FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Northampton" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Northampton
Borough of Northampton

Northampton Guildhall, built 1861-4, by E.W. Godwin
Geography
Northampton
Shown

within Northamptonshire Download high resolution version (700x865, 203 KB)The Guildhall in Northampton. ... Northampton Guildhall, built 1861-4, E.W. Godwin, architect The Northampton Guildhall is a building which stands on St Giles Square in Northampton, England. ... Northampton Guild Hall, built 1861-4, displays Godwins Ruskinian Gothic style. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... map File links The following pages link to this file: Northampton Categories: GFDL images ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ...

Status: Borough
Region: East Midlands
Admin. County: Northamptonshire
Area:
- Total
Ranked 262nd
80.76 km^2
Admin. HQ: Northampton
Grid reference: SP 7560
ONS code: 34UF
Twin towns: Marburg, Germany
Poitiers, France
Demographics
Population:
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
Ranked 68th
200,100
2,478 / km^2
Ethnicity: 91.6% White
3.3% S.Asian
2.4% Afro-Carib.
Politics
Northampton Borough Council
http://www.northampton.gov.uk/
Leadership: Leader & Cabinet
Executive: Liberal Democrat
MPs: Brian Binley, Sally Keeble

Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in the English East Midlands region. Northampton is situated 67 miles (108 km) north of London on the River Nene, and is the county town of Northamptonshire. The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East Midlands is one of the regions of England and consists of most of the eastern half of the traditional region of the Midlands. ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by area. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... , Marburg is a city in Hesse, Germany, on the Lahn river. ... Location within France Poitiers (population 85,000) is a small city located in west central France. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Brian Arthur Roland Binley (born 1 May 1942) is a United Kingdom Conservative Party politician. ... Sally Curtis Keeble (born 13 October 1951, Mrs Andrew Potter) is a Labour Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... The East Midlands is one of the regions of England and consists of most of the eastern half of the traditional region of the Midlands. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The River Nene is a river in the east of England. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ...


The district has a population of 205,000, whilst the surrounding county of Northamptonshire has a population of 575,000 (thus as populous as the city of Portsmouth). By this measurement, it is the 21st largest settlement in England and is the UK's fourth largest town without official city status – after Reading, Dudley and Warrington. Northampton is the most populous district in England not to be a unitary authority, a status it failed to obtain in the 1990s local government reform.[citation needed] Northampton's population has increased greatly since the 1960s, largely due to planned expansion under the New Towns Commission in the early-1960s. The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... This is a list of the largest cities and towns of England ordered by population. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... City status is the naional recognition of an area as a city. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... Map sources for Dudley at grid reference SO9390 Dudley is a town in the West Midlands, England. ... This article is about the town and Unitary Authority in the north-west of England. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The structure of local government in the United Kingdom underwent large changes in the 1990s. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... A new town, planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ...


Traditionally Northampton was a major centre of shoemaking and other leather related industries. Shoemaking has almost ceased though the back streets of the town still retain the pattern of small shoe factories surrounded by terraced houses for outworkers. Northampton's main industries now include distribution and finance, and major employers include Barclaycard, Euro Building & Maintenance, Panasonic, Travis Perkins, Coca Cola Schweppes Beverages Ltd, and Carlsberg [1]. A shoe is an item of footwear worn on the foot or feet of a human, dog, cat, horse, or doll. ... Modern leather-working tools Leather is a material created through the tanning of hides and skins of animals, primarily cattlehide. ... The Barclaycard is a credit card associated with the Barclays Bank in the UK. It offers MasterCard and VISA versions. ... Panasonic is an international brand name for Japanese electric products manufacturer Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. ... Travis Perkins plc is a British builders merchant based in Northampton. ... This article is about the beverage. ... Cadbury-Schweppes plc (Cadbury Trebor Bassett) is a chocolate and beverage company with its headquarters in London, UK. Jacob Schweppe developed a method to make mineral water in Geneva, Switzerland in 1783. ... Note: Carling beer is not produced by the Carlsberg brewery. ...

Contents

History

Early history

Remains have been found in the Northampton area dating back to the Iron Age. It is believed that farming settlement began in the Northampton area in around the 7th century. By the 8th century it had become an administrative centre for the kingdom of Mercia. Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ...


The pre-Norman town was known as Hamtun and was quite small, occupying only some 60 acres.


Medieval Northampton

The town became significant in the 11th century, when the Normans built town walls and a large castle under the stewardship of the Norman earl, Simon de Senlis.[2] The original defence line of the walls is preserved in today's street pattern (Bridge St, The Drapery, Bearward St and Scarletwell Street). As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Simon I of St Liz, 1st Earl of Northampton[1] (d. ...


The town grew rapidly after the Normans arrived, and beyond the early defences. By the time of the Domesday Book, the town had a population of about 1500 residents, living in 300 houses. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ...


The town and its castle were important in the early 12th century and the King often held Court in the town. During his famous fall out with Henry II, Thomas Beckett at one time escaped from Northampton Castle through the unguarded Northern gate to flee the country, Henry II of England 5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... Saint Thomas à Becket (or Thomas Becket) (ca. ...


Northampton had one of the largest Jewish populations in 13th century England, centred around Gold Street. In 1277 300 Jews were executed, allegedly for clipping the King's coin, and the Jews of Northampton were driven out of the town. For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Events The philosophical doctrine Averroism is banned from Paris by bishop Etienne Tempier Burmas Pagan empire begins to disintegrate after being defeated by Kublai Khan at Ngasaungsyan, near the Chinese border. ...


The town was originally controlled by officials acting for the King; these officials collected the taxes and upheld the law.


