East Chicago Avenue. ... The Northwestern University School of Law is a private American law school in Chicago, Illinois. ... Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (G-ETS) is a graduate school of theology of the United Methodist Church located in Evanston, Illinois. ...


Campus Life

Traditions

Northwestern University student traditions include:

The Rock
The Rock
  • Originally a fountain that was donated by the Class of 1902, painting The Rock is now a way to advertise Greek organizations, student groups, and on-campus events.[50]
  • Northwestern has several traditions for football games. For example, the Wildcat Growl is done when opposing teams control the ball. This works especially well in thwarting audibles on the field as the majority of home fans participate. Also, students jingle their keys at the beginning of each kickoff. Students used to throw marshmallows during football games, but this unusual tradition was discontinued at the behest of former football coach Gary Barnett.
  • The Clock Tower glows purple after a winning game, alternating sports with the season, announcing the results to a large part of the Evanston community. The Clock Tower remains purple until a loss or the end of the sports season. This is a recent change from the original tradition of lighting the Clock Tower purple only after winning football games, and keeping it purple during the off-season if the football team won its last game of the season.
  • Dance Marathon, a 30-hour philanthropic event, raises several hundred thousand dollars every winter. The 2007 "DM" raised in excess of $708,000.
  • Primal Scream is held at 9 p.m. on the Sunday before finals week every quarter. For the event, students lean out windows or gather in court yards and scream at the top of their lungs.[51]
  • Armadillo Day, or more commonly Dillo Day, is held on Northwestern's Lakefill every Spring on the weekend before Memorial Day.[52]

The Rock is a boulder on the campus of Northwestern University, located in between University Hall and Harris Hall. ... Gary Barnett (born May 23, 1946 in Lakeland, FL) is a college football head coach. ... Currently in its 32nd year, The Northwestern University Dance Marathon is one of the worlds largest student-run philanthropies. ... Dillo Day is an annual music festival that takes place on the Saturday before Memorial Day at Northwestern University. ... The Northwestern University lakefill was built from 1964-1969 as a result of the universitys need to expand the campus physical facilities. ... Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ...

Media

The Daily Northwestern is the main student newspaper at Northwestern. It is published on weekdays during the academic year. Established in 1881, it is run entirely by undergraduates, many of whom are students at the Medill School of Journalism. The Daily is widely considered one of the best college newspapers in the country, a frequent winner of the Columbia Scholastic Press Association and the coveted Associated Collegiate Press Pacemaker award. Although it serves the Northwestern community, the Daily is not affiliated with the university and is supported entirely by advertisers. It is owned by the Students Publishing Company. Current circulation is in excess of 7,500 as The Daily Northwestern is the only daily publication for both Northwestern University and the city of Evanston. The Daily Northwestern is a student newspaper at Northwestern University that is published on weekdays during the academic year. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Northwestern Universitys Medill School of Journalism (often just called Medill) is one of the premier journalism, integrated marketing, and media schools in the United States. ... Logo of the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. ... The Associated Collegiate Press (official site) is the largest and oldest national membership organization for college student media in the United States. ...


WNUR (89.3 FM) is a 7200 watt radio station that broadcasts to Chicago and its northern suburbs. It is the largest student-run radio station in the country. In 2003, WNUR was named the #1 college radio station in the country by Spin magazine. WNUR has also been recognized as a top US station by The Wire and is often cited as one of the major centers for the nascent indie music movement during the early 1990s. However, music is not the only part of WNUR's programming. Students broadcast Northwestern's varsity athletics (football, men's and women's basketball, baseball, softball, and lacrosse) live, produce news updates on weekdays, and discuss politics, current events, and literature. WNUR (89. ... FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Spin is a music magazine that reports on all the music that rocks. Founded in 1985 by publisher Bob Guccione, Jr. ... The Wire is a British avant garde music magazine. ...


The Northwestern News Network, commonly known as NNN, is the student television news and sports operation at Northwestern. It broadcasts news and sports programming three days of the week during the academic year on NU Channel 1, online at nnntv.org and weeknights at 10 p.m. on Evanston cable access channel 6. The Northwestern News Network, commonly known as NNN, is the student television news and sports operation at Northwestern University. ...


North by Northwestern is a student-run online publication dedicated to campus life. It recently won first place in its region for Best All-Around Independent Online Student Publication from the Society of Professional Journalists. North by Northwestern is a daily online newsmagazine at Northwestern University, started in September 2006 by students at the Medill School of Journalism. ... SPJ logo, taken from a cropped photo of a sign at the Region 10 SPJ Conference, March 2006 The Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ, formerly known as Sigma Delta Chi) is one of the oldest organizations representing journalists in the United States, debuting in 1909. ...


