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Encyclopedia > Northeastern University

Northeastern University Look up neu in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Motto Lux, Veritas, Virtus
(Light, Truth, Virtue)
Established 1898
Type Private
Endowment $650 million
President Dr. Joseph Aoun
Faculty 1854
Undergraduates 15,195
Postgraduates 4,268
Location Boston, MA, USA
Campus Urban 67 acres (271,139 m²)
Newspaper The Northeastern News
Colors Red and Black           
Mascot Husky
Athletics Huskies
17 Division I/I-AA NCAA teams
Affiliations New England Association of Colleges and Schools
Website www.northeastern.edu

Northeastern University, abbreviated as NU or NEU, is a private national research university in Boston, Massachusetts. Northeastern's award winning campus is mostly located in Boston's Fenway and Back Bay neighborhoods adjacent to Huntington Avenue near the vaunted Museum of Fine Arts and Symphony Hall. The area is also known as the Fenway Cultural District.[1] Image File history File links Summary www. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... Joseph E. Aoun is the seventh president of Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts where he took office on August 15, 2006. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... “Boston” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Husky is a general term for several breeds of dogs used as sled dogs. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Summary www. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... “Boston” redirects here. ... Fenway-Kenmore is an area of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Back Bay is the name of several places and neighborhoods in the world, including: Back Bay, Boston Back Bay, New Brunswick This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Huntington Avenue is a road in the city of Boston, Massachusetts beginning at Copley Square, and continuing west through the Back Bay and Mission Hill neighborhoods. ... Museums of Fine Arts include: The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, in Houston, Texas The Museum of Fine Arts in St. ... There are a number of concert halls known as Symphony Hall. ... Fenway-Kenmore is an area of Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Northeastern is perhaps best known for its distinctive "co-op" program, which encourages students to alternate semesters of study with periods of full-time work with co-operative partners in business and industry. In 2003, US News ranked Northeastern #1 for Best Co-ops/Internships. Employers from around the world participate in the program, providing an avenue for internships and post-graduation employment. Employers include top ranked international law firms, banks, and corporations, including many of the Fortune 500 companies. The co-op program enhances the theoretical classroom work with real world experience. Cooperative education is a structured method of combining academic education with practical work experience. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ...


Northeastern has many programs that are nationally recognized and respected as among the best. In 2007, the Princeton Review rated Northeastern as one of the top colleges in the Northeast.[2] The undergraduate business school is ranked number 26 in the country by Business Week. Northeastern ranked No. 4 in Forbes Magazine as one of "America's Most Entrepreneurial Campuses."[3] The School of Architecture was ranked #12 by the Key Institute National Rankings. Northeastern has produced many successful graduates, including top executives, entrepreneurs, scientists, astronauts, entertainers, and professional athletes. Northeastern graduates have particularly excelled in the high technology industry. For example, Northeastern grads founded EMC Corporation, Lycos, and Cognex. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... EMC Corporation (NYSE: EMC) is an American manufacturer of software and systems for information management and storage. ... Lycos is an Internet search engine and web portal. ... Cognex may mean: Cognex Corporation, a US manufacturer of machine vision systems. ...


Admission to Northeastern is highly competitive and very selective, even for a top 100 university. In 2007, the university received over 30,000 applications for 2800 seats in the freshman class. The acceptance rate was 39%. Northeastern is ranked among the top 10 private universities in the U.S. in terms of the total number of applications received.

Contents

History

Northeastern's historic Ell Hall on Huntington Avenue

Northeastern was established in 1898 as the "Evening Institute for Younger Men" at the Huntington Avenue YMCA.[4]The Institute catered to needs of the rapidly growing immigrant population in Boston. Within a few years of its formation, it offered classes in law, engineering, and finance. In 1909 the school began offering day classes and it moved to a new location on Huntington Avenue in 1913. The school was officially organized as a college in 1916, and in 1922 it was renamed "Northeastern University of the Boston Young Men's Christian Association." The University continues to rent space for undergraduate housing in the adjacent Huntington Avenue YMCA. In a period of rapid campus expansion, the University purchased the Huntington Avenue Grounds (former Boston Red Sox ballpark) in 1929, but was unable to build on the land due to financial constraints during The Great Depression. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Huntington Avenue is a road in the city of Boston, Massachusetts beginning at Copley Square, and continuing west through the Back Bay and Mission Hill neighborhoods. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds was a baseball park located in Boston, Massachusetts and was the home field of the Boston Red Sox from 1901 to 1911. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. ...


In 1935, the College of Liberal Arts was added to Northeastern, and the University's name was simplified to "Northeastern University." In 1937 The Northeastern University Corporation was established, creating a board of trustees made up of 31 members of the NU Corporation and 8 members of the YMCA. In 1948 Northeastern separated itself completely from the YMCA. 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Following World War II, Northeastern began admitting women, and in the boom of post-war college-bound students, Northeastern created a College of Education (1953), University College (now called the School of Professional & Continuing Studies) (1960), College of Pharmacy, and College of Nursing (1964). The College of Pharmacy and College of Nursing were subsequently combined into the Bouvé College of Health Sciences. Northeastern also added the College of Criminal Justice (1967) and College of Computer Science (1982), which has since been renamed the College of Computer and Information Science. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


Since its inception, the University had been a commuter school with many part-time and evening students, and by the early 1980s had grown to a staggering 60,000 enrollees. In the 1990s, the University decided to drastically reduce the number of enrolled students in an effort to better fit the mold of the more prestigious schools around it. The University cut its freshman class size from around 4500 students to 2800 students.


Since 1996, President Richard Freeland has ushered in an extraordinary stage of institutional change: average SAT scores increased more than 200 points, retention rates rose dramatically, and applications have doubled. President Freeland oversaw Northeastern’s largest expansion ever, opening $455 million in new facilities, including residence halls, academic and research facilities, and new athletic centers. The institution has also become substantially more selective, leading to a more-qualified student body.


During the transition, students endured annual tuition hikes, a re-organization of the co-operative education system, and the introduction of a new academic calendars introduced at the insistence of the faculty. The new calendar features two traditional semesters and two summer "minimesters", and replaced the popular quarter system.


