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Encyclopedia > Northumberland
Northumberland
Geography
Status: Ceremonial & Non-metropolitan county
Region: North East England
Area:
- Total
- Admin. council
Ranked 6th
5,013 km²
Ranked 6th
Admin HQ: Morpeth
ISO 3166-2: GB-NBL
ONS code: 35
NUTS 3: UKC21
Demographics
Population:
- Total (2005 est.)
- Density
- Admin. Council
Ranked 44th
311,400
62 / km²
Ranked 33rd
Ethnicity: 99.0% White
Politics
Northumberland County Council
http://www.northumberland.gov.uk/
Executive: Labour
MPs: Peter Atkinson
Alan Beith
Ronnie Campbell
Denis Murphy
Police Force Covering Area

Northumbria Police
Districts
Image:NorthumberlandNumbered.png
  1. Blyth Valley
  2. Wansbeck
  3. Castle Morpeth
  4. Tynedale
  5. Alnwick
  6. Berwick-upon-Tweed

Northumberland is a county in the North East of England. The non-metropolitan county of Northumberland borders Cumbria to the west, County Durham to the south and Tyne and Wear to the south east, as well as having a border with the Scottish Borders council area to the north, and nearly eighty miles of North Sea coastline. Since 1974 the county council has been located in Morpeth, situated in the east of the county at 55°10′07″N, 1°41′15″W; however, both Morpeth and Alnwick claim the title county town. map of Northumberland within England File links The following pages link to this file: Northumberland Categories: GFDL images ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... North-East England is one of the nine official regions of England and comprises the combined area of Northumberland, County Durham, Tyne and Wear and a small part of North Yorkshire. ... This article explains the meaning of area as a Physical quantity. ... This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Area. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This is a List of Administrative shire counties of England by Area, that is to say Administrative counties with a two-tier County council structure, not including Administrative counties which are Unitary Authorities. ... The Castle Morpeth coat of arms Morpeth is a small market town in Northumberland, England, on the River Wansbeck, which flows east through the town. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... In physics, density is mass m per unit volume V. For the common case of a homogeneous substance, it is expressed as: where, in SI units: ρ (rho) is the density of the substance, measured in kg·m-3 m is the mass of the substance, measured in kg V is... This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Population - 2002 mid-year estimates from the Office for National Statistics, unrounded figures published by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister in the Entitlement Notification Reports for Revenue Support Grants [1]. See also: List of Administrative shire counties of... This is a list of non-metropolitan counties of England by population. ... Image File history File links This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Peter Atkinson (born 19 January 1943) has been British Member of Parliament for Hexham since 1992. ... Categories: Stub | 1943 births | UK Liberal Democrat politicians | Members of the Privy Council | British MPs ... Ronald Campbell (born August 14, 1943) is the Labour member of Parliament for Blyth Valley in north-east England. ... Denis Murphy (born 2 November 1948, Ashington) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Northumbria Police is the police force for the north English counties of Northumberland and Tyne and Wear. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Northumberland User:Morwen/Allnumbered Categories: GFDL images ... Blyth Valley is a borough and district in south-east Northumberland, England, bordering the North Sea and Tyne and Wear. ... Wansbeck is a local government district in south-east Northumberland, England. ... Castle Morpeth is a local government district and borough in Northumberland, England. ... Tynedale is a local government district in south-west Northumberland. ... Alwnick is a local government district in Northumberland, England. ... Berwick-upon-Tweed is a local government district and borough in Northumberland in the north_east of England, on the border with Scotland. ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ... North-East England is one of the nine official regions of England and comprises the combined area of Northumberland, County Durham, Tyne and Wear and a small part of North Yorkshire. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... A shire county or non-metropolitan county in England, is a county level entity which is not a metropolitan county. ... Cumbria (IPA: ), created in 1974, is a county in the North West region of England. ... County Durham is a county in north-east England. ... Tyne and Wear is a metropolitan county in the North East of England around the mouths of the Rivers Tyne and Wear. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... The Castle Morpeth coat of arms Morpeth is a small market town in Northumberland, England, on the River Wansbeck, which flows east through the town. ... For the parish in New Brunswick, see Alnwick, New Brunswick Alnwick (pronounced ) is a small market town in north Northumberland, in the north-east of England. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ...


