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Encyclopedia > Northern Ireland Assembly
The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a six flowered linen or flax plant.
The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a six flowered linen or flax plant.
Northern Ireland

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Northern Ireland
Image File history File links Size of this preview: 665 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (693 × 625 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/png)Logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 665 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (693 × 625 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/png)Logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... Binomial name Linum usitatissimum Linnaeus. ... Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official languages English (de facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3, BSL, NISL, ISL Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Ian Paisley  - Deputy First Minister... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Northern Ireland is an administrative region and one of four parts of the United Kingdom. ...


In Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland Assembly Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official languages English (de facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3, BSL, NISL, ISL Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Ian Paisley  - Deputy First Minister...


Acts: Acts
Members: 1998 - 2003 - 2007
Elections: 1998 - 2003 - 2007
Presiding Officer This is a list of Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly passed by that body during its existence between 2000 and 2002 when it was suspended. ... This is a list of Members of the Northern Ireland Assembly elected in 1998. ... The Northern Ireland Assembly elected in November 2003, never met as such, since Northern Irelands devolved government and representative institutions were suspended following the re-introduction of direct rule by the United Kingdom government on 14 October 2002. ... The Northern Ireland Assembly election, 2007 will be held on 7 March 2007. ... The first elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly were held on June 25, 1998. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The third elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly were held on 7 March 2007. ... The Speaker of the Northern Ireland Assembly is the presiding officer of the Northern Ireland Assembly, elected on a cross-community vote by the Members of the Northern Ireland Assembly. ...


Northern Ireland Executive The Northern Ireland Executive as established by the Northern Ireland Act 1998 is the (currently suspended) executive body for Northern Ireland, answerable to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ...


First Minister: Ian Paisley
Deputy First Minister: Martin McGuinness
Departments and agencies The Office of the First Minister and the Deputy First Minister (OFMDFM) (Irish: Oifig an Chéad-Aire agus an LeasChéad-Aire, Ulster Scots: Offis o tha Heid Männystèr an tha Heid Männystèr Depute) is the Northern Ireland government department with overall responsibility for the... Ian Richard Kyle Paisley (born 6 April 1926), styled The Revd and Rt Hon. ... The Office of the First Minister and the Deputy First Minister (OFMDFM) (Irish: Oifig an Chéad-Aire agus an LeasChéad-Aire, Ulster Scots: Offis o tha Heid Männystèr an tha Heid Männystèr Depute) is the Northern Ireland government department with overall responsibility for the... James Martin Pacelli McGuinness (Irish: Máirtín Mag Aonghusa,[1] born in Derry 23 May 1950) is an Irish Republican politician and Member of Parliament, and a former Provisional IRA leader. ... List of Government departments and agencies in Northern Ireland This article is a list of Northern Ireland government Departments and their Agencies and other related organisations (listed underneath each Department) (at September 2006): // Government departments and agencies These Departments are subject to the Northern Ireland Assembly, when it is in...


Local Government
Courts of Northern Ireland Northern Ireland is divided into 26 districts for local government purposes. ... The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system — England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. ...

In the United Kingdom

United Kingdom Parliament The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ...


Committees: Affairs - Grand
Members: Commons - Lords
Elections: 2005 The Northern Ireland Affairs Committee is appointed by the House of Commons to examine the expenditure, administration and policy of the Northern Ireland Office. ... The Northern Ireland Grand Committee is one of three such committees in the United Kingdom Parliament. ... This is a list of members of Parliament elected at the 2001 UK general election or in subsequent by-elections for Northern Ireland seats, by party. ... This is a list of Members of the United Kingdom House of Lords who were born, live or lived in Northern Ireland. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ...


United Kingdom Government The agencies responsible for the government of the United Kingdom consist of a number of ministerial departments (usually headed by a Secretary of State) and non-ministerial departments headed by senior civil servants. ...


Northern Ireland Office
Secretary of StateDirect Rule The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) is an arm of the United Kingdom government, responsible for Northern Ireland affairs. ... The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is the British cabinet minister who has responsibility for the government of Northern Ireland. ... Direct Rule is the term given to the running of the day-to-day administration of Northern Ireland directly from Westminster. ...

