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Encyclopedia > North by Northwest
North by Northwest

Original film poster
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Associate producer:
Herbert Coleman
Uncredited:
Alfred Hitchcock
Written by Ernest Lehman
Starring Cary Grant
Eva Marie Saint
James Mason
Jessie Royce Landis
Martin Landau
Leo G. Carroll
Music by Bernard Herrmann
Cinematography Robert Burks, ASC
Editing by George Tomasini
Distributed by Metro Goldwyn Mayer
Release date(s) USA July 28, 1959
Running time 136 min.
Language English
Budget US$ 4,000,000
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

North by Northwest (1959) is a suspense film starring Cary Grant, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and produced at MGM. The movie's world premiere took place in the San Sebastian International Film Festival. North by Northwest is a tale of mistaken identity, with an innocent man pursued across America by agents of a mysterious organization who want to stop his interference in their plans to smuggle out some microfilm (a classic MacGuffin). A modern compass card. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (415x650, 133 KB) This image is of a movie poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the movie or the studio which produced the movie in question. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Ernest Lehman (born December 8, 1915 in New York City - died July 2, 2005 in Los Angeles, California) was a successful screenwriter in Hollywood. ... For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... Eva Marie Saint (born July 4, 1924) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ... Jessie Royce Landis (25 November 1904 - 2 February 1972) was an American actress. ... Martin Landau (born June 20, 1931) is an Academy Award-winning American film and television actor. ... Leo G. Carroll (October 25, 1892–October 16, 1972) was an British character actor, best known for his roles in several Hitchcock films and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.. He was born in Weedon, Buckinghamshire to a wealthy Catholic family, who named him after the reigning pope... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cinematographer Robert Burks (1909 - 1968) was known for being proficient in virtually every genre and equally at home with black-and-white or colour. ... George Tomasini (born April 20, 1909, died November 22, 1964) was the genius American film editor who often worked with very closely with film director Alfred Hitchcock. ... MGM redirects here. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... See also: 1958 in film 1959 1960 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film Events The Three Stooges make their 180th and last short film, Sappy Bullfighters. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... The San Sebastian International Film Festival was founded in 1953 in San Sebastian, Spain. ... Microfilm machines may be available at libraries or record archives. ... This article is about the plot device. ...


The film also stars Eva Marie Saint, James Mason, Leo G. Carroll, and Martin Landau. The screenplay was written by Ernest Lehman, who wanted to write "the Hitchcock picture to end all Hitchcock pictures."[1] The film is one of several Hitchcock movies with a film score by Bernard Herrmann and features a famous title sequence by the graphic designer Saul Bass. This article is about motion pictures. ... Eva Marie Saint (born July 4, 1924) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ... Leo G. Carroll (October 25, 1892–October 16, 1972) was an British character actor, best known for his roles in several Hitchcock films and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.. He was born in Weedon, Buckinghamshire to a wealthy Catholic family, who named him after the reigning pope... Martin Landau (born June 20, 1931) is an Academy Award-winning American film and television actor. ... Ernest Lehman (born December 8, 1915 in New York City - died July 2, 2005 in Los Angeles, California) was a successful screenwriter in Hollywood. ... A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Saul Bass (May 8, 1920 - April 25, 1996) was a graphic designer and Academy Award-winning filmmaker, but he is best known for his design on animated motion picture title sequences, which is thought of as the best such work ever seen. ...

Contents

Plot

A Madison Avenue advertising executive, Roger Thornhill (Cary Grant), is mistaken for a government agent named George Kaplan. He is seized by two men, Valerian (Adam Williams) and Licht (Robert Ellenstein) at New York City’s Plaza Hotel and taken to the house of Lester Townsend. There he is interrogated by a man he assumes to be Townsend, but who is really Phillip Vandamm (James Mason). Vandamm becomes frustrated when Thornhill repeatedly denies he is Kaplan and orders his right-hand man, Leonard (Martin Landau) to get rid of him. Madison Avenue, looking north from 40th Street Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries northbound one-way traffic. ... // Advert redirects here. ... For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... Adam Williams (b. ... Robert Ellenstein (born June 18, 1923 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American film and television actor. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Plaza Hotel in New York City is a landmark 19-story luxury hotel with a height of 250 feet (76 m) and length of 400 feet that (122 m) occupies the west side of Grand Army Plaza, from which it derives its name, and extends along Central Park South... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ... Martin Landau (born June 20, 1931) is an Academy Award-winning American film and television actor. ...