Throughout the transformation, President Freeland's oft-repeated goal was to crack the Top 100 of the U.S. News rankings. With this goal accomplished as they reached number 98 , and with the transformation from commuting school to national university complete, he stepped down from the presidency on August 15, 2006. His successor is Dr. Joseph Aoun, formerly a dean at USC.[5]Since coming into office in the fall of 2006, president Aoun has implemented a Harvard decentralized management model, giving the academic deans of the university more control over their own budgets, faculty hiring decisions, and fundraising. Aoun has also placed more emphasis on improving town/gown relations by reaching out to leaders of the communities surrounding the university.[6]In addition, Aoun has created more academic partnerships with other institutions in the Boston area including, Tufts, Hebrew College[7], and The School of the Museum of Fine Arts.[8] Joseph E. Aoun is the seventh president of Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts where he took office on August 15, 2006. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Tufts University is a university located in Medford, Massachusetts (near Boston). ... Hebrew College is transdenominational school of Jewish studies, located in Newton Centre, Massachusetts, near Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Presidents

Presidents of Northeastern (with years of tenure and campus buildings named in their honor):

Frank Palmer Speare was the first president of Northeastern University from 1898-1940. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Carl Stephens Ell was the second president of Northeastern University from 1940-1959. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline for Biographies. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth Gilmore Ryder was the president of Northeastern University from 1975-1989. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... John A. Curry was the President of Northeastern University (Boston) from 1989 to 1996. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Richard Middleton Freeland (born May 13, 1941 in Orange, New Jersey) was President of Northeastern University (Boston) from 1996 to 2006. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph E. Aoun is the seventh president of Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts where he took office on August 15, 2006. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Admissions

According to Barrons College Guides, admission to Northeastern University is "highly competitive." In 2007, the university received over 30,000 applications for 2800 seats in the freshman class. The acceptance rate was 39%. The average SAT/GPA for enrolled students is 1251/3.5. Since 2001, SAT scores have increased by more than 200 points and the number of applications received has doubled. The hardest programs to get into are honors, pharmacy, engineering, criminal justice, computer science, and international business. These programs have propelled the university into a top 100 national university.


Academics

See also: Northeastern University School of Law

Northeastern offers undergraduate degrees in numerous professional programs. Northeastern's innovative experiential educational model combines rigorous pre-preprofessional studies and liberal arts with cutting edge research and the most extensive co-op/internship program in the world.[9] Northeastern offers many widely respected programs, including Business, Political Science, Journalism, Engineering, Computer Science, Architecture, Pharmacy, Nursing, and PT. Northeastern's Architecture and Doctor of Pharmacy programs are considered to be among the best in the nation, while their Nursing and PT graduates go on to work in top hospitals such as Mass General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. The original mission of the school – to provide Boston’s first evening law school program for students who could not attend full-time day classes – seems reasonable today, but it was a revolutionary moment when Professor Robert Gray Dodge delivered the school’s first lecture in...


Colleges and Schools

Colleges listed including Schools and degrees offered

An associate degree is an academic degree awarded by community colleges, junior colleges, business colleges and some bachelors degree-granting colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study usually lasting two years. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // In the United States the Pharm. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // In the United States the Pharm. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts three or four years. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts three or four years. ... Master of Science in Finance MSF is typically a one-year, non-thesis graduate program designed to prepare graduates for careers in financial analysis, investment management and corporate finance. ... Master of Accountancy (MAcc, MAc, or MAcy), alternatively Master of Professional Accounting (MPAcc) or Master Science in Accounting (MSAcc), is typically a one-year, non-thesis graduate program designed to prepare graduates for public accounting and to provide them with the 150 credit hours required by most states before taking... For the river of the same name, see Emba River. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... An associates degree is a degree awarded by community colleges, junior colleges and some bachelors degree-granting colleges and universities in Canada and the United States upon completion of a course of study equivalent to the first two years in a four-year college or university. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... The Master of Education (M.Ed or M.A.E.) is a degree conferred by American institutions for educators moving on in their field. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ...

The Honors Program

Northeastern's Honors Program provides wonderful academic opportunities for top students.[10]Among other benefits, freshman honors students may live in the new West Village F residence hall which offers apartment style living in the heart of the new West Village area of the campus (on a space available basis).[11]


Pre-Med Program

Northeastern has a strong Pre-Med Program.[12]The university recently partnered with Tufts University School of Medicine to create an early acceptance BA/MD Program.[13]Northeastern's campus is just a few blocks from the Longwood Medical and Academic Area where Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Dental Medicine are located and world class teaching hospitals such as Dana Farber, Childrens Hospital, New England Baptist Hospital and Brigham and Womens Hospital. Massachusetts General Hospital ("MGH") is also located in Boston. MGH is one of the oldest hospitals in the U.S. and among the most prestigious hospitals in the world. These institutions provide NU pre-med students with unparalleled internship opportunities. The Tufts University School of Medicine is one of the eight schools that comprise Tufts University. ... Longwood Medical and Academic Area (also known as Longwood Medical Area, LMA, or just Longwood) is a section of Boston with a high density of hospitals, colleges, and biomedical research centers. ... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard School of Dental Medicine Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is a Comprehensive Cancer Center designated by the National Cancer Institute. ... The Carl J. B. and Olive Currie Rose Fund assures that all patients receive a red rose upon admittance. ... Massachusetts General Hospital (often abbreviated to Mass General or just MGH) is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and biomedical research facility in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Study Abroad Program

Northeastern has a very extensive study abroad program with placements in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, South America and other parts of the globe. Some participating schools include: University of Edinburgh, Scotland; University of Cape Town, South Africa; University of Cambridge and London School of Economics, England; University of Auckland, New Zealand; and Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile.[14] The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The University of Cape Town, abbreviated as UCT, is a public university located on the Rhodes Estate on the slopes of Devils Peak, in Cape Town in the Western Cape province of South Africa. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Golden Triangle G5 Group Website http://www. ... The University of Auckland (Māori: Te Whare Wānanga o Tāmaki Makaurau) is New Zealands largest research-based university. ... Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC) (Spanish Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) is one of Chiles oldest and most prestigious universities. ...


Undergraduate Research

The university also provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to engage in research through the Center for Experiential Education & Academic Advising (CEA).[15]In 2007, Northeastern was classified as a RU/H Research Extensive institution (high research activity) by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of teaching.[16]In 2006, annual external research funding exceeded $70 million dollars. In 2002, Northeastern was designated an Engineering Research Center by the National Science Foundation. In 2004, Northeastern was one of six institutions to be selected by the National Science Foundation as a center for research in nanotechnology. From 2000 to 2005, Northeastern attracted $141.8 million in federal research grants.[17]


Research Centers and Institutes[18]:

  • Antimicrobial Discovery Center
  • Barnett Institute of Chemical and Biological Analysis
  • Brudnick Center on Violence and Conflict
  • Center for Advance Microgravity Materials Processing
  • Center for Communications and Digital Signal Processing
  • Center for Community Health Education Research and Service
  • Center for Criminal Justice Policy Research
  • Center for Drug Discovery
  • Center for Effective University Teaching
  • Center for Experiential Education and Academic Advising
  • Center for Family Business
  • Center for High Rate Nanomanufacturing
  • Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems
  • Center for Labor Market Studies
  • Center for Microcontamination Control
  • Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits
  • Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine
  • Center for Subsurface Sensing and Imaging Systems
  • Center for the Study of Democracy
  • Center for the Study of Sport in Society
  • Center for Urban Environmental Studies
  • Center for Urban and Regional Policy
  • Center for Work and Learning
  • Domestic Violence Institute
  • Electronic Materials Research Institute
  • Institute for Complex Scientific Software
  • Institute for Global Innovation Management
  • Institute for Information Assurance
  • Institute for Network and Pervasive Computing
  • Institute for Security and Public Policy in Criminal Justice
  • Institute on Race and Justice
  • Institute on Urban Health Research
  • Marine Science Center
  • National Education and Research Center for Outcomes Assessment in Healthcare
  • New England Inflammation and Tissue Protection Institute
  • Public Health Advocacy Institute
  • STEM Education Center