As the kingdom of Northumbria under King Edwin, the region's historical boundaries stretched from the Humber in the south to the Forth in the north. The historic boundaries of the county cover a different area, including Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the traditional county town, as well as Tynemouth and other settlements in North Tyneside, areas administered by Tyne and Wear since 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972. The historic boundaries of the county are sometimes taken to exclude Islandshire, Bedlingtonshire and Norhamshire (collectively North Durham), exclaves of County Durham which were incorporated into Northumberland in 1844. Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... Saint Edwin (alternately Eadwine or Æduini) ( 586–October 12, 632/633) was the King of Deira and Bernicia - which would later become known as Northumbria - from about 616 until his death. ... River Hull tidal barrier. ... The River Forth meanders over fertile farmlands near Stirling The River Forth, 47 km (29 miles) long, is the major river draining the eastern part of the central belt of Scotland. ... Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a city in north-east England. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Tynemouth beach This article concerns itself with the village. ... North Tyneside is a metropolitan borough in the North East of England, part of the Tyne and Wear urban area centred on Newcastle and formerly part of Northumberland. ... Tyne and Wear is a metropolitan county in the North East of England around the mouths of the Rivers Tyne and Wear. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Islandshire is a region in England, centred around Lindisfarne or Holy Island, including many villages on the mainland. ... Bedlingtonshire is an area in England, centred around the town of Bedlington. ... Norhamshire or North Durham was an exclave of County Durham in England. ...


Being on the border of Scotland and England, Northumberland has been the site of many battles. The county is noted for its undeveloped landscape of high moorland, a favourite with landscape painters, and now largely protected as a National Park. The Anglo-Scottish border runs for 96 kilometres (60 miles) between the River Tweed on the east coast and the Solway Firth in the west. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Northumberland National Park is the northernmost national park in England. ...


Northumberland's county flower is the Bloody Cranesbill (Geranium sanguineum) and her affiliated Royal Navy ship is her namesake, HMS Northumberland. A county flower is a flowering plant chosen to symbolise a county. ... Species See list The cranesbills make up the genus Geranium of 422 species of annual, biennial, and perennial plants found throughout the temperate regions of the world and the mountains of the tropics, but mostly in the eastern part of the Mediterranean. ... HMS Northumberland (F238) is a Type 23 frigate of the Royal Navy. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Northumberland

Once part of the Roman Empire and the scene of many wars between England and Scotland, Northumberland has a long and complicated history. Hence there are many castles in Northumberland, including among the better-known those at Bamburgh, Dunstanburgh, Warkworth and Alnwick. // Northumberland, Englands most northerly county, is a land of historical extremes. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... Bamburgh Castle from the beach. ... Dunstanburgh Castle. ... West face of the Keep of Warkworth Castle Plan of the keep. ... Alnwick Castle, from the east, across the pastures and the River Aln Alnwick Castle is a castle and stately home in Alnwick, Northumberland, England (grid reference NU187137). ...


The region of present-day Northumberland once formed the core of the Anglian kingdom of Northumbria. Northumberland is called the "cradle of Christianity" in England, because it was on Lindisfarne, a tidal island north of Bamburgh, also called Holy Island, that Christianity flourished when monks from Iona were sent to convert the English. Lindisfarne was the home of the Lindisfarne Gospels and Saint Cuthbert, who is buried at Durham Cathedral. White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Lindisfarne Castle Lindisfarne (grid reference NU125421, ), also called Holy Island (variant spelling, Lindesfarne), is a tidal island off the north-east coast of England, which is connected to the mainland of Northumberland by a causeway and is cut off twice a day by tides — something well described by Sir Walter... Bamburgh is a large village on the coast of Northumberland, England. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Iona village viewed from a short distance offshore. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Lindisfarne Castle Lindisfarne (grid reference NU125421, ), also called Holy Island (variant spelling, Lindesfarne), is a tidal island off the north-east coast of England, which is connected to the mainland of Northumberland by a causeway and is cut off twice a day by tides — something well described by Sir Walter... Folio 27r from the Lindisfarne Gospels contains the incipit from the Gospel of Matthew. ... Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (ca. ... Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city and main settlement of the City of Durham district of County Durham in North East England. ...