In 1189 King Richard I gave the town its first charter and in 1215 King John authorised the appointment of William Tilly as the town's first Mayor. He also ordered that, "...twelve of the better and more discreet" residents of the town join him as a council to assist him. In 1176 the Assize of Northampton laid down new powers for dealing with law breakers. Events January 21 - Philip II of France and Richard I of England begin to assemble troops to wage the Third Crusade September 3- Richard I of England is crowned as king of England. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 to 6 April 1199. ... A certified copy of the Magna Carta March 4 - King John of England makes an oath to the Pope as a crusader to gain the support of Innocent III. June 15 - King John of England was forced to put his seal on the Magna Carta, outlining the rights of landowning... This article is about the King of England. ... The Assize of Northampton, largely based on the Assize of Clarendon of 1166, is among a series of measures taken by King Henry II of England which solidified the rights of the knightly tenants and made all possession of land subject to and guaranteed by royal law. ...


A university was established in the town in 1261 by scholars fleeing Cambridge. It briefly flourished, but was dissolved by Henry III in 1265 owing to the threat it posed to Oxford. The University of Northampton was a university in existance in Northampton from 1261 to 1264. ... Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ...


The first Battle of Northampton took place at the site of Northampton Castle in 1264 - when the forces of Henry III over ran the supporters of Simon de Montfort. In 1460, a second Battle of Northampton took place in the grounds of Delapre Abbey - and was a decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, and King Henry VI was captured in the town by the Yorkists. In April 1264 an encounter took place, as part of the Barons War wherein Henry III of England beseiged Simon de Montforts supporters who were holed in at Northampton Castle. ... Two notable men bore the name of Simon de Montfort or Simon de Montford in the middle ages: Simon de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester (1160 - 1218), a French nobleman, achieved prominence in the Fourth Crusade and in the Albigensian Crusade. ... Events The first Portuguese navigators reach the coast of modern Sierra Leone. ... Combatants House of York House of Lancaster Commanders Warwick Henry VI, Buckingham Strength 20,000-30,000 10,000-15,000 Casualties Unknown 300 The Battle of Northampton was a battle in the Wars of the Roses, which took place on 10 July 1460. ... Delapre Abbey - the south front Delapre Abbey - Northampton was one of only three Cluniac nunneries built in England; the Cluniac order was a branch of the Benedictines and fell under under the rule of the great abbey at Cluny in Burgundy. ... Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ...


In May 1328 the Treaty of Northampton was signed - being a peace treaty between the English and the Scots in which Edward III recognised the authority of Robert the Bruce as King of Scotland and betrothed Bruce's still infant son to the king's sister Joanna. Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... Prior to the Treaty of Edinbugh-Northampton, Edward II claimed he adhered to a truce, but he allowed English privateers to attack Flemish vessels trading with Scotland. ... Edward III King of England Edward III (13 November 1312–21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English Kings of medieval times. ... Robert I, King of Scots, usually known as Robert the Bruce (July 11, 1274 – June 7, 1329, reigned 1306 – 1329), was, according to a modern biographer (Geoffrey Barrow), a great hero who lived in a minor country. ...


There remains a large network of medieval tunnels that can be found around the centre of Northampton centred on All Saints church. Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in central England upon the River Nene, and the county town of Northamptonshire; its history goes back many centuries with much of the present towns development taking place during medieval times. ...


Civil War to 1900

Northampton supported the Parliamentarians during the English Civil War. For this reason the town walls and castle were later torn down on the orders of King Charles II as punishment. The railway station in Northampton stands on the site of the former castle, and used to be called "Northampton Castle Station". The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street Station in 1865. ...


The town was destroyed by fire in both 1516 and 1675, and was re-built as a spacious and well-planned town. In the 18th century Northampton became a major centre of footwear and leather manufacture. The prosperity of the town was greatly aided by demand for footwear caused by the Napoleonic Wars of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. // Events March - With the death of Ferdinand II of Aragon, his grandson Charles of Ghent becomes King of Spain as Carlos I. July - Selim I of the Ottoman Empire declares war on the Mameluks and invades Syria. ... Year 1675 (MDCLXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... High-heeled shoe Footwear consists of garments worn on the feet. ... Modern leather-working tools Leather is a material created through the tanning of hides and skins of animals, primarily cattlehide. ... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Sicily  Spain[3]  Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Italy Naples [5] Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[6] Saxony[7] Denmark-Norway [8] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich João Francisco de Saldanha Oliveira e Daun Gebhard von...


In his 18th century, "A Tour through the Whole Island of Great Britain", Daniel Defoe described Northampton as, "...the handsomest town in all this part of England." Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] â€“ April 24 [?], 1731)[1] was an English writer, journalist, and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ...


Northampton's growth was accelerated in the 19th century, first by the Grand Union Canal, which reached the town in 1815 and later the coming of the railways. The first railway to be built into Northampton was a branch from the main London-Birmingham line at Blisworth to Peterborough through Northampton which opened in 1845. This was followed by lines to Market Harborough (1859) and Bedford (1872). The Northampton loop off the major West Coast Main Line was built into Northampton in the late 1870s. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... The London and Birmingham Railway (L&BR) was an early railway company in the United Kingdom from 1833 until 1846, at which date it became a constituent part of the London and North Western Railway. ... Blisworth is a village and civil parish in the South Northamptonshire district of Northamptonshire, in England. ... This article is about the city in the United Kingdom. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... , The stilted Old Grammar School Market Harborough is a market town in Leicestershire, England. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the English county town. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Northampton loop is a loop railway line serving Northampton. ... The WCML running alongside the M1 motorway at Watford Gap in Northamptonshire A Virgin Pendolino and freight train on the WCML The West Coast Main Line (WCML) is one of the most important intercity railway lines in the United Kingdom, part of the British railway system. ... // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ...


Over the coming centuries the town continued to grow rapidly; after 1850 the town spilled out beyond the old town walls and began the growth we see today. in 1800 the population was round 7,000 and this had grown to 87,000 a century later.


In the 19th century Northampton acquired a reputation for political radicalism when the radical non-conformist Charles Bradlaugh was elected on several occasions as the town's MP. Charles Bradlaugh (26 September 1833 _ 30 January 1891) was a political activist and one of the most famous English atheists of the 19th century. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...


1900 - Today

Growth after 1900 was slower. The town's famous shoe industry ceased to grow and other industries arrived slowly.