The Faculty

Due to its growing national reputation and desirable Boston location, Northeastern has been able to attract many top notch faculty. The vast majority of Northeastern faculty received their degrees from top graduate programs, including elite institutions such as Harvard, MIT, Penn and The University of California, Berkeley. Northeastern's current president, Dr. Joseph Aoun, earned a PhD in linguistics from MIT. In the spring of 2007, Northeastern was able to attract renowned nanotechology scholar, David Luzzi, from Penn to lead NEU's College of Engineering.[19]. In late 2006, Northeastern received a $20 million dollar gift from the Bernard Gordon Foundation to support engineering education and research.[20] Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... Penn may refer to: // Penn, Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom Penn, West Midlands, United Kingdom Penn, Pennsylvania, United States Penn Lake Park, Pennsylvania, United States Penn Township, several municipalities in the United States University of Pennsylvania, a private research university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Alexander Penn Wooldridge, American mayor of Austin, Texas... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as UC Berkeley, Berkeley, Cal, and other names) is the oldest and flagship campus of the ten-campus University of California system. ... Joseph E. Aoun is the seventh president of Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts where he took office on August 15, 2006. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... Penn may refer to: // Penn, Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom Penn, West Midlands, United Kingdom Penn, Pennsylvania, United States Penn Lake Park, Pennsylvania, United States Penn Township, several municipalities in the United States University of Pennsylvania, a private research university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Alexander Penn Wooldridge, American mayor of Austin, Texas... Bernard Gordon (born 1918) in New Britain, Connecticut is an American writer and producer. ...


The University recently allotted $75 million towards its "Academic Investment Plan" (AIP).[21]Over five years, the University plans to enhance its academic programs in three areas: undergraduate education, core graduate professional programs, and centres of research excellence. The cornerstone of the Academic Investment Plan is the expansion of University faculty by 100 tenured and tenure-track professors between 2005 and 2009. This plan was recently expanded to provide for the hiring of an additional 30 tenure and tenure-track faculty expanding the total to 130 new faculty hires.[22]Additionally, the University plans to expand its undergraduate majors and advance research in areas of interdisciplinary sciences and engineering, namely biotechnology, nanotechnology, and sensing and imaging.


Co-op/Internship Program

With over 2000 national and international employers, Northeastern has one of the largest co-op/internship programs in the world.[23]Started in 1909, the university’s co-op program is also one of the oldest in the nation. Through the co-op program, students alternate periods of academic study with periods of professional employment related to their major. Most majors offer a four-year graduation option with fewer co-op placements, but the five year program is more popular with students. The co-op program typically starts sophomore year (after a traditional freshman year).


Co-op placements range from small dynamic start-up companies to large multinational companies with thousands of employees, including many Fortune 500 corporations such as Microsoft, EMC, Raytheon and many other well known companies and investment banks such as Merrill Lynch and Fidelity Investments. The program also places students with government agencies, branches of government, nonprofits, and non-governmental organizations. Northeastern students can be found interning in the United States Congress, the White House, United Nations, and at NASA. Student placements usually last six months, and are mostly paid which can help defray tuition costs. Unlike some co-op programs, Northeastern students do not pay tuition during periods of employment. The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... EMC is a TLA that may stand for: electric membership corporation electromagnetic compatibility Electro-Motive Corporation, the predecessor to General Motors Electro-Motive Division EMC Corporation European Marketing Confederation European Muon Collaboration Evergreen Marine Corporation This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational... Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is a major American defense contractor and industrial corporation with core manufacturing concentrations in defense systems and defense and commercial electronics. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... Fidelity Investments is a group of privately held companies in the financial services industry. ... A non-governmental organization (NGO) is an organization which is not a part of a government. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... This article is about the American space agency. ...


Students may live in the university residence halls on campus during periods of co-op employment (room and board is charged). The university currently leases housing for students co-oping in New York City and Washington, D.C. The university's Co-op Connections office also helps students find suitable housing in other American cities and internationally. The university administration recently announced a plan to double the number of international placements by the fall of 2007.


By sampling different work environments and varied types of positions, students gain valuable insight into the type of career they want to pursue before committing to a post-graduation position. The typical Northeastern student will graduate with three co-op placements under their belt, an impressive resume, and a list of contacts, giving Northeastern graduates an edge in the job market over graduates from most other schools. Many Northeastern students accept a permanent position from one of their former co-op employers. Those students who do not accept a permanent position typically head directly to graduate or professional school. Northeastern graduates get into some of the top graduate and professional schools in the country. Such schools include Harvard, MIT, Columbia, University of Chicago, Duke, and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.[24] Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... A duke is a nobleman, historically of highest rank and usually controlling a duchy. ... The Johns Hopkins University is an internationally prestigious private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland. ...


Senior Capstone

The Senior Capstone is an advanced level course related to the student's major. The course requires the student to integrate what they have learned through their academic coursework and their experiential learning experience (co-op, research, study abroad, service learning).[25]


Northeastern University Press

Northeastern has its own press arm called the Northeastern University Press. The NU Press specializes in the publication of scholary books in the humanities and the social sciences, African-American and women's literature, and books for the public about Boston and New England.[26]


Rankings

In the 2008 US News and World Report college ranking, Northeastern ranked 96th on the list of "Top National Universities", a list of hundreds of universities across the nation.[27] Northeastern is one of fastest rising schools in the U.S. News rankings. Since 2001, Northeastern has moved up 54 spots in the rankings. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Northeastern ranks among the top 10 in terms of reputation in Massachusetts in a reputational survey released by the reputation management and public relations firm Morrissey & Co.[28]