Organisations

British-Irish Council
Electoral Commission
North/South Ministerial Council The British–Irish Council (sometimes known as the Council of the Isles) is a body created by the Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement). ... The Electoral Commission is a non-ministerial government department with powers in the United Kingdom, which was created by an Act of Parliament, the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000 (2000 c. ... The North/South Ministerial Council (NSMC, Irish: An Chomhairle Aireachta Thuaidh/Theas, Ulster-Scots: The Noarth-Sooth Cooncil o Männystèrs) is a body established under the Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement) to co-ordinate activity and exercise certain limited governmental powers across the whole...

See also

Belfast Agreement (1998)
St Andrews Agreement (2006) The Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was a major political development in the Northern Ireland peace process. ... The St Andrews Agreement is an agreement proposed by the British and Irish Governments in relation to devolution of power to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ...


Elections in Northern Ireland Elections in Northern Ireland gives information on election and election results in Northern Ireland. ...


ConstituenciesPolitical parties Northern Ireland is divided into 18 Parliamentary constituencies - 4 Borough constituencies in Belfast and 14 County constituencies elsewhere. ... Political parties in Northern Ireland lists political parties in Northern Ireland. ...


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The Northern Ireland Assembly (Irish: Tionól Thuaisceart Éireann,[1] Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann Semmlie[2]) is the devolved legislature of Northern Ireland. It has power to legislate in a wide range of areas that are not explicitly reserved to the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and to elect the Northern Ireland Executive. It sits at Parliament Buildings at Stormont in Belfast. Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... Ulster Scots, also known as Ullans, Hiberno-Scots, or Scotch-Irish, refers to the variety of Scots (sometimes referred to as Lowland Scots) spoken in parts of the province of Ulster, which spans the six counties of Northern Ireland and three of the Republic of Ireland. ... Devolution or home rule is the statutory granting of powers from the central government of a state to government at national, regional or local level. ... A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official languages English (de facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3, BSL, NISL, ISL Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Ian Paisley  - Deputy First Minister... In Scotland reserved matters, also referred to as reserved powers, are those subjects over which power to legislate is retained by Westminster, as explicitly stated in the Scotland Act 1998. ... The Houses of Parliament, as seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... The Northern Ireland Executive as established by the Northern Ireland Act 1998 is the (currently suspended) executive body for Northern Ireland, answerable to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Northern Ireland Parliament Buildings Parliament Buildings, known as Stormont because of its location in the Stormont area of Belfast, served as the seat of the Parliament of Northern Ireland and successive Northern Ireland assemblies and conventions. ... Stormont is a suburb of the city of Belfast, in which the Northern Ireland Parliament building and Stormont Castle area located. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


The latest incarnation of the Assembly was established under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, an accord aimed at bringing an end to Northern Ireland's violent 30-year Troubles. It is based on the principle of power-sharing under the D'Hondt method, in order to ensure that both communities in Northern Ireland, unionist and nationalist, participate in governing the region. The Assembly is a unicameral, democratically elected body comprising 108 members who are known as Members of the Legislative Assembly, or MLAs. Members are elected under the single transferable vote form of proportional representation. The Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was a major political development in the Northern Ireland peace process. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... For the UK post-rock band, see Troubles (band) The Troubles is a term used to describe the latest installment of periodic communal violence involving Republican and Loyalist paramilitary organisations, the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), the British Army and others in Northern Ireland from the late 1960s until the late... The DHondt method (equivalent to Jeffersons method) is a highest averages method for allocating seats in party-list proportional representation. ... Unionism, in Ireland, is a belief in the desirability of a full constitutional and institutional relationship between Ireland and Great Britain based on the terms and order of government of the Act of Union 1800 which had merged both countries in 1801 to form the United Kingdom. ... Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... Democracy (literally rule by the people, from the Greek demos, people, and krateo, rule[1]) is a form of government. ... A Member of the Legislative Assembly, or MLA, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to the Legislature or legislative assembly of a subnational jurisdiction. ... This STV ballot for the Australian Senate illustrates group voting tickets. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ...