Leonard and the other two men force a large quantity of bourbon down Thornhill's throat and then Valerian and Licht put him in a stolen car, intending to stage a fatal accident. He breaks free and, after an exciting chase on a perilous road through the dark in Glen Cove, NY, is rear-ended by a police car. Thornhill is apprehended and charged with drunk driving. He tries to convince the police, the judge, and his mother (Jessie Royce Landis) that he was kidnapped and forced to drink the liquor, but they are all skeptical, especially when a woman posing as Townsend's wife informs them that Townsend is a United Nations diplomat. Bourbon (from French) or Borbón (from Spanish) can refer to people, places, food and drink, political events, and popular culture. ... Glen Cove is a city in Nassau County, New York on the North Shore of Long Island. ... Drunk driving (drink driving in the UK) or drinking and driving is the act of operating a motor vehicle after having consumed alcohol (i. ... Jessie Royce Landis (25 November 1904 - 2 February 1972) was an American actress. ... UN redirects here. ...


Realizing that the only way to prove the truth of his far-fetched story is to locate George Kaplan, Thornhill visits Kaplan’s hotel room, where he finds a photograph of the man he believes is Townsend.


Narrowly avoiding capture when Valerian and Licht appear, Thornhill catches a taxi to the General Assembly building of the United Nations, where Townsend is due to deliver a speech. When he meets him, Thornhill is surprised to find that he is not the man who interrogated him. At that moment, Valerian throws a knife that strikes Townsend in the back. He falls forward, dead, into Thornhill’s arms. Unthinkingly, Thornhill removes the knife, making it appear that he is the killer. A passing photographer captures the scene, forcing him to flee. This article is about the physical offices of the United Nations in New York. ...

Thornhill (Grant) on the run, attempting to travel incognito.

Still in pursuit of Kaplan, Thornhill needs to get to Chicago since Kaplan has now checked out of the Plaza and his itinerary indicates he has a reservation in a Chicago hotel the next day. Seeing a train as the best means of being able to travel unobtrusively despite the manhunt searching for him, Thornhill goes to Grand Central Station and sneaks onto a 20th Century Limited train going to Chicago. On board, he meets the blonde Eve Kendall (Eva Marie Saint), who helps Thornhill evade policemen searching the train by hiding him twice: once in the overhead, fold-up bunk in her compartment. During a conversation, she asks about his personalized matchbooks with the initials ROT; he says the O stands for nothing. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The main concourse Grand Central Terminal (GCT, often unofficially called Grand Central Station) is a terminal rail station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue (42nd Street and Park Avenue) in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... The 20th Century Limited was a passenger train operated by the New York Central (NYC) railroad. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Eva Marie Saint (born July 4, 1924) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Matchbook (open) A matchbook is a small cardboard container that holds a quantity of matches inside and has a coarse striking surface on the exterior. ... David O. Selznick David Oliver Selznick (May 10, 1902–June 22, 1965), was one of the icon Hollywood producers of the Golden Age. ...


Arriving at Chicago's LaSalle Street Station, Thornhill borrows the uniform of one of the porters, and carries Eve’s luggage through the crowd. Although the police are alerted to his disguise, the sheer number of porters allows Thornhill to elude them. Meanwhile, Eve (who is Vandamm's lover) meets with one of Vandamm’s henchmen, and lies to Thornhill about arranging a meeting with George Kaplan. LaSalle Street Station is a commuter rail terminal in downtown Chicago, Illinois, serving Metras Rock Island District. ...


In an iconic scene, Thornhill travels by bus to meet Kaplan at a remote crossroads in the middle of a perfectly flat, open countryside. The only other person in sight is a man who is dropped off by a car and waits at the bus stop. Before boarding the next bus and leaving Thornhill alone, he observes that a crop duster is "dusting crops where there ain't no crops." Without warning, the plane flies towards Thornhill and starts shooting at him. He dives for cover, is chased through a cornfield and dusted with pesticide. Finally, Thornhill flags down a gasoline tanker, which stops barely in time. The plane then crashes into it, triggering a large explosion. Taking advantage of rubberneckers stopping, Thornhill steals a pickup truck and returns to Chicago. An agricultural aircraft is an aircraft that has been built or converted for agricultural use - usually aerial spraying of pesticides or fertiliser. ... A vehicular collision in Yate, near Bristol, England, in July 2004. ...