Between the wars pressure on housing led to new council-built housing estates being erected. The Borough boundary, first extended in 1900, was expanded again in 1932. The population had increased to around 100,000 by 1961 and 130,000 by 1971. Northampton was designated a New Town in 1968, and the Northampton Development Corporation (NDC) was set up to almost double the size of the town, with a population target of 230,000 by 1981, rising to 260,000 in later years. By this time the town also linked to the M1 motorway. Actual growth was much slower than planned (in 1981 the population was 156,000), but by the time NDC was wound up after 20 years, another 40,000 residents and 20,000 houses had been added. The borough boundaries changed in 1974 with the abolition of Northampton county borough and its reconstitution as a non-metropolitan district also covering areas outside the former borough boundaries but inside the designated New Town. Recently suggestions for another major expansion have been put forward, and are the subject of much public debate. Northampton is expected to reach 300,000 inhabitants by 2018. Image File history File links NptonPop. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ...


At the millennium, Northampton applied unsuccessfully to be granted city status as a part of the "millennium cities" scheme. This distinction for the Midlands area was instead granted to Wolverhampton. Northampton will be up against other major towns with over 200,000 inhabitants such as Reading, Milton Keynes, Dudley, Walsall and Bournemouth-Poole when city status is competed for again. Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... // Wolverhampton is a City in the historical county of Staffordshire and metropolian county of the West Midlands. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... , Milton Keynes is a large town in northern Buckinghamshire, in South East England, about 45 miles (75 km) north-west of London, and roughly halfway between London and Birmingham. ... Map sources for Dudley at grid reference SO9390 Dudley is a town in the West Midlands, England. ... , Walsall is a large industrial town in the West Midlands of England. ... , Bournemouth is a large town and tourist resort, situated on the south coast of England. ... Poole is a coastal town, port and tourist destination, situated on the shores of the English Channel, in the ceremonial county of Dorset in southern England. ...


The University of Northampton received full university status in 2005, following several years as a University College. This article is about The University of Northampton in the present day; for the University in existence from 1261 to 1265, see University of Northampton (thirteenth century). ...


Expansion

Northampton's population has increased greatly since the 1960s, largely due to planned expansion under the New Towns Commission in the early-1960s. Other factors are the rail link and the busy M1 motorway that both lead direct to London. Northampton is within 70 miles of central London, and by train it takes approximately 1 hour to journey between the two. This transport link to the South East has proved attractive, with already high house prices in and around London rising rapidly since the 1990s causing many people to move increasingly further away from the area in order to commute from more reasonably-priced housing. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... A new town, planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Commuters on the New York City Subway during rush hour Rush hour at Shinjuku Station, Yamanote Line Traffic jam Commuting is the process of travelling between a place of residence and a place of work. ...


Most of Northampton's housing expansion has taken place to the east of the town with developments such as Canterbury Court, and on the western outskirts at Upton and to the south adjacent to an improved junction on the M1 at Grange Park, a development of some 1,500 houses actually in South Northants Council area. // Grange Park is a residential housing estate three miles south of Northampton town centre, in the shire county of Northamptonshire (Northants). ... South Northamptonshire is a local government district in Northamptonshire, England. ...


Northampton (since 2006) is within one of the government's designated expansion zones and a new wave of development is being overseen by the West Northamptonshire development Corporation (WNDC). Their goal is the development of up to 37,000 new dwellings within the borough of Northampton and the infrastructure and services that will be required to service the increased population.


Expansion has already started with new roads and housing developments in West Northampton at Upton and St Crispins (2007). A lot of the expansion will be on brownfield sites such as Ransome road Far Cotton (an inner suburb) and within the existing borough boundaries. The WNDC will also oversee the redevelopment of Central Northampton into a primary regional centre that will service the expanded population, that will be comparable to UK cities such as Coventry and Nottingham with a population of approx 300,000 by 2018-2021.


Government and politics

Northampton is administered by two local authorities: Northampton Borough Council, which from May 2007, and for the first time, was run by the Liberal Democrats. The other is Northamptonshire County Council which is currently controlled by the Conservative Party from 2005. The two authorities are responsible for running different local services, with the former responsible for services such as waste collection and planning within Northampton Borough, and the latter responsible for services such as libraries and education within the county as a whole. Since April 2006 major planning decisions such as large housing schemes and new roads have been the responsibility of West Northamptonshire Development Corporation (WNDC). Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in central England on the River Nene, and the county town of Northamptonshire, in the English East Midlands region. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... The West Northamptonshire Development Corporation is an Urban Development Corporation set up to cover parts of Northamptonshire in England, by the United Kingdom government in 2004/2005. ...


Northampton is currently the largest district in England not to be a self-governing unitary authority. Northampton's present local government status was set in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972 when it became a non-metropolitan district. Prior to this it had been an independent county borough. A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ...


Northampton is represented in Parliament by two MPs. These are: Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons The Right Honourable Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups (as of May 5, 2005 elections) Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats...

Both of these constituency boundaries change significantly from the next General Election after 2005 with the creation of a new constituency of Northamptonshire South which takes a large chunk of the Northampton borough area (see external link to election maps). Brian Arthur Roland Binley (born 1 May 1942) is a United Kingdom Conservative Party politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... For the newly created constituency in the county of Northamptonshire, see South Northamptonshire Northampton South is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Sally Curtis Keeble (born 13 October 1951, Mrs Andrew Potter) is a Labour Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Northampton North is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