In 2003, Northeastern ranked #1 for Best Co-ops/Internships the only time that US News ranked schools on this characteristic. Also in 2003, Northeastern's career services department was awarded top honors by Kaplan Newsweek's "Unofficial Insiders Guide to the 320 Most Interesting Colleges and Universities." In 2007, the undergraduate business school ranked 26th in the nation and No. 1 in internships according to Business Week and 15th for international business by US News.[29]Northeastern's High Technology MBA program ranked #1 in a "Top Techno MBA Survey" released by ComputerWorld Magazine.[30]Northeastern also ranked No. 4 in Forbes Magazine as one of "America's Most Entrenpreneurial Campuses." Northeastern is also listed among 25 “Cutting-Edge Schools” in the 2008 edition of “You Are Here,” a college guide by Kaplan Publishing.The graduate school engineering ranked in the top 50 according to US News 2007. The EMBA program is ranked in the top 50 in the U.S. by the Financial Times and No. 21 in the nation by US News. The Finance Department is ranked No. 2 in the nation by Advances in Financial Education in terms of the number of publications in financial journals.[31]In rankings published by the Journal of Product Innovation Management Northeastern ranked No. 3 in the world in innovation management research output. In addition, Northeastern undergrad B-school students have dominated case competitions against other Boston area business schools winning nine of the last 11 Business School Beanpot competitions. BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Computerworld is an IT magazine that provides information to technology managers. ... Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Northeastern is ranked No. 26 in the nation by the National Research Council in Oceanography. The Criminology program is ranked in the top 14 by US News. In 2007, the architecture program ranked No. 12 in the country in terms of research by Archsoc.com. The Law School ranked No.1 in public interest law by the ABA.[32]The Physician's Assistant program is ranked No. 17 by US News. The History and English departments ranked 14th in the nation in terms of scholary productivity in the Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index (FSP).[33]Other strong programs include: computer science, journalism, political science, music industry, history, international affairs, nursing, biology, chemistry, pharmacy, and physical therapy.-1... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Look up ABA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index The Faculty Scholarly Productivity IndexTM, a product of Academic Analytics, LLC, was designed to create benchmark standards for the measurement of academic and scholarly quality within and among institutions. ...


The Campus

Northeastern University from the intersection of Huntington Avenue and Forsyth Street
Northeastern University from the intersection of Huntington Avenue and Forsyth Street

Northeastern's campus is mostly located along Huntington Avenue in an area known as the "Fenway Cultural District" which is part of Boston's Fenway and Back Bay neighborhoods. Other notable institutions in the district include: the vaunted Museum of Fine Arts, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Symphony Hall, the Huntington Theater, New England Conservatory of Music, Boston Conservatory, Christian Science Center, Mary Baker Eddy Library, and Harvard School of Public Health. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Fenway-Kenmore is an area of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Fenway is an ambiguous term: It usually refers to Fenway Park, a baseball stadium in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Back Bay is the name of several places and neighborhoods in the world, including: Back Bay, Boston Back Bay, New Brunswick This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Museums of Fine Arts include: The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, in Houston, Texas The Museum of Fine Arts in St. ... The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is a museum in Boston, Massachusetts with a collection of over 2,500 works of European, Asian and American art, including paintings, sculpture, tapestries, and decorative arts. ... There are a number of concert halls known as Symphony Hall. ... The New England Conservatory of Music (NEC) in Boston, Massachusetts is the oldest independent conservatory in the United States. ... The Boston Conservatory is an arts conservatory located in the Fenway-Kenmore region of Boston, Massachusetts, United States. ... Christian Science Plaza in Boston, Massachusetts The First Church of Christ, Scientist (Christian Science Center in common reference) is the mother church and administrative headquarters of the Christian Science Church and is located in the Back Bay neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Mary Baker Eddy Library for the Betterment of Humanity is a museum as well as the repository for the papers of Mary Baker Eddy, an influential American author, teacher, and religious leader, noted for her groundbreaking ideas about spirituality and health, which she named Christian Science. ... Harvard School of Public Health The Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) is Harvard Universitys School of Public Health. ...


Northeastern's campus is something of an urban oddity; despite its location in central Boston, Northeastern is home to a remarkable amount of green open space and quads.[34]This is an attribute not shared by most urban universities.


A site master planning competition awarded a multi-million dollar contract to revive and rejuvenate the campus and the process was started in 1988 with the creation of the new Northeastern Quad and Mt Ryder. A small oval of land centrally located at the campus main entrance that was refurbished by the donations of the graduating class of 1989.


What was once a concrete square, outside of the library and student center, was transformed with brick pavers and granite curb stones, in a scalloped design that would eliminate all square corners, a concept developed by the outgoing class of 1989 in a “Northeastern News” poll and suggestion to the President Box that was presented to the board of Trustees in March 1988. The “No Corners” campaign kicked off with a fund raiser at the Ell Student Center on Parents weekend in October 1988. The later selection of a nationally recognized green space landscape architect in 1990 started a renewal plan that continues today. Since the late 1990’s Northeastern has been considered a model of design for an urban university and has been twice won the “most beautiful new or renovated exterior space” award presented by the American Institute of Architects in 2001 and again in 2004.


In 2003, Northeastern was awarded the prestigious gold medal by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. A unique feature of the University is its well-traveled network of underground tunnels that link 13 major campus buildings for easier travel during inclement weather. However, due to city regulations preventing expansion of the tunnels under major city streets and underground rivers under the campus, the tunnels primarily service the buildings on the university's early campus space (i.e., buildings developed during the 1980s through the present are not served by the tunnel system). A disused railway tunnel now converted to pedestrian and bicycle use, near Houyet, Belgium A tunnel is an underground passage. ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ...


Snell Library

The NU Libraries are comprised of the Snell Library, the John D. O'Bryant African-American Institute Library, and a library at the NU Marine Science Center in Nahant, Massachusetts. Northeastern University also has a School of Law Library.   Nahant is also the alias name of version four of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. ...


Snell Library, the main Northeastern library, opened in 1990 at a cost of $35 million and is home to 985,000 volumes. Snell is home to the Favat Collection; a comprehensive and current collection of children's literature and K-12 curriculum resources, instructional materials, and related information to support courses offered by the NU School of Education for the practice of teaching. Snell is also home to three computer labs operated by NU Information Services. The InfoCommons and InfoCommons II are labs available to all NU students, faculty, and staff. The other lab is used as a teaching lab. Wireless internet access is also available.


The NU Libraries received federal depository designation in 1962 under the sponsorship of Massachusetts Congressman John W. McCormack. As a selective depository, the Libraries receive forty-five percent of the federal publication series available to depository libraries. John William McCormack (December 21, 1891 – November 22, 1980) was an American politician from Boston, Massachusetts. ...


The Snell Library is also home to the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections department, which includes the Benjamin LaGuer papers collection. The Special Collections focus on records of Boston-area community-based organizations that are concerned with social justice issues.[35]. Benjamin LaGuer was born on May 1, 1963 in the Bronx, New York. ...