The Assembly has been suspended on multiple occasions throughout its history, the longest being from 14 October 2002 until 7 April 2007, a period of over four and a half years; during these suspensions, its powers reverted to the Northern Ireland Office. Following talks that resulted in the St Andrews Agreement being accepted in November 2006, an election to the Assembly was held on 7 March 2007 and full power was restored to the devolved institutions on 8 May 2007.[3] October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) is an arm of the United Kingdom government, responsible for Northern Ireland affairs. ... The St Andrews Agreement is an agreement proposed by the British and Irish Governments in relation to devolution of power to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... 67 die and about 300,000 people are affected by floods in Ethiopias Somali Region of Ogaden after the Shabelle River bursts its banks. ... The third elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly were held on 7 March 2007. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (67th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (129th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ...

Contents

History

Previous legislatures

From 7 June 1921 onwards, Northern Ireland was governed under majority unionist rule by the Parliament of Northern Ireland, an earlier devolved legislature. It was suspended on 30 March 1972, and was abolished shortly thereafter under the terms of the Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973. June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... The Parliament of Northern Ireland was the home rule legislature created under the Government of Ireland Act 1920, which existed from June 7, 1921 to March 30, 1972, when it was suspended. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (90th in leap years). ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Northern Ireland Constitution Act was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, passed in 1973 to replace the previous system established by the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898. ...


Shortly after this first parliament was abolished, attempts began to restore devolution on a new basis that would see power shared between nationalists and unionists. To this end a new parliament, the Northern Ireland Assembly, was established in 1973. However, this body was brought down by opposition from hard-line unionists and republicans and was abolished in 1974. In 1982 another Northern Ireland Assembly was established at Stormont, initially as a scrutinising body for the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, although it received little support from nationalists and was officially dissolved in 1986. Devolution or home rule is the statutory granting of powers from the central government of a state to government at national, regional or local level. ... The Northern Ireland Assembly was a legislative assembly set up by the Government of the United Kingdom on 3 May 1973 to restore devolved government to Northern Ireland with a power-sharing executive made up of unionists and nationalists. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Northern Ireland assembly elections, 1982. ... The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is the British cabinet minister who has responsibility for the government of Northern Ireland. ...


The modern Assembly and suspensions

The modern Northern Ireland Assembly was first elected on 25 June 1998 and first met on 1 July of that year; however, it existed only in "shadow" form until 2 December 1999 when full powers were devolved to the Assembly. Since then the Assembly has operated only intermittently and has been suspended on four occasions: June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...

Attempts to secure its operation on a permanent basis have been frustrated by disagreements between the two main unionist parties (the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and Ulster Unionist Party (UUP)) and Sinn Féin, the largest nationalist party, which is widely perceived to be the political wing of the Provisional IRA. This accusation is considered by some as being politically motivated to discredit Sinn Féin. Unionists had refused to participate in the Good Friday Agreement's institutions alongside Sinn Féin until they were assured that the IRA had discontinued all of its activities, decommissioned its arms and disbanded. February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... DUP redirects here. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish name: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA) is an Irish Republican left-wing paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern Ireland...


The most recent suspension occurred after unionists started to walk out of its power-sharing Executive after Sinn Féin's offices at Stormont had been raided by the police investigating alleged intelligence gathering on behalf of the IRA by members of the party's support staff. The assembly, already suspended, dissolved on 28 April 2003 as scheduled, but the elections due the following month were postponed by the UK government and were not held until November that year. Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish name: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA) is an Irish Republican left-wing paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern Ireland... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 8 December 2005, three Belfast men at the centre of the alleged IRA spying incident at ‘Stormontgate’ were acquitted of all charges. The prosecution offered no evidence "in the public interest." Afterwards, Denis Donaldson, one of those arrested, said that the "charges should never have been brought" as the police action was "political." On 17 December 2005, Donaldson publicly confirmed that he had been a spy for British intelligence since the early 1980s. [1] Mr Donaldson was murdered on April 4, 2006. December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Denis Donaldson (left) pictured with Bobby Sands Denis Martin Donaldson (Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1950 – April 4, 2006 in Donegal, Republic of Ireland) was a member of the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) and Sinn Féin who was exposed in December 2005 as an informer in the employ of MI5... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), more commonly known as MI6 (originally Military Intelligence [section] 6), or Her Majestys Secret Service or just the Secret Service, is the British external security agency. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


"The Assembly" and "the Transitional Assembly"

"The Assembly established under the Northern Ireland Act 2006"