Other prominent student publications include the Northwestern Business Review, a business magazine; Helicon, a literary magazine; schmooze, a magazine for Jewish college students around the country; STITCH, a fashion and photography magazine; Blackboard, published by black student alliance For Members Only; Mustardseed, a Christian publication; NUde Magazine, which focuses on student culture and experiencing Chicago and The Protest, which is part of the Peace Project umbrella organization.


Performing arts

Student theater enjoys a highly visible presence on campus. Two annual productions are especially notable: the Waa-Mu[53] show, and the Dolphin show. Waa-Mu is an original musical, written and produced almost entirely by students. The Dolphin Show is the nation's largest student produced musical. Children's theater is represented on campus by Griffin’s Tale and the recently formed Purple Crayon Players. In addition, Northwestern boasts the largest student-theatre community in the nation. Students produce over sixty independent productions each year. Many Northwestern alumni have used these productions as stepping stones to successful television and film careers. Chicago's Lookingglass Theatre was founded by several alumni, including David Schwimmer, and began in the Great Room in Jones Residential College. Visit the Official Web Site Here [[[1]]] From 2006s On the Town Held annually at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, The Dolphin Show is the nation’s largest student-produced musical. ... Griffin’s Tale is Northwestern Universitys only childrens repertory theater company. ... David Lawrence Schwimmer (born November 2, 1966 in Flushing, Queens, New York) is an Emmy-nominated American actor and director for television and film, who gained popularity when playing Dr. Ross Geller on the hugely popular American sitcom Friends. ... Jones Residential College is Northwestern Universitys fine and performing arts residential college located on the southern edge of campus, in close walking distance of downtown Evanston, the Norris University Center, the Library, the Theatre and Interpretation Center, and the Music Administration Building. ...


Northwestern also has a variety of improv groups. The improv and sketch comedy group Mee-Ow lists Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Dermot Mulroney, Ana Gasteyer, John Cameron Mitchell and Seth Meyers among its alumni. The Titanic Players are the oldest long-form improv group in the country. Mee-Ow, Titanic, and Out da Box, a multicultural comedy show, along with Northwestern's theatre department, have brought nation-wide attention to Northwestern's improv comedy training and performance.[citation needed] Mee-Ow, also known as The Mee-Ow Show, is Northwestern Universitys short-form improv and sketch comedy group. ... This article is about the American actress. ... Dermot Mulroney (born October 31, 1963) is an American actor of Irish descent. ... Ana Kristina Gasteyer (born May 4, 1967) is an American actress and comedian. ... John Cameron Mitchell (born April 21, 1963 in El Paso, Texas) is an American writer, actor, and director. ... Seth Adam Meyers (born December 28, 1973 in Bedford, New Hampshire) is an American actor and comedian best known as a cast member of Saturday Night Live (SNL). ...


There are also many a capella groups and a variety of dance companies on campus, such as Fusion Dance Company, a Hip-Hop Dance Crew, and Graffiti Dancers, a dance group that focuses more on jazz and modern. Radio drama featuring student voice actors is a staple of WNUR's programming.


Service

Many Northwestern students are also heavily involved in community service. Annual events include Dance Marathon, a 30-hour event that raised over $708,000 for charity in 2007,(as cited in "Planting Seeds of Growth", the program for the 31st Annual Philanthropy Awards Luncheon hosted ay the Chicago Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals on May 18, 2007)[citation needed] Project Pumpkin, a Halloween celebration where over 800 local children are invited to campus for an afternoon of games and candy, and Suitcase Party.[citation needed] Many students also assist with Special Olympics and take alternative spring break trips.[citation needed] Northwestern students also participate in the Freshman urban program - a special program for students interested in community service. The Dance Marathon 07 organizers were awarded the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Chicago Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals. Currently in its 32nd year, The Northwestern University Dance Marathon is one of the worlds largest student-run philanthropies. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the holiday. ... The crowd at the 2003 Special Olympics World Summer Games Opening Ceremonies in Croke Park, Dublin, Ireland. ... Spring break at Panama City Beach, Florida, Florida Spring break, also more commonly known as March break in some parts of Canada, is a week-long recess from studying in early spring at universities and schools in the United States, Canada, Japan, Taiwan, Korea, China, and other countries. ... The Freshman Urban Program (FUP) is a pre-new-student-week orientation program for incoming freshmen at Northwestern University, Harvard University, Transylvania University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ...