Bamburgh is the historic capital of Northumberland, the "royal" castle from before the unification of England under one monarch. The capital of Northumberland now, however, may be thought to be Morpeth, since Northumberland County Council's offices are in that town or may be thought of as the market town of Alnwick, mainly because the Duke of Northumberland has his home there. Bamburgh Castle from the beach. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... The Castle Morpeth coat of arms Morpeth is a small market town in Northumberland, England, on the River Wansbeck, which flows east through the town. ... For the parish in New Brunswick, see Alnwick, New Brunswick Alnwick (pronounced ) is a small market town in north Northumberland, in the north-east of England. ... The title Duke of Northumberland was created in 1551 for John Dudley. ...


The lords of Northumberland once wielded inordinate power in England affairs because, as the Lords of the Marches, they were entrusted with protecting England from Scottish invasion. Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime...


Northumberland has a history of revolt and rebellion against the government, as seen in the Rising of the North in Tudor times. These revolts were usually led by the then Dukes of Northumberland, the Percy family. Shakespeare mentions one of the Percys, Harry Hotspur. The county was also a centre for Catholicism in England, as well as of Jacobite feelings after the Restoration. Northumberland became a sort of wild county, where outlaws and border reivers hid from the law, for it was largely rural and unpopulated. However, the frequent cross-border skirmishes and accompanying local lawlessness largely subsided after the union of the crowns of Scotland and England under King James VI and I. The Rising of the North or Northern Rebellion was an unsuccessful uprising against Elizabeth I of England in 1569 by Catholics of Northern England. ... The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh: ) was a series of five monarchs of Welsh origin who ruled England and Ireland from 1485 until 1603. ... The title Duke of Northumberland was created in 1551 for John Dudley. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Henry Percy was the name of several nobles in the line that produced the earls of Northumberland. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... See also Border Reivers (Rugby) and Border Reivers (game); or Reavers for other varieties of brigand. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... James Stuart (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old. ...


Northumberland played a key role in the industrial revolution. Coalmines were once widespread in Northumberland, with collieries at Ashington, Ellington and Pegswood The region's coalfields fuelled industrial expansion in other areas of the country, and the need to transport the coal from the collieries to the Tyne led to the development of the first railways. Ship-building and armaments manufacture were other important industries. A Watt steam engine. ... Statistics Population: 28,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: NZ2787 Administration District: Wansbeck Shire county: Northumberland Region: North East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Northumberland Historic county: Northumberland Services Police force: Northumbria Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: North East Post office and telephone Post... Ellington can refer to: // Ellington, Connecticut, a town in Tolland County, Connecticut. ... Pegswood is a village in Northumberland, England. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... Italian Full rigged ship Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large watercraft capable of deep water navigation. ... The bayonet, still used in war as both knife and spearpoint. ...


Today, Northumberland is still largely rural. As the least populated county in England, it commands much less power in British affairs than in times past. In recent years the county has had considerable growth in tourism due to its scenic beauty and the abundant evidence of its historical significance. Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area...


Physical geography

Physical geography of Northumberland and surrounding areas
Physical geography of Northumberland and surrounding areas

