FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Northumbrian smallpipes

The Northumbrian smallpipes (also known as the Northumbrian pipes) are bellows-blown bagpipes from Northumbria in the north-east of England. These pipes are sometimes referred to as being from Northumberland. This however is not true, as the name suggests they are found and played in Northumbria, which is a much larger area encompassing Northumberland and many other counties in the North-East. It shares the unusual characteristic, along with the Uilleann pipes, of being able to stop the sound of the chanter. This is done by giving the chanter a completely closed end. This combined with the unusually tight fingering (each note is played by lifting only one finger or opening one key) means that traditional Northumbrian piping is staccato in style. The chanter has a number of metal keys, most commonly seven, but chanters with a two octave range can be made which require seventeen keys, all played with either the right hand thumb or left hand pinkie. There is no overblowing to get this two octave range, due to the cylindrical bore; the keys are therefore integral, along with the length of the chanter, to obtaining the two octaves. The original (18th century) short keyless chanters only had the range of one octave. The introduction of keyed chanters with a range of more than one octave seems to have happened around 1800, with makers such as John Dunn, and later Robert Reid and his son James. In practice, beginning players find that the seven key chanter, with a range of D to b, is sufficient for playing most of the traditional piping repertoire. Chanters with more keys permit playing tunes with a wider range or with more chromatic notes, and allow access to much of the fiddle repertoire. A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, and of the much smaller earldom which succeeded the... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population –mid-2004... Uilleann pipes (IPA: ) are a unique form of bagpipes originating in Ireland. ... In musical notation, staccato indicates that notes are sounded in a detached and distinctly separate manner with their lengths shortened; that is, a short silence should be between the notes, without affecting the rhythm. ... A key is a small rectangular button on a musical instrument that is depressed to cause the instrument to create a sound of a particular pitch. ... In music, an octave (sometimes abbreviated 8ve or 8va) is the interval between one musical note and another with half or double the frequency. ... Overblowing is producing a different note in a wind instrument by forcing air harder. ...


Traditionally, the chanter is pitched in what Northumbrian pipers refer to as F+, a pitch where the nominal G sounds approximately twenty cents sharp of F natural. The music, however, is always written in G. Nowadays, chanters are available anywhere from D to G, G being the most popular for playing ensemble with other instruments. There are usually four drones on the Northumbrian pipes, which can be tuned to several different combinations of pitch for playing in different keys. Each drone will usually possess one or more 'bead holes' allowing its pitch to be raised by a tone or two. Different drone tunings can be set up, allowing a piper to play in different keys. Sets with five or even six drones are made, to allow ease of retuning. Only three drones are usually sounded at once, tuned for instance to G, D and g if the tonic of the tune is G. Sets with more than four drones sometimes have drone switches, allowing players to change key without stopping playing. In music, pitch is the perception of the frequency of a note. ... The cent is a logarithmic unit of measure used for musical intervals. ... In music theory, the key identifies the tonic triad, the chord, major or minor, which represents the final point of rest for a piece, or the focal point of a section. ...

Contents


Playing style

The traditional and basic style of playing on the instrument is to play each note slightly staccato. Each note is only sounded by lifting one finger or operating one key. The aim is to play each note as full length as possible, but still separate from the next - 'The notes should come out like peas'. The chanter is closed, and thus silent, between any two notes. For decoration, it is common to play short grace notes preceding a melody note. Some pipers allow themselves to play these open-fingered, and hence not staccato, and Billy Pigg was able to get great expressive effects in this way - 'You should be able to hear the bairns crying'. But 'choyting', that is the complex open-fingered gracing after the manner of Highland piping, is generally frowned on, and Tom Clough made a point of avoiding open fingered ornament altogether, considering open-fingering 'a grievous error'. In musical notation, staccato indicates that notes are sounded in a detached and distinctly separate manner with their lengths shortened; that is, a short silence should be between the notes, without affecting the rhythm. ... Billy Pigg (1902 - 1968) was an English player of Northumbrian bagpipes Northumbrian Pipers Society The Northumbrian Pipers Society was formed in 1928 in Newcastle Upon Tyne to promote both types of Northumbrian bagpipes - the smallpipes and the somewhat rarer half-longs. ... Tom Clough (1881-1964), known as The Prince of Pipers, was an English player of the Northumbrian Smallpipes. ...


Recordings

  • Topic TSCD487 The Northumbrian Smallpipes - includes Tom Clough recordings.
  • LERCD4006 Billy Pigg, the Border Minstrel

Notable Northumbrian pipers

Past players

  • James Allan
  • G.G. Armstrong
  • Jack Armstrong
  • Forster Charlton
  • Henry Clough
  • Tom Clough
  • Joe Hutton
  • Richard Mowat
  • John Peacock
  • Billy Pigg

Tom Clough (1881-1964), known as The Prince of Pipers, was an English player of the Northumbrian Smallpipes. ... Billy Pigg (1902 - 1968) was an English player of Northumbrian bagpipes Northumbrian Pipers Society The Northumbrian Pipers Society was formed in 1928 in Newcastle Upon Tyne to promote both types of Northumbrian bagpipes - the smallpipes and the somewhat rarer half-longs. ...

Current players

Richard Austen Butler aka Rab Butler (1902–1982), British politician and Chancellor of the Exchequer Richard Girnt Butler, founder of the Aryan Nations Sir Richard Layton Butler (1850–1925), Premier of South Australia, 1905. ... Kathryn Tickell (b 1967) is an English player of the Northumbrian smallpipes and fiddle. ...

See also

Northumberland is the northernmost county of England. ... The Northumbrian Pipers Society is a group of bagpipe players, founded in 1928 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, to promote both types of Northumbrian bagpipes - the smallpipes and the somewhat rarer half-longs. ... The Scottish smallpipe is a bellows-blown bagpipe developed from the Northumbrian smallpipes by Colin Ross and others, to be playable according to the Great Highland Bagpipe fingering system. ...

External links

  • Northumbrian Pipers' Society
  • Northumbrian Smallpipes Encyclopedia

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m