Although the Northern Ireland Assembly remained suspended from 2002 until 2007, the persons elected to it at the 2003 Assembly election were called together on 15 May 2006 under the Northern Ireland Act 2006 to meet in an assembly to be known as "the Assembly"[4] (or fully "the Assembly established under the Northern Ireland Act 2006") for the purpose of electing a First Minister and Deputy First Minister and choosing the members of an Executive before 25 November 2006 as a preliminary to the restoration of devolved government. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (136th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a six flowered linen or flax plant. ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


On 23 May 2006 Ian Paisley, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) refused Sinn Féin's nomination to be First Minister alongside Sinn Féin's chief negotiator, Martin McGuinness, as Deputy First Minister. Eileen Bell was appointed by the Secretary of State Peter Hain to be the Speaker of the Assembly, with Francie Molloy and Jim Wells acting as deputies. [5] The Northern Ireland (St Andrews Agreement) Act 2006 repealed the Northern Ireland Act 2006 and thus disbanded "the Assembly". May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Ian Richard Kyle Paisley (born 6 April 1926), styled The Revd and Rt Hon. ... DUP redirects here. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... The Office of the First Minister and the Deputy First Minister (OFMDFM) (Irish: Oifig an Chéad-Aire agus an LeasChéad-Aire, Ulster Scots: Offis o tha Heid Männystèr an tha Heid Männystèr Depute) is the Northern Ireland government department with overall responsibility for the... James Martin Pacelli McGuinness (Irish: Máirtín Mag Aonghusa,[1] born in Derry 23 May 1950) is an Irish Republican politician and Member of Parliament, and a former Provisional IRA leader. ... Eileen Bell (born August 15, 1943) is a Northern Ireland politician, member of the Northern Ireland Assembly for North Down and deputy leader of the Alliance Party. ... Peter Gerald Hain (born February 16, 1950, Nairobi, Kenya) is a British Labour Party politician, Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and Secretary of State for Wales. ... Francie Molloy MLA is a Sinn Féin politician and a deputy speaker of the Transitional Assembly (Northern Ireland). ... Jim Wells MLA (born 27 April 1957) is a politician from the Democratic Unionist Party and a deputy speaker of the Transitional Assembly (Northern Ireland). ... The St Andrews Agreement is an agreement proposed by the British and Irish Governments in relation to devolution of power to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ...


"The Transitional Assembly"

The Northern Ireland (St Andrews Agreement) Act 2006 provided for a "Transitional Assembly" (or fully "the Transitional Assembly established under the Northern Ireland (St Andrews Agreement) Act 2006") to take part in preparations for the restoration of devolved government in Northern Ireland. A person who is a member of the Northern Ireland Assembly is also a member of the Transitional Assembly. Eileen Bell Is Speaker of the new Transitional Assembly and Francie Molloy and Jim Wells continue as deputies. The Transitional Assembly first met on 24 November 2006, when the proceedings was suspended due to a bomb threat by loyalist paramilitary Michael Stone. [6] It was dissolved on 30 January 2007 when campaigning for the upcoming Northern Ireland Assembly elections started. November 24 is the 328th day (329th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Michael Stone (born circa 1955 in Belfast) is a loyalist paramilitary from the Braniel estate in east Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ...


An election to the then-suspended Northern Ireland Assembly was held on 7 March 2007. Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Peter Hain signed a restoration order at lunchtime on 25 March 2007 allowing for the restoration of devolution at midnight on the following day.[7] The two largest parties following the election, the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and Sinn Féin, agreed to enter power-sharing government together, and power was eventually restored on 8 May with Ian Paisley as First Minister and Martin McGuinness as Deputy First Minister. [3] The third elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly were held on 7 March 2007. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (67th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is the British cabinet minister who has responsibility for the government of Northern Ireland. ... Peter Gerald Hain (born February 16, 1950, Nairobi, Kenya) is a British Labour Party politician, Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and Secretary of State for Wales. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... DUP redirects here. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ...