Thornhill goes to the Ambassador East Hotel, where he believes George Kaplan is staying. He is surprised when he is told that Kaplan checked out earlier that day (before Eve claimed to have spoken to him), leaving a forwarding address in Rapid City, South Dakota. Doubting her honesty, Thornhill visits Eve in her room and is asked to stay away. He removes his suit for cleaning and ironing, and pretends to take a shower as she leaves for a meeting. Using a pencil to reveal the indentations on a notepad Thornhill learns her destination and follows her to an art auction. Rapid City is a city located in the western part of South Dakota and is second largest city in the state of South Dakota after Sioux Falls. ... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...


At the auction, Thornhill once more comes face to face with Vandamm. Vandamm bids for and purchases a pre-Columbian Tarascan statue. He still believes that Thornhill is George Kaplan; indeed, he accuses Thornhill of overacting the role of the innocent bystander. After being threatened once more, Thornhill tries to leave, only to find all exits covered by Leonard and Valerian. To avoid capture, he deliberately makes a scene, placing nonsensical bids, so the police will be called to remove him. To make sure that he stays safely in custody, Thornhill identifies himself as the UN killer, but as they drive to the police station, the officers are ordered to take him to Chicago Midway International Airport (where a gate for Northwest Airlines is seen, playing on the film's title). Tarascan men reeling cord for nets & making nets, 1899. ... For other uses, see Midway Airport (disambiguation). ... Northwest Airlines, Inc. ...


Thornhill meets the Professor (Leo G. Carroll), a spymaster who is trying to stop Vandamm from smuggling microfilmed secrets out of the country. The Professor reveals that George Kaplan is imaginary, a fiction created to distract Vandamm from the real government agent—Eve, whose life is now in danger because of Thornhill's interference. In order to protect her, Thornhill agrees to help the Professor and his agency fool Vandamm. Leo G. Carroll (October 25, 1892–October 16, 1972) was an British character actor, best known for his roles in several Hitchcock films and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.. He was born in Weedon, Buckinghamshire to a wealthy Catholic family, who named him after the reigning pope...


At the cafeteria at the base of Mount Rushmore, Thornhill (now pretending to be George Kaplan) meets with Eve and Vandamm. He offers to allow Vandamm to leave the country unhindered in exchange for Eve. The deal is refused. In a staged struggle, Eve shoots Thornhill and flees. Vandamm and Leonard quickly depart, as the apparently critically wounded Thornhill is taken away by stretcher in a station wagon, accompanied by the Professor. The makeshift ambulance is driven to a secluded spot; Thornhill emerges unharmed to speak with Eve privately. He becomes highly agitated when he learns that she is using the "shooting" to get Vandamm to take her with him, so that she can gather further intelligence. The "park ranger" driver then knocks Thornhill unconscious with a punch. When he wakes up, he finds himself locked in a hospital room under guard to prevent his further meddling. He talks the Professor into getting a bottle of bourbon, changes his clothes, and escapes through a window. For the 1960s rock band, see Mount Rushmore (band). ...


Thornhill arrives at Vandamm’s mountainside home. He scales the outside of the building and slips inside undetected. He watches as Leonard convinces his boss Vandamm that the shooting he witnessed was faked by firing the gun (filled with blanks) at him. Vandamm decides to throw Eve out of the plane once they are airborne. Thornhill manages to warn her by writing a note inside one of his ROT matchbooks and dropping it where she will see it.


Just before she is to board the plane, Eve escapes with the microfilm, which is hidden in the pre-Columbian statue purchased by Vandamm at the auction, and joins Thornhill. (He was supposed to create a diversion to help her get away, but was held up by the housekeeper, armed, he finally realizes, with the gun with the blanks.) They are chased across the Presidential faces on Mount Rushmore by Leonard and Valerian, the latter of whom winds up falling to his death during a fight with Thornhill. When Eve slips and clings desperately to the mountainside. Thornhill reaches down and grabs one of her hands, while precariously steadying himself with his other hand. Above them, a gloating Leonard arrives and begins grinding his shoe on Thornhill's hand. They are saved from a fatal fall by the timely arrival of the Professor and a police marksman, who shoots Leonard. For the 1960s rock band, see Mount Rushmore (band). ...


Thornhill pulls Eve to safety and the film smoothly cuts to him pulling her into an overhead train bunk, where they are spending their honeymoon. The final scene shows their train speeding into a tunnel.


Origins

John Russell Taylor's official biography of Hitchcock, Hitch (1978), suggests that the story originated after a spell of writer's block during the scripting of another movie project: Image File history File links North_by_Northwest_movie_trailer_screenshot_(33). ... Image File history File links North_by_Northwest_movie_trailer_screenshot_(33). ... Image File history File links North_by_Northwest_movie_trailer_screenshot_(38). ... Image File history File links North_by_Northwest_movie_trailer_screenshot_(38). ... John Russell Taylor (born in Dover on June 19, 1935 and educated at Dover Grammar School) is a British critic and author, who was educated at Cambridge University. ... For other uses, see Writers block (disambiguation). ...