Transport links

Northampton is situated near junctions 15, 15a and 16 of the M1 motorway. The A45 and A43 go through the town and the A14 is close by to the north. By rail, Northampton railway station is served by the Northampton Loop of the West Coast Main Line, and has regular services to London and Birmingham provided by Silverlink Trains (to London) and Central Trains (to Birmingham). Virgin Trains also provide some services to London and the north, with a small number of Pendolinos running each day. Sywell Aerodrome is the nearest airfield; for international links, East Midlands Airport and Luton Airport are quickly accessible by the M1, and Birmingham International Airport is accessible direct by train. The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... The A45 is a major road in England. ... The A43 is a primary road in the English Midlands. ... The A14 is a major road in England, running from the Port of Felixstowe to the junction of the M1 and M6 motorways near Rugby. ... Northampton (Castle) railway station is the railway station that serves Northampton and the south of Northamptonshire. ... The Northampton loop is a loop railway line serving Northampton. ... The WCML running alongside the M1 motorway at Watford Gap in Northamptonshire A Virgin Pendolino and freight train on the WCML The West Coast Main Line (WCML) is one of the most important intercity railway lines in the United Kingdom, part of the British railway system. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Birmingham (pron. ... Silverlink Trains is a regional franchise in the British railway system with routes in suburban London and from London to Northampton. ... Central Trains rolling stock at Liverpool Lime Street railway station Central Trains is a train operating company in the United Kingdom, running local and long-distance services in central England. ... Virgin Trains is a train operating company in the United Kingdom. ... Pendolino (from Italian Pendolo [pndolo] Pendulum and -ino, a diminutive suffix) is an Italian family of tilting trains used in Italy, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, Finland, the Czech Republic, United Kingdom,Switzerland and China. ... Sywell Aerodrome is an airfield near Northampton, England. ...


Transport within the town exists in the form of buses run by two main companies; The Stagecoach Group and The First Group, both of which offer a reasonable service with average wait times of between 10 to 30 minutes. Stagecoach Group plc (LSE: SGC) is a leading international transport group operating bus, train, tram, express coach and ferry operations. ... First Group PLC (LSE: FGP) is a British transport company operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland and North America, with headquarters in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Bus travel into and out of Northampton is provided by The Stagecoach Group and National Express with Stagecoach providing travel to the outlying villages and towns and National Express covering major routes between urban centres in Britain. Stagecoach Group plc (LSE: SGC) is a leading international transport group operating bus, train, tram, express coach and ferry operations. ... National Express coach on route 561 National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ...


Northampton is the terminus of an arm of the Grand Union Canal which snakes across Britain that allows navigation to the River Nene and the North Sea. Although no longer used for freight, the waterway is still popular with narrowboat owners with many stopping at the outlying villages of Gayton, Blisworth and Stoke Bruerne. The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ... The River Nene is a river in the east of England. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... Moored narrowboats near Tardebigge, Worcestershire, England Horse drawing a narrowboat on the Kennet and Avon Canal. ... Gayton is a small rural village near Towcester in South Northamptonshire. ... Blisworth is a village and civil parish in the South Northamptonshire district of Northamptonshire, in England. ... Categories: UK geography stubs | Villages in Northamptonshire | British visitor attractions ...


Education

Caroline Chisholm School is an all-through 4-18 primary and secondary school, the first in the UK, that opened in September 2004.[3] It is a Business and Enterprise specialist school located within the Wooldale Centre of Learning in Wootton Fields.[4][5] Caroline Chisholm School is an all-through 4-18 primary and secondary school, located in Northampton, England that opened in September 2004. ... A primary school in ÄŒeský Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... September 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Events Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8... Business and Enterprise Colleges (BECs) were introduced in 1995 as part of the Specialist Schools Programme in the UK. The system enables secondary schools to specialise in certain fields. ... The specialist schools programme is a UK government programme which encourages secondary schools to specialise in certain areas to boost acheivement. ...


Leisure and culture

The town is noted for its many parks, which include:

  • Abington Park,
  • The Racecourse (home to the annual Balloon Festival). This was originally a horse-racing course until 1904, when it was abandoned following a series of accidents. To the far side of the park is the White Elephant public house, aptly named after the closure of the racecourse led to the loss of its main clientele. During WWII the park was ploughed over so that local residents could plant and grow vegetables.
  • Delapre Park,
  • Bradlaugh Fields,
  • Becket's Park (named after Thomas Becket, who also lends his name to the nearby Becket's Well and Thomas a Beckett public house) and *Iron Age hill fort Hunsbury Hill.
  • Billing Aquadrome leisure park is situated on the town's outskirts, which incorporates a caravan site, marina and funfair. As well as the 'Marina' bar, the site offers 'The Quays' riverside restaurant and 'The Billing Mill' which was converted from the original water mill, with many of the original workings still in place and visible through gallery windows.
Northampton Market

As well as two indoor shopping centres (The Grosvenor Center and Peacock Place), the town also claims to have Britain's largest market square, which dates back to 1235. The square and surrounding shopping streets used to host the annual St Crispin Street Fair, held during the October half-term school holiday from 1993 to 2005. Away from the town centre the main suburban shopping areas are Wellingborough Road and the Weston Favell Centre. There are retail parks at Riverside and Towcester Road. The main leisure area is Sixfields, which includes bowling, restaurants and a cinema. Abington Park, in the Abington district of Northampton, has lakes, aviaries, and a museum, as well as trees and grassy open spaces. ... The Northampton Balloon Festival is an annual event held in the English town of Northampton, in the Racecourse park. ... Delapre Abbey - the south front Delapre Abbey - Northampton was one of only three Cluniac nunneries built in England; the Cluniac order was a branch of the Benedictines and fell under under the rule of the great abbey at Cluny in Burgundy. ... Charles Bradlaugh (26 September 1833 _ 30 January 1891) was a political activist and one of the most famous English atheists of the 19th century. ... St Thomas Becket, St Thomas of Canterbury (c. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Billing Aquadrome is a leisure park on the outskirts of Northampton, England. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x738, 191 KB)Northampton market This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, G-Man. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x738, 191 KB)Northampton market This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, G-Man. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see pedestrian street or promenade. ... The Market square (or sometimes the market place) is a feature of many British and other European towns. ... Events Anglo-Norman invasion of Connacht St. ... The St Crispin Street Fair is an annual fun fair held in town centre streets of Northampton, England. ...