The physical geography of Northumberland is diverse. It is low and flat near the North Sea coast and increasingly mountainous toward the northwest. The Cheviot Hills, in the northwest of the county, consist mainly of resistant Devonian granite and andesite lava. A second area of igneous rock underlies Whin Sill (on which Hadrian's Wall runs), an intrusion of carboniferous Dolerite. Both ridges support a rather bare moorland landscape. Either side of Whin Sill the county lies on carboniferous limestone, giving some areas of karst landscape.[1] Lying off the coast of Northumberland are the Farne Islands, another Dolerite outcrop, famous for their bird life. Image File history File links This is a section from William Shepherds physical map of Britain (1926) showing Northumberland and surrounding areas. ... Image File history File links This is a section from William Shepherds physical map of Britain (1926) showing Northumberland and surrounding areas. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... The Cheviot Hills are a range of rolling hills straddling the England/Scotland border between Northumberland and the Scottish Borders. ... Resistance can mean one of: electrical resistance antibiotic resistance resistance to a disease (see related subject immunology) a political resistance movement military resistance against foreign occupation geological resistance fluid resistance thermal resistance This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Artists illustration of a Devonian scene. ... Close-up of granite from Yosemite National Park, valley of the Merced River Quarrying granite for the Mormon Temple, Utah Territory. ... A sample of andesite (dark groundmass) with amygdaloidal vesicules filled with zeolite. ... Look up lava, Aa, pahoehoe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Igneous rocks are formed when molten rock (magma) cools and solidifies, with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ... Whin Sill is a Sill in the northern-most county of Northumberland, England. ... The Carboniferous is a major division of the geologic timescale that extends from the end of the Devonian period, about 359. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Diabase. ... Moorland in the Pennines (England); Coarse grasses and bracken tend to dominate especially in high rainfall areas. ... Limey shale overlaid by limestone. ... Karst topography is a three-dimensional landscape shaped by the dissolution of a soluble layer or layers of bedrock, usually carbonate rock such as limestone or dolomite. ... The Inner Farne seen from Seahouses harbour The Farne Islands (also referred to less formally as the Farnes) are a group of islands off the coast of Northumberland, England. ... “Aves” redirects here. ...


There are coal fields in the southeast corner of the county, extending along the coastal region north of the river Tyne. The term sea coal likely originated from chunks of coal, found washed up on beaches, that wave action had broken from coastal outcroppings.

River Coquet.
River Coquet.

Being in the far north of England, above 55° latitude, and having many areas of high land, Northumberland is one of the coldest areas of the country. It has an average annual temperature of 7.1 to 9.3 °C, with the coldest temperatures inland.[2] However, the county lies on the east coast, and has relatively low rainfall, between 466 and 1060 mm annually, mostly falling in the west on the high land.[3] Between 1971 and 2000 the county averaged 1321 to 1390 hours of sunshine per year.[4] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 1910 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Northumberland Rothbury Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 1910 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Northumberland Rothbury Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Latitude, usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter), symbol mm is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ...


Approximately a quarter of the county is protected as the Northumberland National Park, an area of outstanding landscape that has largely been protected from development and agriculture. The park stretches south from the Scottish border and includes Hadrian's Wall. Most of the park is over 800 feet (240 metres) above sea level. Northumberland National Park is the northernmost national park in England. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ...


Ecology

There are a variety of notable habitats and species in Northumberland including:

Chillingham Cattle is the name of a herd of wild bovids at Chillingham Castle, Northumberland, England; also known as Chillingham Wild Cattle, this rare species herd of 62 animals (as of the year 2006) inhabits a very large woodland that has existed since the Middle Ages, although there were fewer... More than one place has become known or formally named Holy Island. ... The Inner Farne seen from Seahouses harbour The Farne Islands (also referred to less formally as the Farnes) are a group of islands off the coast of Northumberland, England. ... Staple Island is a small rocky island that is one of the outer Farne Islands in Northumberland, England. ...

Economy and industry

Housedon Hill
Housedon Hill

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added of Northumberland at current basic prices published (pp.240-253) by Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling. Image File history File links Housedon_hill. ... Image File history File links Housedon_hill. ...

Year Regional Gross Value Added[5] Agriculture[6] Industry[7] Services[8]
1995 2,585 130 943 1,512
2000 2,773 108 831 1,833
2003 3,470 109 868 2,494

Northumberland has a relatively weak economy amongst the counties and other local government areas of the United Kingdom.[9] The county is ranked sixth lowest amongst these 63 council areas. In 2003 23% of males and 60% of females were earning less than the Council of Europe's decency threshold. As of May 2005 unemployment is at 2.3%, in line with the national average.[10] Between 1999 and 2003 businesses in the county grew 4.4% to 8,225, making 0.45% of registered businesses in the UK.[11] European flag of the Council of Europe which is also adopted by the European Union. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Wikimedia Commons has media related to: May 2005 Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21...


A major source of employment and income in the county is tourism. The county annually receives 1.1 million UK visitors and 50,000 foreign tourists who spend a total of £162million in the county.[12]. Tourists on OÊ»ahu, Hawaii Tourism is travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes, and also refers to the provision of services in support of this act. ... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom, Crown Dependencies Inflation 3. ...