West Village

West Village A North or "High Rise"
West Village H

West Village was originally Northeastern University's largest parking area. In the early 1990s, Northeastern plotted the land into several sections to be turned into residence halls as well as academic buildings. The West Village area was opened in 1999 with the opening of West Village A, and was completed in 2006 with the opening of West Village F, which houses the Honors Program offices, the John D. O'Bryant African-American Institute (the original Institute building was leveled during the construction of WVF), housing for freshmen in the honors program (breaking the tradition of freshmen living on the Hemenway Street area of campus), and classrooms. Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1421 KB)West Village A at Northeastern University. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1421 KB)West Village A at Northeastern University. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (533x800, 79 KB) Credit: Michelle Callinan [1] Date: March 31 2006 Source: http://flickr. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (533x800, 79 KB) Credit: Michelle Callinan [1] Date: March 31 2006 Source: http://flickr. ... A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ... Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The construction of West Village has been the cause of some controversy on campus and in the community, namely concerns about construction noise and the loss of parking spaces where the buildings are now located. The Museum of Fine Arts was also concerned about the height of West Village H (which houses the University's College of Computer and Information Science, as well as a dormitory for students over 21 years of age), and whether it would cast a shadow on the Museum during the day. The construction of West Village F brought two complaints: first, the John D. O'Bryant African-American Institute became the only cultural center on campus not to have its own building. Second, the presence of honors freshmen in West Village F angers many upperclass students, because West Village had previously been limited to only upperclassmen housing. Upperclassmen in the honors program have been particularly upset, because there is no building reserved exclusively for upperclass honors students (although there are several floors in West Village C). Additionally, rooms in West Village F are larger and newer than rooms in West Village C. However, the controversy and complaints have been low-key compared to that of other construction and expansion projects the university has undertaken.


The following buildings make up West Village, in order of completion:

  • West Village A (opened 1999): Residence Hall; separated into two sections, West Village A North and South. Although it is one building, you must exit West Village A North to enter South and vice versa. Frequently referred to as "High Rise" and "Low Rise," which causes some confusion among visitors and new students now that the taller West Village H has opened.
  • West Village B (opened 2001): Residence Hall.
  • West Village C (opened 2001): Residence Hall. Several floors are set aside for upperclassmen in the honors program. Contains one classroom used by the Registrar during the day for classes and for hall activities in the evening.
  • Behrakis Health Science Center (opened 2002): Contains classrooms, laboratories, and the Admissions Visitor Center. Behrakis Center is also designed to act as a response center in the event of a mass public health emergency in the city of Boston; it can be converted into a fully functional hospital in 24 hours.
  • West Village E (opened 2002): Residence Hall.
  • West Village G (opened 2004): Residence Hall. Also contains several classrooms.
  • West Village H (opened 2004): Residence Hall. West Village H is currently open to students who are over the age of 21. The building is also the new home of the College of Computer and Information Science and has several classrooms, offices and computer labs.
  • West Village F (opened 2006): Residence Hall for the freshman honors program (breaking the tradition of freshman residing on the Hemenway Street area of campus). Also includes the John D. O'Bryant African-American Institute (the original Institute building was leveled after construction of West Village F), offices for the Honors Program, and classrooms.

A 22-story high rise has been approved behind the current YMCA, this building will fit another 650 beds. This article is about the year. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


South Campus (Columbus Avenue)

Northeastern University's southernmost section of campus is located along Columbus Avenue in Roxbury, parallel to the Orange line. The University expanded south into Roxbury at the same time as they were building West Village. In 2001, Davenport Commons was opened, providing 585 students housing in two new, state-of-the-art residence halls while 75 families representing a range of incomes have been able to purchase a condo or townhouse at or below Boston’s market value. Davenport Commons also created more than 2000 square feet of commercial space on Tremont Street and has received an enthusiastic response from city residents, students and its occupants.[36] Outbound Train at North Station The old Main Line Elevated and related lines The Orange Line is one of the four subway lines of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


In the spring of 2004, the Student Government Association and NU's Administration announced plans to build an athletic complex and football field where the Columbus Parking Lot now stands by 2014. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2014 (MMXIV) will be a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


During the summer of 2006, Northeastern University proposed a new residence hall further away from the main campus at the corner of Tremont Street and Ruggles Street. The building was approved by the city in January of 2007. Construction on the building, which is located on land known as Parcel-18, began in late February 2007. The building is expected to open in the Fall of 2009 and will be a total of 23 stories tall. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The following buildings make up the Southern Campus, with their respective opening dates:


Residential Buildings

  • Davenport Commons A - 2000
  • Davenport Commons B - 2000
  • 780 Columbus Avenue - 2001
  • 10 Coventry - 2005

Administrative Buildings Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Columbus Place (716 Columbus Ave) - 1997
  • Renaissance Park (1135 Tremont St)

Athletic Buildings For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

  • Badger and Rosen Facility (Squashbusters) - 2003

Parking Lots Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Renaissance Parking Garage (Public)
  • Columbus Parking Lot (Faculty/Staff)
  • Columbus Parking Garage (Faculty/Staff/Students)
  • Columbus Place Lot (Faculty/Staff/Students)

Public transportation

Of the many colleges and universities in the greater Boston area, Northeastern has the best overall access to both intercity and intracity public rail and bus transportation as it is serviced directly by two of the four color coded subway and streetcar subsystems. The larger part of Northeastern's campus is directly adjacent to Huntington Avenue and is accessible by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA, or the 'T'); three Green Line (all "E" Branch) stops (Symphony, Northeastern, and Museum of Fine Arts) and two Orange line (Massachusetts Avenue and Ruggles) (which also has commuter rail service) stops. “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ... The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is a body politic and corporate, and a political subdivision of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts [2] formed in 1964 to finance and operate most bus, subway, commuter rail and ferry systems in the greater Boston, Massachusetts area. ... Two trains at Park Street. ... The E Branch or Arborway Branch is a streetcar line in the Boston, Massachusetts area, operating as a branch of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Green Line. ... Symphony is an underground subway stop in Boston, Massachusetts on the E branch of the MBTA Green Line. ... Northeastern University Station is a surface-level subway stop on the MBTA Green Line. ... Museum of Fine Arts is a stop on the E branch of the MBTAs Green Line. ... Outbound Train at North Station The old Main Line Elevated and related lines The Orange Line is one of the four subway lines of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. ... Other information Opened May 4, 1987 Accessible Owned by Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Services Massachusetts Avenue is a MBTA subway station on the Orange Line, located at 380 Massachusetts Avenue in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Ruggles Station is a MBTA subway station on the Orange Line; it is also a MBTA commuter rail station serving the Attleboro/Stoughton, Franklin, and Needham Lines. ...


Riders can connect easily via a short ride to the Red line or Blue line by either of the Orange or Green Lines. Red Line train of #1 Red Line stock crossing the Charles River on the Longfellow Bridge, towards Boston View of Boston from the Red Line The Red Line is a rapid transit line operated by the MBTA running roughly north-south through Boston, Massachusetts into neighboring communities. ... The Blue Line is one of the four subway lines of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. ...


Student life and activities

Although Northeastern's student population tends to be considered somewhat fractured, a result of alternating cycles for the co-op program, there is still substantial student involvement in a number of activities. Several distinct student-run entities, including the Student Government Association (SGA), the Council for University Programming (CUP), and the Resident Student Association(RSA) organize activities for both Northeastern students as well as the surrounding community.