Housing

See also: List of Northwestern University residences

Northwestern has diverse student housing options, including both regular residence halls and specially-themed "Residential Colleges." Some residential colleges include Jones Residential College, dedicated to the arts, multi-themed Willard Residential College, multi-themed Shepard Residential College, and the Communications Residential College (CRC) for students interested in communications. This is a list of residential buildings at Northwestern University; for a list of other buildings see List of Northwestern University buildings This list of Northwestern University residences houses some of the universitys approximately 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students on the Evanston, Illinois campus. ... Jones Residential College is Northwestern Universitys fine and performing arts residential college located on the southern edge of campus, in close walking distance of downtown Evanston, the Norris University Center, the Library, the Theatre and Interpretation Center, and the Music Administration Building. ... Willard Residential College is a residential college at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois known for its strong spirit of community and unique traditions including Willard Formal, Polka Party, Woo-au Luau, and the notorious Frances Willard Party. ... The Communications Residential College (CRC) is a residential college at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. ...


According to numbers posted by the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, 36% of students were affiliated with a fraternity or a sorority in Spring 2005. This is the highest percentage of students involved in Greek life among Big Ten universities.[citation needed] The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ...


Athletics

Main article: Northwestern Wildcats
Northwestern University Wildcats
Northwestern University Wildcats

A charter member of the Big Ten Conference and the only private institution in the conference, Northwestern has 19 intercollegiate athletic teams (8 men's and 11 women's) and numerous club sports.[citation needed] The football team plays at Ryan Field (formerly known as Dyche Stadium); the basketball and volleyball teams play at Welsh-Ryan Arena. The Northwestern Wildcats are the athletic teams that represent Northwestern University, a founding member of the Big Ten Conference, and the only private university member. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ryan Field. ... Welsh-Ryan Arena 2006 Welsh-Ryan Arena is an 8,117-seat multi-purpose arena in Evanston, Illinois. ...


Northwestern's athletic teams are nicknamed the Wildcats. Before 1924, they were known as "The Purple" and unofficially as "The Fighting Methodists." The name Wildcats was bestowed upon the university in 1924 by Wallace Abbey, a writer for the Chicago Daily Tribune who wrote that even in a loss to the University of Chicago, "Football players had not come down from Evanston; wildcats would be a name better suited to [Coach Glenn] Thistletwaite's boys." [54] For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... The Chicago Tribune, formerly self-styled as the Worlds Greatest Newspaper, remains the principal daily newspaper of the midwestern United States and one of the ten largest daily newspapers in the nation. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... Glenn F. Thistlethwaite was a college football coach. ...


The name was so popular that university board members made "wildcats" the official nickname just months later. In 1972 the student body voted to change the official nickname from "Wildcats" to "Purple Haze" but the new name never really stuck.[citation needed]

The Northwestern Athletics' mascot is Willie the Wildcat. However, the team's first mascot was not Willie, but a live, caged bear cub from the Lincoln Park Zoo named Furpaw. In fall 1923, Furpaw was driven to the playing field to greet the fans before each game. After a losing season, the team decided that Furpaw was the harbinger of bad luck and banished him from campus. Willie made his debut ten years later in 1933 as a logo, but did not actually come to life until 1947, when members of the Alpha Delta fraternity dressed up as him during the Homecoming parade. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NCAA women Lacrosse champions. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ... The Northwestern Wildcats are the athletic teams that represent Northwestern University, a founding member of the Big Ten Conference, and the only private university member. ... Willie the Wildcat is the mascot for the Northwestern University Wildcats. ... Lincoln Park is a 1,200 acre (4. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Northwestern University Marching Band (NUMB) leads the students in cheers and spirit, providing strong links to the past and preserving Northwestern's oldest traditions. They perform the school's fight song, "Go U Northwestern". The Northwestern University Wildcat Marching Band (NUMB) is the marching band of Northwestern University. ... The Go U Northwestern is the primary fight song for Northwestern University. ...