Composition

Affiliation Members
Democratic Unionist 36
Sinn Féin 28
Ulster Unionist 18
Social Democratic and Labour 16
Alliance 7
Green (NI) 1
Progressive Unionist 1
  Kieran Deeny (Independent) 1
 Total
108

The Assembly's composition and powers are laid down in the Northern Ireland Act 1998. The Assembly's 108 members are elected from 18 six-member constituencies on the basis of universal adult suffrage. The constituencies used are the same as those used for elections to the Westminster Parliament. The 1998 Act provides that, unless the Assembly is dissolved early, elections should occur once in every five years on the first Thursday in May. However the second election to the Assembly was delayed by the UK government until 23 November 2003. The Assembly is dissolved shortly before the holding of elections on a day chosen by the Secretary of State, the British minister with responsibility for Northern Ireland. After the holding of elections the Assembly must meet within eight days. The Assembly can vote to dissolve itself early by a two-thirds majority of the total number of its members. It is also automatically dissolved if it is unable to elect a First Minister and Deputy First Minister within six weeks of its first meeting or of those positions becoming vacant. Members of the Assembly are known as MLAs or "Members of the Legislative Assembly". The three elections held to the Assembly so far were the: DUP redirects here. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Green Party in Northern Ireland is a minor political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) are a small political party from Northern Ireland. ... Kieran Deeny (born October 12, 1954) is a Northern Irish medical doctor turned politician, and an independent Member of the Legislative Assembly for West Tyrone, having run on a single issue ticket of retaining the Tyrone County Hospital in Omagh. ... The Northern Ireland Act 1998 is part of the Labour governments constitutional reform programme. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is the British cabinet minister who has responsibility for the government of Northern Ireland. ... The First Minister of Northern Ireland (Ulster Scots: Heid Männystèr o Norlin Airlann) and the Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland (Ulster Scots: Heid Männystèr Depute o Norlin Airlann) are the leaders of the Northern Ireland Executive, Northern Irelands home rule government set up in...

The Northern Ireland has two primary mechanisms to guarantee power-sharing. The first is the manner in which ministers are appointed to the Northern Ireland Executive. These are not nominated by a simple majority vote. Rather all parties with a significant number of seats are entitled to at least one minister, and ministerial portfolios are divided among the parties in proportion to their strength in the Assembly, through a method known as the D'Hondt system. The second power-sharing mechanism is the requirement that certain resolutions must receive "cross community support", or the support of a minimum number of MLAs from both communities, to be passed by the Assembly. Every MLA is officially designated as either "nationalist", "Unionist" or "non-aligned". The election of the First and Deputy First Ministers, the election of the Speaker and Deputy Speakers, any changes to the standing orders and the adoption of certain money bills must all occur with cross-community support. The election of the First and Deputy First Ministers must occur by parallel consent but in all other cases either form of cross community support is acceptable. In addition to votes on these subjects any vote taken by the Assembly can be made dependent on cross-community support if at least thirty MLAs present the Speaker with a "petition of concern" before the vote is taken. This means, in effect, that, provided enough MLAs from a given community agree, each of the two communities represented in the Assembly can exercise a veto over its decisions. The first elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly were held on June 25, 1998. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The third elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly were held on 7 March 2007. ... The dHondt method is a highest averages method for allocating seats in party-list proportional representation. ... It has been suggested that Speakers of the House be merged into this article or section. ...


Each MLA is free to designate themselves as "nationalist", "unionist" or "other" as they see fit, the only requirement being that no member may change their designation more than once during an Assembly session. The power-sharing system thus depends on the honesty of its participants. The system has been criticised by some, in particular the cross-community Alliance Party, as entrenching sectarian divisions. Alliance favours a change that would involve an end to official designations of identity and the taking of important votes on the basis of an ordinary super-majority. A particular bone of contention for them is that members designated as "other" have less say in the election of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister, as it is decided by parallel consent. The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... Sectarianism refers (usually pejoratively) to a rigid adherence to a particular sect or party or religious denomination. ... A supermajority or a qualified majority is a requirement for a proposal to gain a specified level or type of support which exceeds a simple majority in order to have effect. ...