  • Thorntons Park
  • Victoria Park

The Derngate and Royal theatres are situated next door to each other in Guildhall Road, opposite Northampton Museum and Art Gallery. They have been recently renovated and reopened to the public in November 2006. The Deco is a theatre/conference centre based on the Grade II listed former Cannon Cinema, in Abington Square. There is a smaller museum in a former mansion within Abington Park. Derngate is a theatre in Northampton, England. ... The Royal Theatre is a 19th century theatre in Northampton, England. ...


Until the removal of council funding caused its closure and liquidation, the Northampton Roadmender was a leading venue for art and music in the region. It has since been brought by the Purplehaus group [1] and recently reopened.Three cinemas are also located in the town: Vue (formerly UCI) at Sol Central, Cineworld (formerly UGC, and before that Virgin Cinema) at Sixfields and the Forum Cinema at Lings Forum. Vue company logo Vue is a cinema company in Ireland and the UK. The company was formed in May 2003 when SBC International Cinemas bought Warner Village Cinemas. ... Sol Central is a leisure complex in Northampton, England that contains a cinema, health club, casino and restaurants among other facilities. ... Cineworld Cinemas is a multiplex cinema chain in the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Jersey. ... UGC is the largest European cinema operator with, as of October 2004, 92 sites and 929 screens across six countries: UK: 41 cinemas, 391 screens France: 40 cinemas, 365 screens Spain: 5 cinemas, 88 screens Belgium: 4 cinemas, 56 screens Ireland: 1 cinema, 17 screens Italy: 1 cinema, 12 screens... Sixfields in Northampton, Northamptonshire was a Landfill until a few years ago, when it was converted into a leisure area to accommodate the new Sixfields Stadium for Northampton Town Football Club. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ...


Every year, Northampton hosts the Balloon Festival, normally held at Racecourse Park. The festival has been held for 17 years. The Northampton Balloon Festival is an annual event held in the English town of Northampton, in the Racecourse park. ...


Sport in Northampton

The town is home to:

  • League One football club Northampton Town (nicknamed The Cobblers due to the town's previous association with shoemaking), at Sixfields Stadium. There is also an athletics track adjacent to the football ground.
  • Northampton also has three non-league clubs in the United Counties Football League - Northampton Spencer, Northampton Sileby Rangers and Northampton Old Northamptonian Chenecks.
  • Rugby union club Northampton Saints, who play at Franklin's Gardens in the St James area of Northampton. The Saints, as they have been nicknamed, had their greatest ever moment when the team won the Heineken Cup in 2000 at Twickenham Stadium, beating Munster Rugby 9-8. Unfortunately The Saints were relegated from The Guinness Premiership on 28th April 2007 despite beating London Irish on the last day of the season.
  • Northamptonshire County Cricket Club, known in limited overs cricket as the Steelbacks, play at the County Ground.
  • Alan Bosworth, former British Light-Welterweight title challenger and English Light Welterweight champion.
  • The Nene Whitewater Centre provides an artificial whitewater course for canoes, kayaks and rafts.
  • Northampton Swimming Club, which trained the young Olympic swimmer Caitlin McClatchey.
  • Collingtree Golf Club, which hosted the British Masters in 1995.
  • Northampton International Raceway near Brafield is a leading venue for stock-car racing and hosts the European Championships every July.
  • Derek Redmond, the Olympic runner, was born and raised in the town. He attended Roade Comprehensive School (now Roade Sports College) in Roade where the sports hall is named after him.
  • Sharron Davies, Olympic swimmer, lived in Collingtree Park.
  • Ben Crossland, Junior World Kickboxing Champion

Speedway racing, then known as dirt track racing, was staged in Northampton in 1930. Football League One (often referred to as League One for short or Coca-Cola Football League 1 for sponsorship reasons) is the second-highest division of The Football League and third-highest division overall in the English football league system. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Northampton Town Football Club is a football club based in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. ... Sixfields Stadium is a community stadium in Northampton, England. ... The United Counties Football League (also known after its sponsor as the Eagle Bitter United Counties League) is an English football league covering Northamptonshire, Bedfordshire and the surrounding area. ... Northampton Spencer F.C. is a football club based in Northampton, England. ... Northampton Sileby Rangers F.C. are a football club based in Sileby, near Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. ... Northampton Old Northamptonian Chenecks F.C. are a football club based in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Official website www. ... The Heineken Cup sponsored by Heineken (known as the H Cup in France due to alcohol advertising laws) is an annual rugby union competition involving leading club, regional and provincial teams from England, France, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. ... Twickenham Stadium (usually known as just Twickenham or Twickers[1]) is a stadium located in Twickenham, a suburb of south-west London (in the historic county of Middlesex). ... Official website www. ... Official website www. ... Northamptonshire County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county of Northamptonshire. ... The Melbourne Cricket Ground hosts an ODI match between Australia and India. ... The County Cricket Ground, is a cricket venue in Northampton, England. ... Whitewater is formed in a rapid, when a rivers gradient drops enough to form a bubbly, or aerated and unstable current; the frothy water appears white. ... It has been suggested that Canadian canoe be merged into this article or section. ... Look up kayak in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Traditional raft, from 1884 edition Huckleberry Finn and Jim Children successfully test their raft, in Brixham harbour, south Devon, England. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Collingtree is a village and civil parish in Northamptonshire, England. ... The Daily Telegraph Dunlop Masters is a PGA European Tour golf tournament which takes place each May. ... This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... Derek Redmond (born September 3, 1965 in Bletchley) is a retired English athlete. ... Roade is a village in Northamptonshire, England. ... Sharron Davies, MBE (born November 1, 1962) is one of Britains most successful swimmers ever. ... Collingtree Park is a district of the town of Northampton in the East Midlands of England. ...