Ryan Field, Northwestern's 49,000 seat football stadium
Ryan Field, Northwestern's 49,000 seat football stadium

Northwestern's football team has a history of futility, as it holds the all-time records for Division I-A losses, points allowed, and negative point differential (amount opponents have outscored them by), and is on the losing end of the greatest comeback in Division I-A history. Northwestern also holds the record for the longest losing streak in Division I-A, 32 games. However, the team has seen success in recent years, including trips to the 1996 Rose Bowl, 1997 Citrus Bowl, 2000 Alamo Bowl, 2003 Motor City Bowl and 2005 Sun Bowl. In addition to those winning seasons, Northwestern also enjoyed one of their most memorable Football victories in 2004, with an upset over usual Big Ten power Ohio State. The current coach is former All-American Northwestern linebacker Pat Fitzgerald. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 605 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 605 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... For other uses, see Ryan Field. ... // Basic Information Northwestern University athletics logo Head Coach: Pat Fitzgerald Stadium: Ryan Field Conference: Big Ten All-Time Win/Loss/Tie Record as of 2006: 449-596-44 Big Ten Championships: 1903, 1926, 1930, 1931, 1936, 1995, 1996, 2000 Trophy Game: Sweet Sioux Tomahawk - University of Illinois History The Northwestern... Biggest Comeback in NCAA History Regular Season Big Ten Conference Game Michigan State Spartans at Northwestern Wildcats Northwestern Wildcats (2-6) 38 October 21, 2006 Ryan Field The 2006 edition to the Michigan State Spartans / Northwestern Wildcats football game featured the biggest comeback in NCAA history. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article is about the football stadium. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The Alamo Bowl is a major American college football bowl game played annually since 1993 in the 65,000-seat Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Motor City Bowl is a major postseason college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played annually since 1997. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Brut Sun Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played usually at the end of December in El Paso, Texas. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... For information specifically about the 2006 season, see 2006 Ohio State Buckeyes football team. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... This article relates to sports. ... Pat Fitzgerald is the current head coach of the Northwestern University Wildcats football team. ...


The Northwestern women's soccer team gained significant notoriety in 2006 when pictures of an alleged hazing incident involving new team members were found on Facebook and posted on Badjocks.com [55] Soccer redirects here. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test and a task, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ... Facebook is a social networking website that was launched on February 4, 2004. ...


Current successful athletic programs include men's soccer, wrestling, men's swimming, men's golf, women's tennis, softball, fencing and women's lacrosse. The women's lacrosse team is the defending three-time NCAA national champion, and went undefeated in 2005. Soccer redirects here. ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... A womens lacrosse player carries the ball past a defender. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... NCAA women Lacrosse champions. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notable alumni

Many Northwestern alumni play or have played important roles in Chicago and Illinois, such as current Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich, Chicago Bulls and Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf, and theater director Mary Zimmerman. The following is a list of notable alumni who attended Northwestern University // Madeleine Wing Adler (B.A. 1962), President, West Chester University Robert J. Alpern (B.A. 1972), Dean, Yale School of Medicine Elijah Anderson (Ph. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Milorad Blagojevich, commonly known as Rod R. Blagojevich (pronounced  , born December 10, 1956) is an American politician from the state of Illinois. ... The Chicago Bulls are a professional basketball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) (Chicago) White Stockings (1901-1903 *From 1900 to 1903, the official name did not contain the city name of Chicago... Jerry Reinsdorf (born February 25, 1936 in Brooklyn, New York) is the owner of Chicago White Sox and the Chicago Bulls. ... Mary Zimmerman is a member of the Lookingglass Theatre Company and is an Artistic Associate of the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Northwestern's film and theater programs have also produced a steady stream of talented actors, actresses, and filmmakers. Alumni who have made their mark on film and television include Academy Award-winner Charlton Heston, Ann-Margret, Warren Beatty, David Schwimmer, Zach Braff, Marg Helgenberger, William Daniels, and Stephen Colbert. Alumni such as Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Heather Headley, Kristen Schaal, Lily Rabe, and Walter Kerr have seen prominence on Broadway. Amsterdam-based comedy theater Boom Chicago was founded by Northwestern alumni, and the school has become a training ground for future The Second City, I.O., ComedySportz, Mad TV and Saturday Night Live talent. Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Ann-Margret Ann-Margret (born April 28, 1941) is a Swedish-born actress and singer. ... Henry Warren Beatty (born March 30, 1937), better known as Warren Beatty, is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actor, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... David Lawrence Schwimmer (born November 2, 1966 in Flushing, Queens, New York) is an Emmy-nominated American actor and director for television and film, who gained popularity when playing Dr. Ross Geller on the hugely popular American sitcom Friends. ... Zachary Israel Braff (born April 6, 1975) is an American television and film actor, director, screenwriter, and producer. ... Mary Margaret Helgenberger (born November 16, 1958) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American film and television actress. ... For other persons named William Daniels, see William Daniels (disambiguation). ... This article is about Stephen Colbert, the actor. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Heather Headley on the cover of her 2002 debut album This Is Who I Am Heather Headley (born October 5, 1974) is a Grammy nominated R&B singer from Trinidad and Tobago. ... Kristen Schaal is an American actress and comedian, best known for her role as Mel in the HBO series Flight of the Conchords. ... Young actress currently appearing (August 2005) in the Broadway show Steel Magnolias. ... Walter Kerr (July 8, 1913 – October 9, 1996) was an American writer and Broadway theater critic. ... Note on spelling: While most Americans use er (as per American spelling conventions), the majority of venues, performers and trade groups for live theatre use re. ... Boom Chicago is an improvisational theater, founded in Amsterdam in 1993 by group of American tourists, who named it after their hometown. ... Second City redirects here. ... The I.O., or I.O. Chicago, (formerly known as ImprovOlympic) is a theater at 3541 N. Clark Street in the Wrigleyville neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois dedicated to improvisational comedy. ... ComedySportz is an improvisational comedy organization started in 1984 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, by Dick Chudnow. ... For other uses, see Mad TV (disambiguation). ... SNL redirects here. ...