Alfred Hitchcock had agreed to do a film for MGM, and they had chosen an adaptation of the novel The Wreck of the Mary Deare by Hammond Innes. Composer Bernard Herrmann had recommended that Hitchcock work with his friend Ernest Lehman. After a couple of weeks, Lehman offered to quit saying he didn't know what to do with the story. Hitchcock told him they got along great together and they would just write something else. Lehman said that he wanted to make the ultimate Hitchcock film. Hitchcock thought for a moment then said he had always wanted to do a chase across Mount Rushmore. The Wreck of the Mary Deare is a novel written by British author Hammond Innes and later a movie starring Gary Cooper. ... Hammond Innes (July 15, 1914 – June 10, 1998) was an English author who wrote over thirty novels, as well as childrens and travel books. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ernest Lehman (born December 8, 1915 in New York City - died July 2, 2005 in Los Angeles, California) was a successful screenwriter in Hollywood. ... For the 1960s rock band, see Mount Rushmore (band). ...

Lehman and Hitchcock spitballed more ideas: a murder at the United Nations Headquarters; a murder at a car plant in Detroit; a final showdown in Alaska. Eventually they settled on the U.N. murder for the opening and the chase across Mount Rushmore for the climax. This article is about the physical offices of the United Nations in New York. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ...

For the central idea, Hitchcock remembered something an American journalist had told him about spies creating a fake agent as a decoy. Perhaps their hero could be mistaken for this fictitious agent and end up on the run. They bought the idea from the journalist for $10,000.

Lehman would sometimes repeat this story himself, as in the documentary Destination Hitchcock that accompanied the 2001 DVD release of the film. In his 2000 book Which Lie Did I Tell?, screenwriter William Goldman, commenting on the film, insists that it was Lehman who created North by Northwest and that many of Hitchcock's ideas were not used. Hitchcock had the idea of the hero being stranded in the middle of nowhere, but suggested the villains try to kill him with a tornado.[2] Lehman responded, "but they're trying to kill him. How are they going to work up a cyclone?" Then, as he told an interviewer; "I just can't tell you who said what to whom, but somewhere during that afternoon, the cyclone in the sky became the crop-duster plane."[3] Which Lie Did I Tell?: More Adventures in the Screen Trade is a work of non-fiction first published in 2000 by novelist and screenwriter William Goldman. ... William Goldman (born August 12, 1931) is an American novelist, playwright and two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ...


In fact, Hitchcock had been working on the story for nearly nine years prior to meeting Lehman. The "American journalist" who had the idea that influenced the director was Otis C. Guernsey, a respected reporter who was inspired by a true story during World War II when a couple of British secretaries created a fictitious agent and watched as the Germans wasted time following him around. Guernsey turned his idea into a story about an American travelling salesman who travels to the Middle East and is mistaken for a fictitious agent, becoming "saddled with a romantic and dangerous identity". Guernsey admitted that his treatment was full of "corn" and "lacking logic". He urged Hitchcock to do what he liked with the story. Hitchcock bought the sixty pages for $10,000. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


Hitchcock often told journalists of an idea he had about Cary Grant hiding out from the villains inside Abraham Lincoln's nose and being given away when he sneezes. He speculated that the film could be called "The Man in Lincoln's Nose" (Lehman's version is that it was "The Man on Lincoln's Nose"[4]) or even "The Man who Sneezed in Lincoln's Nose", though he probably felt the latter was insulting to his adopted America. Hitchcock sat on the idea, waiting for the right screenwriter to develop it. At one stage "The Man in Lincoln's Nose" was touted as a John Michael Hayes — Alfred Hitchcock collaboration. When Lehman came on board, the travelling salesman — which had previously been suited to James Stewart — was adapted to a Madison Avenue advertising executive, a position which Lehman had formerly held. It has also been speculated that Hitchcock felt Stewart was too old and this had hurt their previous collaboration Vertigo, but in fact Hitchcock had planned to reunite with Stewart on his next film "The Blind Man". For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... John Michael Hayes (born May 11, 1919) an American playwright. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City which carries northbound one-way traffic. ... For other uses of the word, see Vertigo. ... Projects developed by Alfred Hitchcock but not realized: Greenmantle (1939 - 1942) Hitchcock very much wanted to direct a follow-up to The 39 Steps, and he felt that Greenmantle was a superior book. ...