Demographics

At the Census 2001 Northumberland registered a population of 307,190,[13] estimated to be 309,237 in 2003.[14] In 2001 there were 130,780 households, 10% which were all retired, and one third were rented. Northumberland has a very low ethnic minority population at 0.985% of the population, compared to 9.1% for England as a whole. 81% of the population reported their religion as Christianity, 0.8% as another religion, and 12% as having no religion.[15]. UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ...


Politics

See also: List of Parliamentary constituencies in Northumberland

Like most English shire counties Northumberland has a two-tier system of local government. It has a county council based in Morpeth and also has six districts, each with their own district council. The county of Northumberland is divided into 4 Parliamentary constituencies - 1 Borough constituencies and 3 County constituencies. ... A shire county or non-metropolitan county in England, is a county level entity which is not a metropolitan county. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... There is no single system of local government in the United Kingdom. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... The Castle Morpeth coat of arms Morpeth is a small market town in Northumberland, England, on the River Wansbeck, which flows east through the town. ...


These districts are, Blyth Valley, Wansbeck, Castle Morpeth, Tynedale, Alnwick and Berwick-upon-Tweed. The county and district councils are responsible for different aspects of local government. Blyth Valley is a borough and district in south-east Northumberland, England, bordering the North Sea and Tyne and Wear. ... Wansbeck is a local government district in south-east Northumberland, England. ... Castle Morpeth is a local government district and borough in Northumberland, England. ... Tynedale is a local government district in south-west Northumberland. ... Alwnick is a local government district in Northumberland, England. ... Berwick-upon-Tweed is a local government district and borough in Northumberland in the north_east of England, on the border with Scotland. ...


The Department for Communities and Local Government are considering reorganising Northumberland's administrative structure. Two proposals are being looked at - one to abolish all of the districts to create a Northumberland unitary authority; and one to create two separate unitary authorities, South East Northumberland (the area now covered by Blyth Valley and Wansbeck), and Rural Northumberland (the area now covered by the other four districts). The changes are planned to be implemented no later than 1 April 2009.[16][17][18] The Department for Communities and Local Government is a United Kingdom government department. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ...


Northumberland is represented in the House of Commons by four Members of Parliament, of whom one is a Conservative, one is a Liberal Democrat and two are Labour. The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ...


Culture

The Northumberland Flag
The Northumberland Flag

Northumberland has traditions not found elsewhere in England, reflecting a mix of indigenous, Anglian, Celtic and Norse influences. These include the rapper sword dance, the Clog dance and the Northumbrian smallpipe. Northumberland also has its own tartan, often referred to in Scotland as the Shepherd’s Tartan. Traditional Northumberland music sounds similar to Scottish music, reflecting the strong historical links between Northumbria and Scotland. Image File history File links Flag_of_Northumberland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Northumberland. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... This article is about the European people. ... Norse is an adjective relating things to Denmark, Norway, Iceland and Sweden. ... Rapper sword is a kind of sword dance. ... Clogging is a traditional type of percussive folk dance which is associated with a number of different regions across the world. ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... A tartan is type of pattern, originating in woven cloth, but now used in many materials. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... Northumberland is the northernmost county of England. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime...


In general, the culture of Northumberland, as with the north east of England, has much more it would seem in common with Scottish Lowland culture than with the rest of England, the two perhaps having more in common with each other in some respects, than with other parts of their respective countries.[citation needed] The links between Northumberland and Scotland are audible in the dialects of both, which include many Old English words, such as bairn for child. For further information, see Scots language and Geordie. Attempts to raise the level of awareness of Northumberland culture have also started, with the formation of a Northumbrian Language Society to preserve the unique dialects (Pitmatic and Northumbrian) of this region, as well as to promote home-grown talent. Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the languages speakers. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... Look up Geordie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pitmatic (originally pitmatical) is a dialect of English used in the counties of Northumberland and Durham. ... Northumbria is primarily the name of an Anglian or Anglo-Saxon kingdom which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, and of the earldom which succeeded the kingdom. ...