Notable buildings

Interior of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre
  • Northampton's oldest standing building, the Church of The Holy Sepulchre, is one of the largest and best-preserved round churches in England. It was built in 1100 on the orders of the first Earl of Northampton, Simon de Senlis , who had just returned from the first Crusade. It is based on a plan of the original Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem.
  • The current All Saints' Church was built on the site of a great Norman church, All Hallows, which was almost completely destroyed by the Fire of Northampton in 1675. All that remained was the medieval tower and the fine vaulted crypt, but by 1680 All Saints had been rebuilt, with the help of donations from all over England, including 1,000 tons of timber from King Charles II, whose statue can be seen above the portico. Famously, the poet John Clare liked to sit beneath the portico of the church.
All Saints' Church in central Northampton
  • The Guildhall in Northampton (see picture at top) was constructed mostly in the 1860s in Victorian Gothic architecture, and extended in the 1990s. It is built on the site of the old town hall.
  • 78 Derngate contains an interior designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh for Wenman Joseph Bassett-Lowke and is the only major domestic commission outside Scotland. It is open to the public.
  • The 127.45 metre tall Express Lift Tower is a dominant feature in the area. Terry Wogan conducted a radio phone-in during the 1980s to come up with a name for it: "Northampton Lighthouse" was suggested as Northampton is one of the furthest places from the sea. It is also known as the "Cobblers' Needle". It was built to facilitate the testing of new lifts at the Express Lifts factory. It is visible from most of the town, but is now redundant. The tower has however been listed as being of architectural importance in the town.
Express Lift Tower
  • Northampton Castle (now only remaining as a rebuilt postern gate in a wall outside the railway station and the hill on which it stood) was for many years one of the country's most important castles. The country's parliament sat here many times and Thomas Becket was imprisoned here until he escaped.
  • The Carlsberg UK brewery is located in the town.
  • Delapre Abbey – former Cluniac nunnery, founded by Simon de Senlis - later the County Records Office and site of the second Battle of Northampton.
  • Queen Eleanor's body rested here on its way to London – and the nearby Queen Eleanor's cross commemorates this resting. The Cross is also referred to in Daniel Defoe's a "Tour through the whole island of Great Britain" where he describes the Great Fire of Northampton, "...a townsman being at Queen's Croos upon a hill on the south side of the town, about two miles off, saw the fire at one end of the town then newly begun, and that before he could get to the town it was burning at the remotest end, opposite where he first saw it."
  • Northampton Academy - The county's most expensive school, with a state of the art 27 million pound building. Darren Kahan was former head boy.
  • Northampton School For Boys – one of the few state-funded single sex school for boys in England.
  • The town's Greyfriars Bus Station, built in the 1970s to replace the old Derngate station, was featured on Channel 4's Demolition programme and was cited as the worst transport station in the UK, and it was suggested worthy of demolition.
Medieval cellars at the Northampton & County Club
  • Northampton & County Club, established in 1873, was the old county hospital before becoming a private members' club; the cellars date back to medieval times and there are currently plans to develop these into a wine bar.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 447 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (761 × 1021 pixel, file size: 496 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Rev. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 447 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (761 × 1021 pixel, file size: 496 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Rev. ... Simon de Senlis, Earl of Northampton, was responsible for making Northampton, England, a Norman stronghold by building a castle (now destroyed) and a town wall (approximately on the site of the inner ring road). ... The title of Marquess of Northampton was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1812 for the Earl of Northampton. ... The title of Marquess of Northampton was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1812 for the Earl of Northampton. ... All Saints Church in central Northampton Simon de Senlis church of All Hallows, Northampton, England, lasted with medieval alterations until disaster struck the town on 20th September 1675. ... Year 1675 (MDCLXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... All Saints Church in central Northampton Simon de Senlis church of All Hallows, Northampton, England, lasted with medieval alterations until disaster struck the town on 20th September 1675. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Categories: Architectural elements | Stub ... John Clare (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) was an English poet, in his time commonly known as the Northamptonshire Peasant Poet, the son of a farm labourer, born at Helpston near Peterborough. ... Download high resolution version (700x879, 214 KB)All Saints church in Northampton town centre. ... Download high resolution version (700x879, 214 KB)All Saints church in Northampton town centre. ... Northampton Guildhall, built 1861-4, E.W. Godwin, architect The Northampton Guildhall is a building which stands on St Giles Square in Northampton, England. ... // The First Transcontinental Railroad in the USA was built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... 78 Derngate is a Grade II* listed Georgian house in the centre of Northampton, England. ... For the chemist and inventor, see Charles Macintosh. ... This article is about the country. ... Express Lift Tower The Express Lift Tower is a former elevator test tower built by the Express Lift Company off the Weedon Road in Northampton, England. ... Sir Michael Terence Wogan, KBE DL (born August 3rd 1938, in Limerick, County Limerick, Ireland), more commonly known as Terry Wogan, is a radio and television broadcaster who has worked for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in the United Kingdom (UK) for most of his career. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (500x961, 102 KB)Express Lift Tower in Northampton. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (500x961, 102 KB)Express Lift Tower in Northampton. ... St Thomas Becket, St Thomas of Canterbury (c. ... Note: Carling beer is not produced by the Carlsberg brewery. ... Delapre Abbey - the south front Delapre Abbey - Northampton was one of only three Cluniac nunneries built in England; the Cluniac order was a branch of the Benedictines and fell under under the rule of the great abbey at Cluny in Burgundy. ... Cluny nowadays The town of Cluny or Clugny lies in the modern-day département of Saône-et-Loire in the région of France, near Mâcon. ... The title of Marquess of Northampton was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1812 for the Earl of Northampton. ... Combatants House of York House of Lancaster Commanders Warwick Henry VI, Buckingham Strength 20,000-30,000 10,000-15,000 Casualties Unknown 300 The Battle of Northampton was a battle in the Wars of the Roses, which took place on 10 July 1460. ... For other Eleanors of England, see Eleanor of England (disambiguation) Eleanor of Castile (1241 – 28 November 1290) was the first Queen consort of Edward I of England. ... The Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross The Eleanor crosses are lavishly decorated stone monuments in the shape of a cross that Edward I of England erected in memory of his wife Eleanor of Castile. ... Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] â€“ April 24 [?], 1731)[1] was an English writer, journalist, and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... Northampton School for Boys (NSB) is a secondary school in Northampton, England. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Demolition is a 2005 television series from Channel 4, which can be seen as being the reverse of the BBCs 2003 series Restoration. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 545 KB) // Summary Medieval cellars at the Northampton & County Club in Northampton. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 545 KB) // Summary Medieval cellars at the Northampton & County Club in Northampton. ...