Analysis

Alfred Hitchcock planned the film as a change of pace after his dark romantic thriller Vertigo a year earlier. In an interview with François Truffaut ("Hitchcock / Truffaut"), Hitchcock said that he wanted to do something fun, light-hearted, and generally free of the symbolism permeating his other movies.[5] Writer, Ernest Lehman, has also mocked those who look for symbolism in the film.[6] Despite its popular appeal, however, the movie is considered to be a masterpiece for its themes of deception, mistaken identity, and moral relativism in the Cold War era. Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Vertigo is a 1958 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Mistaken Identity may refer to albums: Mistaken Identity (Kim Carnes album) Mistaken Identity (Delta Goodrem album) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... In philosophy, moral relativism is the position that moral or ethical propositions do not reflect objective and/or universal moral truths, but instead make claims relative to social, cultural, historical or personal circumstances. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


The central theme is that of theatre and play-acting, wherein everyone is playing a part, no one is who they seem, and identity is in flux. This is reflected by Thornhill's line: "The only performance that will satisfy you is when I play dead." Significantly, Thornhill is a successful advertising executive (a man who makes his living by distorting reality and deceiving the public). In the role of Thornhill, Grant was distressed with the way the plot seemed to wander aimlessly, and he actually approached Hitchcock to complain about the script. "I can't make heads or tails of it," he said (unwittingly quoting a line that Thornhill utters in the film).


The title, North by Northwest, is often seen as having been taken from a line in Hamlet, a work also concerned with the slippery nature of reality[7]. Hitchcock noted this in an interview with Peter Bogdanovich in 1963. Lehman however, states that he used a working title for the film of "In a Northwesterly Direction", because the film was to start in New York and end in Alaska.[8] Then the head of the story department at MGM suggested "North by Northwest", but this was still to be a working title.[9] Other titles were considered, including "The Man on Lincoln's Nose", but "North by Northwest" was kept because, according to Lehman, "We never did find a [better] title".[10] The fact that this boxed direction does not exist, was only realised after the film's release. The inaccuracy carries no significance.[11] The Northwest Airlines reference in the film plays off of the title. For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Peter Bogdanovich Serbian Cyrillic Петар Богдановић (born July 30, 1939) is a Serbian-American film director, writer and actor. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... A modern compass card. ...


The plot of this film is one of the purer versions of Alfred Hitchcock's idea of the "MacGuffin", the physical object that everyone in the film is chasing after but which has no deep relationship to the plot. In North by Northwest, the spies are attempting to smuggle microfilm containing government secrets out of the country and try to kill Thornhill, who they believe is the fictitious agent George Kaplan on their trail. This article is about the plot device. ... Microfilm machines may be available at libraries or record archives. ...


There are similarities between this movie and Hitchcock's earlier film Saboteur (1942), whose final scene on top of the Statue of Liberty foreshadows the Mount Rushmore scene in the later film. In fact, North by Northwest can be seen as the last in a long line of "wrong man" films that Hitchcock made according to the pattern he established in The 39 Steps (1935). Saboteur is a 1942 Universal film directed by Alfred Hitchcock with a screenplay written by Peter Viertel and Joan Harrison. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... The 39 Steps is a 1935 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, based on the adventure novel The Thirty-nine Steps by John Buchan. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ...


Some refer to North by Northwest as "the first James Bond film" because of the similarities to the splashily colorful settings and secret agents of the later Bond movies, not to mention the elegantly adventurous leading man. Based on the strength of North By Northwest, Alfred Hitchcock was seriously considered to direct the first conceived James Bond film by Ivar Bryce (co-owner of Xanadu Productions), Ian Fleming, and Kevin McClory. Hitchcock read the script that would eventually become Thunderball and was interested in directing it. Later the team shared doubts about Hitchcock's involvement because of his minimum salary requirement and the amount of control over the picture they would have to give up. Hitchcock ultimately passed on the Bond film in order to direct Psycho. This article is about the spy series. ... This article is about the author. ... Kevin ODonovan McClory (b. ... For other topics with this name, see Thunderball. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ...


Awards

North by Northwest was nominated for three Academy Awards for Film Editing (George Tomasini), Art Direction (Robert F. Boyle), and Original Screenplay (Ernest Lehman). The film also won, for Lehman, a 1960 Edgar Award for Best Motion Picture Screenplay. It is #40 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years...100 Movies, #4 on its 100 Years...100 Thrills. In 1995, North by Northwest was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... George Tomasini (born April 20, 1909, died November 22, 1964) was the genius American film editor who often worked with very closely with film director Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... // The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... Ernest Lehman (born December 8, 1915 in New York City - died July 2, 2005 in Los Angeles, California) was a successful screenwriter in Hollywood. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The first of the AFI 100 Years. ... The 100 most heart-pounding American films as described by the AFI on the evening of June 12, 2001. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


Production

The filming of North by Northwest took place between August and December of 1958 with the exception of a few re-takes that were shot in April 1959.