Greek life

Fraternities

  • Alpha Delta Phi (ΑΔΦ)
  • Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ)
  • Alpha Kappa Sigma (ΑΚΣ)
  • Beta Gamma Epsilon (ΒΓΕ)
  • Kappa Sigma (ΚΣ)
  • Pi Kappa Alpha (ΠKΑ)
  • Sigma Phi Epsilon (ΣΦΕ)

Colonies Alpha Delta Phi (ΑΔΦ) is a Greek-letter fraternity in the United States and Canada. ... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ...

  • Sigma Alpha Mu (ΣΑΜ)

Sororities Sigma Alpha Mu (ΣΑΜ) also known as Sammy is a college fraternity founded at the City College of New York in 1909. ...

  • Alpha Epsilon Phi (ΑΕΦ)
  • Delta Phi Epsilon (ΔΦΕ)
  • Delta Zeta (ΔΖ)
  • Sigma Delta Tau (ΣΔΤ)
  • Sigma Sigma Sigma (ΣΣΣ)
  • Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ)
  • Sigma Gamma Rho (ΕΓΡ)

Alpha Epsilon Phi (ΑΕΦ) is a sorority founded by seven Jewish women and a member of the National Panhellenic Conference. ... This article is about the social sorority. ... Delta Zeta (ΔΖ) is a college sorority founded on October 24, 1902, at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Sigma Delta Tau (ΣΔΤ), a national sorority and member of the National Panhellenic Conference, was founded March 25, 1917 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. ... Sigma Sigma Sigma (ΣΣΣ), also known as Tri Sigma or Sigma, is a national American women’s sorority with membership of more than 92,000 members (as of August 1, 2006). ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, is the first Greek-letter organization established and incorporated by African-American college women. ...

Student publications

The most widely circulated publication is The Northeastern News, a bi-weekly newspaper assessing the recent events around the campus. While the News does contain student-composed editorials and other information pertinent to the Northeastern community, its most well-read feature is the Crime Log, a page containing various entries from the Campus Safety log, including the "Crime Log Entry of the Week."


Other publications include the humor magazine Times New Roman, the African-American cultural magazine Onyx, the faculty newspaper Northeastern Voice, the conservative Northeastern Patriot, and the newest publication, Tastemakers, a music magazine that was first issued in the fall of 2006.


School statistics and awards

Awards and recognition

  • In 2002, the campus was designated an Engineering Research Center by the National Science Foundation.
  • Since 2002, NU has received three major awards for design excellence including the 2005 Harleston Parker Medal from the Boston Society of Architects.
  • In 2004, NU was one of six institutions to be selected by the National Science Foundation as a center for research in nanotechnology.

The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... Buckminsterfullerene C60, also known as the buckyball, is the simplest of the carbon structures known as fullerenes. ...

Northeastern University in Popular Culture

In the 2003 remake of the movie, The Italian Job[37], Lyle (played by Seth Green), is revealed to be a Northeastern University alumnus who claims to be the original inventor of music file sharing progam Napster. Shawn Fanning makes a brief appearance in the film and plays the role of himself. The Italian Job is a British caper film, written by Troy Kennedy Martin, produced by Michael Deeley and directed by Peter Collinson. ... Seth Green (born on February 8, 1974, Overbrook Park, Pennsylvania) is an American actor and television producer known for his acting roles as Doctor Evils son Scott in the Austin Powers series of comedy films and Daniel Oz Osbourne in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ... Napster was a file sharing service that paved the way for decentralized P2P file-sharing programs such as Kazaa, Limewire, iMesh, Morpheus, and BearShare, which are now used for many of the same reasons and can download music, pictures, and other files. ... Shawn Napster Fanning (born November 22, 1980, Brockton, Massachusetts[1]), is a computer programmer. ...


Athletics

Main article: Northeastern Huskies
Northeastern Huskies logo
Northeastern Huskies logo

A few outstanding athletes have played for Northeastern's sports teams. Dan Ross played football at Northeastern long before setting the Super Bowl record for receptions in a game. Reggie Lewis still holds the men's basketball career scoring record. The Northeastern University Huskies are the athletic teams representing Northeastern University. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Daniel R. Ross (February 9, 1957 – May 16, 2006) was a former professional American Football tight end who played for the Cincinnati Bengals (1979-1985), the Seattle Seahawks (1985), and the Green Bay Packers (1986). ... Reggie Lewis (November 21, 1965 - July 27, 1993) was a basketball player for the Boston Celtics from 1987-1993. ...


Most of the Northeastern University athletic teams now compete in the Colonial Athletic Association; the school switched from the America East Conference to the CAA for the 2005-06 athletic season. In their first year in the more prestigious league, the men's basketball team finished in 6th place (out of 12 teams) and advanced to the semifinals of the conference tournament. The CAA would prove to be a competitive conference in the 2006 NCAA Basketball Tournament, as George Mason University advanced all the way to the Final Four. The Colonial Athletic Association, also known as the CAA, is a NCAA Division I college athletic conference whose members are located in East Coast states from Massachusetts to Georgia. ... The America East Conference is a college athletic conference whose members are located mainly in the northeastern United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Final four redirects here. ... George Mason University, also known as GMU or simply Mason, is a public university in the United States. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ...


Northeastern's hockey program competes in the highly competitive Hockey East Conference. They are not known as a dominant team, usually finishing in the middle of the pack, although they have made some major upsets in the past. Their last NCAA appearance was 1994. They are also a particpant in the annual Beanpot tournament between the four major Boston-area colleges. Northeastern has won the annual event 4 times in its 54-year history. Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ... The Beanpot refers primarily to a college mens ice hockey tournament between four major college hockey schools of the Boston, Massachusetts area, held annually since the 1952-53 season. ...


In the Club Sports area NU has a unique program in the sport of Rugby. The rugby program was started in 1984 by a group of students from NU and included some athletes from other schools in the area. Due to university policy the team could not gain formal recognition and was not allowed to use the "Husky" name. Therefore, the name "Maddogs" was chosen by the lads. In about 1986 the university did grant the rugby program formal recognition but the Maddog name remains with the rugby program to this day. The Maddogs compete in the top division of Collegiate rugby in the country.


In the more recent past a "Lady Maddog" program was started and they compete in the highest level of competition in the country.


The Northeastern University Department of Athletics currently sponsors Men's Intercollegiate Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Football, Ice Hockey, Rowing, Soccer, Track & Field. They also sponsor Women's Intercollegiate Basketball, Cross Country, Swimming, Volleyball, Track & Field, Rowing, Ice Hockey and Field Hockey. Club Sports offered are Men's Rugby and Women's Rugby.