The Medill School of Journalism has produced notable journalists such as Elisabeth Bumiller, ESPN personalities Michael Wilbon and Mike Greenberg, and CNN anchor Nicole Lapin. Garry Marshall, Happy Days producer and movie director, is also a Medill alumnus. Northwestern Universitys Medill School of Journalism (often just called Medill) is one of the premier journalism, integrated marketing, and media schools in the United States. ... Elisabeth Bumiller (born May 15, 1956), an American journalist and former White House correspondent for the New York Times. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Michael R. Wilbon (born November 19, 1958) is an American sportswriter and columnist. ... Mike Greenberg (born August 6, 1967 in New York City, New York) is a television anchor and radio host for ESPN. At ESPN, he hosts the weekday evening SportsCenter and ESPN Radios Mike and Mike in the Morning show with Mike Golic. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Nicole Lapin is both an anchor and correspondent to many of CNN’s news services. ... Garry Kent Marshall (born November 13, 1934) is an American actor/director/writer/producer. ... For other uses, see Happy Days (disambiguation). ...


Northwestern alumni involved in music include Thomas Tyra, Andrew Bird, Matt Muckey, M. Superlatif, Julie Liu, Jen Charowhas, and members of Arcade Fire, The Lawrence Arms, Chavez, Freddie Feldman, and OK Go. Andrew Bird (born July 11, 1973) is an American musician, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist. ... Arcade Fire (often known as The Arcade Fire) is an indie rock band from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The Lawrence Arms are an American punk rock band from Chicago, Illinois, formed in 1999 and currently recording for Fat Wreck Chords. ... This article or section may contain too much repetition. ...


Northwestern alumni living in New York City and Los Angeles, especially those involved in theater and film, are commonly known as the "Northwestern Mafia" due to their high concentration in the area and their willingness to help out fellow Wildcats [4]. They were referenced in an episode of Joey, in which Matt LeBlanc's character pretends to be a Northwestern alumnus in order to improve his industry connections. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Joey is a sitcom starring Matt LeBlanc, reprising his role as Joseph Francis Tribbiani from the popular sitcom Friends. ... Matthew Steven LeBlanc (July 25, 1967 - May 25, 2007) is an Emmy and Golden Globe nominated American actor, best known for his role as Joey Tribbiani on the TV sitcom Friends (1994-2004). ...


Northwestern alumni involved in professional sports administration include Rick Sund (NBA) and Billy McKinney (NBA). Billy McKinney is a former American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