At Hitchcock's insistence, the film was made in Paramount's VistaVision widescreen process, making it one of the few VistaVision films made at MGM. In François Truffaut's book-length interview, Hitchcock/Truffaut (1967), Hitchcock said that MGM wanted North by Northwest cut by 15 minutes so the running time would be under two hours. Hitchcock had his agent check his contract, learned that he had absolute control over the final cut, and refused. Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... A VistaVision 35 mm horizontal camera film frame. ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ...


MGM wanted Cyd Charisse for the role later taken by Eva Marie Saint. Hitchcock stood by his choice of Saint as she won the role.[12] Cyd Charisse Cyd Charisse is an American dancer and actress. ...


One of Eva Marie Saint's lines in the dining car seduction scene was redubbed. She originally said "I never make love on an empty stomach", but it was changed in post-production to "I never discuss love on an empty stomach". It is said that the censors felt the original version was too risqué.


The car chase scene in which Thornhill is drunkenly careening along the edge of cliffs high above the ocean, supposedly in New York, was actually shot on the California coast.


At the time, the United Nations prohibited film crews from shooting around its New York City headquarters. In an example of guerrilla filmmaking, Hitchcock used a movie camera hidden in a parked van to film Cary Grant and Adam Williams exiting their taxis and entering the building. The cropduster sequence, set in northern Indiana, was shot on location near the towns of Wasco and Delano, north of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. The plane was piloted by Bob Coe, a local cropduster from Wasco[13]. In a remarkable detail, Hitchcock even placed replicas of square Indiana highway signs in the scene. UN redirects here. ... Guerrilla filmmaking refers to a form of independent filmmaking characterized by low budgets, skeleton crews, and simple props using whatever is available. ... Adam Williams (b. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Location shooting is the practice of filming in an actual setting rather than on a sound stage or back lot. ... Wasco is the name of two places in the United States: Wasco in California, Wasco in Oregon. ... Delano may refer to: Delano, California Delano, Minnesota Delano, Pennsylvania This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Bakersfield is the county seat of Kern County, California, in the United States. ... Kern County is a county located in the southern Central Valley of the U.S. state of California. ...


The house at the end of the film was not real. Hitchcock asked the set designers to make the set resemble a house by Frank Lloyd Wright, the most popular architect in America at the time, using the materials, form and interiors associated with him. The set was built in Culver City, where MGM was located. Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator, and philosopher who designed more than 1,000 projects, of which more than 500 resulted in completed works. ... Culver City sign near the intersection of the 405 and the 90. ...


This film is the only one directed by Alfred Hitchcock that was released by MGM. However, it is now owned by Turner Entertainment — since 1996 a division of Warner Bros. — which owns the pre-1986 MGM library. Turner Entertainment Company was established August 4, 1986 to oversee Turner Broadcastings film library after its acquisition of MGM/UA. In addition to the studio, Turner got its library, which included all of MGMs films, Warner Bros. ... “WB” redirects here. ...


Release

The Trailer for North by Northwest featured Alfred Hitchcock presenting himself as the owner of Alfred Hitchcock Travel Inc. and tells the viewer he has made a motion picture to advertise these wonderful vacation stops. Today, it is one of Alfred Hitchcock's most famous movies, and the Crop- Dusting sequence is very famous.


Cast

  • Cary Grant as Roger O. Thornhill. James Stewart was the original choice to play Thornhill[citation needed], but Hitchcock replaced him with Grant after the poor box office performance of Vertigo, which Hitchcock blamed on Stewart looking too old to still attract audiences. In reality, Grant was four years older than Stewart.
  • Eva Marie Saint as Eve Kendall.
  • James Mason as Phillip Vandamm.
  • Leo G. Carroll as The Professor.
  • Jessie Royce Landis as Clara Thornhill. Landis, who played Thornhill's mother, was only one year older than Grant (according to the making of documentary on the DVD). She also played his future mother-in-law in To Catch a Thief.
  • Martin Landau as Leonard.
  • Philip Ober as Lester Townsend.
  • Josephine Hutchinson as Mrs. Townsend.
  • Adam Williams as Valerian.
  • Sara Berner in her final screen role as the uncredited voice of a telephone operator.