Northumberland has its own flag, based on the design first used on the tomb of St Oswald in the 7th century. The current version was granted to the county council in 1951, and adopted as the flag of Northumberland county in 1995.[1] Oswald (c. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Media

Having no large population centres, the county's mainstream media outlets are served from nearby Tyne and Wear, including radio stations and television channels (such as BBC Look North, BBC Radio Newcastle, Tyne Tees Television and Metro Radio), along with the majority of daily newspapers covering the area (The Journal, Evening Chronicle). Newspapers focusing exclusively on Northumberland or its districts include the Northumberland Gazette, Morpeth Herald, Berwick Advertiser, Hexham Courant and the News Post Leader. Tyne and Wear is a metropolitan county in the North East of England around the mouths of the Rivers Tyne and Wear. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... The term television channel generally refers to either a television station or its cable/satellite counterpart (both outlined below). ... The BBC Look North ident Look North is the BBC local regional news programme for the BBC Yorkshire area. ... BBC Radio Newcastle is the BBC Local Radio service English metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear. ... Tyne Tees Television is the ITV television contractor for North East England. ... Metro Radio is an Independent Local Radio station broadcasting to North East England. ... The Journal is a daily newspaper produced in Newcastle upon Tyne. ... The Evening Chronicle is a daily, evening newspaper produced in Newcastle upon Tyne, covering Tyne and Wear, southern Northumberland and northern County Durham. ... The Northumberland Gazette is a weekly newspaper published in Alnwick, Northumberland, England. ... The Morpeth Herald is a weekly newspaper published in Morpeth, Northumberland, England. ...


Lionheart FM, a community radio station based in Alnwick, has recently been awarded a five-year community broadcasting license by OFCOM. Radio Borders covers Berwick and the rural north of the county. Community radio is a type of radio service that caters to the interests of a certain area, broadcasting material that is popular to a local audience but is overlooked by more powerful broadcast groups. ... For the parish in New Brunswick, see Alnwick, New Brunswick Alnwick (pronounced ) is a small market town in north Northumberland, in the north-east of England. ... Ofcom is a regulator for communication industries in the United Kingdom. ... Radio Borders is a radio station broadcasting to the Scottish Borders and North Northumberland. ...


People

The Eider Duck is the Northumberland county bird, sacred to Northumberland's patron saint St. Cuthbert
The Eider Duck is the Northumberland county bird, sacred to Northumberland's
patron saint St. Cuthbert

Famous Northumbrians include: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1897x1543, 482 KB) Common Eider duck Somateria mollissima at Bristol Zoo, Bristol, England. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1897x1543, 482 KB) Common Eider duck Somateria mollissima at Bristol Zoo, Bristol, England. ... Binomial name Somateria mollissima (Linnaeus, 1758) Green: breeding Blue: winter/feeding Subspecies The Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) is a large sea-duck, which is distributed over the northern coasts of Europe, North America and eastern Siberia. ... Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (ca. ...