References in popular culture

Drew Blyth Barrymore (born February 22, 1975) is an American actress and film producer, the youngest member of the Barrymore family of American actors. ... Never Been Kissed is a 1999 comedy directed by Raja Gosnell and starring Drew Barrymore, David Arquette, Michael Vartan, Molly Shannon, Leelee Sobieski, John C. Reilly, Jessica Alba, Marley Shelton, James Franco, Giuseppe Andrews, Jeremy Jordan and Garry Marshall. ... This article is about the actress. ... The Devil Wears Prada is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 comedy-drama film, a loose screen adaptation of Lauren Weisbergers 2003 novel of the same name. ... Sabrina Lloyd as Natalie Hurley in Sports Night Sabrina Lloyd (born November 20, 1970 in Fairfax, Virginia) is an American film and television actress. ... This article is about the American television series. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Dr. Sara Tancredi is a fictional character from the American television series, Prison Break. ... Sarah Wayne Callies (born Sarah Anne Callies on June 1, 1977 in La Grange, Illinois) is an American actress who is best known for her role as Dr. Sara Tancredi in the American television series, Prison Break. ... This article is about a television series. ... Elizabeth Liz Lemon is a fictional character played by Tina Fey on the American television series 30 Rock. ... Jenna Maroney is a fictional character on the American television series 30 Rock, played by Jane Krakowski. ... Elizabeth Stamatina Tina Fey (b. ... Jane Krakowski (née Krajkowski, born October 11, 1968 in Parsippany, New Jersey) is a Tony Award-winning American actress and singer. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Bradley Whitford (born October 10, 1959 in Madison, Wisconsin) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor. ... Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip is an Emmy Award winner and Golden Globe Award nominated American television Comedy-drama series created and written by Aaron Sorkin. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Law enforcement characters of The Wire. ... For others uses of the term, see The Wire (disambiguation). ... Nicole Ari Parker Kodjoe (born Nicole Ari Parker on October 7, 1970 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an African American actress, who was briefly a model. ... For the type of cuisine, see soul food. ... For the upcoming film based on the novel starring Eric Bana and Rachel McAdams, see The Time Travelers Wife (film). ... Jonny Lee Miller Jonny Lee Miller (born November 15, 1972) is an English actor. ... Melinda and Melinda is a 2005 film written and directed by Woody Allen. ... The gate under which Harry meets Sally in the film; located on the campus of the University of Chicago When Harry Met Sally. ... My Boys is a United States television sitcom that debuted on November 28, 2006, on TBS. The show deals with a female sports columnist in Chicago and the men in her life including her brother, her ex-boyfriend, her best friend and a sportswriter for a rival publication. ... Temperance Brennan is the protagonist of the American television series, Bones, which is very loosely based on the works of author Kathy Reichs. ... Emily Erin Deschanel (born October 11, 1976) is an American actress. ... Bones is an American drama television series that premiered on the Fox Network on September 13, 2005. ... Side Order of Life is a dramatic television series broadcast by Lifetime on Sunday night. ... For other persons named Jonathan Bennett, see Jonathan Bennett (disambiguation). ... Mean Girls is a 2004 film directed by Mark Waters (Freaky Friday), written by (and co-starring) Tina Fey and stars Lindsay Lohan with Rachel McAdams, Amanda Seyfried and Lacey Chabert and featured several Saturday Night Live cast members, including not only Tina Fey but also Tim Meadows, Ana Gasteyer... Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972)[1] is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe- and two-time Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American actress. ... Proof is a 2005 film starring Anthony Hopkins, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jake Gyllenhaal, and Hope Davis. ... Proof is a play by David Auburn which won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and the 2001 Tony Award for Best Play. ... Jennifer Anne Garner[1] (born April 17, 1972) is an Emmy-nominated and Golden Globe- and SAG Award-winning American actress. ... Felicity is a Golden Globe-winning American primetime television drama produced by Touchstone Television and Imagine Television for The WB network. ... Jason Matthew Biggs (born May 12, 1978) is an American actor who obtained wide fame in 1999 for his role as Jim Levenstein in the American Pie series of teen films. ... American Pie 2 is the 2001 sequel to the comedy film American Pie. ... Ana Kristina Gasteyer (born May 4, 1967) is an American actress and comedian. ... Mean Girls is a 2004 film directed by Mark Waters (Freaky Friday), written by (and co-starring) Tina Fey and stars Lindsay Lohan with Rachel McAdams, Amanda Seyfried and Lacey Chabert and featured several Saturday Night Live cast members, including not only Tina Fey but also Tim Meadows, Ana Gasteyer... Shohreh Aghdashloo (Persian: شهره آغداشلو, born 11 May 1952) is an Academy Award-nominated Iranian-American actress and self-proclaimed activist. ... The Exorcism of Emily Rose is a 2005 horror/thriller film directed by Scott Derrickson. ... Buffy Anne Summers is the eponymous fictional character in the film Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the television program of the same name and its numerous spin-offs, such as novels, comic books, and video games. ... Sarah Michelle Gellar (born April 14, 1977) is an American actress. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... Shiri Freda Appleby (born December 7, 1978) is an American actress. ... Jonny Lee Miller Jonny Lee Miller (born November 15, 1972) is an English actor. ... Masiela Lusha (born October 23, 1985) is an Albanian-born actress and writer. ... George Lopez (also known as The George Lopez Show) is an American sitcom starring comedian George Lopez that originally aired on ABC from March 27, 2002 to May 8, 2007. ... Brandy on the cover of her album Full Moon Brandy Rayana Norwood (born February 11, 1979 in McComb, Mississippi), known professionally as Brandy, is an African American pop/R&B singer and actress. ... Moesha is also the title of a song by former Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio, frequently performed by his first solo band. ... Daniel Cosgrove (born December 16, 1970 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American actor. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 2002 films | Comedy films | Teen films ... For other uses, see Steve Martin (disambiguation). ... Cheaper by the Dozen is a 2003 American comedy film about a family with twelve children (seven boys and five girls). ... Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX), is the largest online DVD rental service, offering flat rate rental-by-mail to customers in the United States. ... Mena Adrienne Suvari (born February 13, 1979) is an American actress, model, fashion designer and spokeswoman. ... American Pie is a 1999 teen comedy film directed by Paul Weitz and Chris Weitz and written by Adam Herz. ... Meadow Mariangela Soprano, played by Jamie-Lynn Sigler, is a fictional character on the HBO TV series The Sopranos. ... This article is about the television series. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Shannen Maria Doherty (born April 12), 1971 is an American actress and television director, perhaps best known for her work as Heather Duke in Heathers, as Brenda Walsh in Beverly Hills, 90210 and as Prue Halliwell in Charmed. ... Jason Priestley (born August 28, 1969), actor, was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Beverly Hills, 90210 is a primetime television soap opera that aired from October 4, 1990, to May 17, 2000, on FOX in the United States and subsequently on various networks around the world. ... Major League is a 1989 film written and directed by David S. Ward starring Tom Berenger, Charlie Sheen and Corbin Bernsen. ... The Deering Library in 2006 The Charles Deering Library is a library located on the main Evanston campus of Northwestern University. ... Matt LeBlanc as Joey Tribbiani in Joey Matt LeBlanc (born July 25, 1967 in Newton, Massachusetts, USA) is an American actor. ... Joey may refer to: A nickname for Joanne, Joanna, Josephine, Joan, Joseph, Joe or Jo Joey, an infant marsupial American slang for a clown United Kingdom slang for the silver English/British coin Threepence, named after Joseph Hume In glassblowing, a Joey or diving Joey, are colloquialisms for a bubble... Jennifer Aniston (born February 11, 1969) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe Award-winning American film and television actress, best known for her role as Rachel Green in the popular television sitcom Friends. ... The Breakup will star Vince Vaughn and Jennifer Aniston. ... Matthew Langford Perry (born August 19, 1969) is a Canadian-American Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated actor and comedian, best known for his role as Chandler Bing in the hugely popular television sitcom Friends, a part he played for 10 years. ... Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip is an Emmy Award winner and Golden Globe Award nominated American television Comedy-drama series created and written by Aaron Sorkin. ... License to Wed (spelled Licence to Wed outside the United States) is a 2007 romantic comedy film starring Robin Williams, Mandy Moore, and John Krasinski and directed by Ken Kwapis. ... John Burke Krasinski (born October 20, 1979) is an American actor, most widely known for playing Jim Halpert on NBCs The Office and for his role in the film License to Wed. ... Amanda Mandy Leigh Moore (born April 10, 1984) is an American pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... Weather man and Weather Man redirect here. ... This article is about the English actor. ... Scene for College Road Trip being filmed in Stamford, Connecticut College Road Trip is a 2008 comedy film produced by Walt Disney Pictures. ... Raven-Symone as Raven Raven-Symoné Christina Pearman (born December 10, 1985 in Atlanta, Georgia, USA), known professionally as Raven-Symoné, is an African American actress, singer, and former model. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Official University Sites