Other churches in Northampton

  • St Andrew
  • St David's
  • St Edmunds [closed in 1978 and subsequently demolished]
  • St Giles
  • St James'
  • St John Baptist
  • St Matthew's (built 1893)[2]
  • St Michael and All Angels with St Edmund [where the St Edmund congregation went after closure]
  • St Peter
  • Duke Street Evangelical Church [www.dukest.org.uk]

Northampton Cathedral is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Northampton, England. ... // The diocese covers Bedfordshire, the old county of Buckinghamshire including the Slough area and Northamptonshire. ... The Bishop of Northampton is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Northampton in the Province of Westminster. ...

Twin towns

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... , Marburg is a city in Hesse, Germany, on the Lahn river. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Location within France Poitiers (population 85,000) is a small city located in west central France. ...

Celebrity Local Residents

Modern
Historical
Musical
Other

William Alwyn (November 7, 1905 – September 11, 1985) was an English composer, conductor, and music teacher. ... Sir Malcolm Arnold Sir Malcolm Henry Arnold, CBE (21 October 1921 – 23 September 2006) was an English composer. ... Judy Carne (born Joyce Botterill on April 27, 1939 in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England) is an actress and may be best remembered for her introducing the phrase Sock it to me! while a regular on Laugh-In. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the film producer and manager with a similar name, see Allan Carr or Allen Carr for the self-help writer. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was an English molecular biologist, physicist, and neuroscientist, who is most noted for being one of the co-discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... James Dewey Watson (born April 6, 1928) is an American molecular biologist, best known as one of the co-discoverers of the structure of DNA. Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins were awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was an English molecular biologist, physicist, and neuroscientist, who is most noted for being one of the co-discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953. ... Andrew Collins Andrew John Collins (born March 4, 1965, Northampton, United Kingdom) is a British journalist, scriptwriter and broadcaster. ... Joan Hickson played Miss Marple in the popular BBC TV series Joan Hickson OBE (August 5, 1906 – October 17, 1998) was an English actress of theatre, film and television, who achieved fame in her old age playing Agatha Christies Miss Marple. ... Margaret Rutherford as Miss Marple Jane Marple, usually known as Miss Marple, is a fictional character appearing in twelve of Agatha Christies crime novels. ... Kingsthorpe was once a Northamptonshire village but is now a suburb to the north-west of the major town of Northampton. ... Birds Of A Feather is the second track on Phishs 1998 album The Story of the Ghost. ... Lesley Joseph (born 14 January 1946) is a British stage and television actress. ... Robert Llewellyn Robert Llewellyn (born 10 March 1956 in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England) is a British actor, presenter, and writer. ... Character descriptions and casting details for the Red Dwarf BBC sitcom and series of novels by Rob Grant and Doug Naylor. ... For the type of star, see Red dwarf. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... This article is about the comic book series. ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a comic book limited series written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin ONeill, published under the Americas Best Comics imprint of DC Comics. ... The hardcover version Voice of the Fire is the title of the first novel from Alan Moore, acclaimed comic book writer. ... Broadcasting House in Abington Street, Northampton BBC Radio Northampton is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Northamptonshire. ... Nanette Newman (born 29 May 1934), is an English actress and author. ... Robert Frederick Zenon Geldof (born January 12, 1932) is a veteran English television personality. ... Myrea Pettit Born 10 February 1970, Northampton United Kingdom, British contemporary Fairy and Fantasy Artist and Illustrator, Works published in following books, Der Elfen und der Feen 2003, Fantasy Figures 2003, The Art of Faery 2003 written by David Riché, Watercolor Fairies 2004 written by David Riché, The World of... by Sophie Anderson A fairy, or faery, is a creature from stories and mythology, often portrayed in art and literature as a minuscule humanoid with wings. ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Delia Derbyshire (5 May 1937 - 3 July 2001) was a British musician and composer who was a pioneer of electronic music. ... For other uses, see Doctor Who (disambiguation). ... Peter Purves (publicity portrait) Peter Purves (born February 10, 1939) is a British actor and television presenter. ... Cogenhoe (pronounced Cook-know) is a village in the English midland county of Northamptonshire. ... Edmund Rubbra (23 May 1901–14 February 1986) was a British composer. ... Norman Smiley (born February 28, 1965 in Northampton) is a British professional wrestler currently competing for Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. ... Althorps entrance front in the 1820s. ... “Diana Spencer” redirects here. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Michael Underwood Michael Underwood is a British television presenter who famously won a contract on Gaby Roslins BBC television show Whatever You Want. ... Marc Warren (born March 20, 1967 in Northampton) is an English actor, best known for his role as Danny Blue in Hustle. ... The Hustle team (L–R): Ash Morgan, Albert Stroller, Mickey Stone, Stacie Monroe, and Danny Blue Hustle is a British television drama series made by Kudos Film & Television for BBC One. ... Kingsthorpe was once a Northamptonshire village but is now a suburb to the north-west of the major town of Northampton. ... Stuart Pearson Wright (born 1975, Northampton) is an award winnig English artist who works mainly in acrylic paints. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lorna Katie Fitzgerald (born 1996) is a British child actress from Northampton. ... EastEnders is a popular BBC television soap opera, first broadcast in the United Kingdom on BBC1 on 19 February 1985[4] and continuing to date. ... Hunsbury is a modern suburban housing development in the south of Northampton approximately 2 miles from the town centre. ... Elizabeth Dorothea Cole Bowen (7 June 1899 – 22 February 1973) was an Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer. ... Charles Bradlaugh (26 September 1833 _ 30 January 1891) was a political activist and one of the most famous English atheists of the 19th century. ... Title page, second (posthumous) edition of Bradstreets poems, 1678 Anne Bradstreet (ca. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Alban Butler (October 24 NS, 1710 - St-Omer, France May 15, 1773), English Roman Catholic priest and hagiographer, was born at Appletree Northamptonshire. ... John Clare (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) was an English poet, in his time commonly known as the Northamptonshire Peasant Poet, the son of a farm labourer, born at Helpston near Peterborough. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Jerome Klapka Jerome (May 2, 1859 – June 14, 1927) was an English author, best known for the humorous travelogue Three Men in a Boat. ... Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog), published 1889, is a humorous account by Jerome K. Jerome of a boating holiday on the Thames between Kingston and Oxford. ... Spencer Perceval (1 November 1762 – 11 May 1812) was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... John Bellingham (c. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Charles Thomas Studd was born 2 December 1860, Spratton, Northamptonshire, England, and died 16 July 1931, Ibambi, Belgian Congo. ... The Ashes is a Test cricket series, played between England and Australia - it is international crickets most celebrated rivalry and dates back to 1882. ... Spratton is a village in the Daventry district of the county of Northamptonshire in England. ... Bauhaus are an English Goth rock band, formed in Northampton in 1978. ... The Departure is an English rock band from Northampton, that formed in January 2004. ... Au Pair is currently a television film trilogy directed by Mark Griffiths. ... Faye Louise Tozer (born Northampton, November 14, 1975) is a singer who gained fame as a member of the band Steps. ... For the TVB drama, see Steps (TVB Series). ... Keeping Up Appearances is a British sitcom starring Patricia Routledge as social snob Hyacinth Bucket. ...