Thomas Addison was a renowned 19th-century English physician and scientist. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... George Biddell Airy Sir George Biddell Airy (July 27, 1801 – January 2, 1892) was British Astronomer Royal from 1835 to 1881. ... --69. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Avison (February 1709, Tyne – May 9 or May 10, 1770, Newcastle upon Tyne) was an English composer during Baroque period. ... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... Battle of Chesma, by Ivan Aivazovsky. ... William George Armstrong, 1st Baron Armstrong (November 26, 1810 - December 27, 1900) was an English industrialist, the effective founder of the Armstrong-Siddeley manufacturing empire. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Thomas Bewick (August 1753 - November 8, 1828) was an English wood engraver and ornithologist. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Lancelot Brown (1716 - 6 February 1783), more commonly known as Capability Brown, was an English landscape gardener, now remembered as the last of the great English eighteenth-century artists to be accorded his due, and Englands greatest gardener. He designed over 200 parks, many of which still endure. ... // Events July 24 - Spanish treasure fleet of ten ships under admiral Ubilla leave Havana, Cuba for Spain. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Categories: Stub ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Josephine Elizabeth Butler (1828 - 1906) was a Victorian era feminist campaigner who was primarily interested in the welfare of prostitutes. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Basil Cheesman Bunting (March 3, 1900 – 1985) was a British modernist poet. ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eric Victor Burdon (born 11 May 1941, in Walker, Newcastle upon Tyne) was the lead singer of The Animals and later of War. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Sir Robert Bobby Charlton, CBE (born 11 October 1937 in Ashington, Northumberland) is a former English professional football player who won the World Cup and was named the European Footballer of the Year in 1966. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Jack Charlton OBE (born Ashington, Northumberland, May 8, 1935) was a footballer who spent his whole career in the successful Leeds United side of the 1960s and 1970s and won the World Cup with England. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Grace Darling (November 24, 1815–October 20, 1842[1]) is one of Englands best-loved Victorian heroines, on the strength of a celebrated incident in 1838. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Bryan Donkin (March 22, 1768 - February 27, 1855) was a British engineer and industrialist. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Daniel Gooch was the first chief mechanical engineer of the Great Western Railway from 1837 to 1864. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir John Alistair Graham (born 6 August 1942) is a well known figure in British Public Life. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... The Right Honourable Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC (13 March 1764–17 July 1845), known as Viscount Howick between 1806 and 1807, was a British Whig statesman and Prime Minister. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Stephen James Harmison MBE (born 23 October 1978, Ashington, Northumberland) is an England cricketer, and a leading Test match fast bowler. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ... Alan Hoyle (born December 13, 1983 in Ashington UK), is a UK basketball player who currently plays for the ETS Renegades. ... John Edward Thompson Jackie Milburn, (May 11, 1924 – October 9, 1988), also known to fans as Wor Jackie or Jackie Mellbairn and the first World Wor in reference to his global fame, was a football player for Newcastle United and England. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ross Noble, born 6 June 1976 an English stand-up comedian, raised in Cramlington, Northumberland. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... A carving of Henry Hotspur Percy Sir Henry Percy, also called Harry Hotspur (May 20, 1364/1366 – July 21, 1403) was the eldest son of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, 4th Lord Percy of Alnwick. ... Events Foundation of the University of Vienna Births John de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (died 1394) Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk (died 1399) Deaths May 17 - Louis VI the Roman, elector of Brandenburg (born 1328) July 27 - Duke Rudolf IV of Austria (born 1339) Categories: 1365 ... Events July 21 - Battle of Shrewsbury. ... Billy Pigg (1902 - 1968) was an English player of Northumbrian bagpipes Northumbrian Pipers Society The Northumbrian Pipers Society was formed in 1928 in Newcastle Upon Tyne to promote both types of Northumbrian bagpipes - the smallpipes and the somewhat rarer half-longs. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Admiral of the Fleet Lord Jellicoe Admiral of the Fleet Sir John Rushworth Jellicoe, 1st Earl Jellicoe (December 5, 1859- November 20, 1935) was a British Royal Navy admiral. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... George Stephenson George Stephenson For the British politician, see George Stevenson. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Statue of Robert Stephenson at Euston Station, London Robert Stephenson FRS (October 16, 1803–October 12, 1859) was an English civil engineer. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Bob Stokoe (1930 - February 1, 2004) was a footballer and a manager who managed, almost uniquely, to transcend the traditional North-East rivalry between the regions footballing giants, Newcastle United and Sunderland. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Algernon Swinburne, Portrait by Rossetti Algernon Charles Swinburne (April 5, 1837 – April 10, 1909) was a Victorian era English poet. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Kathryn Tickell (b 1967) is an English player of the Northumbrian smallpipes and fiddle. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton (January 15, 1914 – January 26, 2003) was a notable historian of early modern Britain and Nazi Germany. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Turner (c. ... 1508 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 23 - Peace of Longjumeau ends the Second War of Religion in France. ... Cicely Veronica Wedgwood (1910-1997) was a British historian. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Doherty (born March 12, 1979) is the singer and songwriter of the band Babyshambles, and formerly co-frontman and songwriter (along with Carl Barât) of The Libertines, with whom he first shot to fame. ... For the song by the Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ...