Alfred Hitchcock's cameo is a signature occurrence in most of his films. In North by Northwest he can be seen missing a bus, two minutes into the film. For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the word, see Vertigo. ... Eva Marie Saint (born July 4, 1924) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ... Leo G. Carroll (October 25, 1892–October 16, 1972) was an British character actor, best known for his roles in several Hitchcock films and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.. He was born in Weedon, Buckinghamshire to a wealthy Catholic family, who named him after the reigning pope... Jessie Royce Landis (25 November 1904 - 2 February 1972) was an American actress. ... To Catch a Thief is a 1955 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, Jessie Royce Landis and John Williams. ... Martin Landau (born June 20, 1931) is an Academy Award-winning American film and television actor. ... Philip Ober (23 March 1902, Fort Payne, Alabama - 13 September 1982, Mexico City) was an American actor. ... Josephine Hutchinson [1] was an American born (November 10, 1903 - June 4, 1998) actress. ... Adam Williams (b. ... Sara Berner (b: January 12, 1912, Albany, New York; d: December 19, 1969, Van Nuys, California) was an actress known primarily for her supporting roles, including two for Alfred Hitchcock. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Alfred Hitchcock cameo appearances. ...


Notes

  1. ^ TCM Archives - North by Northwest. tcm.com.
  2. ^ John Brady, "The craft of the screenwriter", 1981. Page 202
  3. ^ John Brady, "The craft of the screenwriter", 1981. Page 202
  4. ^ John Brady, "The craft of the screenwriter", 1981. Page 201
  5. ^ Hitchcock, however, was not above inserting a Freudian joke as the last shot (which, notably, made it past contemporary censors).
  6. ^ John Brady, "The craft of the screenwriter", 1981. Page 199/200
  7. ^ The line reads: "I am but mad north-north-west: when the wind is southerly / I know a hawk from a handsaw." (Act II, Scene ii). Hamlet thus hints to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, his friends, that his madness is only an act to protect himself while he gathers information on his father's murder.
  8. ^ John Brady, "The craft of the screenwriter", 1981. Page 201
  9. ^ John Brady, "The craft of the screenwriter", 1981. Page 201
  10. ^ John Brady, "The craft of the screenwriter", 1981. Page 201
  11. ^ John Brady, "The craft of the screenwriter", 1981. Page 201
  12. ^ Spoto, Donald (1999). The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock. Da Capo, 405. ISBN 030680932X. 
  13. ^ The Bakersfield Californian, Wasco man had Hitchcock movie role, 11/Oct/2007

Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ...