Notable alumni

Business

Richard Egan is: Richard Egan (actor) - American film actor Richard Egan (businessman) - American businessman, Ambassador This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... EMC Corporation (NYSE: EMC) is an American manufacturer of software and systems for information management and storage. ... Shawn Napster Fanning (born November 22, 1980, Brockton, Massachusetts[1]), is a computer programmer. ... Napster was a file sharing service that paved the way for decentralized P2P file-sharing programs such as Kazaa, Limewire, iMesh, Morpheus, and BearShare, which are now used for many of the same reasons and can download music, pictures, and other files. ... EMC Corporation (NYSE: EMC) is an American manufacturer of software and systems for information management and storage. ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... There are two referenced people named Robert Black: Robert Black (lawyer) , Professor Emeritus of Scots Law at the University of Edinburgh Robert Black (murderer), Scottish serial killer and paedophile See also Bob Black, American anarchist and lawyer This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same... Black & Decker (NYSE: BDK) is a corporation based in Towson, Maryland, that is best known for power tools and home appliances. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... WB Mason is an office supply contract supplier, founded in Brockton, Massachusetts. ... Seymour Sy Sternberg (born 1943) is Chairman and CEO of New York Life Insurance Company. ... The New York Life Insurance Company (NYLIC) is the largest mutual life-insurance company in the United States, and one of the largest life insurers in the world. ... George Chamillard is an American business executive most famous for his roles at Teradyne, a manufacturer of automatic test equipment for semiconductor devices. ... Teradyne NYSE: TER, a US company, is a supplier of automatic test equipment (ATE). ... Robert Davis can refer to: Robert Davis, inventor of the oxygen rebreather Robert A. Davis, Premier of Manitoba from 1874-1878 Robert Davis, UKIP Parliamentary Candidate in Wycombe Bob Davis, American novelist This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Lycos is an Internet search engine and web portal. ... John Edmund Driscoll (b. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... Jerald G. Fishman serves as Chief Executive Officer and President of Analog Devices since November 1996. ... Analog Devices (NYSE: ADI) is an American multinational producer of semiconductor devices. ... Nat Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American civil libertarian, free speech absolutist, pro-life advocate, anti-death penalty advocate, jazz critic, historian, biographer and anecdotist, and columnist for the Village Voice, Legal Times, Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher, Free Inquiry and Jewish World Review. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 1838 map of Victoria and New South Wales showing towns, major rivers and the limits of the Colony at the time. ... Robert Swanson was a researcher and developer, and is credited with the invention of the first six- and five-chime air horn for use on locomotives. ... Founded in 1981, Linear Technology Corporation is a leading supplier of high performance analog integrated circuits. ... Matthew hk 13:54, 18 May 2006 (UTC) Categories: ... Travelport is a new company with a nearly 30-year track record. ... Kevin Roche (b. ... Getronics N.V. (Euronext: GTN) is an international Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Company focused on Workspace Management Services, including Application Services. ... There are multiple men named Robert Bennett, among them: Robert Bennett, mayor of Melbourne (1861-1862) Robert Earl Bennett, 1960 and 1964 Olympics bronze medalist in swimming Robert Foster Bennett, Senator from Utah (1993 to date) Robert Frederick Bennett, Governor of Kansas (1975-1979) Robert Howard Bennett, 1948 Olympics bronze... Dan Murphy (born Daniel Murphy, on July 12, 1962 in Duluth, Minnesota) is best known as the guitarist for the band Soul Asylum. ... IKON Office Solutions is a Fortune 500 company based in Malvern, Pennsylvania. ... William Churchill, F.R.A.I. (1859-1920) was an American Polynesian ethnologist and philologist, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., and educated at Yale. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ...

Entertainment and sports

Harry Barnes (born July 2, 1936) is an English politician, and member of Parliament for North East Derbyshire. ... Michelle Bonner is an anchor on ESPNEWS and the weekend SportsCenter. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... This article is about the American ESPN show. ... Fred Cusick was the longtime TV play-by-play broadcaster for the Boston Bruins, from 1971 to 1995. ... Barbara Kopple (born July 30, 1946) is an American film director primarily known for her work in documentary film. ... Two major American professional sports teams have existed under the name Boston Braves, both of which still exist today but are no longer located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Jane Curtin - Promo Picture from 3rd Rock from the Sun Jane Therese Curtin (born September 6, 1947) is an American actress and comedian, from Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the American television series. ... Damien Richard Fahey (born June 1, 1980) is an MTV VJ. Fahey grew up in Chicopee, Massachusetts, and moved to the town of Longmeadow, Massachusetts during the summer of 1992. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Jim Fahey (born May 11, 1979 in Boston, Massachusetts) is a professional ice hockey defenceman who currently plays for the San Jose Sharks of the NHL. Fahey was drafted in the 8th round, 212th overall by the San Jose Sharks in the 1998 NHL Entry Draft. ... “NHL” redirects here. ... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... Fernie Flaman (January 25, 1927 in Dysart, Saskatchewan was a Canadian professional ice hockey forward who played for the Toronto Maple Leafs and Boston Bruins in the National Hockey League. ... Alex Garcia is a Nuevo Latino chef who helped popularize this version of Cuban food at several New York City restaurants and on the Food Network. ... Food Network is an American cable network that airs many specials and recurring (episodic) shows about food. ... Bill Hunnefield (Born William Fenton Hunnefield January 5, 1899 in Dedham, Massachusetts - Died August 28, 1976 in Nantucket, Massachusetts) was a professional baseball player in Major League Baseball. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Indians (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Other nicknames The Tribe, The Wahoos Ballpark Jacobs Field (1994–present... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Sean Jones is a former American Football defensive end who played for the Los Angeles Raiders (1984-1987), Houston Oilers (1988-1993), and the Green Bay Packers (1994-1996). ... NFL redirects here. ... “Packers” redirects here. ... Aisha Kahlil has been a member of the African American a cappella ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock since 1981. ... Reggie Lewis (November 21, 1965 - July 27, 1993) was a basketball player for the Boston Celtics from 1987-1993. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... José Juan Barea (born June 26, 1984 in Mayagüez) is a Puerto Rican professional basketball player. ... The Dallas Mavericks (also known as the Mavs) are an NBA basketball team based in Dallas, Texas. ... Dave Leitao (May 18, 1960 – ) is the 10th and current University of Virginia Cavaliers mens basketball coach. ... Will McDonough (July 6, 1935 - January 9, 2003) gave the American Football League honest exposure in his articles and columns in a nationally prominent newspaper, the Boston Globe. ... Dan McGillis (born July 1, 1971 in Hawkesbury, Ontario) is a Canadian professional ice hockey defenseman currently under contract with the NHLs New Jersey Devils. ... The San Jose Sharks are a professional ice hockey team based in San Jose, California, United States. ... The Philadelphia Flyers are a professional ice hockey team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The Boston Bruins are a professional ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Michael Ryan (born May 16, 1980 in Boston, Massachusetts, USA) is an American ice hockey forward. ... The Buffalo Sabres are a professional ice hockey team based in Buffalo, New York. ... Perry Moss is a basketball player, a guard. ... Washington Bullets may refer to either the former name of the Washington Wizards basketball team or the song by The Clash, Washington Bullets (song). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Golden State Warriors are a professional basketball team based in Oakland, California. ... Christopher Chris Nilan (born February 9, 1958 in Boston, Massachusetts) is a former professional ice hockey player. ... The Montreal Canadiens (French: ) are a professional ice hockey team based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The Boston Bruins are a professional ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The New York Rangers (NYR) are a National Hockey League (NHL) team based in New York City, New York. ... Patrice ONeal is a black comedian and former World Wrestling Entertainment writer from Boston. ... Shane OMara began rowing at Tampa Catholic in 1997, captaining for three years. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Don Orsillo is the play-by-play announcer for Boston Red Sox games on the New England Sports Network. ... Carlos Felipe Peña (born May 17, 1978 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic) is a left-handed first baseman for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Bruce Racine (Born August 9, 1966 in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada) is a retired professional hockey player who played briefly in the NHL with the St. ... The St. ... Daniel R. Ross (February 9, 1957 – May 16, 2006) was a former professional American Football tight end who played for the Cincinnati Bengals (1979-1985), the Seattle Seahawks (1985), and the Green Bay Packers (1986). ... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Fightin Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin... John Patrick Tobin, known as Johnny or Jackie (January 8, 1921, Oakland, California—January 18, 1982, Oakland), played third base for the 1945 Boston Red Sox. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Flavor of Love is an American reality television dating game show starring Flavor Flav of the rap group Public Enemy. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... Flavor of Love is an American reality television dating game show starring Flavor Flav of the rap group Public Enemy. ... Richard L. Weitzman (born April 30, 1946) is a retired American basketball player. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Cover of The Wendy Williams Experience Wendy Williams (born July 16, 1964) is an African-American radio host and television personality. ...