Powers and functions

The Assembly has both legislative powers and responsibility for electing the Northern Ireland Executive. The First and Deputy First Ministers are elected on a cross-community vote. However the remaining ministers are not elected but rather chosen by the nominating officers of each party, each party being entitled to a share of ministerial positions roughly proportionate to its share of seats in the Assembly. The Assembly has authority to legislate in a field of competences known as "transferred matters". These matters are not explicitly enumerated in the Northern Ireland Act 1998. Rather they include any competence not explicitly retained by the Parliament at Westminster. Powers reserved by Westminster are divided into "excepted matters", which it retains indefinitely, and "reserved matters", which may be transferred to the competence of the Northern Ireland Assembly at a future date. An incomplete list of "transferred", "reserved" and "excepted" matters is given below. While the Assembly is in suspension its legislative powers are exercised by the UK government which effectively has power to legislate by decree. Laws that would normally be within the competence of the Assembly are passed by the UK government in the form of Orders-in-Council rather than legislative acts. An Order-in-Council is a type of legislation in the United Kingdom and in the Commonwealth of Nations which is formally made in the name of the Queen by the Privy Council (Queen-in-Council), or the Governor-General in a Commonwealth realm or Governor by the Executive Council...


Unlike laws enacted by the Westminster Parliament, Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly are subject to judicial review. A law can be struck down if it is found to exceed the competences of the Assembly but also if it violates European Union law or the European Convention on Human Rights, or if it is found to discriminate against individuals on the grounds of political opinion or religious belief. The European Union is unique among international organisations in having a complex and highly developed system of internal law which has direct effect within the legal systems of its member states. ... The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe[1] in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ...


Although the British monarch is not formally a component of the Assembly (as is the case at Westminster), all bills passed by the Assembly must receive the Royal Assent in order to become law. This is not a mere formality; if he or she believes that a bill violates the constitutional limitations on the powers of the Assembly the Secretary of State will refuse to submit the bill to the monarch for Assent. If submitted by the Secretary of State, the monarch will, by convention, sign a bill into law. Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly begin with the enacting formula: "BE IT ENACTED by being passed by the Northern Ireland Assembly and assented to by Her Majesty as follows:". The British monarch or Sovereign is the head of state of the United Kingdom and in the British overseas territories. ... // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... A constitutional convention is an informal and uncodified procedural agreement that is followed by the institutions of a state. ... An enacting formula is a short phrase that introduces the main provisions of a law enacted by some legislatures. ...


Transferred matters

Caitríona Ruane MLA (b. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... Michael McGimpsey (born July 1, 1948) is a Northern Ireland unionist politician, and Ulster Unionist Party Member of the Legislative Assembly for Belfast South. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... Michelle Gildernew (born 28 March 1970) is an Irish republican politician. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... Nigel Alexander Dodds, OBE (born August 20, 1958) is a barrister and Northern Ireland unionist politician. ... DUP redirects here. ... Cllr Arlene Isabel Foster (née Kelly) (b. ... DUP redirects here. ... Conor Murphy (born 10 July 1963, Newry) is the main Sinn Fein representative for the Newry and Armagh constituency in Northern Ireland, which he represents as its MP and one of its six Member of the Legislative Assembly. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... Sir Reg Empey, MLA and Leader of the Ulster Unionist Party. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... Several notable people are called Peter Robinson: For the member of the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada who oversaw emigration schemes, see Peter Robinson (1785-1838) For the Northern Ireland politician Peter David Robinson, see Peter Robinson (politician) For the English-born Canadian-based detective novelist, see Peter Robinson (novelist... DUP redirects here. ... Margaret Ritchie (1903 - 1969) was an English soprano who sang opera, oratorio and song. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... Alderman Edwin Poots MLA is a Northern Ireland politician and a Democratic Unionist Party MLA for Lagan Valley. ... DUP redirects here. ...

Reserved matters

  • Criminal law
  • Police
  • Postage
  • Navigation and civil aviation
  • International trade
  • Telecommunications
  • The foreshore and sea bed
  • Disqualification from Assembly membership
  • Consumer safety
  • Financial services and markets
  • Intellectual property
  • National minimum wage

Excepted matters

  • Royal succession
  • International relations
  • Defence and armed forces
  • Nationality, immigration and asylum
  • Taxes levied across the United Kingdom as a whole
  • Appointment of senior judges
  • All elections held in Northern Ireland
  • Currency
  • Conferring of honours

Organisation

The Assembly is chaired by the Speaker and three Deputy Speakers. Lord Alderdice served as the first regular Speaker of the Assembly, but retired to serve as part of the current Independent Monitoring Commission that supervises paramilitary ceasefires. The position is currently filled by William Hay. In the Assembly the Speaker and ten other members constitute a quorum. The Assembly Commission is the body corporate of the Assembly. It ensures that the Assembly has the property, staff and services it needs to carry out its work. Legal proceedings taken for or against the Assembly are taken for or against the Commission on behalf of the Assembly. John Thomas Alderdice, Baron Alderdice (28 March 1955— ) is a Northern Ireland politician. ... The Independent Monitoring Commission is an organisation, founded on 7 January 2004, to promote peace and stability in Northern Ireland. ... William Hay is a Unionist politician from Northern Ireland Hay was elected to Derry City Council in 1981. ...