References

External links

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North by Northwest (1959 film)
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North by Northwest
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... Blogcritics is a popular news and opinion blog founded in 2002 by Eric Olsen and Phillip Winn. ... // Complete filmography Silent films British films American films Television episodes Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Revenge (1955) Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Breakdown (1955) Alfred Hitchcock Presents: The Case of Mr. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... In 1922 Alfred Hitchcock obtained his first shot at directing for Gainsborough Pictures with the film Number 13 (or Mrs. ... Always Tell Your Wife is a 1923 short comedy film directed by Hugh Croise and an uncredited Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Pleasure Garden is a 1925 film, and the debut feature of Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Mountain Eagle was Alfred Hitchcocks second silent film as director, released in 1926, following The Pleasure Garden. ... The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog often just called The Lodger was a 1927 silent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Downhill is a 1927 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Easy Virtue is a 1928 silent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Ring is a 1927 British, silent, black and white film directed and written by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Farmer’s Wife is a silent movie, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and released in 1928. ... Champagne is a 1928 silent film by film director Alfred Hitchcock, based on an original story by English writer and critic Walter C. Mycroft. ... The Manxman is a 1929 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Blackmail (1929) was directed by Alfred Hitchcock and stars Anny Ondra, John Longden, and Cyril Ritchard, and based on the play Blackmail by Charles Bennett. ... Juno and the Paycock is a 1930 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Mary is a 1931 Alfred Hitchcock film based on Clemence Danes novel & Herbert Juttkes book. ... Elstree Calling is a 1930 film directed by Andre Charlot, Jack Hulbert, Paul Murray, and Alfred Hitchcock as a homage to vaudeville made to look like an early TV special. ... The Skin Game is a 1931 film by Alfred Hitchcock, based on a play by John Galsworthy. ... Number Seventeen is a 1932 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock based on a stage play by J. Jefferson Fargeon. ... Rich and Strange is a 1932 film direced by Alfred Hitchcock during his time in the British film industry. ... Waltzes from Vienna is a 1933 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Man Who Knew Too Much is a 1934 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The 39 Steps is a 1935 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, based on the adventure novel The Thirty-nine Steps by John Buchan. ... For other uses, see Secret agent (disambiguation). ... Sabotage is a 1936 British film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, which tells the story of Carl Verloc (played by Oscar Homolka), a terrorist from an unnamed European country, who conducts a series of attacks in London. ... Young and Innocent (U.S. title: The Girl Was Young) is a British film (1937) directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Nova Pilbeam, Derrick De Marney and John Longden. ... The Lady Vanishes is a 1938 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Jamaica Inn is a film made by Alfred Hitchcock adapted from Daphne du Mauriers novel of the same name, in 1939, the first of three of du Mauriers works that Hitchcock adapted. ... Rebecca is a 1940 psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock as his first American project. ... Foreign Correspondent is a 1940 film which tells the story of an American reporter who becomes involved in espionage in England during the onset of World War II. It stars Joel McCrea, George Sanders, Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, Albert Bassermann and Robert Benchley. ... For other uses see Mr. ... Suspicion (1941) is a film noir directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine as a married couple. ... Saboteur is a 1942 Universal film directed by Alfred Hitchcock with a screenplay written by Peter Viertel and Joan Harrison. ... For other uses, see Shadow of a Doubt (disambiguation). ... Lifeboat is a 1944 World War II war film, directed by Alfred Hitchcock from a story written by John Steinbeck. ... Aventure Malgache is a 1944 French language propaganda short film made by Alfred Hitchcock for the British Ministry of Information. ... Bon Voyage is a 1944 French language propaganda short film made by Alfred Hitchcock for the British Ministry of Information. ... Spellbound is a 1945 psychological thriller and mystery film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Notorious is a 1946 thriller directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman as two people whose lives become intimately entangled during an espionage operation. ... The Paradine Case was a 1947 courtroom drama movie, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, produced by David O. Selznick. ... Rope (1948) is an Alfred Hitchcock classic film notable for its single location covered in what appeared to be just a few continuous shots. ... Under Capricorn is a 1949 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock based on a novel by Helen Simpson. ... Stage Fright DVD cover Stage Fright is a 1950 Warner Bros. ... Strangers on a Train is a film released in 1951 by Warner Bros. ... I Confess is a 1953 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Montgomery Clift as Fr. ... Dial M for Murder is a 1954 Warner Brothers film directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Grace Kelly and Ray Milland as a married couple. ... For the 1998 remake, see Rear Window (1998 film). ... To Catch a Thief is a 1955 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, Jessie Royce Landis and John Williams. ... The Trouble with Harry is an American black comedy film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, which was released on October 3, 1955 in the United States. ... The Man Who Knew Too Much is a 1956 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring James Stewart and Doris Day. ... The Wrong Man is a 1956 film by Alfred Hitchcock which stars Henry Fonda and Vera Miles. ... For other uses of the word, see Vertigo. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ... The Birds is a 1963 horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the short story The Birds by Daphne du Maurier. ... Marnie is a 1964 psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock and based on the novel Marnie by Winston Graham. ... Torn Curtain DVD cover Torn Curtain is a 1966 thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, featuring his trademark characters and camera techniques. ... Topaz, director Alfred Hitchcocks 51st movie, filmed between 1968 and 1969, was adapted from the book Topaz (ISBN 0-553-23547-8) by Leon Uris. ... For other uses, see Frenzy (disambiguation). ... Family Plot is a 1976 Universal motion picture directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Karen Black, Bruce Dern, Barbara Harris and William Devane, with Cathleen Nesbitt. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Alfred Hitchcock cameo appearances. ... Projects developed by Alfred Hitchcock but not realized: // Greenmantle (1939 – 1942) Hitchcock very much wanted to direct a follow-up to The 39 Steps, and he felt that Greenmantle was a superior book. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
North by Northwest (1959) (670 words)
Hitchcock was a master at this and in North by Northwest he lets his genius shine through totally.
North by Northwest was also nominated for Best Set Decoration and Best Film Editing, but lost to Ben-Hur in both categories.
North by Northwest just reinforces my belief that Alfred Hitchcock was one of the greatest directors of all time.
North By Northwest (1959) (2950 words)
North by Northwest (1959) is a suspenseful, classic Alfred Hitchcock caper thriller.
The box-office hit film is one of the most entertaining movies ever made and one of Hitchcock's most famous suspense/mystery stories in his entire career.
The allusion to traveling 'North' by Northwest (airlines) seems to be the most probable explanation for the film's title.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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