Government and politics

Demetrius Atsalis is a Democrat member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, representing the 2nd Barnstable District. ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Image:Tcalter. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Cheryl A. Coakley-Rivera is an Democratic politician from Springfield, Massachusetts. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... James Franklin Jeffrey was sworn in as U.S. Ambassador to Albania on October 15, 2002. ... Lyndon LaRouche at a news conference in Paris in February 2006. ...

Science and technology

Gregory Jarvis Memorial at Hermosa Beach Gregory Bruce Jarvis (August 24, 1944 - January 28, 1986) was an American astronaut who died during the destruction of the Space Shuttle Challenger on mission STS-51-L, where he was serving as payload specialist. ... Albert Sacco, Jr. ...

Notable faculty

M. Shahid Alam is Professor of Economics at Northeastern University, Boston. ... Ed Bullins (born July 2, 1935) is an African American playwright. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Nicholas Daniloff was a journalist, most prominent in the 1980s for his work in and about the Soviet Union. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Matthias Felleisen is a Professor of Computer Science and an author. ... Dr. William M. Fowler received his Ph. ... Gary Braver is an author of fiction. ... Harlan Lane is a professor of psychology and linguistics at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Jack Levin, Ph. ... Karl Lieberherr is known as the father of adaptive programming. ... Pran Nath is a physicist at Northeastern University concentrating in theoretical partical physics. ... Robert B. Parkers novel Cold Service Robert B. Parker (born September 17, 1932) is an acclaimed American writer of detective fiction. ... Albert Sacco, Jr. ... James Dwight Dana (February 12, 1813–April 14, 1895) was an American geologist, mineralogist and zoologist. ... Albert-László Barabási (born March 30, 1967) is a Romanian-born American scientist. ... Allen Klein (born December 18, 1931) is an American businessman and record label executive. ...

References

  1. ^ Fenway Cultural District
  2. ^ Princeton Review - The Best Northeastern Colleges
  3. ^ Forbes - America's Most Entrepreneurial Campuses
  4. ^ About Northeastern
  5. ^ Boston Globe - Northeastern's Choice
  6. ^ Boston Globe - New Northeastern President Getting Thumbs Up
  7. ^ Northeastern/Hebrew College Partnership
  8. ^ Northeastern/SMFA Joint Degree Programs
  9. ^ Northeastern Experiential Learning Model
  10. ^ Northeastern Honors Program
  11. ^ West Village F
  12. ^ Northeastern Pre-Med Program
  13. ^ Tufts Medical School Early Acceptance Program
  14. ^ Northeastern Study Abroad Programs
  15. ^ Northeastern Undergraduate Research Opportunities
  16. ^ Carnegie Foundation Classifications
  17. ^ Northeastern Nabs Chunk of Cancer Research Grant
  18. ^ Research at Northeastern
  19. ^ Northeastern Taps UPenn Professor
  20. ^ Boston Globe — Northeastern and MFA Receive $20 Million Dollar Grants
  21. ^ Northeastern University Academic Investment Plan
  22. ^ Northeastern New Faculty Hires
  23. ^ The Making of History: Ninety Years of Northeastern Co-op.
  24. ^ Graduate and Professional Schools Attended By Northeastern grads
  25. ^ Senior Capstone
  26. ^ Northeastern University Press
  27. ^ US News - National Universities: Top Schools
  28. ^ Mass. nonprofits dominate 'best reputation' ranks
  29. ^ Boston.com - Northeastern Business School is 26th Best
  30. ^ Encyclopedia.com - Northeastern University High Tech MBA Program Ranks #1 Nationwide
  31. ^ Finance Department ranked #2 by Advances in Financial Education
  32. ^ Northeastern U. law school named No. 1 in public interest law
  33. ^ FSP Rankings Announcement
  34. ^ Northeastern Campus tour
  35. ^ The Department's special collections
  36. ^ Boston City Officials Herald Opening of Davenport Commons
  37. ^ The Italian Job

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Northeastern University (290 words)
Against strong international competition, chemistry and chemical biology chair Graham Jones won a seat on a powerful United Kingdom consortium of universities, giving Northeastern University an inside track on international collaboration and research funding.
The ultimate goal is to open up interdisciplinary, collaborative research between Northeastern University and the United Kingdom institutions, generating breakthrough discoveries and research funding.
Harlan Lane, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, elevated to the highest rank of "Commandeur" in the prestigious French Ordre des Palmes Academiques.
Northeastern posts riot photos - The Boston Globe (1104 words)
Northeastern University asked its students yesterday to help identify classmates involved in Sunday night's Super Bowl riots, posting photographs of those involved in the pandemonium that left one man dead and caused extensive property damage.
The university acknowledges its responsibility to watch over students in its off-campus apartments, and its code of conduct calls for off-campus behavior not to "adversely affect" the school's relationship with its neighbors.
Yesterday's meeting at Northeastern was scheduled by student government as an opportunity for students to learn about the university's response to the rioting and to vent frustrations.
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