When not suspended the Assembly has a number of statutory committees each of which is charged with scrutinising the activities of a particular ministerial department. It also has a number of permanent standing committees and temporary ad hoc committees. The chairs and deputy chairs of the committees are chosen by party nominating officers under a procedure similar to that used to appoint members of the Executive. Ordinary committee members are not appointed under this procedure but the Standing Orders require that the share of members of each party on a committee should be roughly proportionate to its share of seats in the Assembly. Committees of the Assembly take decisions by a simple majority vote. The following were the statutory and standing committees of the Assembly at the time of its suspension in 2002:


Departmental committees

  • Agriculture and Rural Development Committee
  • Culture, Arts and Leisure Committee
  • Education Committee
  • Employment and Learning Committee
  • Enterprise, Trade and Investment Committee
  • Environment Committee
  • Finance and Personnel Committee
  • Health, Social Services and Public Safety Committee
  • Regional Development Committee
  • Social Development Committee

Standing committees

  • Committee on Procedures
  • Business Committee
  • Committee of the Centre
  • Public Accounts Committee
  • Committee on Standards and Privileges
  • Audit Committee

References

  1. ^ Cód Iompair do Bhaill an Bhoird (Irish) (PDF). Foras na Gaeilge. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  2. ^ Tha Boord o Ulstèr-Scotch - Tha Boord (Ulster Scots). Ulster-Scots Agency. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  3. ^ a b "Historic return for NI Assembly", BBC News Online, BBC, 2007-05-08. Retrieved on 2007-05-08. 
  4. ^ http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2006/20060017.htm
  5. ^ http://www.niassembly.gov.uk/theassembly/main.htm
  6. ^ "Stone held over Stormont attack", BBC News Online, BBC, 2006-11-24. Retrieved on 2007-05-08. 
  7. ^ "Parties face deadline at Stormont", BBC News Online, BBC, 2007-03-26. Retrieved on 2007-05-08. 

PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Foras na Gaeilge is the governing body of the Irish language, responsible for the promotion of the language throughout all of Ireland. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (129th in leap years). ... Ulster Scots, also known as Ullans, Hiberno-Scots, or Scotch-Irish, refers to the variety of Scots (sometimes referred to as Lowland Scots) spoken in parts of the province of Ulster, which spans the six counties of Northern Ireland and three of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Ulster-Scots Agency (in Ulster Scots, Tha Boord o Ulstèr-Scotch) is a cross-border body set up in Ireland to promote the Ulster Scots language and culture. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (129th in leap years). ... BBC News Online logo The BBC News Website in February 2006. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (129th in leap years). ... BBC News Online logo The BBC News Website in February 2006. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (129th in leap years). ... BBC News Online logo The BBC News Website in February 2006. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (129th in leap years). ...

See also

This is a list of members of the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The National Assembly for Wales (NAW or NAfW) (Welsh: ) is a devolved assembly with power to make legislation in Wales. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Northern Ireland Assembly debates: House of Commons, House of Lords, and Northern Ireland Assembly (TheyWorkForYou.com) (146 words)
Northern Ireland Assembly debates: House of Commons, House of Lords, and Northern Ireland Assembly (TheyWorkForYou.com)
House of Commons, House of Lords, and Northern Ireland Assembly
The Northern Ireland Assembly was suspended on the 14th of October 2002, and remained suspended until 8th May 2007.
Northern Ireland Assembly - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2095 words)
The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly is a six flowered linen or flax plant, chosen for the plant's historical economic importance to the region.
This Northern Ireland parliament was abolished by the United Kingdom Parliament at Westminister in 1972 when it proved unable to control the escalating civil strife associated with the beginning of the Troubles.
Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly begin with the enacting formula: "BE IT ENACTED by being passed by the Northern Ireland Assembly and assented to by Her Majesty as follows:".
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