Media

Four newspapers are published in the town:

  • The Chronicle and Echo. (Daily, Monday-Saturday)
  • The Mercury. (free, Thursday)
  • Northants on Sunday. (free, Sunday)
  • Herald and Post (free, Thursday)

Radio stations:

Regional television news is provided by: Broadcasting House in Abington Street, Northampton BBC Radio Northampton is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Northamptonshire. ... Northants 96 Categories: Station stubs | UK Radio Stations ...

At one point during the late 1990s-early 2000s, Northampton also had its own local TV station, Northants TV (NTV). It was transmitted on both cable and later terrestrial, mostly showing local adverts, sport, and documentaries on the surrounding countryside and activities. Susie Fowler-Watt, Stewart White & Julie Reinger The BBC Look East ident BBC Look East is the BBCs regional television news programme for the eastern region, which comprises: Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire and Suffolk (NB - the term East here differs from the political East of England... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


American Cousins

Settlers from Northampton moved to the United States and set up various new towns there. As a result Northampton is a popular name for cities and towns in the United States:

Nickname: [[Image:Northampton_ma_highlight. ... Northampton is the name of some places in the U.S. state of New York: Northampton, Fulton County, New York Northampton, Suffolk County, New York This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Northampton is a borough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ... Northampton County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... Northampton Township is the name of some places in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania: Northampton Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania Northampton Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Trivia

  • The Northampton Development Corporation produced a single that was released nationally by EMI, entitled 60 Miles by Road or Rail, by Linda Jardim (who was also a vocalist on Buggles's Video Killed the Radio Star) in an attempt to generate publicity for the growing town. Sixty miles is the approximate distance from the town to London, which many people commute to. The B-side was Energy in Northampton, about extraterrestrials choosing Northampton as a landing site. Strangely, neither song took the charts by storm, but for those interested and unable to obtain a copy on eBay, the A side is still played daily in the town's museum.
  • The bells from the church of St Edmund, Northampton, which was closed in 1978 and subsequently demolished, are now in Wellington Cathedral, New Zealand.
  • Residents of the town are known as Northamptonians.
  • The 2005 film Kinky Boots was filmed in Northampton and featured shots of the iconic statue that sits outside the Grosvenor Centre in the Town Centre, Northampton railway station and various churches and parks.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... The Buggles were a pop/rock band formed in 1977 consisting of Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes, early on including Academy Award-winning film composer Hans Zimmer (who left after the success of Video Killed the Radio Star). ... Video Killed the Radio Star is a New Wave song released in 1979 by the British group Buggles that celebrates the golden days of radio. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Commuters on the New York City Subway during rush hour Rush hour at Shinjuku Station, Yamanote Line Traffic jam Commuting is the process of travelling between a place of residence and a place of work. ... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ... Extraterrestrial life refers to forms of life that may exist and originate outside of the planet Earth. ... The Wellington Cathedral of Saint Paul — informally known as Saint Pauls Cathedral — is the cathedral church of the Church of England in New Zealand and is the seat of the Anglican bishop of Wellington. ... Kinky boots are boots which are intended for or by some people are connected to some kind of shoe fetishism and thus a form of fetish clothing. ... Northampton (Castle) railway station is the railway station that serves Northampton and the south of Northamptonshire. ...

References

  1. ^ English Partnerships
  2. ^ "Northampton Castle", The Gatehouse
  3. ^ "Snap Tory leadership poll impossible", Matthew Temple, The Guardian, 27 May 2005
  4. ^ "Secondary School (KS3) Achievement and Attainment Tables 2006", Department for Children, Schools and Families
  5. ^ "Welcome to Caroline Chisholm School", Caroline Chisholm School

The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in central England upon the River Nene, and the county town of Northamptonshire; its history goes back many centuries with much of the present towns development taking place during medieval times. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Northampton (469 words)
Northampton was destroyed by fire in 1675 and this gave the local people to build a spacious and well-planned town.
The population of Northampton in 1801 was 7,000.
Northampton continued to elect him as their MP but it was not until 1886 that he was allowed to take his seat in the House of Commons.
Northampton, England - LoveToKnow 1911 (860 words)
NORTHAMPTON, a municipal, county and parliamentary borough and the county town of Northamptonshire, England, 66 m.
Northampton is the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop, and there is a pro-cathedral, designed by A. Pugin (1864).
The chief public buildings of Northampton are a town hall, county hall, county council room, corn exchange, antiquarian and geological museum, free library and barracks.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m