Alumni Groups

  • Alumni Association

Student Publications

Athletics

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ NU Endowment. Retrieved on 2008-01-25.
  2. ^ a b Guidelines, Northwestern Identity System, Publications, Northwestern University. Retrieved on 2007-09-26.
  3. ^ Zmirak, John (2005). Choosing the Right College: The Whole Truth about America's Top Schools 2006. Intercollegiate Studies Institute, 689. 
  4. ^ Northwestern Facts. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
  5. ^ Keeping the Faith. Northwestern. Retrieved on 2007-07-20.
  6. ^ Records of the Evanston College for Ladies, northwestern University Archives [1]
  7. ^ Events in Northwestern History. Retrieved on 2007-10-04.
  8. ^ a b The deal that almost was: 'The Universities of Chicago'. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  9. ^ Pat Vaughan Tremmel (January 23, 2003). Death penalty history made at Northwestern. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  10. ^ Timeline 1900-1949, History, About, Northwestern University
  11. ^ AutoAdmit.com - NORTHWESTERN admits 4,852 of 20,649 for 2011 RD
  12. ^ Looking Ahead: A Year of Tradition and Change, Spring 2008, Northwestern University
  13. ^ http://media.www.dailynorthwestern.com/media/storage/paper853/news/2008/01/15/Campus/Nu.Sets.New.Application.Record-3152632.shtml
  14. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/17/education/17admissions.html?_r=1&oref=slogin
  15. ^ http://media.www.dailynorthwestern.com/media/storage/paper853/news/2008/01/15/Campus/Nu.Sets.New.Application.Record-3152632.shtml
  16. ^ Arthur Butz.Anti Defamation League: Arthur Butz
  17. ^ U.S. News and World Report (2008). America's Best Colleges 2008: National Universities: Top Schools. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  18. ^ U.S. News and World Report (2007). America's Best Graduate Schools 2008: Top Business Schools. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  19. ^ U.S. News and World Report (2007). America's Best Graduate Schools 2008: Top Law Schools. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  20. ^ U.S. News and World Report (2007). America's Best Graduate Schools 2008: Top Medical Schools - Research. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  21. ^ U.S. News and World Report (2007). America's Best Graduate Schools 2008: Top Medical Schools - Primary Care. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  22. ^ U.S. News and World Report (2007). America's Best Graduate Schools 2008: Top Engineering Schools. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  23. ^ U.S. News and World Report (2007). America's Best Graduate Schools 2008: Top Education Schools. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  24. ^ Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2007). Academic Ranking of World Universities 2007. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  25. ^ Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2007). Academic Ranking of World Universities 2007. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  26. ^ Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2008). Top 100 world universities in Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  27. ^ Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2008). Top 100 world universities in Engineering/Technology and Computer Sciences. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  28. ^ Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2008). Top 100 world universities in Life and Agriculture Sciences. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  29. ^ Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2008). Top 100 world universities in Clinical Medicine and Pharmacy. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  30. ^ Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2008). Top 100 world universities in Social Sciences. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  31. ^ The Times (2006). World University Rankings. The Times Higher Educational Supplement. Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  32. ^ CMUP (2006). The Top American Research Universities: 2006 Annual Report (PDF). Center for Measuring University Performance. Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  33. ^ The Washington Monthly (2007). The Washington Monthly National University Rankings (PDF). The Washington Monthly. Retrieved on 2008-02-20.
  34. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007. U.S. News & World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  35. ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities 2007. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  36. ^ World University Rankings. The Times Higher Educational Supplement (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  37. ^ The Washington Monthly College Rankings. The Washington Monthly (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  38. ^ "The World's 100 Most Global Universities" . Newsweek. Retrieved on 2007-04-15. 
  39. ^ The Top American Research Universities: 2006 Annual Report (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  40. ^ Top Law Schools. U.S. News & World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  41. ^ Top Business Schools. U.S. News & World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  42. ^ Top Medical Schools. U.S. News & World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  43. ^ Top Engineering Schools. U.S. News & World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  44. ^ Top Education Schools. U.S. News & World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  45. ^ Texas Advertising: Department - Reputation. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  46. ^ Graduate School Rankings By U.S. News & World Report:ADVERTISING. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  47. ^ Business School Rankings. Business Week. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  48. ^ Northwestern University Rankings and Lists. The Princeton Review (2007).
  49. ^ America's Fittest and Fattest Colleges in America 2005. Men's Fitness (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  50. ^ Northwestern University Wildcams: Troubleshooting
  51. ^ Northwestern traditions, Campus life, Freshman, Office of Undergraduate Admission - Northwestern University
  52. ^ Northwestern traditions, Campus life, Freshman, Office of Undergraduate Admission - Northwestern University
  53. ^ An acronym for the Women's Athletic Association and the Men's Union.
  54. ^ Abbey, Wallace. "Maroons beat Purple by a Dropkick", Chicago Tribune, November 16, 1924, pp. A1. Retrieved on 2007-08-03. 
  55. ^ USATODAY.com - Northwestern women's soccer team suspended after photos of alleged hazing are publicized
  56. ^ Cheaper by the Dozen. Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  57. ^ On Location. Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  58. ^ Netflix Online Movie Rentals - Rent DVDs, Classic Films to DVD New Releases

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading


  Results from FactBites:
 
Northwestern University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1597 words)
Northwestern's main campus is a 240-acre (970,000 m²) parcel in Evanston, along the shore of Lake Michigan.
Northwestern's professional schools and hospital in downtown Chicago are about four blocks east of the Chicago stop on the CTA Red Line.
Northwestern University is the only private university member of the Big Ten Conference, of which it was a founding member.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m