Settlements

Long Crag.
Long Crag.
See also: List of places in Northumberland
Major settlements in Northumberland
Alnwick | Ashington | Bamburgh | Bedlington | Berwick-upon-Tweed | Blyth | Cramlington | Haltwhistle | Hexham | Morpeth | Newbiggin-by-the-Sea | Ponteland | Prudhoe | Rothbury | Seahouses | Wooler

Image File history File links Long_Crag_summit. ... Image File history File links Long_Crag_summit. ... -1... -1... Image File history File links Flag_of_Northumberland. ... For the parish in New Brunswick, see Alnwick, New Brunswick Alnwick (pronounced ) is a small market town in north Northumberland, in the north-east of England. ... Statistics Population: 28,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: NZ2787 Administration District: Wansbeck Shire county: Northumberland Region: North East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Northumberland Historic county: Northumberland Services Police force: Northumbria Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: North East Post office and telephone Post... Bamburgh is a large village on the coast of Northumberland, England. ... Bedlington is a town in Northumberland, to the north of the Tyne and Wear urban area. ... Map sources for Berwick-upon-Tweed at grid reference NT9952 Berwick-upon-Tweed from across the river Berwick-upon-Tweed, (pronounced Berrick) situated in the county of Northumberland, is the northernmost town in England, situated on the east coast on the mouth of the river Tweed. ... Blyth is a town in the district of Blyth Valley, Northumberland, England. ... The small town of Cramlington in the county of Northumberland is situated nine miles north of the provincial city of Newcastle Upon Tyne in the north east of England. ... Map sources for Haltwhistle at grid reference NY7064 Haltwhistle is a town in Northumberland, England, situated ten miles east of Brampton, near Hadrians Wall. ... Hexham is a large market town in Northumberland, England, located south of the River Tyne. ... The Castle Morpeth coat of arms Morpeth is a small market town in Northumberland, England, on the River Wansbeck, which flows east through the town. ... Newbiggin-by-the-Sea is a town in Northumberland, England, lying on the North Sea coast. ... Ponteland is a residential suburb of Newcastle upon Tyne, England. ... // Prudhoe is a small town in the southern part of the English county of Northumberland in the district of Tynedale, close to the border with Tyne and Wear and just south of the River Tyne. ... Rothbury is a town in Northumberland, England, located on the River Coquet near the Simonside Hills and the Northumberland National Park. ... Seahouses is a small town on the North Northumberland coast in England. ... Wooler is a small town in Northumberland, England. ...

See also

The title Duke of Northumberland was created in 1551 for John Dudley. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... -1... The county of Northumberland is divided into 4 Parliamentary constituencies - 1 Borough constituencies and 3 County constituencies. ... The Anglo-Scottish border runs for 96 kilometres (60 miles) between the River Tweed on the east coast and the Solway Firth in the west. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Northumberland National Park Authority, n.d. "The topology and climate of Northumberland National Park."
  2. ^ Met Office, 2000. "Annual average temperature for the United Kingdom."
  3. ^ Met Office, 2000. "Annual average rainfall for the United Kingdom."
  4. ^ Met Office, 2000. "Annual average sunshine for the United Kingdom."
  5. ^ Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
  6. ^ includes hunting and forestry
  7. ^ includes energy and construction
  8. ^ includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured
  9. ^ Northumberland County Council, 2003 "Northumberland in context.". MS Word, HTML (Google)
  10. ^ Northumberland InfoNet, 2005. "Unemployment Statistics."
  11. ^ Northumberland InfoNet, 2004. "Key Statistics: Businesses." (PDF)
  12. ^ Northumberland InfoNet, 2004 "Key Statistics: Tourism." (PDF)
  13. ^ Office for National Statistics, 2003. "Update on 2001 Census figures." (PDF)
  14. ^ Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, 2003. "Local Government Finance Settlement 2005/06." (PDF)
  15. ^ Office for National Statistics, 2001. "KS07 Religion: Census 2001, Key Statistics for local Authorities."
  16. ^ Northumberland County Council - One Future, One Council
  17. ^ One Northumberland Two Councils
  18. ^ Communities and Local Government - Proposals for future unitary structures: Stakeholder consultation

The new building on the edge of Exeter The Met Office (originally an abbreviation for Meteorological Office, but now the official name in itself), which has its headquarters at Exeter in Devon, is the United Kingdoms national weather service. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the government executive agency charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister is a department of the British government. ...

Bibliography

Tomlinson, W. W. (1888). Comprehensive guide to the county of Northumberland (reprinted 1968). Trowbridge, UK: Redwood.


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